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Issue #95 – September 13 to September 19

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say it ain’t so New federal regulations could decimate our indie music scene Group of seven Professional Native Indian Artists Inc. exhibit at the MacKenzie the family + informant Film reviews

Photo: courtesy of Craig Kief


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On the cover:

IRON & WINE

On his latest album. 10 / feature

Photo: courtesy of CRAIG kIef

culture

NEWs + Opinion

entertainment

Q + A with MARIE-EVE munger On her RSO debut. 8 / Q + A

Live Music listings Local music listings for September 13 through September 21. 14 / listings

STRIKE A POSE

FOUR IN ONE

Nightlife Photos

Modelling in Saskatchewan. 3 / Local

Shannon Rose invokes the changing seasons. 9 / Arts

We visit The Exchange.

GROUP OF SEVEN

THE family + informant

How Professional Native Indian Artists Inc sparked a revolution. 9 / Arts

15 / Nightlife

We review the latest movies. 16 / Film

SAY IT AIN’T SO... New federal regulations could damage our indie music scene. 4 / Local

editorial

LATTES AND LUNCH

on the bus

Here’s our thoughts on drinking and driving. 6 / Editorial

We visit Caffe Cafeina. 12 / Food + Drink

Weekly original comic illustrations by Elaine M. Will. 18 / comics

comments

Music

Game + Horoscopes

Here’s what you had to say about privatizing Canada Post. 7 / comments

Ben Sures, Aroara + The Good Lovelies 13 / music

Canadian criss-cross puzzle, weekly horoscopes and Sudoku. 19 / timeout

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Publisher / Parity Publishing Editor in Chief / Ryan Allan Managing Editor / Jessica Patrucco staff Writers / Adam Hawboldt + Alex J MacPherson Contributing writer / MJ deschamps

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ART & Production design Lead / andrew yanko GRAPHIC designer / BRYCE KIRK Contributing Photographers / Baily eberle, Maxton Priebe, Adam Hawboldt + Alex J MacPherson

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Strike a pose

Photo: courtesy of holly stewart

Modeling in Saskatchewan and beyond by ADAM HAWBOLDT

T

he first thing you notice about Holly Stewart is her eyes. A disarming shade of blue, they’re not quite turquoise, but not far from it. At their centres, surrounding the pupils, are flecks and rings of marbled hazel. They’re the kind of eyes that light up a face, make it really stand out in a crowd. And seated in a busy coffee shop downtown, Holly Stewart certainly stands out. Tall, with porcelain skin and a naturally lithe build, she’s the kind of girl you see walking down the street and think, “Oh, she must be a model.” Think that, and you’d be right. “When I was younger, I never really thought about getting into modeling,” says Stewart with a smile. “But a lot of friends and family said I should try. So I thought about it and I ended up taking some classes at SHE [Modelling] to help boost my confidence.” “I’ve always been kind of shy,” continues Stewart. “And for most of my life, I thought I was too skinny. I’ve always been uncomfortable with that.” So she started taking modeling and acting classes, and soon her confidence began to grow. Eventually, Stewart started landing the odd job here and there. Then one day, a few years back, she went to a model and talent audition and talked to a man named Charles Stuart. He suggested she go to the Faces West International Model and Talent Convention in Vancouver.

In an upstairs room of the SHE Modelling agency, Charles Stuart is sitting at a table, eating a piece of Babybel cheese.

This is the calm before the storm. In a few minutes from now, established models and aspiring models will begin filing into the room, one by one, to talk with him. See, Stuart is kind of a big deal in the Canadian modeling industry. A former model who once did a photoshoot with Twiggy back in the ‘60s, Stuart opened his own modeling agency (Charles Stuart International Models) back in 1982. A decade later, he created the Faces West International Model and Talent Convention, which brings together agents, scouts, and managers from all over the world. And in 2004, he discovered supermodel Coco Rocha. So what’s he doing in Saskatchewan? Looking to discover some new talent, naturally. With a sheet of paper on the table in front of him, Stuart takes a bite of cheese and says,”When new people come in they have an information sheet they have to fill out and I talk to them about things. What are their hobbies? What’s their favourite movie? I get them to talk about themselves.” Then tapping the sheet of paper, which lists categories down the left margin, he says, “Then I look at things like runway technique, poster, poise, presence, overall appearance, confidence, acting, presentation, voice.” Thing is, though, even if a person scores high in all these categories, it doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll become a successful model. “You can’t tell by simply looking at a person,” says Stuart. “The thing I’ve found over the years, when people walk in and you meet them, you can have the most beautiful person in front

of you and go ‘Wow!’ but put them in front of a camera and nothing works.” Stuart shifts in his chair and says, “Then you can have the plainest person walk in, put them in front of a camera, and magic happens.” Even then — even if they wow in their audition and the camera loves them — there’s one more element necessary to success. “Personality,” says Stuart. “Personality sells. It’s what clients want to see. They want projection on camera, they want someone who is outgoing. Not just someone who stands there and looks pretty.”

That is something Holly Stewart admits she sometimes struggles with. Sure, she’s modeled overseas for two-and-a-half months in Japan. And yes, she’s moving to Manhattan soon to work at Wilhelmina Models, one of the top agencies in the world. But, at times, Stewart still finds it tricky to sell herself. “Like I mentioned before, I’ve always been shy and laid-back,” she says, “I’m not a super bubbly person. I don’t want to be like that, it’s not me. I’ve been told by a lot of agents that everything else is great, but that, personality-wise, I have to try to put myself out there more. It’s not like I’m serious all the time. I love to laugh and joke around, but it takes me time to warm up to people.” For a young woman of 18 years, Stewart is remarkably level-headed — something that should play in her favour when she heads to New York. When a lot of people look at the modeling industry, they see beauti-

ful people living glamorous lives. And while that can certainly be a part of it, there’s much more to the industry than meets the eye. There’s the never-ending parade of castings you have to go to if you actually want to make money. Then there’s the fact that most people live in “model apartments” with the same people they’re competing with for jobs. And don’t forget the image demands placed on models by the industry. “One thing that came as a shock to me was when I was working in Japan and they asked me to lose three centimetres around my waist,” says Stewart. “I want to model, but I want to feel comfortable in my own body, too.” From there, Stewart reminisces about the last time she stayed in New York. “When I was there, living with all those models, it seemed like none of them ate actual meals. Just an apple or something here and there,” she says.

“And that’s their own personal thing, but I want to stay balanced. I want to keep healthy.” She also wants to make the most of her upcoming work at Wilhelmina, but, true to form, remains realistic about how her life in Manhattan might unfold. “I’m not going there looking to become a multi-millionaire or anything,” she says, against showing a glimpse of wisdom beyond her years. “I’d just like to live there for a while, get a few decent jobs, make some money … I definitely want to go to school, but I don’t know what I want to do for a career. So, for now, I’m going to do this and see where it takes me.”

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Photo: courtesy of globochem3x1minus1

Say it ain’t so...

New federal regulations could back our indie music scene into a dark corner by ADAM HAWBOLDT

B

rant Palko sensed change was coming. And it wasn’t the kind of change he was hoping for. Back in April, when a story broke that the Royal Bank of Canada had outsourced 45 information technology jobs to workers in India — workers who were reportedly brought in under the federal temporary foreign worker program — feces hit the clichéd fan. People around the country vehemently criticized the move, saying it was replacing Canadian jobs with cheaper, foreign ones, and called it wrongheaded and unethical. Soon as he heard this, Palko, a longtime booker for Amigos Cantina, had a feeling his venue and other similar venues around the province were going to take one on the chin. “We knew it was coming,” says Palko, “My boss and I looked at each other when the RBC scandal broke and when the government said they were bringing in tougher legislation. We just knew bad news was coming our way.” The bad news came shortly after, when Jason Kenney, Canada’s minister of employment, social development and multiculturalism,

announced reforms to the temporary foreign worker program. Reforms that require, “a new $275 processing fee for each temporary foreign worker position that an employer requests through a Labour Market Opinion (LMO).”

thing other than music must pay a fee of $275 per band member (whether it be a musician, sound person, tour manager … whatever) when it applies for an LMO. What’s more, there’s also an additional $150 per member for a work visa.

…culturally, it’s not good for the development of new … music. eric tessier

Now, you may be thinking to yourself, “So what? If the government wants to penalize companies who bring in cheap foreign labour to undercut wages, that’s a good initiative, right?” Not really. Because of these new regulations, and the oversights contained within, the indie music industry in our country is set to suffer. How? Well, it means the cost of bringing international bands to bars, restaurants or coffee shops in Canada has spiked significantly. Now, any venue whose primary business is some-

All this could mean dark days ahead for Saskatchewan’s indie music scene.

Fees for foreign musicians being brought to Canada is nothing new. It used to be that if you were a bar, restaurant or coffee house, you had to pay a one-time installment of $150 per band member, up to a maximum of $450. If the band was going to play at a few different places during their stay, typically this fee was split between the various venues. Continued on next page »

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Not anymore. Now, every non-exempt venue must pay the fee individually if they want to host international acts. “This is completely ridiculous,” says Palko. “It was a hassle before, something we had to struggle with, but it wasn’t worth fighting against because the fees were minimal. But

the way things are now, it means we can’t host out-of-country bands. I’ve already had to cancel shows. I’ve already had promoters I’ve been dealing with for years tell me they can’t do shows here anymore. That greatly affects our bottom line and our reputation as, I think, a premiere music venue in Western Canada. We just can’t afford it.”

Not only is this a slap in the face to small business — to the clubs and promoters that helped build our thriving indie music scene — it’s also a poke in the eye to concert-goers. Think about it. In the absence of up-and-coming international bands, and having booked as many touring bands as possible, venues like Amigos are

going to have to find acts to fill the void. Where will they find them? Locally, of course. But what happens if more new, local bands don’t start to emerge, and the indie scene gets over-saturated and homogenized with familiar acts from our own area code?

Eric Tessier loves going to concerts. He loves seeing a band perform that he’s never seen play live before. There’s something special about it. Something more engaging and more visceral than listening to the same music at home. But Tessier isn’t simply a lover of concerts. He’s also a member of Indigo Joseph, a high-energy rock band from Regina. And for him, he sees this new legislation as a double edged sword — with one side much sharper than the other. “I think there may be some positives for domestic bands potentially having some more opportunity,” says Tessier. “And while I do see that side of the coin, I can’t help but think the positives are going to be a short-term thing. Canadian bands will be filling these bills for a little while, but then eventually some of these venues will probably close because it’s the touring acts that are really bringing out the fans. They have the name that attracts audience members.” If that does happen, if some of these non-exempt venues shut down, not only could there be less

shows to see in Saskatchewan, but shows of a lesser quality. And that doesn’t bode well for anyone — promoters, clubs, artists, or fans. “I’m inclined to feel that, culturally, it’s not good for the development of new culture and new music,” says Tessier. “It may lead to a kind of mono-culture … We live in a global community nowadays. Canadians are listening to music from outside of Canada, and they should have the ability to see those acts live. Cultural cross-pollination is important to fans and musicians.” And while neither Tessier nor Palko think the federal government intentionally set out to harm our indie music scene, both think it would be prudent for them to go back, re-examine, and change the negative aspects of the legislation. They are not alone, either. Online, at www.change.org, more than 100,000 people have signed a petition telling the government “don’t ruin live music” in Canada. “People need to keep signing these petitions and tweeting at their MPs, MLAs, Jason Kenney,” says Palko. “Hopefully they’ll come to their senses … but I doubt it.”

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Road pop outrage

We need to fix Saskatchewan’s problem with drinking and driving This article is part one of a twopart series on drinking and driving in Saskatchewan. This week’s piece examines the current situation, and next week’s piece will propose some new solutions.

I

t’s no great secret that drinking and driving is a serious problem here in Saskatchewan, as we are some of the worst offenders in the country. But we believe that part of the issue is the current methods we use to deter and prosecute drunk drivers, and that a more comprehensive approach would be far more effective. To start, let’s review the current state of affairs: according to Statistics Canada, Saskatchewan has some of the worst drunk driving statistics in the country. Take our number of police-reported impaired driving incidents, for example. In 2011, we had 683.35 incidents for every 100,000 people in the province. In case you’re wondering, that’s the highest rate among provinces. It’s also almost

suspended for 24 hours. A second offence leads to another 24-hour suspension and a mandatory Driving Without Impairment class. For every offence afterwards, you face a 90-day suspension and mandatory addictions screening. If you are convicted of driving while impaired (a BAC higher than .08) then you face the following punishments: for a first offence, you receive a oneyear license suspension; second offence, three-year license suspension; third offence or greater, a fiveyear suspension. As for monetary punishment, minimum court fines begin at $1,500 for impaired drivers, which includes a $500 fine in accordance with the Safe Driver Recognition program. However, it must be noted that this is just a minimum penalty. There are absolutely no maximums for fines, which are ultimately up to the judge’s discretion. What’s more, some offenders may lose the benefits of insurance. For instance, if you get into an accident you have to pay for all the damages, while facing a minimum fine of $600.

triple the national average (261.80) and more than five times the rate of the lowest province, Ontario (129.56). And that’s not the worst of it. When you turn and look at per-capita rates of impaired driving deaths, things get even grimmer. In 2009 (the last year from which comprehensive data is available) we had 8.44 impaired driving deaths per 100,000 people Saskatchewan — again the highest among provinces. And again almost triple the national rate of 3.18 per 100,000 people. These numbers are simply unacceptable, especially in a province that has the highest legal drinking age (19) and the lowest legal limit for blood-alcohol content (in Saskatchewan, consequences for drinking and driving can kick in if you have a BAC of .04). Simply put: something has to be done about this. But what? At the moment, anyone caught drinking and driving with a BAC greater than .04 in Saskatchewan immediately has his or her license

So that’s the punishment side of things. On the prevention front, many places (like Saskatoon, Regina, and Prince Albert) have implemented a road safety program called Report Impaired Drivers (RID). How this works is easy: if anyone sees a suspected impaired driver, he or she is encouraged to call 911 and report said driver to the police, thereby hopefully making the streets safer for everyone. But all of these efforts are clearly not enough, particularly in the area of repeat drunk driving offenders. After all, this past summer a man from Saskatchewan was convicted of driving while drunk — for the 19th time. That would suggest that what we are doing now to prevent DUIs, and especially multiple DUIs, isn’t really working. This is a clear problem in Saskatchewan, and we need to approach it differently if we want a different outcome. Because while we applaud our elected officials for taking some measures to improve the situation, we can’t help but think that

the solutions they have arrived at only addresses part of the problem. Simply punishing people who do bad things doesn’t really address root causes, since penalties can only be enacted after an offence has already taken place. Instead, we believe that we also need to empower people to make better choices, so that they don’t get behind the wheel after drinking in the first place. Check back next week to see how we propose to lower drinking and driving rates in Saskatchewan. These editorials are left unsigned because they represent the opinions of Verb magazine, not those of the individual writers.

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On Topic: Last week we asked what you thought about privatizing Canada Post. Here’s what you had to say: – I agree canada post should be gradually privatized. They had quite some nerve telling that guy “we won’t deliver to your house anymore because your front step is too high.” All businesses everywhere need equal competition to be fair to us, the “customer”

– Wouldn’t getting rid of Canada Post just make it more difficult for people who live out in the boonies to get mail? Do we care to subsidize there choices though? Just a though EK

– Regarding privatizing Canada Post, are you nuts? For one thing I noticed you didn’t mention anything about rural mail delivery and delivery in the north. Sure they can privatize the post office in countries like the U.K., Austria, the Netherlands and Germany. Those countries are puny in comparison to the vast territory covered by Canada. At best a privatized Canada Post could be required to continue rural and northern delivery for two, three, at most five years. But after that good luck. No business would buy Canada Post if they were required to do all rural delivery and northern delivery forever. And to prove the point, UPS and other competitive paradises to you don’t deliver to many rural and northern areas, they let Canada Post do it. Also, much of your editiorial is just full of statements like privatizing Canada Post “would allow our postal service to be run more like a business and less like a dysfunctional government department.” That’s just right-wing claptrap. Get real. I’d love to see Harper try to privatize Canada Post. All his rural support would melt away, including in Alberta, and the Tories would be

text yo thoughtsur to 881 vE R b 8372

in the political hinterland for a decade or more.

– Probably parcelling of Canada Post would free up some money that is tied up in Crown assets etc which should make for better service to all Canadians. I’d be interested in a partial privatization maybe for five or ten yrs to see how it works, then move on if it seems to be a good idea.

– I don’t know about getting rid of the postal service. Canada Post has been a part of our heritage for so long that it’s important to preserve our history.

– Canada Post definitely needs to give its head a shake. Refusing to deliver mail because of the height of a stair? Competition breeds a healthy dose of reality , and it seems like CP could use some of this. I understand refusing service for a legitimate reason (unshoveled stairs presents an actual safety hazard, but the height of a step? Ridiculous. Not sure if getting rid of CP entirely is the answer.

OFF TOPIC

LIGHT CAMERAS at that busy intersection which automatically take pictures of vehicles that run red lights!! :0 In response to “Smile! You’re on camera,”

– RED LIGHT CAMERAS SHOULD NOT BE SCRAPED!!! There was an accident earlier in the evening on Mon Sept 9,2013 at Parliament and Albert in Regina,Sask caused when a black SUV eastbound on Parliament ran a red light and hitted a vintage convertible and another car. An ambulance and a police SUV shoed up. The police usually don’t attend accidents unless there are injuries or fatalities and if drugs or alcohol are involved. Thank goodness there are RED

Editorial #93 (August 30,2013)

– Yes maybe red light cameras are a cash grab but they wouldn’t even be necessary if people would not run red lights in the first place! In response to “Smile! You’re on camera,” Editorial #93 (August 30,2013)

– In the end only kindness matters.

Next week: What do you think of the problem of drinking and driving in Saskatchewan? Pick up Verb to get in on the conversation: We print your texts verbatim each week. Text in your thoughts and reactions to our stories and content, or anything else on your mind.

sound off – I yam what I yam.

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AJM: At the same time, does a piece of music like the “Flower Duet” create more pressure for you than something that is not as well known? MM: I don’t think it’s more difficult. I think people have expectations. But most people are just happy to hear it because it’s so beautiful. There is maybe a bit more pressure because everybody knows it and everybody has some kind of expectation about it and you want to meet those expectations to a degree and yet be true to yourself and true to what you do. There’s a balance there.

An Evening At The Opera

AJM: And then there’s the Bernstein piece, which is completely unlike anything in Lakmé.

Rising star Marie-Eve Munger on her debut with the Regina Symphony Orchestra by Alex J MacPherson

U

Alex J MacPherson: You’re singing a piece from Lakmé, the “Flower Duet,” which is one of the most popular pieces of opera music ever composed. What is it like to take on something that everybody has heard?

MM: For sure! It’s so universal. And there’s so many comedies in opera. I mean, you see the word “opera” and you think it’s going to be very serious. But it’s not! There’s a lot of comedy, a lot of beautiful, beautiful romances. There’s all sorts

marie-eve munger

Marie-Eve Munger: It’s a really beautiful piece. It’s one of the pieces that has been done so often, been heard by so many people in advertisements on TV and in movies — it’s all over the place — that it’s a melody everybody knows. And to actually get to do it with the orchestra on stage with the mezzo singer, we get to put our own touch to it, try to get some of the spontaneity of the music back. Every time I do it I try to find the spontaneity of this piece I’ve heard so many times.

Europe, Munger will travel to Regina — along with baritone John Brancy, mezzo-soprano Wallis Giunta, and tenor Won Whi Choi — to perform selections by Leonard Bernstein and Delibes alongside the Regina Symphony Orchestra. I caught up with Munger to learn a bit more about her life as an opera singer and her upcoming appearance in Saskatchewan.

AJM: That’s a good point. It’s important for people to recognize that “opera” doesn’t actually mean “stuffy” or “boring.”

…you see the word “opera” and you think it’s going to be very serious. But it’s not! There’s a lot of comedy…

Photos: courtesy of Zaeya Winter

nlike most musicians, who can simply go to the store and buy an instrument, opera singers must build their instruments, one long practice session at a time. MarieEve Munger began singing early but did not discover opera until she was seventeen. Today, she is one of the rising stars of Canadian opera, having performed across North America and Europe. Next year, she will make her debut at Teatro alla Scala, the famous opera house in Milan, and sing her first Lakmé, an opera by Léo Delibes, with Opéra-Théâtre de St-Étienne. But before her performances in

costumes. Everything is in opera. I do a lot of recitals and when I do, I talk with the audience. I really try to make them understand where this music is coming from and what it’s trying to say. Often on the first hearing it’s hard to get the depth, so I’m trying. It’s something that’s really important to me.

MM: The Bernstein is so much fun. That’s one party piece for sure. It’s a big contrast. It’s on the verge of Broadway theatre, very classical in the orchestration and the singing but it’s a very funny piece. It’s a blast to do in concert.

of things. And there’s so many operas that not everything is for everybody. There are some people who will love Wagner while others don’t. There’s a lot of operas and a lot of stuff for everybody.

AJM: How important is it to you to introduce people to opera?

The Opera Gala September 21 @ Conexus Arts Centre $33–$250 @ RSO Box Office (mytickets.reginasymphony.com)

MM: It’s so important. I came to opera by accident and I was so grateful that I did. There’s very few people, if you look at the whole population, that get to be introduced to this kind of music. But when they do, they really discover something: this extraordinary marriage of music, orchestra, voice, theatre, sets,

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Four In One

Pop songwriter Shannon Rose examines the changing seasons on her latest record

Photo: courtesy oF Mauricio Ortiz

A

fter releasing her first album in 2008, Shannon Rose, a singer and songwriter from Ottawa, decided to spend a year away from the stage. But she couldn’t put down her guitar or her notepad. In 2011,

she began work on an ambitious project: four EPs inspired by and coinciding with the four seasons. “We came up with the idea of doing four EPs, one for each season,” Rose says. “The idea was to have all the songs written, recorded, and released in their respective seasons over the course of a year. By the end of it I was pretty exhausted. But it was challenging in the best possible way.” After releasing the four EPs, Rose decided to collect them on one album. Seasons, which includes all 20 songs, was released in January. It is a sprawling col-

by alex J MacPherson

lection of delicate, well-crafted songs that evoke a slew of emotions. Rose says the project began life as an experiment. She wanted to understand how the weather affected her creative process. The results were predictable. Although the songs that make up Seasons were not necessarily written about the changing weather, the lingering mood of each season bled into the songs. “The winter one is probably more contemplative than the summer one,” Rose says. “Spring sort of has a fresh, renewing feeling and fall is maybe a bit more thoughtful. They

seemed to take on some of those qualities you’d associate with the seasons.” The ideas that pervade Seasons are more than just lyrical, however. Songs like “Winter Alibi” and “Corners,” which were inspired by the darkest months of the year, are slow and measured, simple guitar songs that hint broadly at the loneliness of a frigid weekend in January. “Open Water” and “Under The Moon,” on the other hand, are full of possibility — charming acoustic grooves reminiscent of languorous afternoons under the scorching sun.

Although it was conceived as a writing exercise, an opportunity to explore how the arc of a year affects the soul, Seasons emerged as a strong foundation for a promising career. Rose’s pop sensibility and ephemeral voice give the album both strength and character. Seasons is an extremely long album, but its length should be seen as an invitation to soak up four different ideas, separate yet bound together forever. Shannon Rose & The Thorns September 25 @ Artful Dodger

Group of Seven

How Professional Native Indian Artists Inc. sparked a revolution

I

t is impossible to overstate the importance to contemporary Canadian art of Professional Native Indian Artists Inc., a group of seven First Nations artists who, in the early 1970s, transformed frustration and anger into artistic revolution. The group’s legacy is the subject of 7, a massive retrospective that charts both the artists’ individual careers and the lingering effects of their work as a group. “I think it’s really important for people to be aware of the pervasive attitudes and oppressive govern-

ment regimes or policies that were in place, that these artists and most First Nations individuals experienced,” says curator Michelle LaVallee. “The group developed primarily as a response to the lack of opportunity or exclusionary practices within the Canadian art system.” The seven artists who made up the group — Jackson Beardy, Eddy Cobiness, Alex Janvier, Norval Morrisseau, Daphne Odjig, Carl Ray, and Joseph Sanchez — worked in a variety of styles. 7 includes more than 100 pieces; together, they reveal a

by alex J MacPherson

collective of artists engaged in a rich discourse with past and present. “They sparked something,” LaVallee says. “They weren’t the only artists at the time who were fighting for these things or who were producing work. But they were part of a larger movement toward establishing a voice, establishing respect and recognition as contemporary artists. And they definitely set the standard — they expanded … the image of what First Nations art could be.” According to LaVallee, the group’s work may seem familiar today but it

was avant garde in the 1970s, when it was being produced. “It may not seem as exciting or as new now,” she says, “but it was. They were the first artists to be doing this at the time.” The rise of Professional Native Indian Artists Inc. sparked a revolution. The system that had avoided First Nations art and artists has today become an enthusiastic supporter of contemporary indigenous art. But the rise of Idle No More, a political movement that seeks to correct injustices, gives LaVallee pause. “A lot of the things that the artists and activists were fighting

for in the ‘70s are, unfortunately, still things that are being fought for or discussed in the Idle No More movement,” she says. “It points to the fact that we haven’t gone far enough yet.” 7: Professional Native Indian Artists Inc. September 21, 2013 – January 12, 2014 @ MacKenzie Art Gallery Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

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Ghost On Ghost Iron & Wine mines American music and the American Dream

I

t is natural but wrong to think of Iron & Wine as a singer-songwriter project. Sam Beam, who has been releasing records using the name Iron & Wine since 2002, has certainly played the part of the bearded folk messiah. His early records were simple and skeletal, collections of gently propulsive songs shaped by the ineffable interplay between a man and his guitar. In 2006, he transformed the Postal Service’s throbbing single “Such Great Heights” into a lodestar for the terminally hip. But these events do not define him; his musical vision cannot be defined in just a few words. Beam has spent the last decade building on the foundation laid by his first two records. Each album he releases pushes his sound, and his musical ideas, into fertile new territory. His fifth, Ghost On Ghost, which was released in April, reinforces his commitment to sonic expansion — and his faith that the warmth of his voice will link his albums together. “I feel emboldened by the fact that I have a kind of recognizable voice,” Beam says. “It’s not a very powerful voice. But it’s a recognizable sound. I kind of realized early on and was emboldened — maybe naïvely — by the fact that there would always be this common element, which was my

voice. So I felt free to try different types of music because it would always be tied into the songs that came before. Because it was me.” Ghost On Ghost, which draws its title from a line by the American poet James Wright, is the most complex record Beam has ever

the last century. Many of the songs on Ghost On Ghost are shot through with ideas pioneered a lifetime ago; others, like the staggering “Lovers’ Revolution,” have more in common with Mingus than Dylan. “I have been playing with jazz players for the last few years

I like making a big soup pot for all those types of music, where you just add them all in, stir it up, and see what happens. sam Beam

made. It is a melting pot of sounds. Traditional folk and country ideas are laced with unorthodox jazz arrangements, soaring Appalachian melodies, and swampy blues rhythms. “Honestly, it’s not too much of a cerebral thing when I’m doing it,” Beam says of his fusion of American sounds. “It sounds cerebral when I’m talking about it, but it’s pretty intuitive. I like making a big soup pot for all those types of music, where you just add them all in, stir it up, and see what happens.” The biggest addition to Beam’s musical toolbox is jazz, itself a hybrid of European and African-American influences that emerged in the early part of

and I think it’s seeped in, where I can finally figure out how to apply it to my records,” Beam says. “It’s something I’ve always enjoyed listening to but never really had the experience playing that kind of music. I was just doing it for a hobby. I still feel like I do it for a hobby. But I like the American song narrative, that narrative of how we came up with jazz music and what all went into it. And how it affected the rest.” Beam’s determination to expand his range beyond the lively roots and folk arrangements that appeared on 2007’s The Shepherd’s Dog and 2011’s Kiss Each Other Clean, affected his process. Continued on next page »

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Photo: courtesy of Craig Kief

on his latest album by Alex J MacPherson In the past, he has allowed songs to chart their own course, to develop free from outside interference. But the instrumentation and arrangements on the new record demanded a certain amount of planning. Beam wrote the songs in much the same way as he has

Photo: courtesy of Craig Kief

always written the songs. But instead of spending time experimenting in the studio, looking for inspiration, he spent a great deal of time dreaming up ideas before the tape began to roll. “Before going into the studio I did quite a few demos of these songs,” he says, “and kind of got a feel for what kind of arrangements they’d be and the tone I was looking for.” “Caught In The Briars” opens the record with a disjointed cacophony of instrument noise and drums before settling into a syncopated groove driven by a sparkling acoustic guitar lick and elevated by a chorus of spongy horns. After a fairly conventional series

of verses and choruses, “Caught In The Briars” launches into a long long piano coda — a potent reminder that Ghost On Ghost is a melting pot and evidence of Beam’s desire to experiment with as many musical ideas as possible. “Caught In The Briars” also introduces the central theme of the record. “The blurry details around the edges are these stories of this couple, these people,” Beam says. “I kind of collected songs that had these people, this couple, and it was fun to imagine that they were the same couple.” Just as the music on the album is uniquely American, so too are Beam’s stories. “There’s a lot of unhappiness,” he says of the unnamed characters that populate the album. “They’re not settled in their station or where they are, always looking over the horizon for something better. That’s the American idea. You can move to another town and reinvent yourself. It’s not always true but it’s definitely part of our makeup.” Which is not to say that Beam has abandoned his roots. “Winter Prayers” is the simplest song on the record and also one of the most profound. Casting Beam’s languid vocal delivery, anguished yet somehow detached, against a mournful backdrop of piano and soft guitar, “Winter Prayers” is made even more potent by its position on the album, between two sides of experimental roots music. The songs

are linked by Beam’s voice, but also by his writing style — always incisive, always moving. The songs on Ghost on Ghost are about a pair of people experimenting with themselves and with each other. But the tone changes as the record progresses. Just as “Caught In The Briars” illuminates the feeling of limitless potential that accompanies new love (“Back alleys full of rain / and everything shining / as holy as she can be / the trick’s in the timing”), “Winter Prayers” captures a different reality: “Why you’d follow her there? / Milwaukee’s a deaf ear for winter prayers / There’s no night, there’s no day / With only hope in your pocket, and hell to pay.” Both songs, however, point to the idea embedded in the record’s title: that the moment when two lives intersect is the most important of all. “It really was one of the most representative lives about these people and the characteristics of these people that resonate through all the songs,” Beam says of the characters and the album’s title. “They’re tied together not just physically but also spiritually.” After a pause he adds, “But it also says we were dead before we even started.” This idea is bound up in the last two songs on the album, “Lovers’ Revolution” and “Baby Center Stage.” The former a sprawling assemblage of fragmented horns, pulsating jazz rhythms, and pop-influenced background

vocals; the latter is a rootsy ballad in the tradition of the Band’s “Makes No Difference” — a stunningly beautiful love song that seems to transcend both time and distance. And by turning back to the impossible freedom, the unlimited possibility, of love, Beam reveals something about himself: “In your restless days / I made my bed, I dug my grave / In your restless nights / We both swam blind, Somehow falling into the light.” This sense of potential has always animated Iron & Wine, whether Beam is performing alone onstage or in front of an enormous band. Ghost On Ghost is merely the latest in a long string of albums that pushed the boundaries of what Iron & Wine could be. Beam concedes that this can be problematic,

especially for fans of his music. “There are lots of artists I’ve felt that way about, like, man, I really liked what you did before,” he admits. “I get it. But, you know, as far as I approach working it doesn’t really come into it, unfortunately. It probably should. I could probably put my kids through college and not worry about it. But at the same time I can’t fake it.” Iron & Wine September 23 @ University Theatre (U of R) $30+ @ Globe Theatre box office Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbRegina amacpherson@verbnews.com

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Photos courtesy of Maxton Priebe

lattes and lunch Caffe Cafeina puts a savoury spin on coffee shop eats by MJ Deschamps

A

s a freelance writer who sometimes feels a bit boxed in by the walls of her apartment, let me tell you — a cozy neighbourhood coffee shop to take my laptop to and spend the afternoon in can be worth its weight in gold. It can also give me a good reason to put on pants.

and muffuletta (my rule of thumb: the harder they are to pronounce, the better they taste), cold sandwiches, salads, baked goods and fair trade organic coffee, Caffe Cafeina is a great little place for a destination lunch. The café is the second culinary brainchild to come from Gilles and Jacqueline Gobin, who have built a solid reputation in Regina with their revered French-style desserts shop, Le Macaron. “We wanted to completely change the concept, and just focus on truly good, wholesome food,” said Gilles, adding that customers will find a “more homey, rustic type of baking” at Caffe Cafeina, with all menu items prepared in-house, and with fresh ingredients. I started off with one of their cold lunch options: a spinach wrap with oven-roasted chicken breast, ripe avocado, pea shoots and roasted red peppers, dressed in a garlic balsamic aioli. The pea shoots were crisp and crunchy, the aioli creamy and complimentary, and each bite came with a big wedge of seasoned chicken breast. Honestly — it was probably

Enter Caffe Cafeina — just a few months old, this east-end spot has all the elements that make a corner café worth coming back to: a warm, cozy atmosphere with comfy, bonded-leather chairs and couches nestled around a tall fireplace, and a full menu made up of so much more than just espresso. With a selection of Italian-style hot paninis like the chicken saltimbocca

let’s go drinkin’ Verb’s mixology guide CAFFE CORETTO

Ingredients

Ah, coffee — the best way to start your day and wind it down. This after dinner Italian beverage mixes espresso and liquor together in what can be literally translated into “corrected coffee.”

Freshly ground espresso 1 shot grappa (or Sambuca or brandy) sugar to taste

DIRECTIONS

Brew up a fresh pot of espresso over the stove or with your automatic machine, and fill up espresso cups. Pour grappa into the coffee, and stir in sugar to taste. Salute!

one of the best coffee shop wraps I’ve ever had. In the mood for poultry, I tried the chicken saltimbocca panini next: a hot-pressed sandwich with slices of

It’s a tasty lineup already, but Gobin said he is just getting started — throwing out menu ideas for the future like maple-cured salmon, open-faced sandwiches, and more desserts.

…this new kid on the block is likely to be a hit… MJ deschamps

prosciutto, roasted chicken, fresh arugula, provolone, and a generous layer of tomato pesto. The salty prosciutto and sweet pesto were married together perfectly between slices of thin crusty bread, and the side arugula salad with balsamic vinaigrette made for a simple yet flavourful accompaniment. I finished off with a swig of rich, caramelly espresso and a sticky, sweet, cinnamon apple morning bun — crunchy and glazed on top, with real chunks of apple in the soft pastry below.

So with its casual comfort food straight out of the cucina, this new kid on the block is likely to be a hit with those looking for a quick bite, or — in my case — a place to stay awhile. Caffe Cafeina 3283 Quance Street East | (306) 206 1700 Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbRegina mdeschamps@verbnews.com

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music

Next Week

coming up

Ben Sures

AroarA

The Good Lovelies

@ Artesian on 13th Friday, September 20

@ Artful Dodger Friday, September 20 – $10

@ Conexus Arts Centre Wednesday, December 4 – $52

In 2007, Alice Notley published an outstanding book of avante garde poetry called In the Pines, about her experiences while undergoing treatment for Hepatitis C. Fast forward half a decade or so, and Montreal-based duo AroarA have released an album of the same name, based on the book. Instead of simply putting the poetry to music, AroarA — which consists of Broken Social Scene’s Andrew Whiteman and his significant other, Ariel Engle — took Notley’s verses, deconstructed and reconstructed them using little words and phrases, then set it all to minimal pop and loose rock sounds. The result is an enchanting debut album, fuelled by Engle’s gorgeous voice, that soothes the soul, ignites passion, and forces you to think — all at the same time. Tickets through ticketedge.ca.

Do you know how The Good Lovelies met? No? Don’t worry, neither do they. Sue Passmore thinks they all met at a limbo competition, Caroline Brooks believes it was at a chess tournament, and Kerri Ough, well, she’s certain they all met during a bar fight. No matter, what’s important here is that these three ladies from Ontario eventually got together to form a band. And what a band it is! With catchy songwriting, an upbeat folky sound and a dash of sass, this talented trio have been winning over fans in Canada and beyond. And their efforts have not gone unnoticed. In 2010, their album, The Good Lovelies, won a Juno for Roots/Traditional Album of the year. Don’t miss them when they perform during the Vinyl Cafe Christmas show in December. – By Adam Hawboldt

– $15 (advance), $20 (door)

Man oh man, can Ben Sures write one heckuva song. He was the winner in the folk category at the 2005 John Lennon songwriting competition, placed second in the AAA category of the 2006 International songwriting competition, and he’s received honourable mentions in a couple of USA songwriting competitions. Yes sir, this man can write. But that’s not all. As an entertainer, this Winnipeg-born folk/ acoustic musician puts on intimate, engaging shows that draw audiences in. Oh, and he’s also a much-respected guitarist in the Canadian music industry, having played with the likes of Paul Reddick, The Good Lovelies and Rita Chiarelli. His latest album is an electric blues/African blues/world music project called Son of Trouble. Tickets for the show at artesianon13th.ca. Photos courtesy of: the artist/ the artist/ the artist

Sask music Preview One of the biggest drum events to happen in Canada, the 3rd annual Regina Drum Festival, is back again! On September 28 + 29, the Exchange and the Club will host world class players who perform in the genres of metal, jazz, funk and more. The trade show will feature a vintage drum expo and a fastest hands competition, not to mention Matt Halpern, Mark Kelso and Steve Ferrone — all that and more, all weekend! Weekend passes are $55, and available at Long and McQuade in Regina, Boomtown Drums and www.ticketedge.ca Keep up with Saskatchewan music. saskmusic.org

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september 13» september 21 The most complete live music listings for Regina. S

M

T

W

T

13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Friday 13

The Empire Associates Concert / Artesian on 13th — With Skylight, Vudu Hounds and Ink Road. 8pm / $20 Alexis Normand, Julia McDougal / Artful Dodger — Some laid back music with two lovely ladies. 8pm / Cover TBD

Saturday 14

Corb Lund / Casino Regina — Also appearing is Ian Tyson. 8pm / SOLD OUT Tom Holliston / The Club — Former punker is doing a solo tour. 7:30pm / DJ Pat & DJ Kim / Habano’s — Local DJs spin top 40 hits. 9pm / $5 cover Big Chill Fridays / Lancaster — Come out and get your weekend started with DJ Fatbot. 10pm / Cover TBD Slow Motion Walter / McNally’s Tavern — A rock and roll party band. 10pm / $5 Stephanie Thomson / Pump — Adult contemporary music. 10pm / Cover TBD Albert / Pure — Appearing every Friday night. 10pm / $5 cover Jess Moskaluke / Whiskey Saloon — A country singer who rocks! 9pm / Cover TBD DJ Longhorn / Whiskey Saloon — Come check out one of Regina’s most interactive DJs. 8pm / Cover TBD

Groove Etiquette / Artful Dodger — Featuring Mikhail and Kinder along with DJ Fatbot. 10pm / $5 Wanted Man / Casino Regina — A tribute to Johnny Cash. 8pm / $20+ Digital Doomzday + more / The Exchange — Grind metal, rap, and punk. 7:30pm / Cover TBD The Accomplice / Lancaster — Rock and alternative tunes. 8pm / Cover TBD Slow Motion Walter / McNally’s Tavern — A rock and roll party band. 10pm / $5 Stephanie Thomson / Pump — Adult contemporary music. 10pm / Cover TBD Drewski / Pure Ultra Lounge — Doing what he does best. 10pm / $5 cover Jess Moskaluke / Whiskey Saloon — A country singer who rocks! 9pm / Cover TBD 

Sunday 15

Itchy Stitches + more / The Club — A night of heavy metal and more. 7pm / $10 Sexy Retro Dance Party / McNally’s Tavern — DJ Baby Daddy will be rocking all the hits of the ‘70s and ‘80s. 10pm / Cover TBD

Monday 16

Open Mic Night / The Artful Dodger — Come down and jam! 8pm / No cover Monday Night Jazz / Bushwakker — Featuring Whiteboy Slim. 8pm / No cover

Tuesday 17

Elliott Brood / Artful Dodger — Altcountry from Toronto. 8pm / Cover TBD Troubadour Tuesdays / Bocados — Come check out some live tunes from local talents. 8pm / No cover

Wednesday 18

Mike Plume / Artful Dodger — Country music from New Brunswick. 8pm Wednesday Night Folk / Bushwakker Brewpub — Featuring Last Mountain Breakdown. 9pm / No cover

Jam Night / McNally’s — Come on down and enjoy some local talent. 9pm / No cover Tim Hicks / Pump Roadhouse — Come out for a “Hell Raisin’ Good Time.” 8pm / $20 (ticketedge.ca)

Thursday 19

Young Galaxy, Human Human / The Exchange — Indie rock. 7:30pm / $12 Decibel Frequency / Gabbo’s Nightclub — A night of electronic fun. 10pm / Cover $5 PS Fresh / The Hookah Lounge — With DJ Ageless and DJ Drewski started in Saskatoon. They both landed in Regina and have come together to sling some bomb beats. 7pm / No cover Open Mic Night / King’s Head Tavern — Come out, play some tunes, sing some songs, and show Regina what you got. 8pm / No cover Foxx Worthee / Pump Roadhouse — A country female duo worth checking out. 10pm / Cover TBD DJ Longhorn / Whiskey Saloon — Come check out one of Regina’s most interactive DJs as he drops some of the best country beats around. 8pm / Cover TBD Alex Runions / Whiskey Saloon — A talented local country artist. 9pm / $5

Friday 20

Ben Sures / Artesian on 13th — A CD release party for this talented singer/songwriter. 8pm / $15/20 AroarA / Artful Dodger — A haunting Montreal duo. 8pm / Cover TBD Eric Bourdin / Casino Regina — One of Rolling Stone’s Top 100 voices of all time. 8pm / $40 (casinoregina.com) Coldest Night of the Year, White Women, Castle River / The Exchange — Rock from Regina and Saskatoon. 7:30pm / Cover TBD DJ Pat & DJ Kim / Habano’s Martini & Cocktail Club — Local DJs spin top 40 hits every Friday night that are sure to get you on the dance floor. 9pm / $5 cover

Big Chill Fridays / Lancaster Taphouse — Come out and get your weekend started with DJ Fatbot, who’ll be doing his spinning thing every Friday night. 10pm / Cover TBD Adam’s Rib / McNally’s Tavern — A rock/ reggae/jam band you should check out. 10pm / $5 Foxx Worthee / Pump Roadhouse — A country female duo worth checking out. 10pm / Cover TBD Albert / Pure Ultra Lounge — Appearing every Friday night, come listen to Albert as he does his spinning thing. 10pm / $5 cover DJ Longhorn / Whiskey Saloon — Come check out one of Regina’s most interactive DJs as he drops some of the best country beats around. 8pm / Cover TBD Alex Runions / Whiskey Saloon — A talented local country artist. 9pm / $10

Saturday 21

RSO Mosaic Masterworks: The Opera Gala / Conexus Arts Centre — Featuring the music of Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner. 8pm / Tickets TBD Carter Powley Jazz Trio / Lancaster Taphouse — Jazz tunes to get your night going. 8pm / Cover TBD Adam’s Rib / McNally’s Tavern — A rock/ reggae/jam band you should check out. 10pm / $5 Foxx Worthee / Pump Roadhouse — A country female duo worth checking out. 10pm / Cover TBD Drewski / Pure Ultra Lounge — Doing what he does best, every Saturday night. Come on down and dance the night away with this local DJ. 10pm / $5 cover Alex Runions / Whiskey Saloon — A talented local country artist. 9pm / $10

Get listed Have a live show you'd like to promote? Let us know! layout@verbnews.com

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Friday, September 6 @

the Exchange

The Cultural Exchange 2431 8th Avenue (306) 780 9495

Check out our Facebook page! These photos will be uploaded to Facebook on Friday, September 20. facebook.com/verbregina

Photography by Bebzphoto

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Photo: Courtesy of relativity media

Laughs, violence and Robert De Niro Yet despite all that, The Family still doesn’t live up to its potential by adam hawboldt

Y

ou know what really grinds my gears? When a movie seems to have all the components to be amazing, yet somehow fails to put them all together into one big ball of awesomeness. Only reason I mention this is because the other day, before I sat down to watch The Family, there was a fleeting moment when I said to myself, “You know what? This has the potential to be an excellent movie.” It really does. Think about it. It has top-notch actors in it like Robert De Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Tommy Lee Jones. The writer/director, Luc Besson, is no slouch. After all, he’s the guy responsible for The Fifth Element, The Professional and La Femme Nikita. It had good subject matter — the mafia. A fantastic narrator in De Niro. And it’s a mixture of dark comedy and action. Yesirree, on the surface The Family had all the makings of a terrific

movie. But, like so many films before it, The Family fails to put all the pieces together to make an amazing whole. Sure it’s good and fun and entertaining and all, but amazing? No way. The movie starts out with Giovanni Manzoni (De Niro) living in the witness protection program under the name Fred Blake. He and his family

the family Luc Besson Starring Robert De Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer + Tommy Lee Jones Directed by

112 minutes | 14A

Why were they relocated? Well, you can take the family out of the mob, but you can’t take the mob out of the family. And this clan — well, they’re a real handful. You see this once they get settled in their new hometown. Fred plans to spend the time quietly writing a memoir of his mafioso past. The writing soothes him … or so he thinks. When a plumber tries to rip him off, Fred snaps his leg. When his tap starts spitting brown water, he bombs the hell out of a nearby chemical plant. And the rest of the family is just as violent. Fred’s wife, Maggie (Pfeiffer) blows up a grocery store. His son, Warren

…you can’t help but feel [like] you’ve seen most of these characters before. Adam Hawboldt

are on their way to small-town France after having been relocated from their previous hideout.

(an excellent John D’Leo) is busy exacting revenge on the bullies in his new high school. And his daughter, Belle (Dianna Agron) has a penchant for beating the crap out of local boys who think American women are easy. And while all this is going on, the guy trying to keep the family out of trouble, agent Stansfield (Tommy Lee Jones), is growing more and more frustrated with his assignment. Sound like a fun, dark romp to you? It is. In fact, that may be one of things holding The Family back from being a great movie. There’s too much fun, not enough noirish mafioso stuff. That, and the fact that you can’t help but feel you’ve seen most of these characters before. De Niro goes a

little Analyze This/That, Jones plays a watered down version of his character in The Fugitive, and Pfeiffer goes at it from a Married to the Mob angle (albeit better and turned down a notch.) All that being said, The Family is still worth a watch. There are some great action scenes and big belly laughs to be had. Just don’t expect a classic (or even a cult classic) when you walk into the theatre.

Feedback? Text it! (306) 881 8372

@VerbRegina ahawboldt@verbnews.com

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A web of lies

Informant is an interesting documentary about anarchism, the FBI and self-deceit by adam hawboldt

Photo: Courtesy of kinosmith

T

here was a time, not so long ago, when Brandon Darby was the darling of America’s radical left. A teenage runaway who, at an early age, developed a keen disdain for people who abuse power, Politically minded with an anarchist bent, Darby eventually moved to Austin,Texas where he met two people who would factor into one of the most important chapters of his life — anarchist Scott Crow, and former Black Panther Robert King. In 2005, after Hurricane Katrina decimated New Orleans, Darby and Crow traveled there to rescue King. Those were tense times. In a new

document called Informant, directed by Jamie Meltzer, Darby talks about those days, recalling an incident when an Army Ranger tried to stop

lead Darby to exclaim, “if I had an appropriate weapon, I would have attacked my government for what they were doing.”

…Meltzer effectively gives Darby — who comes off as brash … the rope with which he hangs himself. Adam Hawboldt

the rescue attempt. Darby wasn’t happy. And as incidents like this began to pile on top of each other, it

He didn’t get the proper weapon, though. Instead, he and Crow launched Common Ground Relief, a

non-profit organization that helped deliver water, food and medical assistance to people in need of immediate relief after the storm. Not only did Darby earn respect from the government he wanted to attack, but he soon became an activist hero of the far left. Roll credits, end of documentary. Okay, not exactly. See, somewhere between 2005 and the 2008 GOP National Convention, Darby took a hard right. And by hard right, I mean straight to the far right wing of American politics. He became an informant for the FBI, putting some of his former anarchist friends behind bars and, eventually, speaking at Tea Party Rallies. This abrupt about-face brought death threats from the far left and praise from his new allies. In Informant we get to hear Darby explain why he did what he did, every step of the way, from the man himself. Sure, there are re-enactments and interviews with other players in the Darby-saga, but for the most part director Jamie Meltzer gives Darby the floor and allows him to intimately explain his actions to the camera. He talks about his thought process at key points of his life, about loyalty, betrayal, and how he felt the entire time. By doing this, Meltzer effectively gives Darby — who comes off as brash, arrogant, and righteous — the rope with which he hangs himself.

informant Jamie Meltzer Starring Brandon Darby, Scott Crow + Malik Rahim Directed by

80 minutes | NR

And hang he does. Especially when much of what he says is rebutted by fellow anarchists, protesters, and his former coworkers at Common Ground Relief. When their story comes to fore, it becomes easy to see that Darby is a man fond of embellishment and lying to himself in order to account for, and justify, what he has done. All this makes for absorbing, mesmerizing, and absolutely intriguing viewing. After all, some of the greatest lies we tell are to ourselves. And watching a man spiral deeper and deeper into his self-created web of deceit is simply too good to pass up. Informant will be screened at the Regina Public Library beginning on September 19. See reginalibrary.ca for more information.

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@VerbRegina ahawboldt@verbnews.com

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Š Elaine M. Will | blog.E2W-Illustration.com | Check onthebus.webcomic.ws/ for previous editions!

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crossword canadian criss-cross DOWN

28. Very little 31. Fine linen cloth 35. Decrease in size 36. Milk source 37. Doughnut shapes 38. Biblical boat 39. Not expertly made 41. Unfriendly dog 42. National dance of Spain 44. Bearlike 46. Notes at the office 47. Act like a person who is ashamed to be seen 48. Eats with a spoon 49. Bluish shade of green

1. One’s actions 2. Have a deed for 3. End of a hammerhead 4. Unpredictable 5. Get going 6. Being the only one 7. Bustling activity 8. Lisa of ìThe Listener’ 9. Where I point 11. Exclamation of joy 12. Rid oneself of 14. Most parents have them 17. Alberta’s ___ Mountains 20. Back of a book 22. Be worthy of 24. Hard-working insect 25. Home for a house plant

27. Component of particleboard 28. Wash the deck 29. Billiards shot 30. Socks cover them 32. Living together in communities 33. It’s at the rear of most cars 34. Ireland, in Ireland 36. Christian symbol 39. Trim a photograph 40. Eagle of the sea 43. Big bird 45. Skipper’s domain

sudoku answer key

A

B

4 8 9 5 2 3 6 1 7 3 7 2 6 1 8 5 4 9 1 6 5 4 7 9 3 2 8 5 1 3 7 4 6 9 8 2 8 2 7 3 9 1 4 6 5 6 9 4 2 8 5 7 3 1 9 5 1 8 6 4 2 7 3 7 3 6 1 5 2 8 9 4 2 4 8 9 3 7 1 5 6

1. Inside information 5. Close with a bang 9. Air controller’s place 10. It’s here before tomorrow 12. A bruise surrounding the eye 13. Inuit jacket 15. Chick’s mom 16. Iridescent layer of a mollusc shell 18. Greek X 19. Work units 21. Make doilies 22. Temporary state of mind 23. Loss of hope 25. Spanish dollars 26. Canine neighbour

8 2 6 1 3 9 5 4 7 7 9 5 4 2 6 3 8 1 4 1 3 5 7 8 2 6 9 9 4 8 3 6 5 1 7 2 3 6 7 2 9 1 8 5 4 1 5 2 8 4 7 9 3 6 5 8 9 7 1 4 6 2 3 2 7 1 6 5 3 4 9 8 6 3 4 9 8 2 7 1 5

ACROSS

© walter D. Feener 2013

Horoscopes september 13-september 19 Aries March 21–April 19

Leo July 23–August 22

Sagittarius November 23–December 21

Feel like doing something a little different today, Aries? Go for it. Branch out in directions you never thought possible.

Big changes are on the horizon, Leo. Some you can control, others you can’t, but all will be worth it. Enjoy the ride.

You might feel the urge to contact someone you miss, Sagittarius. Give in to the urge, even if it hurts. The rewards from doing so could astound you.

Taurus April 20–May 20

Virgo August 23–September 22

Capricorn December 22–January 19

If you’re feeling flustered or unable to communicate this week, why not try to get your thoughts in order by writing them down? Then take action.

Your reasoning and judgement powers are going to be firing on all cylinders this week, Virgo. It’s time to confront those hard-to-make decisions.

This is gonna be one of those weeks where daydreaming comes easily, Capricorn. Let your imagination roam free, and follow your heart.

Gemini May 21–June 20

Libra September 23–October 23

Aquarius January 20–February 19

You may find it exceedingly difficult to get going early in the week, Gemini, but this will pass. Now is the time to act on those impulses!

Energy is going to be hard to come by over the next few days, Libra. But don’t let that stop you from getting things done.

Make an effort to contact your loved ones this week, Aquarius. Chatting with people is the name of this game. You’ll be glad you did.

Cancer June 21–July 22

Scorpio October 24–November 22

Pisces February 20–March 20

Cheerful and generous. That’s what you should strive to be this week, Cancer. Even if you don’t feel up to it, someone around you could really use the boost.

This is a week for socializing, Scorpio. The sun is still shining, the weather’s still warm, so get out there and meet people.

Summer is coming to an end, Pisces. So take some time to get out and enjoy what’s left of it. The upcoming months could be busy for you.

sudoku 2 1 3 4 7 7 5 4 8 1 8 9 4 8 5 1 6 7 9 1 5 7 9 6 5 4 6 2 3 2 3 8 6 3 9 2

crossword answer key

A

8 3 7 2 6 8 9 1 6 7 3 2 5 3 7 4 8 2 9 5 6 5 7 1 9 1 8 4 3 5 2 9 4 4 1 6

B

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VerbNews.com

Verb Issue R95 (Sept. 13-19, 2013)  

Verb Issue R95 (Sept. 13-19, 2013)

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