Milestone 1967

Page 1

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T

A

B

L

E

O

R

C

O

N

T

E

N

Introduction

4

Anticipation

17

Participation

23

Year's H i g h l i g h t s

53

Competition

81

Societies

119

Personalities

159

Conclusion.

270

Directory

277

"They say that life is a highway and its milestones are the years . . —Joyce Kilmer

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"The past is stone, and stands forever fast Eugene Lee Hamilton


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The morning was bright and ho pish, and I shall never forget it. Came the greenied days in anticipation with pots and things. The lines never stop or go but we are here and that counts. Long nights dykstraining and creeping out of caves: Leave a stone . . .


The maples shook and threw their red fingers in my face and I laughed. I stopped and listened. It was coolish late and the message was Bach. The snoiv-stars twinkled and squealed when I walked. "Dark limbs clutched an ice-moon', craving green. I saw my shadoiv on the wall, but I knew I was really not that big.




Leave more stones: The sun set into the lake, and with red and blue quietness all around I jumped from the dune with the grains in my mouth and ears while the wind whistled by because it was spring.


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Leading and following with more stones Four times we pulled with Breugehlian splendor, and we sang, too. Stones and miles of them, marking the way and the words. For I'll forget the testing and the teacups, but inside goes the learning how to learn and the hoping how to hope.


A speck of the variety of human experience gets lodged and we wonder and wonder and wonder

. . .



And who can say that it never really happened? Late times over deepness or tears with friends who will last longer than time can suppose, a slaterish stomach and the jokes about it, sleepy eyes watching colors change as the sun comes past the eight a.m. stained glass, kletzian warmth in rich browns . . .


Build with milestones a place to exist, for a somethingness is godding through us. A hundred years past and mine now a part yet apart . . .




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ANTICIPATION

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'T^e sun lies supple on the bricks; I walk the fluent street. . . . —David Mc Cord

17


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The first lesson for an official college student is to stand in lines—long

The only place for freshmen—down freshman Tom Miersma!

on their knees!

Note

lines.

Freshmen Freshman

must Mixer

be identified—name, rank, and they got their credentials—green

serial number. At beanies and signs.

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R r o s h i m e n O r ieritocl " T l n o m s o l v o s

The campus came alive with cries of "Pot, Frosh," hailing the beginning of freshman orientation. For the 495 Freshmen, the first few days were filled with placement exams, library tours, counseling sessions, discussion groups, and receptions. Some faced housing problems, as an all-time high enrollment forced girls to triple up in Phelps and others to live in cottages without sufficient furniture. With the aid of 50 faculty advisors and 100 student advisors the Freshman Class faced and overcame a m a j o r obstacle—the schedule. They soon became familiar with terms such as honor points, credit hour, and grade point average. At the Monday night mixer, the frosh received their "pots" and were taught the proper way to show subservience to superiors. Although the wearing of the green was less prominent this year, the newly-formed class of '70 united against the class of '69 at water fights and at the Frosh-Soph Beach Party. Climaxing the week-long rivalry was Kangaroo Court which brought forward the most daring criminals in the Freshman Class. After the appropriate punishments were meted out amidst water balloons, both classes united to sing the Alma Mater, and the Class of '70 was welcomed to the Hope College Community.

A little water never hurt splashing from the Sophs.

anyone!

Freshmen

got a traditional

It wasn't all fun. There was business to be done as well in Orientation. Ver Beek counseled frosh advisee. Alison Perry.

Freshmen

and Sophomores

town Beach.

got better acquainted

Mr.

on their first trip to Lake-


R o g i s t r s i t i o r i C o n v o o s t t i o n Again the familiar lines formed and general confusion was evident as 1,837 students from 38 states and 20 foreign countries registered for the fall '66 semester. CHECK YOUR PACKET (Don't bend the cards. Handle at top corners.) It should contain a yellow card, 3 pink or brown cards, 3 green or blue cards, and the blue Hope College information card. . , . And thus, through the wonders of automation, you were registered easily and efficiently with only a two hour wait in line and 3 schedule changes. The first academic year of Hope's second century was formally opened at the 105th Convocation. Dr. I. John Hesselink, Professor of the History of Doctrine and Ecclesiastical Latin at Tokyo Theological Seminary, spoke on the "Quest for Authenticity". Dr. Hesselink, who had just completed his second term of missionary service in Japan, challenged the students to expose themselves to the ultimate truth, for a commitment to truth is necessary in the search for authenticity. And then the classes began. . . .

". . . Examine your packet. Remove the blue, green and pink cards. Do not bend, fold or . .

•


Convocation:

a few moments

to pause and reflect

before

beginning

again

But I don't have $909.99 in the bank!

The Convocation speaker was Dr. John Hesselink of the Tokyo Theological Seminary. Smile! years!

This picture

must

last you four

long


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PARTICIPATION "Leave no stone unturned.' —Euripides


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Campus Evangelism—What is it? Two hundred students gathered for a week-end of discussion September 23-25 to find out. Too many people have rejected evangelism on the grounds that they resent being beaten over the head with salvation. Evangelism needs defining perhaps. As stated by Chaplain Hillegonds it begins with an intelligent, mature concern for others. Several speakers from organizations including Young Life and Y.M.C.A. explained how they felt evangelism should be carried out on a college campus. The retreat concluded with a panel dis iscussion designed to promote questions in the minds of the participants.

There was something both exhausting and restful about wind, waves, and white sand.

High on a hill amid sand and beachgrass, a chapel.

with the resounding

wash oj waves below, rests


"Hey, you guys your team! t"

have

too many

people

on

At midnight, in the light of the fire, many saw the light of the Savior.

Group

discussions

on evangelism

constituted

the main

interest

of the retreat.


Highior Horizons Ror VoLJngstors On almost any day during the school year, Hope students involved in Higher Horizons may be seen with the elementary and junior high children to whom they relate on a one-to-one basis, giving at least an hour each week to this friendship. Activities are geared to provide opportunities for the development of selfexpression, self-realization, and growth. Together they walk and talk, bowl, or go to a concert, assemble a model, ride bikes, cook or sew. The full time director of the program, Mr. Bruce Struik, advises almost 300 students involved in the volunteer program, and he has initiated many new and beneficial activities this year. Parents, school authorities, and townspeople have supported Higher Horizons enthusiastically, recognizing its worth in the lives of those involved, and its value in meeting a need in the community. Through culturally and academically enriching activities, the child can learn values and skills; college students also learn much as they enjoy these friendships. Jfith a little coaching from Ted Johnson and other Higher Horizon advisers, these Holland boys built a model road racing track.

Christine Hansen says, "Sift together one cup cup of flour", to her Higher Horizons friend.

of sugar

Sometimes those models are confusing even for a college student. Working together the two boys will figure out this boat's construction.

and

one


All

was under

assigned

Judy

Jensen

Bowling

control

Hope students

spent

with

many

with a friend

protege tips on scoring.

Bruce

to Holland

hours

is much

Struik

at the stern.

He organized

the

year's

program

and

youngsters.

reading

with

more fun!

young

Jeff

Holland

Lambkin

girls.

gave his

Young Mexican clothes together.

girls

and

senior

seamstress,

Joyce

Nelson,

made

doll


F R O N T R O W : D. Wilkens (Taylor) ; M. Hendricks, S. Sonneveldt (Doesburg) ; J. Heeren (Taylor) ; S. Schaper (Dosker) ; 2ND R O W : D. Gross (German House) ; D. Droppers (Dosker) ; R. Zietnann, C. Defendorf (Belt) ; J. Van Sloten. 1. Edbrooke (Du Mez) ; L. Weessies (German H o u s e ) ; C. Rowe (French House).

A d v i s o r s — Rriond a.rid Disoiiolinetriein Resident Advisers are carefully chosen by the administration to serve as a type of student counsellor in the dorms. They make a special effort to get to know well everyone who is under their charge. In this way they can be the one to whom a new student or any student may come with questions or problems about dorm life or college life in general. Many times, general gab sessions with R.A.'s yield a growth in wisdom and close friendship. As experienced, responsible upperclassmen, R.A.'s are guardians of dorm and college rules and are directly responsible for their enforcement. F R O N T R O W : J. Sutherland (Zwemer) ; D. Vanderwel, R. Shiels ( K o l l e n ) . 2ND ROW : R. Woodger (Warm Friend Hotel) ; R. Kronemeyer (Mandeville) ; D. Dnitsman ( K o l l e n ) ; J. Moored (Cosmo H a l l ) ; L. Cole (Emmie H a l l ) .

F R O N T R O W : L. Verhoek (Voorhees) ; C. Roberts (Phelps) ; D. DeAngelis, M. Bennink (Durfee) ; E. Gleichmann, W. Van Pernis (Phelps) ; J. Wells (Voorhees) ; G. Paalman (Gilmore) ; J. Grossman ( P h e l p s ) .


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F R O N T R O W : J. P o o r t i n g a : T. Gonzales; J. Claerbout; C. C h a p m a n ; K. Vandenberg; C. MacGregor; S. L a r k i n ; D. T.nidens. 2ND R O W : C. Schakel; E. Arnold; J. Brown; R. Luyendyke; C. Koterski; J . G u n d e r s e n : D. Hellenga. SRD R O W : T.. K o o p : R. T i m m e r ; M. Luckey; S. Dykstra; S. Wiegerink. 4TH R O W ; R. Donia; H. Diggelmann; R. Veenstra; B. W h i t e ; B. Clapham. 5TH R O W : S. R e y n e n ; R. Kooi.

G o v e r n m e r i t L. Wyman, Rec. Sec.; G. Pearson, Pres.; Sonneveldt, V. Pres.; J. Freshour, Corres. Sec.

C.

Holleman, Treas.;

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Student Senate is the organization through which students may voice their opinions, suggestions and criticisms of school policy and activities. It is an elected, representative body which draws its members from all classes to get a true cross-section of student sentiment. This year's Senate wrestled with such controversial issues as compulsory chapel and women's rules. This body also planned many of the cultural affairs and other social activities. Student Court, made up of juniors and seniors, is selected by the Senate to serve as the disciplinary board. It hears cases of rule violations and is careful to decide each case for the mutual good of the student and the college.

F R O N T R O W : W. Mills; D. Shiels; R O W : D. Farme ; R. Ziemann ( C o u r t ) .

Kemink;


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F R O N T R O W : P. Leestma (Knicks) ; J. Leenhouts (Cosmos) ; T. Hendrickson ( E m m i e s ) ; J. Piers (Fraters) ; S. Disbrow (Centurians). 2ND R O W : S. Reynen (Knicks) ; D. Honholt, J. Tysse (Fraters) ; R. Veenstra (Emmies) ; M. Menning (Arkies) ; D. Damsteegt (Centurians) .

Go\/ornmorTt for

Sooietios

The Interfraternity Council and the Pan-Hellenic Board are the governing bodies for Hope's Greek societies. Two representatives from each fraternity made up IFC this year. They set the dates for frat rush activities, devised the rules concerning rush and pledging, and when necessary, saw that these rules were followed. The Pan-Hellenic Board drew three members from each sorority. Early in the year, fall and spring rush rules were revised. Allowance was made for an increase in sorority membership. Together, IFC and PanHel made plans for future Greek Activities.

F R O N T R O W : J. Soder ( K a p p a Chi) ; P. Reynolds, Sec. (Sibs) ; C. Dalebout (Alpha P h i ) ; K. Wilson ( D o r i a n ) . 2ND R O W : B. Zandstra (Dorian) ; A. Johnson (Sorosis) ; L. Noetzel ( K a p p a C h i ) . 3RD R O W : C. Berens (Alpha P h i ) ; J. Van Dam ( K a p p a C h i ) . 4TH R O W : P. Helder, C. Karsten ( S i b s ) .


F R O N T ROW, Executives: R. Van A u k e n ; R. Schroeder; L, Van DeHoef; E. Myers. 2ND R O W : A. A a r d s m a ; D. Scott; J. Windover.

Sleepless, John Windover continued 48 hours in the radio marathon.

Radio station WTAS got off to a slow start during the fall because of technical breakdowns. However, hard work and creative ideas, coupled with appropriate expenditures, corrected this situation. By March air time averaged sixty hours a week. P r o g r a m m i n g included classical, pop-standard, contemporary music, campus and national news, and special events coverage. At the end of the year during i weekend of marathon broadcasting, WTAS D.J., John Windover, managed to stay awake and continue programming for 48 hours, a new national collegiate record!

F R O N T R O W ; B. Vissers; R. Valentine; R. Van A u k e n ; E. Myers; Genovese; P. Mateer; J. R i c k a r d ; L. F l e t c h e r ; B. Staats; D. Abbring. 2ND R O W : S. F a l m e r ; J. Christensen; P. W o o d ; C. Rowell; D. Scott. SRD R O W : A. A a r d s m a ; R. Schroeder; M. Koets; L. Van D e H o e f ; J. Windover.

broadcasting

for


F R O N T R O W : R. Bosman; D. Rigg; B. Clapham; A. VerSchure; R. Rietveld. 2ND R O W : W. Jackson; S. Baker; G. Van Noord; R. Fylstra; Mr. H. Mikle.

D o bo.t o

SciLjetd

Hope's Debate Squad took on the national debate question: "Resolved: that the United States should substantiate Red foreign policy commitments." Debaters traveled to the national convention of debaters at Peoria, and also debated at Goshen, Indiana, Lansing, and Purdue. They attended the Pi Kappa Delta Convention at Whitewater, Wisconsin. Debating gives students a fine opportunity to improve their public speaking skills, as well as clarify and formulate their opinions on pertinent public issues.

S t u d o n t

Clnurohs

Hyper-active has become a synonym for the Student Church in its first year of existence at Hope. Since its conception in the spring of 1966 on a trial basis, the Student Church has grown to be one of the leading organizations on campus. One of the greatest tasks of any church is to challenge its members. This the Student Church has tried to do under the leadership of its student board of trustees. The Student Church presented the student body with much more than a Sunday service; it provided opportunities for discussion and dialogue with outside speakers, faculty, and other students; opportunities to see the challenge of the church s task in places like Harlem and Appalachia on spring vacation trips; opportunities to work and give help in a wide range of areas. The Student Church is the one organization where anyone who wishes to give of himself can participate.

T. Ogren; W. Borsehel; R. Shiels; W. Michaelson; J. Pohl. 2ND R O W ; N. Gibson; M. Hesselink; P. I n k p e n ; B. T i m m e r ; M. Bennink; S. Borst; S. Ticknor. 3RD R O W : D. Vanderwel; D. Rozendaal; J. S u t h e r l a n d ; F. Brady.


Mel Andringa, Torn Coleman, John Lyons, and Don Battjes appeared in "What Say They?" by James Bridie. Don stood before the Dean pleading not to be expelled from Skerryvore.

"Tinroe Drstmsts from thio Litizlo Thioettor The Little Theater was less active than usual this year, hut it did institute a "designer-in-residence" program. New York theater designers in costume, lighting, and sets were invited to Hope's campus. Miss Sarah Gift, a professor at United Scenic Artists, helped design costumes for "Queen After Death". Their beauty and lavishness were stunning. Richard Bianci and Richard Casler were lighting and set designers respectively. Each of these people taught a seminar in his own field. James Bridie's "What Say T h e y ? " was the Little Theater's November production. Life in a Scottish University was set against an Old Testament scheme. A literary drama of little actual action was "Queen After Death" by Henry De Motherlant. Alan Jones performance as King Ferrante was the strongest of any in the, primarily literary, drama. The studentdirected Greek satire, " T h e Clouds" was presented in the Castle Park outdoor amphitheater in May. The satirical burlesque by Aristophanes, directed by Mike Vogas, dramatized the new morality and the immoral logic taught by the younger Greek generation. This year's Little Theater activity seemed to leave room for enlargement and improvement during next year s season of drama. Chris Nagel and Dave Crothers on stage in They are both posing as imposters.

If hat Say They?


V:

Seen in "Queen After Death", in lavish professional costumes, were Alan Jones, Jeff Lambkin, Dave Crothers, and Dennis Jonqs. The King's advisers asked for the death of Dona Inez, his daughter-in-law.

Bonnie Tompkins, as Immoral Logic, told Pheideppedes, (Mike Vogas) how much of the art she can teach him, if he will only come to study at the "Thinkery". Sokrates (Frank Hine) looked on longingly.

Menno Kraai was a Student of Sokrates in "The Chads", presented at the Castle Park outdoor amphitheater.

/


QtJoon" etnd ClOLJCiŠn F ^ o r f o r m e d

"I walk upon the air, and look down upon the sun from a superior standpoint." Frank Mine conducted his studies of the Ethereal air from his "baskette." He soon drew his student to the cutting edge of effective education.

The leader of a chorus of clouds was Jed Green. "No sooner do we drizzle our discontent than you Athenians start carousing and boozing."

&

35


F R O N T R O W : J. Vander L a a n ; S. Graef; M. Lenel; M. Pizzarro; D. Williams; C. Bultman; S. Jalving; B. Alhart; M. Bennink; R. Ziemann; D. Hagle; V. Quist; G. Swart; S. Van Koevering. 2ND R O W : J. Kemink; B. DeHart; J. Alexander; S. Craig: R. Schaap; A. Wilson; M. Richards; L. Noetzel; C. Defendorf; B. Phail; M. DeGraff; C. Claassen; G. Renkes; P. Inkpen; D. Grasman. 3RD R O W : A. VanderMeer; J. Schalk; J. Cronk; R. DeBoer; J. Moored; J. Seise; N. Butterworth; S. Eenigenburg; S. Sonneveldt; A. Van Dorp; G. Langstraat; L. Dykema; W. Coons; T. Dykstra; D. Matthews; H. Lucas. 4TH R O W : R. Rozeboom; J. McKenzie; N. Mol; G. Conover; J. Dykema; D. Naylor; K. Taylor; J. Klein; D. Walvoord; K. Zuithoff; A. Aardsma; W. Michaelson; V. Dreeland; R. Gutwein; T. Hildebrandt; M. K r a a i ; J. De Smidt.

"Thie Chetpel Choir The Hope College during spring tour.

Chapel

Choir

sang

under

Western

skies

W e n t :

W o s t

The fifty-nine members of the Hope College Chapel Choir had a busy and successful year. Members could often be seen carrying their bright-colored robes to 8 a.m. Chapel. Besides singing at Chapel, the Choir contributed its music at Convocation, Student Church services, the Christmas Vespers concert, Baccalaureate, and a Tulip Time Concert. At Tulip Time, the audience was thrilled to hear the program which the Choir had learned well on its spring tour through the West. Concerts were held in Phoenix, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Sacramento, and elsewhere. The Choir members got in some sight-seeing at Disneyland and Marineland, and generally had a great time together. ^ During the summer of 1967, the Chapel Choir will make its first European concert tour. The five-week tour will take them to Italy, Austria, the Netherlands, and other countries. The Chapel Choir is becoming more and more well-known nationally and now internationally for its magnificent performances of sacred music.


i IVIotot: Chioir

The Motet Choir formed a folk group this year to broaden and add a new sound to the Choir.

F R O N T R O W : D. M c i n t o s h ; F. W e b i n g a ; K. Bruggers; L. Noetzel; M. Lenel; F. F a r m e r ; G. Renkes; J. Siese. 2ND R O W : G. Hulse; J. Holesinger; A. Bilyeu; J. Brown; C. Vanden Hoek; B. D e H a r t ; W. Wilson; R. Sierdsma; J. Dykema. 3RD R O W : Mr. J. Tallis; T. Lockwood; F. Van Cor; J. Lamse; M. H o r n b a c h e r ; E. W y b e n g a ; T. Hildebrandt; B. P h a i l ; S. Cutting.

its repertoire

The Motet Choir specializes in the a cappella madrigals and motets of the 16th and 17th Centuries. The Choir's repertoire includes Dutch folksongs, hymns of the early American colonies and Southland, Christmas carols of many countries, and other sacred and secular literature from the 16th to 20th Centuries. Motet Choir is essentially a non-touring group, made up of approximately twenty members. Under the direction of Mr. James Tallis, the Choir has made local appearances in Grand Rapids, Zeeland, Grandville, and at special activities on campus and in the Holland area. Highlights of the year included a concert of sacred anthems of the church year given in Dimnent Chapel, and appearances at Trinity College and Shimer College.


Two weekly practices of the College Chorus produce a rich sound from more than one hundred voices. Nightly rehearsals precede an important performance such as the Christmas Vespers Concert and the spring concert. The "Magnificat" by Antonio Vivaldi was the Choir's selected piece for Vespers. Maurice Durufle's "Requiem" was sung in Latin in the spring. The College Chorus occasionally contributed their musical offerings in morning Chapel and in Student Church services. Although this Chorus is often considered a stepping stone to the Hope College CITapel Choir, it is also in itself a musical outlet for those who ^njoy singing.

38

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F R O N T R O W ; M. Jewell: B. P r i m e ; K. DeWitt; V. Fraser; E. Hook; C. Gerhart; Y. Cook; K. Toonder; L. Mandeville; M. Vander W e r p ; R. Seeley; S. Weaver; J. Gunderson; N. Kuyers; C. Ver H a g e ; J. Bumford; J. Vander Meulen; D. Thompson. 2ND R O W ; L. Pletcher; B. Greer; S. Johnson; E. Reus; K. K a m m e r a a d ; C. Hansen; N. Brown; J. Beretz; M. Weessies; H. Everett; C. Beard; G. Bailey; J. Cathcart; C. Mouw; B. Gleichm a n ; J. Gasperec; C. H o u t m a n ; J . Risser; M. Hoffman. 3RD R O W : L. Koop; K. Beck; M. Hungerford; C. Chapman; K. Vandenberg; T. Bremer; M. Marosy; S. Curtis; K. Verduin; C. Wilterdink; L. F o x ; J. Taylor; N. Warnock; K. Bacon; S. Fortuin; K. Miller; C. Peacock; E. Diamante; A. Andres; J. Bronwers; M. Knoper. 4TH R O W : D. Hymans; C. Phillips; J. Noggle; A. Stephans; M. Welmers; A. DeVelder; J. Ritsema; P. Walther; T. Ligget; L. Amidon; V. Detlefs; P. Tower; J. Wolf; L. Sonneveldt; J. Benedict; G. I m m i k : N. Runchey; B. Ryzenga; C. C h a p m a n ; C. Vanden Heuvel; E. Gibson: S. Wyngarden; A. Johnson. 5TH R O W : Mr. R. Davis; J. Debriceni; T. Welscott; J. K l i n g ; L. MacOueen; D. Kolkman; P. Davton; D. Dievendorf; G. Phillips; E. Davis; W. K u h ; M. Oonk; J. Proli; R. Plaxton; C. Van Noord; K. Mol; G. Seevers; W. Klebe: A. Atwood; S. Sterk; X. Hendrickson; D. Sybesma; R. B r a n c h ; E. Dobbin.

" I V I a g n i f l o e t t "

m A jew moments

of last-minate

practice precede most performances.


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Concert IVlusicians-Xhe Hope College Band and Orohestra The Orchestra, under the direction of Morrette Rider, was busy working on several concerts this year. During the fall, they presented a joint concert with the Band. During the Christmas season, a concert was presented which featured the violin virtuoso, Mischa Mischakoff, who, at 70, is the concertmaster of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. A selected orchestra accompanied the college choirs at the Christmas Vesper service. They also provided the background music for "Down in the Valley", the opera presented during 1 ulip I ime for students and town visitors. Next year, the Orchestra will be directed by Mr. Ritsema, who will fill in while Dr. Rider uses next year for postgiaduate work. The Orchestra will continue to give musically-inclined students the opportunity to channel their abilities into enjoyable, worthwhile activity.

40

MEMBERS: V10E11NS: D. Tubergen; G. Davidson; E. Kulp; S. McClellan; F. Leese; S. Bosman; T. Lockwood; G. Chiriboga; J. Jonoski; M. Hakken; R. Oosterhof; S. Emerick; E. Diamante; N. Warnock; W. Rider. VIOLA: F. Schutmaat; S. Weiden; A. Bentz; P. Selover. CELLO: M. Russell; M. Jones; J. Renwick; R. Schwegler; P. Slagh; J. Lubbers; N. Alexander. BASS: K. Buurma; J. Brown; R. Schaap; G. Hulse. FLUTE: N. Emerson; C. Gauntlett; B. DeHart. PICCOLO: C. Gauntlett. OBOE: D. Mc Intosh; B. Walvoord; J. Krauss; G. Conway. ENGLISH H O R N : B. Waivoord; G. Conway. CLARINET: F. Webinga; J,. Kooim a n ; P. Tower; L. De Boer. BASS CLARINET; D. Hagle. BASSOON: P. Lein; M. Lievense; S. Kutscher. HORN: T. Working; P. Paplawsky; J. Peverly; R. Vander Burgh. T R U M P E T : B. Formsma; A. Bilyeu; K. Austin; S. Disbrow. TROMBONE; D. Dievendorf; G. Philips; P. Carlson. TUBA: J. Allan. T I M P A N I : F. Farmer. PERCUSSION: M. Berry; C. Vanden Hoek. H A R P ; V. Young. CELESTE: C. Vanden Hoek. ORCHESTRA PIANO; D. Hagle.


The Hope College Band is an organization on the move. Under the direction of Robert Cecil, the Band opened the season with the delightful Kletz Concert at Homecoming. This is perhaps one of the most difficult feats for a band— to play well without any directing or even some misdirecting. But the Band succeeded. The Band contributed its part at football and basketball games, and presented several concerts throughout the year. An attempt was made to show versatility by means of the pieces performed. The Band helps to create an interest for the fine art of music on this campus, and enthusiasm continues to grow.

MEMBERS: PICCOLO: B. De Hart. F L U T E S : N. Franke; C. Gauntlett; B. De H a r t ; S. Bray; S. Poinsett; M. Knoper; M. Luckey; L. Pletcher; E. Azeka. OBOE: D. Mcintosh; J. Krauss; R. Weinstein. BASSOON: P. Lein. E-FLAT CLARINET: P. Tower. CLARINET: P. Lang; J. Kooiman; C. Lake; S. Pickard; C. Van Noord; G. Gouwens; R. Beck; D. Hill; J. Morgan; M. Baker. ALTO CLARINET: J. Cathcart. BASS CLARINETS: D. Hagle; R. Stewart. CONTRABASS CLARINET; E. Wybenga. ALTO SAX: S. Medendorp; T. Welscott; R. Gutwein; D. Kolkman; M. Volkers. TENOR SAX: D. Manuel; W. Selanders. BARITONE SAX; B. Gray. HORNS: P. Paplawsky; T. Working; C. Roberts. CORNETS: B. F o r m s m a ; T. Crandall; A. Bilyeu; K. Austin; D. Grissen; F. Emerson; J. Ritsema. T R U M P E T S : T. Crandall; F. Emerson. TROMBONE; P. Carlson; D. Dievendorf; L. Banninga; G. Philips. BARITONE: M. Koets: D. Reinbard. TUBA: E. Dobbin; D. Matthews; C. Van Ark. T I M P A N I : M. Berry. PERCUSSION: F. Farmer; C. Vanden Hoek; H. Kuiper; B. Woods.

I

i

vaaHaMMj

iwmbm mmmm mmm

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I p

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e

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^ ~


Hope's Symphonette Went East for Spring "Tour This year the Symphonette worked industriously under the direction of Dr. Morrette Rider for the Eastern tour. They visited such cities as Washington, D.C., New York City, Philadelphia, Rochester, and Hastings-on-Hudson, and performed for many gracious audiences. Unfortunately, this was the last tour to be directed by Dr. Rider until 1969 after his leave of absence. On the program for the tour were many numbers, including one of the Symphonette's favorites The Toy Symphony." Floyd Farmer performed vocally; Dave Tubergen was the violin solist; and Dr. Kooiker, the piano soloist. The Symphonette is a small group which works closely to produce its own special sound for their own and others' enjoyment.

MEMBERS: VIOLIN: Dave Tubergen; Ellen Kulp; Frank Leese; Sue Bosman; Glenys Davidson; Ruth Oosterhof; Margo Hakken. VIOLA: Fred Schutmaat; Steve Weiden; Lynda Brown. CELLO: Mary Pat Russell; Marilyn Jones; Nancy Alexander. BASS: Kathy Buurma. F L U T E : Norma Emerson; Carol Gauntlett. OBOE: Donn Mcintosh; Barb Walvoord. CLARINET: Julie Kooiman; P r u d y Tower. BASSOON: Mary Lievense; Sue Kutscher. H O R N : Thorn Working; Pete Paplawsky. T R U M P E T : Bruce Formsma; Tim Crandall. T I M P A N I : Floyd Farmer.


Spring tour allowed the Svmphonette to take in the sights in Washington, D.C.. including Lyndon's house.

Pack and unpack and pack again was the continuing of tour. But it was an exciting experience.

story

Scratch

time

. . . Squeeaak

before each concert.

. . . go the violins

at tuneup


L. Cole; C. Walters; R, Nyberg; R. Bruggers; C. Schilstra; P. H a r t m a n ; J. Leenhouts.

The Fellowship of Christian Athletes is a nation-wide, non-denominational organization whose purpose it is to confront athletes, coaches, and, through them, young people, with the challenge and adventures of following Christ in the fellowship of the Church. This year, FCA prepared and sold programs at football and basketball games. The money received will send members to an FCA summer conference. FCA also opened Lincoln School gym for two nights of the week, and joined with local youngsters in athletic activities.

W.A.A. The Women's Athletic Association provides an opportunity for recreation and relaxation for Hope's women. Any girl may participate in the bi-weekly events of archery, basketball, field hockey, softball, tennis, swimming and more. Besides having fun with their classmates, WAA girls gain a new appreciation for physical activity, feel more a part of Hope, and lose that weak, tired-blood feeling.

F R O N T R O W : Miss D. Schippef; O. Delp; C. Kearney; C. Van Wieren. 2ND R O W : J. Morgan; S. Van Raalte; N. Strang; C. Peacock: M. Miller: J. Nvboer. SRD R O W : S. Nevins; M. De Graaf: M. P a r k e r ; B. Dnrling. 4TTI R O W : M. Medema; C. Bache; B. Brunson; A. Gnnkler. 5TH R O W : C. Karsten • C. Clark; J. Sebens.


Orgetnizsttion ÂŁ

for W

o

m

e

n

The local Association of Women Students belongs to the Intercollegiate Association of Women Students, which endeavors to serve women in a representative form of self-government and to encourage a high level of personal responsibility and citizenship. AWS is divided into two groups. The Council is the governing body which sets some of the guiding principles and regulations for the women students, and reviews and enforces them. The AWS Activities Board serves as the social planning board and sponsored events including the Big-Little Sister Program, Nykerk Breakfast, style show, carol sing. Penny Night, the Women's Development Program, May Day, and the Mother-Daughter Banquet. COUNCIL, F R O N T K O W : S. C h a o m a n ; S. C r a e f : C. Moore; D. Gross. 2ND R O W : H. Ver H o e k ; C. Hnn^stra: D. Dronoprs. 3RD R O W : C. Schakel, Pres.; C. Dalebout; P. M c N a m a r a ; B. Rninson. 4TH R O W : M. H e n d r i c k s ; P. Myers.

A C T I V I T I E S BOARD. F R O N T R O W : I. Freshonr; R. Vollink. 2ND R O W : C. Bache; S. V a n R a a l t e ; J. Sebons; M. Schafer; S. Schaper, Pres.; N. Seigbman.


A N C H O R

— S t Li d e n t

S o L a n d i n g

B o a r d

gr*l*> g/sffWri 0_m,

John Cox, critique editor, was responsible for choosing hooks and plays for review in the ANCHOR.

Dick Angstadt headed the photography staff. He and Don Page took photos, and Suzette Luckhardt was the dark room assistant.

46

Credit for the coordination of this gargantuan, often thankless, task, goes to editorin-chief, John Mulder. He stood by all that the ANCHOR ^criticized, proposed, and commended.


Boh Donia and Bruce Ronda were editorial assistants. Bob quently, and Bruce often did critiques and feature articles.

wrote

editorials

fre-

George Arwady, managing editor checked copy for quality, and served as personnel manager, while Tom Hildehrandt, the news editor, gathered campus news as it broke, and assigned reporters to cover it.

The task of the student newspaper, the ANCHOR, is to inform the student body of campus activities and to lead student opinion about campus developments. Having been awarded an All-American rating for its work last year, the ANCHOR, under editor John Mulder, threw itself into the thick of campus life. The housing situation, the chapel controversy, control of student publications, administrative continuity, and the effectiveness of student government were only a few of the issues on w hich the ANCHOR spoke.

$ Each week,

Gordon

Korstange

wrote

his witty,

often

pungent,

"Fifth Column".

Rob Branch, Glen Looman, Pat Canfield, Carol Koterski, and Janice Rakker were the "Wednesday night staff . Put, the features editor turned in stories to be rewritten by Rob and Glen. Carol and Janice checked all copy for accuracy and style.


Thie L i t e r a t o

A. De Velder; R. Schwegler; M. Welmers; G. Korstange; "K. Taylor"; B. R o n d a ; T. Johnson.

Tlie seven people in the above picture are eating bananas, because they have to build up their strength in order to put out the OPUS. Those monthly issues, containing all students' contributions in prose, poetry, art, and photography, were a m a j o r undertaking. There were some meetings at which the students discussed their work with members of the OPUS Board. They needed a lot of bananas for those. The final issue with its op art cover, was the goal toward which those banana-eaters worked. Here the Board offers a banana toast to the garbage can, the symbol of OPUS this year. Next year, with a revised constitution and more bananas, there might be two garbage cans.


A Note from thie Editor: "Gone, gone forever!—like a rushing wave Another year has burst upon the shore of earthly being—and its last low tones. Wandering in broken accents in the air, Are dying to an echo." —George D. Prentice

Our nation, our college and our personal lives are at crossroads. We can feel this more and more each day as wars flare up on all sides of the globe; as college policies are re-examined; and as we ourselves face the dilemma of which career to work toward, or whether or not "he" is the one for "me". Today, in the mid-1960 , s, traditional ideas about nearly every phase of existence are being remodeled or scrapped for the sake of convenience, efficiency, "progress" and, perhaps, even for the sake of newness itself. Is the MILESTONE, as a yearbook, also at crossroads? Vast advances in yearbook publishing have opened up new vistas of exciting and different effects. With better services, facilities, and photography, great strides can be made by individual yearbook staffs. In this, the 50th edition of the MILESTONE, attempts have been made to treat the traditional contents of the yearbook in a new way. All the components were carefully selected and colored with one theme—the milestone marking the transition of past to future, and these combining in the present. The bold cover departs from everything Hope has ever seen on its yearbooks. Even the type styles chosen combine tradition and modernity. A long-used style. Cloister Bold, was chosen for the division pages. The clean, modern Excello Bold was used throughout for headlines. Other elements add to the theme, also. Students and faculty see a yearbook only once —as a published, covered book. Its single appearance often diminishes the fact that one full year of work preceded that ultimate debut. It has been a long, nerve-wracking year indeed, but well worth it as 1 present to you MILESTONE 1967. Watch closely as you review 196/ In this MILE TONE. I hope it piques your mind, as well as your memory. -—Barbara Fugazzotto

m .


\

3J: aW Sheryl Vande Bunte, Jean Bacon, and Jan Voogd faculty, and activities a big tedious job.

indexed

the students,

Julie Kooiman, photography editor, and assistant to the editor, spent hours on the phone scheduling pictures and setting up the poses. Absentee all her work.

clubs and rainy days were small thanks

IVIILES"TOI\]EE R o o o r d s

t h o

for

Y o a r

We hope that the 1967 MILESTONE has achieved its p u r p o s e that it has recorded the events of the year, and the spirit of the times in a new and exciting manner for your enjoyment now and in years to come. As you turn each page, watch for the varied subtleties which depict our point in time as a nation, a college, and as individuals.

Sports editor, Paul Hartman, able to get the "inside story"

a sportsman himself, on the athletic scene.

was

Kitty Davis and Patti Wood compiled and wrote all the faculty copy. Proofreading was also part of their work.

\


Our typists,

Barbara

they

and

typed

Phail

retyped

and Dolores pages

of

Floyd,

got plenty

copy.

of practice

as

Bonnie

Woods'

main

clusion,

mitten

in her own unique

contribution

was

the Introduction

and

Con-

style.

y A

Irene

Edbraoke

wrote special

copy

on the year's

highlight

events.

John Query (right) worked out the actual page layouts for the book. Dave Courtney (left) also did layouts, but his major uork was the exciting,

bold splash

of our cover design.


ma

nnmK m

wmwwk

mmMm

52


YEAR'S HIGHLIGTS

"If all the year was playing holidays, sport would be as tedious 'as to work." —Shakespeare

To

53


Governor Romney

was greeted

by students

and faculty

at the Vanderwerf

home.

Contennieil Homooomirig Hope commemorated the passing of its Centennial milestone by engaging itself in a series of Homecoming events that lasted from Tuesday night through Sunday, lo highlight this week, such speakers as Norman Thomas, Kenneth Crawford, and Michigan's own Gov. Romney, spoke on the publics responsibility for the survival of small colleges, in a sequence of lectures under the general theme. Education for Responsible Leadership." Other noted speakers such as Merrill Mueller, Mortimer Adler, Lester Trimble, Col. John Powers and l)r. ale Brozen filled a busy schedule of lectures Governor George Ronmey's address at the Civic Center was on the theme "Education for Responsible Leadership.'

and discussions. Entertainment and beauty were on hand Friday evening with the coronation of the Homecoming queen followed by the "World Famous" Kletz Concert. Creativity and hard work vied for first place as the week came to a close. Saturday the Homecoming Court and the floats paraded down Eighth Street. After the sorority and fraternity luncheons, the Flying Dutchmen led Hope to a 12-9 victory over the Albion Rritons. The beauty of the week came to a climax Saturday night with the Centennial Ball. Newsweek's Washington Kenneth Crawford, also campus.

Columnist, spoke on


Famed policy

Socialist

leader,

Norman

Thomas,

discussed

U.S.

in Viet Nam.

Dr. Yale Brozen and Mr. Lester Trimble contributed in the panel discussion which was a highlight of the speaker series.

Col. John cussion Dr.

Yale

Powers

with

Mr.

Brozen

and Dr. Mortimer Lester discussed

Trimble

Adler and

controversial

Dr.

participated Yale issues

economic policy.

m

%

in a panel

dis-

his

on

Brozen. after

speech


r

The Homecoming parade.

queen

and her court

were honored

in the Homecoming

day

Floats, Dorm Deoorettions The mark Fraternity.

of excellence

was given

to this

float

built

by

the

Arcadian

The Knickerbocker's Hope.

•

IJSSsf-aW**

jortuneteller

foresaw

a bright

future

for


VOTE

FOR •

AND

.• •

:

--

• • .; ,

THE

N E W DEAL

• -; x :i3x ;-* J-% T^4 "f •,»/.

S^S»

• ^mSkS

'M

y T '

.4

f * / 5pf<« * i

First

The

prize

for

Praters

the

ran

mens

away

dorm

with

decorations

the

float

was given

competition

to Kollen

with

this

Van Vleck came through winning dorm display.

Hall.

blue-ribbon

with

flying

colors with

their prize

entry.

Sigma Sigma went hand in hand with their brother fraternity in the float competition, winning first prize.

$


Senior Cindy Clark was selected as Queen Homecoming. She attended Vienna Summer of the cheerleading squad.

B

O

e

v

e n t i t y

e

r

H

Rosie Hudnut, Sophomore study in Bogata next year. Junior Sue knickers.

Albers

R

o

e

m

Attendant,

loves skiing,

i

e

g

c

majors

swimming,

n

o

to reign over Hope's Centennial School and has been a member

o

d

m

in Spanish

sports

i

n

and

will

g

Candy Chapman, class secretary, guitar player, and folk singer, was Homecoming attendant selected from the Freshman Class.

cars, and

m. &


Mary

Rynbrandt

plans

to be an elementary

chose her for the Homecoming

Sue

Sonneveldt,

Vice President

Senior

teacher.

The

Sophomore

Class

Court.

Attendant,

served

and plans to teach elementary

as Student

Senate

grades. Barb

Ryzenga,

teaching

Junior fessional

Attendant modeling.

Freshman

Attendant,

looks

forward

to

speech.

Sandy

Tomlinson

enjoys

boating,

beaching

and

pro


IVlLJsio, Detnoin^ and Spoofing Riiied t l n o

Henry Brandon and his orchestra student enjoyment at the Centennial

brought Ball.

F

^

r

o

g

back the Big Band

r

e

Sound

t

for

m

Comedian

Barclay

entertained

at the Ball.

Shaw

Queen Cindy Clark and highlight of the Ball.

and

her

his

enchanting

Court

were

marionettes

presented

as


Is this mysterious

conductor

really Miss Morrison?

Can this be our illustrious

WE DID ITU! climaxed

A spectacular

the Centennial

upset victory over Albion,

Homecoming.

11-9,

Chaplain

Hillegonds?


Parents Visited the Campus for the Weekend This fall,, just as the college community had settled in for a long winter's work, a loud wail was heard acoming from parents in the hinterlands: What h o ? they cried What gives? they sighed We invest our daughters and our sons, Some of our hearts and all our funds. Yet what get we? cried their angry mood, Except brief letters: Send money . . . and food!

Barb Bang and her family enjoyed a family-style

Students

introduced

their parents

dinner and discussed

to Dr. VanderWerf

at a special

the latest news.

Presidential

tea.

Faculty members Miss Froth roe, Dr. Brown, and Dr. Dykstra presented their various aspects of campus life to parents and students.

62

To meet this crying need. Mom and Dad's Weekend was ordained by the Student Senate to give parents an idea of what this place called Hope is all about. On Friday, October 28, the first event of the weekend was held. Three Hope professors discussed various aspects of college life from their own points of view. Saturday morning was filled with facultyparent conferences.Here Mom and Dad could meet that special, perhaps philosophy?, prof they'd heard so much about. That afternoon, a crisp and golden day, the Flying Dutchmen shone as well, beating Kalamazoo 48-29 in one of the most exciting games of the season. A show entitled "The Various Sounds of Hope", the final event of the weekend, was presented Saturday night. The program was a combination of vocal and instrumental music, theater, and selected readings. As parents left after this beautiful and Trappy weekend, everyone hoped that each parent had found at Hope that which they were seeking here— and that they at last understood why it was that we always need food and money!


Everyone

enjoyed

especially

since Hope won 48-29.

the football

game against

Kazoo with all Us festivities,

The Motet Choir was one of the groups that performed in "The Various Sounds of Hope", a program which featured a combination of vocal and instrumental music, theater, and selected

readings.


Chiristmets a

t

H

o

p

o

One soft gentle snowflake, large as a mitten, Fell on a f u r r y nose And melted.

W

Blue lights flickered in soft green boughs As caroles and candles shimmered At Vespers. Warm, loving faces smiled tenderly As delicious spicesmells wafted from the kitchen And the golden lights beckoned softly Home. For Peace is born this day in the hearts of men, While velvet white snow smooths awav harshness And we walk in love. G e a r voices peal the good news To those snuggled warm around the tree At Christmas.

Students, faculty, part in Vespers.

and Hollanders

filled

the Chapel

to tqke

Bruce Formsma's

trumpet

solo heralded

the beginning

of this year's

Vesper service.


More than 150 voices combined

4 selected

orchestra accompanied

to sing praises and thanksgiving.

the combined

Before

vacation,

choirs and was directed

carolers

join in singing Christmas

brought songs.

by Roger Davis.

out President

and Mrs. Vander

IT erf to


v

J

a

p

a

n

o

s

o

Ririo Arts and Othior C u l t u r e d AfTiairs

A Japanese Culture theme was selected this year for the Fine Arts Festival. Court and folk dances were demonstrated to an enchanted audience. The fine arts of flower arranging and brush painting were features of an evening of Japanese culture. A full Noh Drama—an ancient religious drama —was presented by Tokyo's Hosho School of Noh. Movies, folk dances, and music combined with lectures to fill a busy program of events.

With the cooperation of the Holland Jaycees, Hope's Student Senate organized aur enriched and exciting Cultural Affairs program this year. A sparkling array of talent and learning was arranged to entertain, educate, and enlighten the college and local communities. A Japanese Fine Arts Festival was complemented by way out notes of progressive jazz, the "doobie-doobie-doo-bop" of the unusual Swingle Singers, the professional night cluh entertaining "Four Preps", and many, many speakers and lecturers from the pungent Drew Pearson to John Cage and his electronic music. The Cultural Affairs program gave students and faculty a look at U.S.Viet Nam policy and an understanding of C.O.R.E.'s stand on race problems. Faculty recitals and Mortar Board films further enlivened a rich program. Outstanding improvements over the last two years' programs and efforts at further improvement promise an even better program for 1967-1968.


The French

came on strong

sical instrumental

music

into

in the unique vocal

music

Swingle with

Singers,

unusual

directed

lyrics,

by American

Ward Swingle.

They

transpose

clas

and a suave jazz beat.

Drew Pearson, a Washington columnist and commentator, let students and faculty in on some of the secrets and behind the scenes activities of Capital personalities. His wit and pungency

were

refreshing.

"Way out" and "Gone" was the Dave Brubeck Quartet as they settled close to earth for Hope students in a Progressive Jazz concert. There are probably few Hope students among avid Progressive Jazz fans, but no one could doubt the talent displayed by this Quartet. Brubeck s training at JuHard is reflected in his mastery of a sort of "abstract" music, consisting of progressions, modulations, and unbelievable rhythms. An obscure bass solo, an exhausting drum solo, and the concluding number, "Take Five", completed a stimulating and truly fascinating

musical

experience.


Mischa Mischakoff, concert master of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, was the feature violinist at our orchestra's winter concert.

Lincoln Lynch, Assistant Director of C.O.R.E., to students and faculty about Black Power.

spoke

Sir Tyrone Stage director, author and theater-founder. Guthrie, was a campus guest. His lecture was the epitome of the intimate relationship between audience and performer. Students and faculty were entranced.

68


Sohioletrly L

e

o

t

u

r

o

r

s

etnd RolK IVIusio

German scholar, Dr. Eric Heller, from Northwestern University, expounded on the writings of Yeats and Nietzsche.

The New Society opened this year's Cultural Affairs program. It was an evening of lively folk music and spicy humor.

1


F^erformers, etnd Operetta.

"Entertaining" doesn't begin to describe an evening with the "Four Preps". Their sparkling, witty style coupled with outstanding voices and that professional touch made a performance which was well-worth putting off other things in order to see it.


The lovers, Brack and Jennie, (Tom Griffen and Andrea Martin) sang of their love for each other in "Down in the Valley". Director was Mr. George Ralph; vocal coaches were Miss Joyce Morrison and Robert Cavanaugh.

\

The Chorus swimg out to the calls of the Bruyn was the choreography director.

Virginia

Reel.

Maxine

De

The speech and music departments presented a musical program featuring J. S. Bach's Concerto No. 2 in C Major for two harpsichords and orchestra along with Curt Weill's folk opera, Down in the Valley", a simple, perhaps dated story of two boys in love with the same girl. They fought to the finish for the love of Jennie Brown.

The villain, Tom Boache, (Dirk Walvoord), hero. Brack Weaver, (Tom Griffen). They

pulled a knife on the had it out over their

mutual love, Jennie Brown.

I


Kollen Hall's Snoopy dorm division.

won first place in the men's

Rip Van Winkle captured first place for the Centuriuns Greek competition.

and Kappa Chi's in the

Hoioe |—lets st Snow CDetrnix/stl'P When the 1967 Snow Carnival was announced, everybody said, "Sure, uh-huh. Winter Carnival" and went merrily along their way, never believing it would come to pass. You see. Snow Carnival had always melted into a preview of showery April. This year was no different in the hearts of men. They still said, "Winter Carnival, uh-huh, sure," in disbelief. Then the miracle happened. Winter stood fast for the Snow Carnival. On Friday the Yukon team of Emmies skidded to victory in the dog sled races, followed by the other fraternal orders of "dogs." That evening a hootenany was held, followed by a dance. Saturday morning was snow sculptures, featuring a wide variety of artistic accomplishments—from Thinkers to Turtles, from Sphinxes to Snoopy and Moby Dick. After all was said and done—or melted away at least —the only change on campus was seen in a slight change of attitude. Now when people mention the Snow Carnival for next year, you may hear them say, Snow Carnival. uh-huh, . . . maybe."

The

cottage

division

was won by Belt

girls.


Cosmos

and

Delphi's

had

a whale

of a good

lime

entering

this

sculpture

in

the

competition.

"The

Old

Woman

girls in the women's

Praters and Sorosites petition.

In a Shoe" dorm

entered

took

first

place

for

Alpha Phi's put a lot of thought their snow sculpture.

and work into

Voorhees

competition.

their

Snoopy

in the Greek

com-

lil

III

A gigantic

snow turtle

was the Sih-Knick

entry.

1


m m

African students, Kawala Simwanza, Cornelius Agori-Iwe,' Pierre Sende entertained with jungle drum rhythms.

De Gaulle

Nadjnurma,

and

Ling Ling Chung and Amy Lam were all decked garb to show us their folk dances. Margarethe Zsulits and Terry Bremer conversed crafts from Germany, Margarethe's homeland.

out in their Chinese

over a display

of


In tor national Rletir In Hope's population, there are representatives f r o m more than 100 different foreign countries—Viet Nam to Canada. One night a year, these students don their native costumes and provide as with a glimpse of " h o m e " in the International Night program. This year's program sparkled with jungle drums, folk dances, and a Chinese dragon dance. Slides of Africa, Austria, and China were featured also. After the program, students and faculty talked with the foreign students who explained the many articles they had on display. It was a good opportunity for them to feel really at home, and teach something new about their land.

Japanese prints and other fine articles fascinated

the students.

A lively Turkish

folk dance was Bonnie Everts' contribution.

Ed Chang and other Chinese about their crafts.

friends

talked

to students

and faculty


A' A Cold Day for IVIety Day

The day was dismal and cold, but hopeful students welcomed spring anyway in the annual May Day activities. Presentation of Court and Queen and the tapping of Mortar Board members were the only features of the ceremony this year, besides the athletic events. The dismal weather was a reflection of students' spirit over the absence of the "delightful and enchanting" May Pole dance, the usual contribution of sophomore girls. No twinkletoed girls cavorted around the Pole which did appear in the Pine Grove for old times' sake. But freshman and junior escorts witnessed the crowning of Queen Sue Albers and the other honors of the day. As students left the Pine Grove, they still wondered, however, how far off spring lingered. It certainly didn't appear that day!

V

The Freshman Daisy Chain and the Junior formed a flowered way for Queen and Court.

Mmm

Escort

of

lovely

spring-clad

girls

1966-67 Queen Jackie Nyboer took her throne awaited the announcement of the new Queen.

and

During the women's Softball competition, endorf displayed fine pitching form.

Def-

Cheryl

f

w

r

,


Frank demic

Barron, (Emmies) and Diane Joldersma, (Sorosis), center, received the acatrophies from IFC president Tom Hendrickson, and Pan-Hel president Pat

Helder.

A determined

Prater

contributed

his

energies

to

his

fraternity

s

success in May Day athletics.

The first step out of the blocks.

t r

V. Praters

i 'I'

overcame

all hurdles

to win May

Day competition.

I


.\ \\ ^v W i *

Q

u

o

o

etnd

n

S

l

j

4

V"

; ' | M ' M Vi •XXA^'V'.-Vx; •' »* A *.,•>. v S> k»*».«A/-. A «••_* VV-iV

o

mm^w.

Court

^

^ ^

% | Vf ^ f • '} M 1 * * * 'Ml

T

R e i g n e d Ovor IVIety Day

I

Jackie

Nyboer,

retiring

May Queen,

presented

'67 Queen

Susan

Alters

with

robe,

sceptre

and

crown. Attendant

Gretchen

Blue Key member,

78

Vander

Werf

Ted Van Dam.

was escorted

to the platform

by

Jim

Klein accompanied

Sandy Tomlinson,

court attendant.


Jane Kallemyn and her escort Wes Michaelson the Daisy Chain to the platform.

marched along

Preston Maring escorted his pert Phyllis Peacock.

B m i ₏ m ' j M m •

r-m

Linda

Deurwaarder

was accompanied

by

Blue

Key

member

Jerry Zwart

Down the Daisy Miller.

Chain

aisle

came

Linda

Patterson

and

her

escort

Randy


( p ; V ,

80


COMPETITION "Fling but a stone, the giant dies." -—Matthew Green

81


On this ground frosh and sophs appeared across the Black River.

The spirited

to battle

over a rope stretched

rivalry finally began with the slap of the rope on the water.

The experienced

sophs poured on the steam.

"TrstditionsU

"Tuig

On the afternoon of October 14, the familiar sounds of "heave, rock," and "lock-in" echoed over the banks of the Black River. The traditional tug of war between the Freshmen and the Sophomores began excitingly enough, but it was not long before the experienced sophs hauled their opponents into the agony of defeat, in what turned out to be one of the shortest pulls in this event's history. The Pull tradition began in 1898 and has developed into one of the most spirited rivalries one will find, on a college campus. The Pull has grown into much more than simply a contest. It gives the frosh the opportunity to show their spirit and let the upperclassmen know that they have what it takes! Winning the Pull is not the most important thing. It is the spirit and determination behind it. The meeting of the two classes in the middle of the river is really thrilling. The spirit and unity this even breeds has spread far and wide. This year Sports Illustrated gave it full coverage.


\ All the screaming

of the frosh spectators

Confident Julie Hendrickson for her man's bruised hands.

cut

seemed futile. They kept losing rope.

tape

%

The first phase began as team members dug their pits.

The tension mounted doubling up in the pits.

as

the

frosh

began


This was the rope—stretching the slimy Black River.

Junior coach Chris Plaasman, muscles strained, the Freshmen the order to rock on the rope.

Conquerors and Conquered shouts of joy.

met in the Black

across

gave

River

with

tears and

h

Senior coach, Ron Kronerneyer went hoarse screaming pull maneuvers to the Soph team.

1

84


There

was indescribable

strain

on the men and morale

girls. Sally

Kruizenga

screams jor her guy Bill Carrie.

Consolation

and

a refreshing

touch

went

to freshman

Don

Carrie

from

morale girl Mary Neznek.

&T

"TooK thie Rope T"ooK et Dip

This

was the place—the

battered

scene

of battle.

They

came,

they

saw,

they

conquered.

his


"AH right now Seconds,

let's stand up and try that again!"

The Frosh orator, Ginnie Slater, coached by Sharon Wozniak.

was

"Ich! If hat a Place," specially written for the Frosh was co-directed by Irene Maatwan and Sue Stoeckley.

by Jennifer

McGilvray

Barrows,


Barb Phail directed "Mr. Finney's Turnip". A special accompanimenl for flute, piccolo, and string bass was written by Barb. Would you believe they won-' These are the screaming

faces of victory.

Girls Compote Comparing Nykerk today as it was in the past, will reveal a marked contrast. The competition began as a rough 'n' tough football game between the coeds of the Freshmen and Sophomore- classes, when the gals huddled around their upperclass coaches, learning pass patterns, offensive blocking and offtackle runs. Then the administration decided that its coeds should be directed toward more feminine activities. The result was the format which Hope now employs: the dramatic performance, the oration, and the song. "Tense" was the word for the night. The two classes were seated opposite each other, watching every move, listening very carefully, and whispering quietly to each other. The competition was close. As each class presented their selections, the tension grew. Finally, after some delay, the decision was made. A chill went through the competitors, hand clutched hand, eyes closed, little prayers were said. The winners: the Freshman Class!!

Mistress of Ceremonies, Carole Folkert, presented the Cup to the representative of the Freshman class, Cindy

Sonnevelt.


So pin Girls Lost thio Chetnoe to Hold thio Cuip

"Keep that Cup in mind when you sing. We want it this year I"

Sobs and tears from great competitors.

Cheryl Defendorf directed the Sophomore women in "By the Bend of the River."

In an attempt to ease the tension, a "Hope's Angels" member. Rick Fair, was presented to the local draft board commissioner, Dick Owens, in a skit during set changes.


X

Lynn Koop presented a stirring oration with the assistance of her coach, Bernice Van Engen.

"Winnie the Pooh", a delightful play presented by the Sophomore Class, was directed by Diane Dykstra.


Athletic Oompetition


Neither wind, nor rain, nor sleet, nor snow shall halt a cross country started while the wind howled at 20 mph, the temperature registered 6" deep!

meet. The Oakland race 23째, and the snow was

SCORES Hope

Wheaton 42 Spring Arbor 33 Adrian 43 Olivet 19 Albion 30 Calvin 29 Kalamazoo 27 Oakland 30 (M.I.A.A. Record

19 22 19 42 26 28 29 26 4-2)

FROINT R O W : J. Delano; R. Bisson; Pedersen; P. H a r t m a n ; T. Kooistra; I). Bruggemann. 2ND ROW: R. Schroeder; D. Colenbrander; G. Peiper; W. M e e r m a n ; C. Osterhaven; D. Formsitia; Coach G. Van Wieren.

Under the direction of first year coach Glenn Hope College cross country team compiled its best in the toughest league ever. I he harriers built a and finished third in the league meet, thus tying

121

Van Wieren, the record since 1952, 6-2 league record for second overall

with Adrian. This year's team was sparked by the consistently hue performance of senior Doug Formsma. He was undefeated in league competition, won the league meet, and smashed the home 4-mile course record with an excellent 21 minutes 4 seconds. After two close losses to Adrian and league champion Albion, and two easy victories over Olivet and Alma, the turning point of the season came. Hope squeaked by Calvin by a score of 28-29. This marked the first victory over the Knights in I 1 years! After the regular season, Formsma, Osterhaven. Meerman. and Hartman went to Wheaton to compete with the top college division barriers in the country in the National Collegiate College Association Cross Country Meet. Doug

Formsma,

the M.I.A.A.'s

most

valuable

runner,

won

the league

meet

in

record time. Kalamazoo Gazette 91


Al Griswold

Jeff Alperin

92

attempted

to get past the defending

team.

tried to center the ball over his opponents.


F R O N T R O W ; D. De V e l d e r ; J. AVperin; P. S e n d e ; A. Criswold; D. Nickols; K. Simwanza. 2ND R O W : T. Cook; S. Nagel; C. Agori-lwe; J. Iloekstra; J. Debreceni; S. W i l t s ; Dr. P. Van Eyl.

Hopo's Bootors EEntorod Loeiguje Com potion Alpc.rin saved the ball from going out of bounds,

The Hope Kickers completed their second year of varsity competition with much practical knowledge and valuable experience gained, while sustaining numerous losses. For the first time since its inception three years ago, the soccer team found itself in league competition. Several of the teams in the highly-competitive Michigan-Indiana-Illinois Soccer Conference are consistent powerhouses. In recent years they have proven themselves to be soccer standouts among the nation s small colleges. Unfortunately for Hope's hooters, this consistency of the other teams, in the form of timeliness, endurance, and experience, could not be easily contained or matched, and statistically, the Dutchmen wound up winless against five league losses. The team's greatest thrill during the frustrating season was a non-league victory over Calvin in a double overtime, 4-3. Another highlight came when senior halfback, Cornelius Agori-lwe, was named to the M.I.I, all-conference second team. Next year's more seasoned team will consist of nine returning lettermen, who will form the nucleus of a potentially stronger squad. Team talent coupled with spirit and enthusiasm could mean a successful campaign.

• V:'

LI V W I

m

but not without

opposition


J ,i

Gridiron Aotion A season's success is poorly measured by the figures in a record book. This year's record of three wins and four losses for the "Flying Dutchmen" poorly reflects the season of hard-fought losses and important victories. This fall saw the Dutch defeat strong Wheaton and Kazoo teams and upset the M.I.A.A. champions from Albion at Homecoming. All M.I.A.A. choices, Ken Carpenter, Keith Abel, and captain Charlie Langeland led a largely inexperienced team in these contests. All excuses aside, the game of football as played at Hope College is played for the great experience it is itself, and so it will continue next year, under coach Russ DeVette.

Just like running

into a brick wall!

All M.I.A.A. halfback, Keith search of some daylight.

Abel

crossed

to


Harry Rumohr

and Al Kinney

cut down an Albion Runner.

More than eleven men played each game.

A perfect punt return is completed

by W alt Reed against Wheat on.


Coach Russ De Vette sent in Al Kinney

D u t o h i

with the next play.

Rinishied

Kazoo found it tough to catch halfback

WitKi

F R O N T R O W : K. Abel, K. Feit, H. Myers, G. Frens, C. Langeland, R. Holman, J. Green, W. Reed, W. Bauer, B. Rasmussen, J. Masvero. 2ND R O W : W. Strampel, G. Gorman, S. Markel, H. Workman, H. Rumohr, B. Ming, H. Thomas, J. Osborn. C. Schilstra, R. Frank, P . Sloan, J.

3--4

Keith Abel.

R e o o r d

Kling. 3RD R O W : D. Abel, J. Oonk, R. Cooper, F. Lundell, A. Kinney, J. Slager, J. Jorgenson, N. Bergmark, R. Herbig, S. Langeland. 1TH R O W : M. Menning, G. Holvick, W. Beebe, J. B. Brown, C. Van Wyk, L. Berens, J. Huisman, M. Hansen. S. Piersma.


r

All M.I.A.A. fender.

fullback

Charlie Lang eland pushed

There was trouble ahead and behind for halfback

SCORES pe

Augustana

6

18

Wheaton

14

14

Adrian

19

0

Olivet

18

12

Albion

9

0

6 48

battle-scarred

Alma

13

Kalamazoo

28

helmet awaited the return to action.

aside an Albion

If alt Reed.

de-


Adrian found that it took more than Charlie Langeland.

A ring of Albion ability.

two to stop captain

A fake here, a block there, and Keith

Abel was off and running.

defenders

running

prepared

to test Walt Reed's



M

umPp

i I

F R O N T R O W : F. B r a d y ; C. Walters. 2ND R O W ; J. Leenhouts; R. Bruggers; J . Schoon; B. Van H u i s ; J. K l e i n ; Coach R. De Vette; S. Schout; G. R y p m a ; D. Utzinger.

A fake to the left, a step to the right; Flying Dutchmen by Floyd Brady.

Flying

up and two more for the

D u i t o h i m o n

Under tzhio HoopŠ

100


Hope

10

'The

People's

Choice",

xi

m

Jim

Schoon,

Dave Utzinger put it in from the side.

hauled

down

another

Concordia 77 Valparaiso 62 Calvin 67 Alma 90 Albion 81 Northwestern 80 Central 92 Wheaton 69 Kalamazoo 82 Lake Forest 59 Adrian 100 Olivet 64 Aquinas 82 Wooster 67 Lake Forest 65 Calvin 83 Alma 79 Kalamazoo 63 Wheaton 85 Adrian 88 Olivet 93 Albion 87 Season Record M.I.A.A. Record

rebound.

Bruce Van Huis sank this one for two more against Albion.

76 74 66 58 74 93 89 95 70 58 63 70 68 72 69 74 78 75 76 72 63 64 15-7 10-2


Carl Walters displayed his patented

jump shot.

Floyd Brady was at his best on the inside drive.

Hope called time out to discuss more strategy.

102


Gary Rypma drove in against Calvin for two points.

Cal Bellman

ended this fast break against Calvin.

Dcitohimen Tied for IVU.A.A. Chietmpionshiip To many, at the beginning of the season, it looked like it was going to be a long, hard one, because of the loss of 3 of the starting 5 men from last year's team. But, through concentrated effort, the return of Carl Walters, and some memorable performances, the Dutchmen tied with Kalamazoo for the M.l.A.A. Championship. Jim Klein returned to form and displayed his scoring and rebounding talent. Tremendous courage from co-captain Cai 1 Walters inspired the whole team. His plays, patented jump, and constant hustle brought much success to the team. The other co-captain Floyd Brady had an outstanding season. He led the team in scoring, rebounding, and field goal percentage, and was, therefore, named the Most Valuable Player in the M.l.A.A. The outlook for Coach De Vette's charges looks good, since only 2 starters are graduating. Good men will come up fiom

The Hope bench sat through many tight situations.

the freshman team.

103


iJuriior N/strsity Hetd

S u o o o s s f U l via i

Hope's junior varsity basketball team appeared to be the best Hope has seen in years. A potent, well-balanced offense produced 125 to 206 total points from seven of the twelve men on the team. The high point of the season was the two-time victory over the Calvin Knights—a feat that hasn't been accomplished for at least the last 12 years. The team finished with a 12-5 M.I.A.A. record, and scored 1,399 points over 1,325 points for their opponents. The tremendous desire and willingness of this squad could qualify any member to put on varsity togs next season.

F R O N T R O W : S. W a r d ; D. Colenbrander; T. Dykstra, D. M a r e m a ; M. Smits; B. McLouth. 2ND R O W : G. Vander H y d e ; T. Zwart; R. Venema; Coach G. Van Wieren; T. H a r m e l i n k ; W. Bekkering; Ass't Coach P. Terpstra.

Randy Nyberg went high to put this one in.

HOPE

Ml 7J.

104


F R O N T R O W : S. H a r m s ; G. Cook; W. Cook. 2ND R O W : Coach H u i d e m a ; B. T i m m e r ; F. Hine; T. Bruggink;

W / r o s t l irig

John Oonk tried to turn on his GRJC foe.

Gary

Cooky undefeated

in

the

137-Ib.

class,

went

for

the

pin.

The Hope College wrestling team justified its existence this year hy clomping over the Calvin Knights with a 21-18 victory. The glory of this accomplishment did much to make the 1-9 win-loss record more digestible. Gary Cook, a freshman, remained undefeated in dual meets, and won the M.I.A.A. tournament in the 137-lb class. Lack of a full-time coach and on-campus practice facilities continued to be a problem this year. Development of high spirit and morale for the team was difficult.


Two down, two to go. Doug Formsma set the pace in the mile, while Paul keep up.

and Rick Bruggers Hartman fought to

T retoK Teetm "TooK First Pletoe

Bill

Bekkering

Norm Klein Day.

descended

grabbed

from

the

heights

after

a record

fifth place in the long jump

during

vault

of I3'6".

the M.l.A.A.

Field

4

I

/•

I* 106


The Hope College Flying Dutchmen won the track crown for the second straight year. The key to this season's success was the tremendous determination of the team which resulted in the shattering of six Hope records. Leading the assault on the record books was captain Doug Formsma, who lowered both the mile and the two mile mark to 4:20.1 and 9:32.3 respectively. Steve Reynen and Dave Thomas completed the record running with Steve posting a 1:57 for the half mile and Dave, a 39.1 for the 330 intermediate hurdles. In the field events, Doug Nichols hurled the javelin 196'8", while Bill Bekkering cleared 13'6" in the pole vault. Hope contributed Doug Formsma, Rick Bruggers, and Steve Reynen to the All-M.I.A.A. track team.

The javelin record winning form.

\Vvll WvVxS •.Vvtfcfew X.AV

holder,

Doug

Nichols,

displayed

his

F R O N T R O W : K. F e i t ; R. Bruggers; W. Cook; J . K l i n g ; D. Nichols; R F r a n k ; R. Bisson; S. Reynen. 2ND R O W : W. R e e d ; P. Sloan; M. Paliatsos M. Oonk; B. K r o m e r ; K. Schroeder; B. Formsma; D. Alexander; D. Dnits m a n ; D. Colenbrander. 3RD R O W : W. Bekkering; T. K a h l e r ; T. Childs B. M i n g ; D. Formsma; P. H a r l m a n ; P. Steketee; L. Cole; Coach G. Brewer

With Herculean

power, Les Cole flung the discus.

107


Hoioo Fi nishiod Witln IVI.I.A.A. Rooord S—O

On his way to a new Hope College record in the 330 yard intermediate hurdle, Dave Thomas cleared the hurdle.

126 79 84 89 110 98y 2 83

SCORES Kalamazoo Calvin Albion Alma Olivet Adrian GRJC

M.I.A.A. FIELD DAY Albion S?1/^ Hope 57 Calvin 50 Adrian 26 Alma 20 Olivet 18y 2 Kalamazoo 11

M.I.A.A. Record 6-0 Another 1-2 finish jar Doug Formsma and Rick Bruggers in the mile.

In recognition of the "Dynamic Duo's" victory in the two-mile, Doug Formsma arid Rick Bruggers took their places on the winners' platform at the M.I.A.A. Field Day.

108

10 57 52 47 26 371/2 52


Vb-gn-w*. Don

Kroodsma

demonstrated

outstanding

M.I.A.A.

pitching

form.

BetsoloeUI

eft

M o p e

The league's up the

circuit

most valuable with

player,

a great

Charlie

batting

r Langeland,

burned

average.

*

.Âť liTOS f

-


r

F R O N T R O W : D. K r u e g e r ; B. Rasmussen; D. Abel; H. R u m o h r ; D. Farmer. 2ND R O W : J. Pearson; C. Langeland; G. F r e n s ; G. Gorman; N. B e r g m a r k ; T. Pelon. 3RD R O W : D. Kroodsma; M. Johnson; D. Troost; B. Van Huis; R. Beishuizen; Coach G. Van Wieren.

Tom Pelon awaited this relay from the outfield that came too late.


Hopo XooK tho vl

Loaguio Orowri

it-".'--Not even close, as Boyd Rasmussen

dove back to first base.

The spring of the year again brought about the indoor, Carnegie gym baseball practices. Although "Rookie" coach Glenn Van Wieren had a sizable nucleus of veterans with which to work, the losses from the previous year's championship team were expected to be felt. Upon returning from the southern tour, the Hope nine lost two quick games to a strong, non-league Central team, but consecutive league doubleheaders with revenge-deserving Kalamazoo and arch-rival Calvin gave Hope an early 4-0 mark. But the win and tie with Albion together with the split with Alma led to a climatic double-header with "then" league leading Olivet (4-0 vs Hope's 6-1-1). Hope took two, securing the league crown and winning with the best percentage won-loss record Hope has ever had in its history of the League (10-1-1, .910). Individual statistics were quite impressive. As a result, Don Troost, Charlie Langeland, (also most valuable team and league members), Harry Rumohr, Gary Frens, Tom Pelon. and Don Kroodsma were included on the All-Conference Team.

Tom Pelon, all-M.I.A.A.

catcher, jouled one off against Albion.

Hope

SCORES 0 Central Michigan 9 Central Michigan Kalamazoo 11 Kalamazoo 11 Calvin 3 Calvin 2 Kalamazoo 5 Albion 8 Albion 3 Alma 6 Alma 0 Aquinas 11 Olivet 8 Olivet 5 Adrian 5 Adrian 6 Season record M.I.A.A. record

Bruce Van Huis received congratulations Van Wieren after hitting a home run.

'

rr>

3 10 10 2 1 0 12 3 3 3 3 2 2 4 4 1 13-10-1 10-1-1

from

Coach


. i m

Bobeldyk

Betd

LljoK

gets ready to swing.

for Hope

ori iihio LinKs

W. H i l m e r t ; G. Cook; D. Bobeldyk, W. Jackson.

A beautiful

follow-through

from Willy Jackson.

It was a bad year on the links for Hope College. The golf team finished sixth in the league. They managed to beat out Olivet 15-0, but the only other victory for the squad was an 8-7 conquest of GRJC. The team ended up with a 2-7 record. The future looks brighter, however, with the return of all five lettermen and others too.


Once again this year, the Hope College Tennis Team went south and met powerful opposition. Hope's netmen won only two matches, and lost five. Back in the north, the team racked up a 7-1 record—good enough for a league second behind perennial champion Kalamazoo (29 consecutive years). The season was enhanced by frosh-flash, John Schadler's winning 25 matches, losing only 9.

rinis Team XooK

F R O N T R O W ; T. Thomas; J. Green; J. Schadler; T. Safar. 2ND R O W : Coach Green; D. Barrow; C. W o r k m a n ; R. Visscher; C. Holleman.

1,1

*Sli

Craig serve.

Workman

put

all his weight

behind

this

big

Ron

Visscher

Kalamazoo.

played

with

grim

determination

to

beat


•>

.

v

«

::

tou

4

'Z4,

^;-4 ^ V- wS* •.•' • J -•' •

\%SM

• •;••'•

- r: ;, . ^ . . - V ?->. « Tk' -jk^'.-f'i!

Dm;) back five and punt!

GrooKs Com toetod for Ohfietmpionshiips Fraters Arkies Indies Cosmos Emmies Knicks Centurians

Sprint to the finish as Fraters went on to win May Day competition.

&

107 87 73 65 55 24 9

Once again this year, the intramural all-sports competition came down to the final event with the Arkies and Indies still in contention until the Frater May Day sweep. The Fraters' overall strength was demonstrated by a first or second place in every sport but handball, where they finished a strong third. Arkies captured firsts in basketball, table tennis, and tied with Fraters for the Softball championship. The Independents captured tennis and handball championships with many seconds and thirds to accumulate their third place total. The Cosmos and Emmies showed good balance in all sports, and Cosmos clinched fourth on May Day.

Undefeated first man for the unbeaten hit a booming serve.

independent

team


Cheering the " G r r r r r r r - e a t " Flying Dutchmen on to victory were eight fun-loving cheerleaders. Freshmen Peggy De Witt, Jan Huizinga, Jill Nyhoer, and Joyce Miyamoto contributed innovations and frosh enthusiasm. Phil Rauwerdink, as Big Dutch, helped rally the spirits of the crowds. Each girl will never forget the weekly practice sessions, last-minute rides to away games, and the times she did the wrong cheer. These girls added a bit of feminine spark to the rough and tumble football and basketball games.

(

C

h

i

o

o

own Flying of course.

,

C

h

e

e

r

s

,

Rlyirig DtJtohimon

K

Dutchman,

s

Chioors for Hope'

F

M

S. Heyer; M. R y n b r a n d t ; P. De W i t t ; J. Miyamoto; J. Mitnro; J. Nyboer; M. P a r k e r ; J. Huizinga.

The Red Baron? No, Hope's Rauwerdink, in wooden shoes,

r

Phil

I


It was a man's world as the mens

soccer team met the girls' hockey

team on the field.

Athilotio AotivitioŠ for Hopo's Women Bmmr-

Melissa Parker and Debbie Delp were chosen for the girls' intercollegiate hockey team.

W.A.A. sponsors numerous competitive activities for Hope's coeds. Four teams are entered in intercollegiate competition— field hockey in the fall; a varsity basketball team; and archery and tennis take the spotlight in spring. A W.M.I.A.A. Tennis and Archery Tournament culminates the season. All these sports for women foster physical fitness and improvement, and build a sportsman-like character. The girls also enjoy participating.

Carri Van Wieren went high for a rebound.


Rosie

Hudnut's

strong

backhand

helped

the

women's

A wholloping

serve from Barb Timmer

served her well,

tennis team.

F R O N T R O W : S. Poinsett; M. Kleis; J. Morgan; P. Beck; D. Delp; 2ND R O W : S. Phillips; R. Larabee; J. Taylor; M. P a r k e r ; J. G r a n t ; Miss D. Schipper.

I



SOCIETIES Something there is that doesrit love a Wall . . . 窶認rost, "Mending Wall

119


B

u

i

s

i

n

e

s

s

m

o

n

The Business and Economics Club met several times this year with guest speakers to discuss such topics as industrial relations, the Common Market and its problems, and "Design". Noted speakers included Mr. Russel Fredricks of Chris Craft, Professor Conrad Cort from the Netherlands, and Mr. Hugh De Pree, president of the Herman Miller Furniture Co. The group concluded its activities with an annual picnic at the home of Dr. Yntema.

W. Cotts; A. Griswold, Sec.; H. Okabe; L B a n n i n g a ; L. Cole; A. Konney, Treas.; K. Teusink, Pres.; G. Keel, V. Pres.; G. Allocca.

V o L i n g Repuibliostris Hope's Young Republicans took an active interest in local political affairs this fall as they canvassed Holland, reminding residents to register and vote. Delegates from the group were sent to the statewide convention for Young Republicans held in Grand Rapids. A debate on Extremism, sponsored by Young Republicans involved Hope professors and interested students. Michigan's Senator Guy Vander Jagt, presented The Republican Point of View in the Homecoming Forum of Contrary Opinion.


Aliohiet EEpsilon Doltet Alpha Epsilon Delta, the International Premedical Honor Society, has its chapter meetings once a month, at which time a local doctor presents a program concerning his field of interest. The purposes of the society are to encourage excellence in premedical scholarship; to stimulate an appreciation for the importance of premedical education; to promote cooperation and contacts between medical and premedical students and educators in developing an adequate progrrm of premedical education. In all this, the premed students are bound together by their common interest.

F R O N T R O W ; C. Agori-Iwe; J. Lootens; L. Kloote; C. Schueneman; M. Menning. 2ND R O W : T. Van Dam; E. Heneveld; B. N y k a m p ; P. Sende.

C h i e m i s t r y

Oluto

The Hope College Chemistry Club, (American Chemical Society Student Affiliates), is designed to provide chemistry m a j o r s with social and service opportunities related to chemistry. This year the club sponsored seminars presented by students and outside speakers and service projects within the department. Members took industrial tours, and had an annual picnic which was designed to foster a spirit of unity within the chemistry department. Membership in the Chemistry Club is by invitation, based on classroom performance and a vote by members and chemistry faculty.

F R O N T R O W : A. Bentz, Pres.; H. Tiegelaar. Treas.; F. Oettle, Sec. 2ND R O W : R . Gruetzmacher; J. H a r d y ; M. Ondrus. 3RD R O W : L. Dykema; W. K i n g , K. Armstrong. 4TH R O W : D. Anderson; C. AgoriIwe; K. Brinks; R. Visscher; Dr. D. K l e i n ; M. S m i t h ; C. B i b a r t ; C. T e n Pas.


•A

IVlortar Board Mortar Board, the National Women's Honorary Society, selects its members from all eligible junior women on the basis of their qualities of outstanding leadership, service and scholarship at Hope. As seniors, the women of the Alcor Chapter sponsor foreign, cultural films, and the Last Chance Talk. Their Dean's List Tea honors the 3.0-|- students.

B

I

l

j

o

k

C

o

-iJ-

F R O N T R O W : C. Yzenbaard; M. Hendricks; L. Bruggemyer, Sec. 2ND R O W : L. Kraemer, Treas.; E. Osterhaven; R. Ziemann, Pres.; N. Greenfield, V. Pres. 3RD R O W : G. Langstraat; S. Eenigenburg; S. Sonnveldt.

F R O N T R O W : J. Klein, Sec.; B. Race, Treas.; D. Vanderwel, V. Pres. 2ND R O W : C. Walvoord, Pres. O T H E R M E M B E R S R. Donia; G. Pearson; T. Griffen; W. Michaleson; J. Mulder; P. Maring; R. Miller; T. Van Dam; H. Tigelaar; F. Van Lente; J. Zwart.

y

Blue Key, a national honorary fraternity honors the high scholarship, leadership and service abilities of senior men. The members operate the Bookstore and in return, receive Blue Key Scholarships. They provide seniors with graduate school information, and sponsor periodic cultural gatherings on campus.

122

..


P. Sende, Pres.; M. Atkinson; Dr. R. P e r r y ; G. Davidson; J H a g e ; C. Rowe, Sec.; E. F r a n c o ; R. Herkner.

The Gamma Mu Chapter of Pi Delta Phi is open to advanced French students of high academic standing who have shown an interest in French language and culture. This year's program included lectures by Detroit's French Consul, and Mr. Jon Smith, Hope's new faculty member in the French Department.

Rronohi Honors Gorrrictn Honors F R O N T R O W : S. Kutscher; 1. Edbrooke; R. Ziemann; C. Dalebout; B. Kollen; D. Gross. 2ND R O W : L. Weessies; L. VerHoek; V. Young; S. Heyer; N. Newman. 3RD R O W : G. Looman; Dr. W. Heine; R. Schwegler.

r

123


EEpsilori

Phii

Two initiation banquets brought together advanced Spanish students of high academic standing in Hope's chapter of Sigma Delta Phi, a national Spanish fraternity. Epsilon Phi promotes interest in Hispanic culture and language. Speakers and films contributed to the enlightenment of these Spanish Honors.

E. G l e i c h m a n n ; B. Van E n g e n ; C. H a r t ; N. Butterworth; M. Esther; Mr. M. R a l p h ; Mr. H. Weller.

Under the leadership of John Koeppe, the Alpha Eta Chapter of Beta Beta Beta has participated in many activities. As an honorary fraternity, Tri Beta promotes functions outside the classroom in related biological areas. Several faculty speakers and laboratory tours were part of the program. Tri Beta also sponsored a "clean up" day and over-night campout at Hope's new Field Station near Castle Park. The activities ended with an initiation breakfast and the election of new officers to carry on the aims of Tri Beta. F R O N T R O W : B. Bang, Historian; N. Greenfield, Sec.-Treas.; M. P a r k e r ; V. Lowdermilk; M. Johnson; C. Schueneraan, V. Pres. 2ND R O W : C Dalebout; L. Bruggemyer; C. Buis; A. Van Deusen. 3RD R O W : J. Koeppe, Pres.; J . K e m i n k ; C. Van Middlesworth; S. Van Vossen; L. Schreiber.

124


F R O N T R O W : R. Donia; G. V a n d e r W e r f ; Mr. J. D u r a m ; C. R a j s k y ; J . Ten Brink, V. Pres. 2ND R O W : B. Bickle; Mr. M. Petrovich; S. Sonneveldt; Dr. P. Fried, Sec.Treas.; R. Shiels. 3RD R O W : T. Sheffield; R. Miller, Pres.; Dr. D. Clark; Mr. W. Vander Hill.

F R O N T R O W : K. D y k s t r a ; J. Tanis, P r e s . ; B. C a p r o n ; M. Blann; E. Bwanausi. 2ND R O W : Mrs. W. Hostetter; A. Hazen; L. Kloote; E. Folkert, Sec.-Treas.; C. Yzenbaard. 3RD R O W : S. N a g e l ; B. F r a s e r ; E. B l a h u t ; S. Wilts, V. Pres.

History Honors The Hope College chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, a national honorary history fraternity, is called Gamma Omicron. Several dinner meetings of the group were held this year and the highlight of these was a guest speaker, the noted historian, Rolf Italiaander. Member Keith Taylor presented a history paper at the regional meeting at Aquinas College. Gamma Omicron awarded book prizes to deserving history students for outstanding ability and enthusiasm.

Honors Hope's Gamma Kho chapter of the national honorary classics fraternity, Eta Sigma Phi, promotes the study and appreciation of the Greek and Roman classics. The group met to discuss papers presented by students and to read a Greek play. Dr. Welmers, linguistics expert, was one of their guest speakers. 125


R u i t L i r o

The Student Education Association is an organization designed to give all prospective teachers a deeper look into, and a greater interest in, education as a profession. Its members may also become members of the Michigan Education Association and the National Education Association. During the year, the group had a chance to meet with educators in all fields and at all levels by means of debates, panel discussions, or as guest speakers. Its main aim is to give interested education students the opportunity to understand what education really means. U f M C E R S : M. Enderlin, Pres.; Pres.; W. Cotts.

The Hope College speech fraternity, Pi Kappa Delta, gathers students interested in oratory. This year, a delegation was sent to the national convention of orators in Whitewater, Wisconsin. Two members of Pi Kappa Delta received awards for excellence in oratorv —Rick Rietveld, for men; Bernice Van Engen, for women.

M. Kaper, Sec.; S. Neher, Treas.; J. Nyboer, V.

^ ^

FN Ketppei Doltet

F R O N T R O W : R. Fylstra; R. Shiels; B. Van E n g e n ; R. Rietveld; W. Jackson. 2ND R O W : Mr. H. Mikle; D. Noel; B. Clapham; D. Rigg; G. Van Noord; R. Bosman; S. B a k e r ; A. Ver Schure.

126


IRO Rosters InterristtiorieU Undorsteincling

F R O N T R O W : B. Clapham; W. Brower; D. P a g e ; N. Walcott; R. Huybregtse; J. A d a m s ; H. Hilliard. 2ND R O W : R. Beatson ( B u r m a ) ; E. Bwanausi ( M a l a w i ) ; A. Lam (China) ; R. Yee (China) ; K. Nguyen (Viet Nam) ; J. P h a m thi Dung (Viet Nam) ; T. Ravantti (Finland) ; T. Tam (Indonesia). 3RD R O W : M. K o e m a n ; S. Van W y k ; K. Simwanza (Zambia) ; B. Everts; M. R e a r d o n ; K. Van A k e n ; N. Roelofs; R. Herkner. 4TH R O W : P. Sende (Cameroon) ; J. J a e c k e r ; R. Claver.

Amidst sweet and sour pork and chicken currie, Burmese student Ruby Beatson served students during an international smorgasbord dinnef. The entire meal was prepared by foreign students.

Affiliated with the National Association of International Relations Clubs, Hope's IRC is concerned with keeping the students informed and involved in international affairs. To this end, it brings authoritative speakers to the campus for banquets and coffee hours. The club regularly sends delegations to national and regional conferences on world affairs. In the IRC library, students can read more than 30 foreign publications that are received regularly. The club provides every incoming foreign student with a student advisor; organizes meetings where the foreign and American students can meet; and does everything it can to promote a cosmopolitan atmosphere at Hope. This part of the program culminates annually at International Night, where students from many nations show songs, dances, stories, and plays from their national culture

127


F R O N T R O W : D. B a t t j e s ; A. Slaughter; A. Jones; C. Masouras; D. Davidsmyer; M. Vogas. 2ND R O W : L. Bruggemyer; R. Rietveld; K. Rach. 3RD R O W : Mr. G. R a l p h ; J. L a m b k i n ; J. Lyons; S. Stoekley; D. H a a n ; B. Van E n g e n ; F. H i n e ; M. Lenel; K. W r i g h t ; J. Riso; D. Crothers; N. Broersma; D. Floyd. P&M member, Carol Masoaras portrayed a powerful and poignant Medea opposite John Cox as Jason in the Greek tragedy, "Medea".

DiletteintoŠ or Dretmst Anyone involved in any drama production is invited to join Palette and Masque—Hope's dramatics society. Palette and Masque organized an annual excursion to the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Ontario. They also presented awards for the Best Actor, (this year's winner, Dave Crothers, in "The Clouds") ; Best Actress, (Chris Nagel, in "What Say T h e y ? " ) ; Best Newcomer, (Dave Crothers) ; Best Character Actor, (Frank Hine, in "The Clouds"). The Century Drama Club Award went to Mike Vogas, who is president of Palette and Masque. In this conclave, drama enthusiasts can gather to discuss their interest amid the grease paint and costumes of that dusty Little Theater.

128


: r - w .

a

- asf:

Sinfonia The Iota Omega Chapter of P h i Mu Alpha Sinfonia, the national honorary music fraternity, has been growing this year. Under the leadership of seniors David Tuhergen, famous Zither player, and Gregory Hulse, Ukulele expert, the boys have helped in bringing to the Hope Conservatory such popular composers as John Cage and Mel Powell. They have aided in dexterously distributing programs and audiences at most Hope concerts and recitals. Iota Omega has established a scholarship fund for the most qualified student musician, which allows him to have one semester of free applied music lessons. Plans got under way to bring more fine lecturers and performers to the campus next year, and to further strive f o r the goals of Sinfonia—to promote brotherhood among musicians, and to support and advance musical activity in America. F R O N T R O W ; D. T u b e r g e n ; C. Van N o r d ; T. Working. 2ND R O W : F. F a r m e r ; S. Cutting; C. Lake.

I — o Corolo Rretnoois The French Club is open to all students of French. At the meetings, the members have an opportunity to converse in French in a relaxed atmosphere. The highlight of this year's program was the Christmas meeting at which foreign students talked about Christmas in their countries.

F R O N T R O W : N. Culver, Treas.; C. Rowe, Pres. 2ND R O W : B. Binson; K. Nguyen; C. Schakel; G. Davidson. 3RD R O W : P. Irwin, Sec.; J. L i n d a u e r ; D. P a g e ; V. Hager.

129


D o r

D e u i t s o h i o K l u b

German Club members tried to learn more about German culture and language in their activities this year. Lectures, plays, outings, parties, and music acquainted members with the atmosphere of Germany, and increased their fluency in the language. Meetings were conducted in German, and the students prepared skits and songs. At Christmas, the wives of the German professors treated the club members to rich German pastries, and all joined together in carols and fellowship.

El Club Esjoanol The Spanish Club this yÂŤ year aimed at better understanding of the Latin American countries. Students who had studied in Latin America presented programs on Colombia and Mexico. Other highlights of the year were a Mexican banquet in Grand Rapids, a Spanish film presented for the Spanish classes, and a fiesta at Christmas for the Mexican children in Holland.

F R O N T R O W : M. Zsulits; J. L i n d a u e r ; G. Looman. 2ND R O W : S. Heyer; B. Woods; L. Weessies; D. Gross. 3RD R O W : V. H a g e r ; P. Canfield; Miss J. W r h e n ; Dr. K. Rothmann.

F R O N T R O W : R. Huybregtse; J. Claerbout; N. Emerson, Pres. 2ND R O W : M. Koeman, V. Pres.; E. Gibson. 3RD R O W : C. Vanden Heuvel; K. Boezeman, Sec.Treas.; C. Hart.

I at



B o t e t O In a p t o r A l p h a

o r

Phii

Campus and community

A-Phi-0 judged "The Boy Scout camp. But

Klondike" Boy Scouts contests where are the Boy Scouts?

at a

cars got a clean up job at the A-Phi-0

A vigorous "volleyball" game kept spring informal at Duck Lake.

Pledges

132

played

actives

in

basketball.

car wash.

A Phi-O's

Actives

and

their

wouldn't

dates

going

admit

the

at a

score.


Brotlnorhioocl ^.nd Servio^

The Nu Beta Chapter of Alpha Phi Omega had an active year of service and socializing. During Freshman Orientation, A-Phi-O's directed wandering Freshmen to the dining hall or the bookstore, and gave them other vital information. At legistration, Freshmen and upperclassmen were aided by A-l hi-0 s in that confusing procedure of filling out IHAI cards. The men served as ushers at Cultural Affairs activities, and helped Student Senate and other groups in various ways. In the fall. Alpha Phi Omega's m a j o r project was the annual Blood Drive. It was not easy, however, to get blood out of 1800 turnips, so Hope lost the intercollegiate competition to Albion. Every drop collected was valuable, however. In April the A-Phi-0 men donated and installed spot lights for Hope's anchor, which this fraternity donated just last \ear. In addition to services rendered to the college community. Alpha Phi Omega men enjoyed themselves at formal and informal social gatherings. Service and brotherhood are their standard.

F R O N T R O W : J. Zavacky; I. Longacre; A. Bentz; J. Flier; R. Veldhoff; H. Bowman; R. Claver; D. Anderson; D. Kershner; G. Aulen. 2ND R O W : D. P a t e r i k ; S. Vander Weele; P. R e a d ; P. Steketee; L. Metzger; W. W h a r y ; D. De Vries; W. BischofF; W. De Boer; D. Fung.

133


Mopo's INJow^st Rreitornity— Alphiet Xhietsi Chii

Dynamic upward growth was the all-pervading principle of Centurian's first year as an active social fraternity. As a result of a driving optimistic spirit, the nine founding brothers saw their group more than triple between September and the end of the spring pledge period. In the Fall, the fledgling fraternity participated in intrafrat tennis and Softball, and chalked up two surprising victories in the latter. Moreover, Homecoming guests were entertained when chanting Centurians pulled the body of Hope's departed century on a rumbling caisson in the parade. Throughout the year, the men of Alpha Theta Chi expanded their activities. They placed high in the scholastic trophy competition; held a spring informal in Saugatuck, and won the Winter Carnival snow sculpturing with their sorority sisters, Kappa Delta Chi. Under the colors of Alpha Theta Chi, strong new personal ties have grown which reflect the fraternity's dedication to individual growth through deep personal and social relationships. Thus Hope's hundredth-year fraternity pauses for a moment in its building program to reflect on a successful first year. The foundations are laid. Now watch it rise!

134

Centurians and their party this spring.

dates

enjoyed

dancing

to live

music

at

their

Old

Crow


LADDER, BOTTOM TO T O P ; J. Evans; G. M u l d e r ; J. Seisse; P. V e r d u i n ; D. Stoepker; W. Reynolds. F R O N T R O W ; F. Favale; T. R o b e r t s ; P . Dayton; E. D o b b i n ; D. Matthews; R. Fylstra. 2ND R O W ; L. Landhuis; E. Witherspoon; M. Dillbeck; D. Courtney; J. De Kock; J. McKenzie; T. Goodfellow. 3RD R O W ; D. Damsteegt; S. Disbrow; C. L a k e ; C. Van H e e s t ; n . Ross; D. Kazen; J. Eenigenburg.

Dave Stoepker

and Paul

Verduin

concentrated

raged loudly at the Old Crow.

>

'Mm**

lalW

on their

chess

board

while

the music


fM \ V

entertained

between

F R O N T R O W : P. Cuticchia; R. K i d d ; J. R y p m a ; L. Berens; R. Rose; N. Bowles; D. Currie; G. Poortinga; R. Bont; D. M a r e m a ; K. Candelora; J. Green. 2ND R O W : D. Allen; B. Van H u i s ; T. Connolly; R. F r a n k ; B. Rasmussen; D. Folkert; J. Koster; R. Adams; J. Mace; D. F a n n e r ; M. V a n d e r L a a n ; R. Johnson; S. W a r d ; M. Benzenberg; W. Currie; W. Bekkering; T. Zwart; T. Mayer. 3RD R O W : C. M u r r a y ; R. Vanderb e r g ; F. Brady; P. Smith; W. Mills; G. R y p m a ; T. T h o m e ; F. L u n d e l l ; D. Honholt; R. Holman; K. F e i t ; W. Kullgren; L. Bone; R. Owens; W. K n e e r ; C. Holleman; A. Kinney; R, K u i p e r s ; G. Tysse; W. Taylor; M. O'Riordon; J. P r u i k s m a ; R. Cooper. 4TH R O W : G. Visscher; D. Corlett; J. P i e r s ; P. Sloan; W. R e e d ; C. P l a s m a n ; J. G u n t h e r ; H. Myers; H. Thomas; J. H u i s m a n ; E. F a i r ; T. Sheffield; P. Maring; C. W o r k m a n ; B. H o p m a ; G. Garwood; W. K l e r k ; J. Zwart; J. Smith; R. Lootens; R. K u i p e r ; J. W a t e r m a n ; R. Kilbourn; P. R a u w e r d i n k ; C. Walters.

Nate Bowles and Floyd Brady seemed to be in a J)ad got on their trail during the Prater Frolics.

way as the KKK


il *11

1

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M

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'• r j f I •- ^ / - f , ?

f

-

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w ..ippMfWiaaig^ :«*rss

The men of Omicron Kappa Epsilon started off another very successful year with the winning of the Centennial Homecoming float trophy. The long hours of joint effort were proudly rewarded. The annual alumni stag brought together Fraters of all ages in a true spirit of brotherhood and lasting friendship. Fraters met in Grand Rapids during the winter for their "Hoi Soiree." Besides the weekly literary meetings, two joint meetings with Sigma Sigma were held. The Fraternal Society was also honored in receiving the first annual $500 community service award. At the annual Christmas Party for underprivileged children, Fraters again acted in response to community needs. The fall and spring rush events brought more than 20 new pledges in to the "few and chosen". OKE demonstrated excellence in all intramural sports and achieved championships in football, bowling, softball, volleyball, and took the day for the third consecutive year on May Day. Thus they captured the All-Sports Trophy. One cold spring night, the Frater tribe descended upon the Fine Grove. To the boom of a drum, Frater dates were called forth and given special invitation to the spring informal. Even many non-Fraters gathered to watch and wonder at the half-clad men in the cold air. Fraters frolicked on the stage for the twenty-first time to earn funds for SCSC. Seniors saluted Fraternal at the Swan Song ceremony, and said goodbye to their fraternity of spirit and comradship.

-

The Fraters own Rat Alan some trickery at the Frolics.

pounced

on the stage for


K a p p e t

EEtet

I \ I l j

KnioKerbooKer IVIon

"Spud' Reynen honored his fraternity hall-mile at the Kalamazoo track meet.

and

the school

Professor Dirk Jellema was asked to drop coffee and conversation with the Knicks.

138

by winning

in one Sunday

evening

the

for

The Knicks opened the 1966-67 school year with a new resident adviser, Dr. David Marker. Immediately the informal social atmosphere of the fraternity was brought out by an all campus Open House Party. After Homecoming, which featured an outstanding float from the Knicks, and a successful banquet for Knick alumni, fall rush came and went with a flurry. Concluding the fall semester was the Informal at the Rathskellar in Saugatuck. The spring semester was looked upon with anticipation and an increasing spirit within the fraternity. Spring rush saw the inauguration of two new parties, the LSD Party and the Subculture Party, in addition to the traditional Gold Rush Party. Knicks were also to be found serving the community and college by aiding in the Muscular Dystrophy Drive, and in the annual Blood Drive. The Knicks became foster fathers of a Chinese orphan. The frat basement was rejuvenated as a result of concerted fraternity effort in raising funds. With the coming of summer and the end of school, the Knicks celebrated with a light informal at Sleepy Hollow. Along with all the fun and work, the men of Knickerbocker maintained their stress upon individuality within the college community and the fraternity itself.


A lowly pledge became a mummy

of a man during one pledge session.

F R O N T R O W : J. Coffenberg; S. Reynen; C. Latowsky; N. Klein; D. Holmes; J. Reidsma; L). Jones; J . R i g h i ; J. Visser; R. Herrick; J. Robertson; K. Carpenter; J. Michel; J. Berger. 2ND R O W : S. S t r u c k ; J. Dykstra; S. Slingerland; J. Witzel; R. Leestma; E. Schneiders; N. Blahut; E. Binder; G. Harrison; A. Q u a l m a n ; R. Engstrom; A. M y a a r d ; P. Bleau; R. De Meester; T. M a r a t e a ; D. De Velder.

iip^i

139


I I

E i m o r s o n i s t n s — F ^ h i i

X S I L J

I \ I L J

Continuing the high standards of love, honor, and success, the Emersonians began the year with the traditional Homecoming activities and a successful rush. In the winter, Emmies and their dates met at a "Holiday Hideaway" in Benton Harbor. During second semester, hard work by all the Emmies brought the remodeling of the frat basement to near completion. Hardy Emersonians won the Dog Sled Race during the winter Carnival; and serviceminded members helped Higher Horizons on demolition projects. The year ended with formal initiation of fourteen new pledges, and a sunny spring informal at Sleepy Hollow.

"I'm sure after it?"

the dipper

fell

in here!

Should

I dive

in


F R O N T R O W ; A. Pedersen; W. S t r e u r ; D. Battjes; T. Dykstra; D. G u n n ; D. M c i n t o s h ; P. Paplawsky; H. K a m m ; P. Struck; W. Seiter; W. Wilson; D. Kolkman; J . Penning; D. Lubbers. 2ND R O W : D. Utzinger; D. Noel; R. Valentasigs; A. Griswold; S. Markel; E. Roberts; G. Anvady; J. Nivala; M. Bull; C. Mulvihill; D. Nichols; F. Wester; J. R y n b r a n d t ; M. Andreas; B. Gruetzmacher; R. Shiels. 3RD R O W : L. Banninga; H. Dykema; J. Insel; R. Block; J. Grissen; G. Syperda; R. Bruggers; R. Gelock; N. Sobania; R. Veenstra; J. Schadler; G. Loom a n ; M. Oonk; M. J o h n s o n ; G. Blank; J. Zimmerman; G. Bergevine; R. Schwegler; D. Hill; R. Vandenburg. 4TH R O W : K. Eriks; D. DeBoer; L. Cole; G. Kuipers; R. Essink; L. Van DeHoef; D. Clifford; W. Meerman; D. Alexander; J. W e b i n g a ; I.. Ligtenberg; H. Stremler; J. T a n i s ; S. L a r k i n ; T. H i l d e b r a n d t ; R. Bonnema; K. Van Tol; J. Osborn; T. Hendrickson.

Amid

the music

of a live band, Emmies

welcomed

spring

at a Sleepy

Hollow

informal.


F R O N T R O W : C. Hall; G. Cook; A. M u l d e r ; J. P e a r s o n ; W. Cook; J. Shalek; E. Otto; A. Spitters; K. Schroeder; R. Huizenga; L. Bolt; R. Maxwell; R. R o b b i n s ; R. Donia; R. Schroeder. 2ND R O W : C. Poslma; R. Bosman; B. Welton; G. Cook; J. Powell; G. Gouwens; V. Plagenhoef; R. Rozeboom; C. Brandman; R. Rietveld; C. Schilstra; D. P i e t ; C. Me Mullin; D. Walvoord; T. Ogren. 3RD R O W : S. F a r b e r ; R. Ritzema; G. McGeehan: R. Thompson; J. Beckering; T. Heusinkveld; R. Weiden; J. Kallemyn; H. Huggins; J. M u l d e r ; R. Miller; C. Osterhaven; R. Hook; T. Bruggink; R. Miller; D. Howe. 4TH R O W : D. Dethmers; W. Michaelson; P. Van Pernis; J. Lotterman; P. H a r t m a n ; K. Zuithoff; P. T e r p s t r a ; T. T r u m a n ; N. Gibson; R. Nyberg; M. Menning; C. Howe; G. Peiper; L. De Boer; J. Bosman; J. Marcus; R. Visscher; W. Vander Lugt; E. Heneveld; D. T r u m a n ; S. P a r k e r ; J. Hollenbach.

Aroetdietn

Broizhi^rs

In that fine Arcadian form, the men of Chi Phi Sigma returned from summer to another year of brotherhood. They participated as a group in the traditional Homecoming events, and before the semester ended, Arkies and their dates were "Gone With the W i n d " at their winter formal. For the seventh consecutive semester, the Arkies earned the interfraternity scholastic trophy. Fraternity rush activities brought more than 15 new Arkies to the fold. They and the actives went to the Castle Park "Grand Prix"—a day of sand, dinner, and dancing, not to mention a real road rally out to the Castle. It was another good year for the united brotherhood of Chi Phi Sigma.


The Arkies were proud of their Muck • Peip.s, and Schrodes. Fraternity

rush

meant

fun

for

active

Arkies

as well

as guest

rushees.

Arkies and their dates relaxed after a grand dinner at their own "Grand

I'nx

own music

group—the

Gassmen—Dirk,


FMVi Kstppst Alphiet

-

Cosmos and their guests their Castle Park informal.

took

a break

for

conversation

and

relaxation

at


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4

F R O N T R O W : R. Appleton; A. Mock; R. Dietch; W. Cotts; K. A b e l ; M. Fitney; D. Abel; T. Woodby; L. Walters; F. Schutmaat; D. Vanderwel. 2ND R O W : J. Moored; B. C l a p h a m ; R. B r i n k ; D. H e n d r i c k s ; D. Lowdermilk; P. Van W i n g e n ; C. Lieder; H. W o r k m a n ; C. Ramsey; W. Coons; C. Walvoord; A. Burrill; A. J o n e s ; R. Nietering. 3RD R O W : R . Bruggers; T. Dykstra; J. Byland; R. H e r b i g ; R. Bonsignore; C. Bigelow; J. Slager; R. Smith; D. L u i d e n s ; K. T e u s i n k ; M. Peterson; R. Quist; J. Vande W e g e ; L. Vande W a l l ; C. B u r t ; D. Mixer. W H R O W : W. W i e r e n g a ; F. Biklow; D. Troost; T. Ferrell; T. D r a f t ; D. Greenwoll; J . K l e i n ; B. R a c e ; D. G r i t ; T. H a r m e l i n k ; M. Elzerman; F. Lease; B. W h i t e ; J. Nello; R. L e m m e r ;

J. Leenhouts;

N. Bergmark.

Cosmos worked hard at their various service projects.

September 1966 was the start of a very successful year for the men of Cosmopolitan. The sports program had a good start, as Cosmos took a first place in golf. On the varsity level, the men turned out to watch the activities on the soccer and football fields. Socially the men gathered together at the Cascade Country Club in Grand Rapids for a winter formal—"The Twelfth Night". Cosmos embarked on an active community service program this year. Cosmos were found painting houses, apartments, and the Holland Red Cross building. After two weeks of varied rush activities, including swim parties, coffee hours, and lit meetings, twenty men accepted Cosmo bids. They enjoyed their new-found brotherhood at a formal initiation dinner and ceremony. W. C. Fields, who appeared in the movie "That Fatal Glass of Beer", made a guest appearance at the Castle Park informal held in the spring.


A Rluirry oT Aotix/ity United thio XA/omori or Ketppet Doltet Chii

Having returned from a summer of varied experiences, llie girls of Kappa Delta Chi became involved in another year of joint activities. The traditional Kappa Chi Hootenanny started oil the year. A good crowd brought proceerls which went to the Pleasant Hill Reformed Church in Grand Rapids to further some of their programs. After ibis, everything moved in rapid succession. First the Fall houseparty, sorority rush, Homecoming, which brought a second place award for the sorority's float, "Onward and Upward", then there was Date Night. Winter and the Christmas season were followed by a "Bewitched" winter formal at the Cascade Country Club. With second semester came another flood of activities. The Centurians became their brother fraternity, and together they crcatcrl the winning snow sculpture, "Rip Van Winkle". Then spring rush, a houseparty, and the informal rushed in. "Pistols and Petticoats" was held at Sleepy Hollow. \ spring banquet closed this year of fun and fellowshij) for Kappa Chi.

F R O N T R O W : J. Owen; J. M u n r o ; N. Gerow; M. Butterfield; A. Andres; S. P i k k a a r l ; C. Hendrickson; C. Bird. 2 N n R O W : J. Soder; S. P i c k a r d ; S. Stoeckly; N. Staffeld; M. Kleis; J. Van Dam; J. De Vette; P. Fulton; J. De P r e e ; N. S t r a n g ; L. Mandeville; L. Noetzel. SRI) R O W : B. Skidmore; M. Yzenbaard; M. Bosker; N. Steele; M. M e d e m a ; P. Lang. 4TII R O W : C. T e m p a s ; C. Ristau; S. H o o k ; M. De C r a a f ; K. Jay. 5TII R O W : L. Kozel; E. Barness; C. H a n s e n ; M. Zuidema; D. Galloway; J. Hage.

146


when Sue Pickard

"Tivas the Night Before Christmas' version of the Morse poem.

did her

"Onward and Upward" won second place at Homecoming. So many hours of work which are never rewarded go into the making of these floats.

It

was

unaware.

a windy

evening

when

the

photographer

caught

us

f


" A r e n ' t

yoLJ

glad thieit yoLi'ro sl • i g m e t

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Every Sorosis meeting resounded with the spirited notes of the Sigma Sigma Song: "Aren't you glad that you're a Sigma S i g m a ? " as Hope's oldest sorority commenced and culminated a most successful year. Sorosites ventured into the festive Centennial year with the winning sorority Homecoming float—"Perk Up Hope—Grind Albion". Pert Sue Alberts represented the sorority on the Homecoming Court. All the traditional fall-winter events such as the fall houseparty, Date Night at the Old Crow, spaghetti dinner with the Vander Werfs, a Christmas Party for underprivileged children, reached a peak in the spring with May Day. Sorosis captured the women's Softball competition trophy for the third consecutive year. It was awarded the academic trophy for its 2.950 scholastic average. May Day Queen, Sue Albers came from the ranks of Sigma Sigma, as did four of the six Court members. It was truly a "very fine year".

Pledges showed the actives "just how" in some of their first softball games. . . . Well, at least they looked good on the sidelines.

In their loveliest duds, Mary Browning and Sue Johnson performed mock opera in the Pine Grove as a quest during Hell Week.

girls were given their Sorosite bids, they were promptly put in so-called proper place—on their knees. Poor Mary Browning.

After their

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Ci.lL

148

a


i

F R O N T R O W : S. P i c k u t ; D. W a r n e r ; L. Rycenga; R. Gaston; M. T h o m e ; M. Griff e n ; K. V a n d e n b e r g ; G. Gearhart; M. Lievensey. 2ND R O W : C. C h a p m a n ; N. Gow; J. P r u i k s m a ; J. Vickroy; C. Vander Velde; K. Kleyn; P. Yoder; J. De Boer; S. Meadows; P. Frissel. 3RD R O W : R. Ziemann; M, Bennink; J . Nelson; J . Remtema; C. Goodrich; C. Defendorf; D. Joldersma; D. Wilkens; H. Rimondi; S. C h a p m a n ; N. Seighman; J. Crossman. 4TH R O W : M. Browning; S. Albers; K. Dickinson; G. Vander W e r f ; J. Kallemyn; K. Candelora; P. Dykstra; B. T i m m e r ; S. Graef; J . Rimondi; S. J o h n s o n ; D. Boles. 5TH R O W : G. Davis; A. Johnson; M. Schakel; B. Klaasen; J. Sytsma; K. Dykstra; J. Olsen; R. Vbllink; C. E s h b a c h ; S. Van Koevering; P. Peacock.

Sigma Sigmas perked up when it was announced that their "Grind Albion" float won first place.


This Sibylline cock crowed the dawn of Hope's second century at Homecoming.

At Enterprise Lodge, Sibs and their dates rocked and rolled on Datenight.


S i g m s t

I o t a

B o t a

Sibylline Girls

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F R O N T R O W : S. W h i t e ; B. D e H a r t ; B. Endweiss; K. Mulder; S. Poinsett; J. P o l c h a ; C. A l d r i c h ; J. H i e f t j e ; L. Gonzales. 2ND R O W : B. Brunsting; M. Blann; P. Reynolds; C. Roden; S. Helgesen; P. M a t e e r ; M. Greiner; E. Azeka. SRD R O W : S. Nevins; M. Whitney; L. Koop; L. Den Besten; D. Deangelis; M. Lee; J. Thompson; S. Mac Barron; D. McKenzie. 4TH R O W : C. R o b e r t s ; M. H o f f m a n ; M. W y a t t ; C. Schakel; J. Wells; L. K r a e m e r ; J. Moyer; C. Karsten. 5TH R O W : C. Byl; A. Cobb; M. Dykema; B. Claussen; E. Oosting; C. Schueneman; S. L a r r a b e e ; P. Helder.

The women of Sigma lota Beta built theii enthusiasm and sense of sisterhootl as they worked and socialized together. Date nights and houseparties united the girls. Hours of work on a Homecoming Hoat did much to build comradeship. At the President Inn, Sihs saw "Variations in Blue", their winter formal. An informal depicted "Sunshine and Lollipops' . Sihs served the community in a TB fund drive with their brothers the Knicks. They refurnished the sorority room and even learned to play bridge at one literary meeting. Sibyllines joined the wilds of the fish and game preserve for the traditional 7 a.m. beach breakfast during rush. This year, rush yielded sixteen new pledges for Sigma lota Beta窶馬ew blood to carry on the spirit and unity of this sorority.

151


F R O N T R O W : B. Zandstra; M. Enderlin; V. F r a s e r ; D. Davidsmeyer; L. R i c h ; G. Bumford; M. Johnson. 2ND R O W : P. Myers; J. K l a a r e n ; C. Bache; C. Van Vossen; C. Cherry; P. Roden; S. Houghtaling; K. Wilson.

D o r i a n

Girls—kCetppa. B e t a

Phii

The Dorians invaded the campus this fall with an enthusiasm and cheerfulness that lasted throughout the year. The year began with the traditional houseparty at Tim Buck II. This was followed by the long weeks of preparation for fall rush activities and Homecoming. The sorority's objectives—creating new friendships and a sense of unity through working together— were developed in these two events. The sorority's desire to serve the community was channeled in their aid to a family at Christmas, and their contribution to the Muscular Dystrophy Drive in the Turtle Race. While preparing for fall and spring rush and enjoying homecoming, Dorians took a break to enjoy themselves at their datenight, which featured a scavenger hunt. The Rathskellar was the scene of the Dorian winter informal; The spring informal was held at Tunnel Park beach. The year's activities ended with a joint meeting with the Emersonians, the annual pizza break, and a second houseparty. There they gathered their hopes and spirit for the coming year.

152


># >

-f4 ^j •

a

a? // lot of fun and goofing go into a float-making Davidsmeyer and Pat Myer.

Cheryl

Van

traditional

Vossen

and

other

formal initiation

Dorians beat the drum coming Parade.

pledges

were

session.

welcomed

Just ash Dona

to the sorority

in a

ceremony.

for Hope's

first

century

in this

entry

to the Home-

153


rr

Rriendship Our .Anchorage — Alpha Gamma F^hi

1 j

F R O N T R O W : M. Musson; N. Culver; J. Sebens; S. Hoerner; N. Greenfield; S. M e d e n d o r p ; C. Berens; S. Cook; M. Van P e r n i s ; L. VerHoek; L. Voskuil; J. Breckenridge. 2ND R O W ; C. Gauntlett; S. Schumacher; E. K u l p ; S. Phillips; M. H e r r e m a ; M. Cipolla; E. Diam a n t e ; H. VerHoek; J. Becksfort; G. Langstraat; E. Safar. 3RD R O W : C. Dalebout; N. Bogue; K. Grabinski; D. H y m a n s ; E. R e u s ; C. H o u t m a n : S. Curtis; B. Anderson; D. Fuller; J. DeBoer; M. Girton; S. Schaper; S. Van Raalte. 4TH R O W : A. Wilson; K. Davis; H. Everett; M. Muller; N. P o s t m a ; S. Brill; K. R a c h ; D. M a n u e l ; M. Oosse; J. Medema; S. Tomlinson; L. Langstraat; S. Wiegerink; D. Droppers; C. Van Wieren; M. Kasmersky; J. Kasmersky.

154

r

Hj

At Sleepy Hollow, Alpha Phis danced and danced with their dates.


Strains of "Friendship Our Anchorage" brought the Alpha Phis together after the summer for the houseparty, fall rush, and busy hours on the Homecoming float. Alpha Phi was proud of her sisters Mary Rynbrandt and Sandy Tomlinson, who represented the sorority on the Homecoming Court. Date Night found many cheerful, but chilly. Alpha Phi's and their dates riding the dunes along Lake Michigan. After sending a family in Kentucky clothes at Christmas, Alpha Phi girls joined their Arcadian brothers in collecting the most donations for the Muscular Dystrophy Drive. Mary Van Pernis planned the winter formal, "Chanson d' Amour", at the Pantlind Hotel in Grand Rapids. The next morning, the more energetic Alpha Phi's worked with the Arkies on the snow sculpture, "The Thinker" which won second place. May Day followed spring rush, and brought long hours of Softball practice, court membership for Sandy Tomlinson, and the tapping of Jan Kemink, Helen Ver Hoek. and Louise Ver Hoek by Mortar Board. A spring informal at Sleepy Hollow, "Steamboat AComin' ", was organized by Sue Hoerner and Jan Kemink; The Alpha Phi's closed another eventful year, and said farewell to departing seniors at their spring houseparty.

Eva Safar and her guest Bill Cook posed for a photographic memento of her first college informal.

The annual informal means all-day fun ending with an evening of dancing.

14 i 155


Del phis Enjoyed Rrostasia" and "Tahitian Affair"

F R O N T R O W : J. Huizinga; D. De Y o u n g ; M. Neznek; J. Miyamoto; M. Miller; B. Smith; G. Reckhow; J. Nyboer; K. DeWitt; C. MacGregor. 2ND R O W : L. H a i n e s ; J. Cooper; L. Manasek; D. Delp; M. Gilder; S. Dochez; B. Meadows; R. K i n g ; S. Nagy; G. Lowdermilk; G. Paalman. 3RD R O W : R. H u d n u t ; M. Hendricks; J. Nyboer; J. D u n n i c a n ; L. L a r k i n ; B. Andrews; S. Kruizinga; S. Heyer; L. Sonneveldt; K. Canene. 4TH R O W : D. H u l l ; N. Mitchell; P. Zoet; S. Borst; M. P a r k e r ; C. Clark; P. Young; S. Ticknor; Z. Pixley; A. Meengs. 5TH R O W : V. Whitfield; S. D a m p m a n ; G. Dacus; C. Folkert; E. Folkert; S. Dykstra; S. Sonneveldt; V. F r i s ; A. Van Deusen; G. Peelle; J. Engelsman; L. Nienhuis.

156

In September, the women of Delta Phi looked forward to a variety of activities. Singing, supper, and fellowship at Tunnel Park began the whirl of events. The "Hell's Angels" dropped in for a visit at their date night in a Holland Furnace. Delphis were indeed proud of their sister Cindy Clark when she was crowned Homecoming Queen. The first graders of Washington School were thrilled by the Christmas party held for them by the Delphis. In fantasy and frosty weather, Delphis and their dates gathered at the Muskegon Country^Club for a "Frostasia" winter formal. A successful spring rush brought nineteen new Delphis into the sisterhood. The Welcoming Chocolate gave the new girls a delicious taste of the fun to come as Delphis. The sultry atmosphere of a tropical "Tahitian Affair" enveloped all the girls and their guests at their South Haven informal. The annual houseparty and final literary meeting brought another exciting year to a fitting close with bright hopes for the coming year.


Alone in the crowd.

Three ugly sisters tried to wear the magic in the entertainment skit for the informal.

wooden

shoe meant

for Cinderella



SlSipPB

W>m

PERSONALITIES "As life runs on, the road grows strange With faces new, and near the end The milestones into headstones change, Neath every one a friend." —James Russell Lowell

159


Dr. Calvin Vander Wert has served as President of Hope College since


"The Creative Forces of Youth. . . The Steadying Experience of IVlaturity"

An early American legend tells of an ambitious settler who wanted to found a college which, in his words, was "to stand free and unfettered, bowing to no existing authority, no established tradition." The poor colonist was thwarted before he started, however, for the first teacher whose aid he solicited, (undoubtedly a philosophy professor) pointed out that the idea of a fresh start was even then an established tradition—one with a long, rich history dating back to at least the flight from Egypt. The traditions, beliefs, customs, practices, and ceremonies handed down from generation to generation, have long been honored on all campuses; and indeed they should be, for they undergird the very foundation of any institution. Who at Hope College wants to do away with the fun and horseplay associated with Pulls, Nykerks, Kangaroo Courts? And who can dfeny the steadying influence on a hundred classes of graduates of the magnificent idea that education is an anchor of hope for people? But unthinking acceptance of all hoary traditions without repeated, critical appraisals of their relevance and current significance produces a community that clings to the buggy in an age of jets. Tomorrow, we must remember, is just as certain as yesterday. Two years ago the educational world was rocked when students at Berkeley, sneering at tradition, raised a new rallying standard with "You can't trust anyone over thirty. This slogan, we heard, symbolized a fresh climate, it was a natural reaction to the paternalism and fuddy-duddiness of older, established authority. Student commentators reported that it signaled the start of a new tradition on U. S. campuses. It substituted, we are told, the dynamism of youth for the stagnancy of age. "Where in this intellectual maelstrom that is still raging," you and I may ask, "do those of us who now make up Hope College stand? With the creative forces of youth or with the steadying experience of m a t u r i t y ? " And the honest reply, 1 feel, is with both. The single most exciting idea I have encountered in my associations here is that education is a glorious alchemy in which the student and faculty generations join hands and pool resources in transforming the world into a brighter and better tomorrow. Only as we are anchored in all that is great, and true, and noble from the past, in mutual faith, trust, respect, and understanding can we reach toward the stars. Age and experience do not hold a monopoly on workable answeis. Youth and enthusiasm do not h a \ e the only true vision of a meaningful future. Hope College knows first-hand that cooperation among scholars and seekers of all ages is not only possible—it is the only road to a creative, exhilarating tomorrow. This is the tradition that we must preserve above all others, for it alone can preserve us. Calvin VanderWerf

161


«

Robert De Young became H year.

« «

M

9#

••W

new Dean of Men this

Directoi of Business Affairs for the College O was Mr Clarence Handlogten.

William S. Mathis occupied the office for the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Isla Van Eenenaam the Dean of Women, is better known as Mrs. Van. Her office in Boyd is always open for advice or just a chat.


Reverend William "Wild Bill" Hillegonds is Hope's happy, whistling chaplain.

Treasurer and Vice President for Finance is Henry J. StefEens.

A d m i n ist r a t i o n

0

Librarian, John May; Archivist, Janet Mulder; and Alumni Relations Director, Marian Stryker represent a large staff of academic, business, and development directors and administrators.

:

Students often hear, "Go to the Records Office' There they find Recorder, Jo Anne Huenink.

163


Housemothers represent discipline and friendship to Hope's dorm-living, female population. Here are Mrs. Virginia Burrill (Durfee) ; Mrs. Mary Emma Young (Van Vleck); Mrs. Lucille Ottipoby (Gilmore); Mrs. Mary Tellman (Phelps); and Mrs. Gertrude Failing (Voorhees).

The Clinic staff includes Mary Wyngarten, Marian Blake, Nell Wichers, Jessie Meengs, and Dr. Ed Vander Berg.

Manager of Hope's Slater Food Service is Mr. Eldon Ankrum.

164


IN/la.ny Pooplo Bohiirid "time Soones Serve thio Colloge OomrriLjnity

A large secretarial staff supports the Van Raalte administrative affairs.

Many maintenance men and cleaning ladies keep the college buildings and grounds attractive.

165


Research


Listen

Review

Experiment!


Thioro Are JVlony F3 at Ins to kCnowlodge

Dialogue between professors-yields knowledge.

Student-faculty exchange is fruitful. If one knows people well, he knows something of

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in Terrs]

you

168

J


Create! Practice


Mr. Stuart Wilson is investigating the application of linguistics to the teaching of composition. He is the associate director of the Vienna Summer School program and coadviser of OPUS.

During the summer of 1966, Dr. Edward Brand of the English Department studied at the University of Denver. This year he served on the Admissions Committee.

Exprossion of* Lifo

Mrs. Zoe Murray, (right), taught composition and literature courses in her slow Texan drawl.

Chairman of the English Department, Dr. John Hollenhach, recently traveled extensively in Middle Eastern and European countries as visiting professor at the Yugoslav-American Seminar, as coordinator of the Junior Year at Beirut Program, and as guest lecturer in American literature.

Mr. Dirk Jellema is an instructor in English. He has been on the Hope faculty two years.


Dr. Charles Hultar, new to Hope this year, is presently editing a 16th-Century poetic miscellany under grant from the American Philosophical Society. Off campus, he is president of the Conference on Christianity and Literature, and reads papers in other Michigan colleges.

Miss E. Jean Prothroe is Associate Professor of English. She served on the Communications Board this year, and was the adviser for the Honors House.

(Bottom Left) Dr. Clarence De Graaf, of the English Department, recently made a trip around the world to visit some 35 Hope graduates located abroad. He is the sponsor for the MILESTONE.

Dr. Henry ten Hoor, Professor of English, joined the Hope College faculty in 1946. He was appointed director of Hope's Summer School program.

R

n McCullcrs '

171


Expression of" Lifte st rid IVIusio

Dr. A. James Prins, English professor, is preparing a series of articles on Charles Dickens. He plans to attend the Oxford summer school program in England. Dr. Prins is the faculty adviser of OPUS and is on the GLCA Faculty Council.

Dr. Joan Mueller spent the summer of 1966 in Italy and England doing Renaissance study. She is now editing English letters and works of the Sixteenth-Century humanist, Sir John Cheke. Work is in progress on a study of "Hamlet".

I

Miss Nancy Taylor was a newcomer to the Hope College faculty this year. Her classes were mainly freshman composition courses.

i WlflllllfflllliiiiiiHii \

Mr. James H. Tallis' topic for his doctoral dissertation is the history of keyboard improvisation. During the year he presented organ recitals in New York and New Jersey, and harpsichord recitals in Chicago. He also conducted the Motet Choir.

172

^ l Y f v r • -i

I


Dr. Morrette Rider is currently working on a history of Michigan orchestras and making a survey of operational statistics of 240 college orchestras. He served as the Music Chairman of the Michigan State Council for the Arts.

Miss Jantina Holleman attended the Conference of International Music Educators at Interlochen. She gave two public recitals this year.

Mr. Charles Aschhrenner performed this year as a piano soloist and in chamber music.

Mr. Robert Cecil is currently authorized to perform concerts for Young Audiences, Inc. under a grant from the Governor's Art Council. He played first horn in the Grand Rapids Symphony, and was a member of the Hope College Woodwind Quintet. He advised Sinfonia.

Dr. Anthony Kooiker looks forward to piano study with Frank Mannheimer. Together they will present a chamber music series. He played six solo recitals this year, and performed with the Hope College Symphonette. An appearance at Carnegie Music Hall was the highlight of his year.

173


Dr. Robert Cavanaugh, Chairman of the Music Department, and director of the Chapel Choir, has edited a collection of "Anthems of Thomas Tomkins", a 16thcentury English madrigalist. This spring he accompanied the Chapel Choir to California and other Western states for the annual spring tour. He and the Choir look forward to a summer European tour lasting five weeks.

Mr. Roger Davis, Assistant Professor of Music served as director of the College Chorus and as organist for the Student Church. During the summer of 1965, he studied organ under Marie-Claire Alain and Anton Heiler in the Netherlands.

Joyce Morrison is doing research in "hel canto" history and present application. This year she did collegiate observation at Oberlin College and Indiana University. She was advisor to the Women's Music Club, and made concert oratorio appearances throughout the Midwest.

Philip C. Homes, Chairman of the Art Department, is doing research in Scandinavian architecture for his Ph.D. dissertation. He is also involved in a study of interdisciplinary humanities courses, with the hope of eventually having such a course here. In the fall he traveled to North Carolina for ceramic kiln research for a book now in progress.


Room Tor Creativity Mr. Stanley Harrington spent all of last year on leave in Europe touring museums and galleries. He sent back many slides to enlarge the art history slide collections. Mr. Harrington did a lot of painting on his own during the year. He also advised the National Collegiate Players.

Mr. Delhert Michel is engaged in painting, drawing, print-making, and sculpture independent of his actual class-room teaching. He has exhibited his works in national juried art exhibits, regional exhibits, and one-man shows. At Hope he is chairman of the Gallery Program.

m


iÂŤ

An exhibit of Roualt lithographs and etchings was loaned to the College for exhibition in Van Zoeren.

"Thio "Time etnd FMetoo Tor Croettivitiy

The Hope College Chapel Choir toured western states during spring vacation, and looked forward to a summer European tour.

Nykerk Hall of Music is the scene of constant creative activity.

176

Japanese potter, Nakazalo spent a day in the Art Department for a ceramic workshop. Students marvelled at his speed and spontaneous technique.


The Art Department boasts of an enlarged ceramic program. Pots, pots, pots fill the Phelps Basement studio.

Music, music, music can always be heard coming from Nykerk Hall.

Sounds of the timpani are often heard in the practice rooms.

The city welding shop? No, it's melal sculpture class in Phelps Basement.


Dr. Paul G. Fried is adviser to the International Relations Club and secretary-treasurer of Hope's National History Fraternity. He is doing research on International Education Programs, particularly East European affairs. As director of Vienna Summer School, Dr. Fried has made twenty-five transatlantic crossings.

Mr. Michael Petrovich, a new history professor, is doing research and taking advanced courses toward a Ph.D. in history at the University of Chicago. He is active in sports as assistant coach to the soccer team. He will be a Vienna Summer School adviser and professor this summer.

Warren Vander Hill earned his doctorate this year with a dissertation entitled "Gerrit J. Diekema; A Michigan Dutch-American Political Leader, 18591930". He has published numerous book reviews, articles and a book.

Dr. David Clark received his doctoral degree from Harvard just this year for his dissertation, "The Altar Controversy and the English Civil War." He read papers at Grand Valley State and the Michigan Academy of Arts and Sciences. At Hope, Dr. Clark is the chairman of the Advisory Board to High er Horizons.


Mr. Alvin W. Vanderbush is Chairman of the Political Science Department. He spent much of last summer at the University of Denver. This year he served as M.I.A.A. faculty representative, and chairman of the Admissions Committee.

JP

Mr. James Duram is presently writing a Ph.D. dissertation on "The Role of the Supreme Court in the New Deal". During spring vacation, he completed his research at Washington, D.C.'s Library of Congress. He is an instructor in history.

Guides for thio F3 re sent . . . . from tine

Professor of Political Science, Dr. J. Dyke van Putten, joined the Hope College Faculty in 1952.


Dr. Adrian Klaasen became a part of the faculty at Hope in 1957. He is Professor of Business Administration and Economics.

Dr. Wright Yntema was on the Educational Policies Committee, and the Department Chairmen Committee. He advised the Business and Economics Club. This year ends Dr. Yntema's 21-year teaching career at Hope.

Dynstmios of" Busirioss, Eddosttiion Dr. Claud Crawford was new to Hope's faculty this year. He was able to gain approval for his experimental ungraded school system to be tried next year by nine student intern teachers in Saugatuck. Dr. Crawford previously taught at the University of Tennessee.

Outside his teaching of Economics, Dr. Kenneth J. Weller is active in Hope's athletics as coach of the football team. In Holland, he is the director of the Management Institute for local businessmen.

Dr. Lamont Dirkse was active as the adviser of the Student Education Association. As a dissertation for his Doctor of Education degree, he is researching "Creativity in the Language Arts in the Elementarv School".


This year, Dr. Robert De Haan completed a three-year study of programmed instruction and began research on experimental elementary schools. He also spoke to a state meeting of special education at Philadelphia.

Since 1952, Mr. William Hilmert has taught at Hope College. He is Professor of Religious Education.

Mrs. Helen V. Schoon is Assistant Professor of Education, She has been a part of the Hope College faculty since 1946.

Mr. Daniel Paul recently joined Hope's faculty. He was a member of the Higher Horizons Committee and represented Hope on the Education Committee of the Chamber of Commerce. He was an adviser to the Student Education Association.

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Ihkroi)

Last Summer, Mr. John J. VerBeek of the Education Department attended a workshop for the National Association for Student Teaching at Indiana, Pennsylvania. He is now serving as president of the Michigan Association for Higher Education, a department of the Michigan Education Association.

jgi


Xhio Chietllenge Com

o r

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Dr. William Schrier, Professor of Speech recently edited, compiled, and published WINNING HOPE COLLEGE ORATIONS— 1941-1966, in connection with the Centennial Homecoming. Currently, he coached four orators in contests of the Michigan Intercollegiate Speech League.

Mr. Harold Mikle, Assistant Professor of Speech, was active in Pi Kappa Delta, Debate, and Forensics. Throughout the year, he traveled to other schools with the Debate Squad and Hope's orators.

A newcomer to Hope this year was Dr. William H. Bos. He became Head of the Speech Department. In addition to writing a chapter in a proposed HISTORY OF AMERICAN PREACHING, to be published this year. Dr. Bos aided in the planning of the theater in the new Student Cultural Center.

Dr. William Welmers, Professor of African languages at UCLA, served as guest professor of linguistics at Hope. While on campus, he taught an introductory course in linguistics. 182

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Mrs. Beula Kampen Maris is doing research for her Ph.D. dissertation, and is gathering material for a French conversation book for travelers. She advised the French Honorary Society, and Pan-Hellenic Board, and supervised the French Poetry Contest. She was recently the community Ambassador to Brussels and traveled throughout France.

Professor of Greek, Dr. Joseph Arvai- Zsiros, is doing research work comparing Plato's ideas with the teaching of the Samarian philosophy. He advised students in their scientific works and spiritual questions.

Marseille • le \ie"v I""1

No1

Mr. Jon Smith just returned from France where he spent the past three years studying French and teaching American civilization at the University of Paris. Presently, he is continuing work toward his Ph.D in French, and is adviser to the French Club at Hope.

Last year. Miss Linda Palmer studied in Paris for a degree and certificate from the Sorbonne. Currently she is working on a comparison of Rutebeuf, Villon, and Marot as lyric poets. Miss Palmer was also active in the French Ciub.


Mr. Martin Ralph, Instructor in Spanish, is involved in the Spanish Summer School at Middlehury College, Vermont. He is director of the language laboratory, and adviser to the Spanish Club.

Dr. Winifred Hostetter was Hope's visiting instructor in Latin. Dr. Ralph Perry is Chairman of the Romance Languages Department and advises the French and Spanish majors.

I nto r n eft i o n eil Oommuinioettion

Hubert P. Weller spent the summer of 1965 in Spain and the fall of 1965 in Lima, Peru doing research for a study, anthology, and bibliography on the Peruvian poet, Martin Adan. This year he served as sponsor of the Spanish Club and of the National Spanish Honor Society.

184

Dr. David Dunbar was new to Hope's Spanish Department last year. Since then he has taken an active part in the academic life of Hope. He was adviser to the Spanish Club this year.

O P A

;


Dr. Ezra Gearhart, Chairman of the German Department, is doing an expansion of his doctoral dissertation on the German Novel of the 17th Century. He will be in Europe for three months during the summer doing research on this topic. A faculty research grant will support him.

Dr. Kurt Rothmann became Assistant Professor of German in his first year of teaching at Hope. He is presently collecting material for a German dictionary, and sponsors the German Club.

In the summer of 1965, Mr. Werner W. Heine did geographical research and studies in Tanzania, East Africa. At Hope, he is the adviser of the International Relations Club, and the German Honorary Society. Mr. Heine will be serving as the director of the International Students Summer Program at Hope. During the summer of 1966, Dr. Gerhard Megow traveled to Germany to investigate a sophomoreyear study project for Hope Students. He also took a 4-week intensive course in French at the Institut Catholique in Paris. His special interest in the field of 18th- and 19th-century literature is Romanticism and its impact on contemporary literature.

Miss Judith Wrhen is an Instructor in German. She joined the faculty in 1965, and advised the German Club this year.

185


Dr. William Vanderlugt had the unique title of Professor-at-Large. In such capacity, he was able to instruct courses in various departments, as he did this year in the Bible, Education, and Political Science Departments. After spending eleven years in the Dean's office, he finds the rewards of teaching much greater.

Dr. Bastian Kruithof recently took a refresher course in philosophy at the University of Edinburgh. He is currently working on a book concerning Christian Ethics and the New Morality.

1 Mr. Robert Raima, instructor of Religion and Bible, completed his first year of teaching at Hope. He returned from Scotland last fall where he was writing his Ph.D. thesis at the University of Edinburgh. His discipline is philosophical theology.

Mr. Lambert Ponstein is investigating religion in the public school system and is also studying Calvin and the notion of God. He served on the Editorial Board of the "Reformed Review".

186


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n d eit: i o n Rstithi

Dr. Arthur Jentz was adviser to Blue Key and a faculty resident at Fraternal Hall. He also headed the Student I ife Committee. Presently he is doing research in the philosophy of art for a planned philosophy course in aesthetics.

Dr. Elton J. Bruins came to Hope just this year. He was Chairman of the Religious Life Committee.

Dr. Henry Voogd is presently writing a textbook for a course in Intertestamentary History. He attended a summer seminar at the University of Michigan to study the religions of the Near East.


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etnd Sooieil IVlstn Instructor in Philosophy, Robert Burton, attended the Eastern Division meeting of the American Philosophical Association in Philadelphia. He has been guest performer with the classic guitar with the Hope College Faculty String Quartet. Mr. Robert Vanderham is doing research concerning religious affiliation of faculty and administration of Reformed church colleges for Western Sem'nary. He represented Hope at the Governor's Conference on Family and Marriage, and represented the Sociology Department at a Michigan Scholars Conference.

Dr. D. Ivan Dykstra is working on a book, THE NATURE OF KNOWING: INTENDING AND PROVING. He served cn the Educational Policies Committee and was faculty resident at the Cosmopolitan Hall.

Mr. Don?ld Clelland is writing two research papers. On a grant from the Office of Economic Opportunity, he is studying "The Effect of Participation in AntiPoverty Programs on the Attitudes and Behavior of Adult Participants". As his doctoral thesis, he is describing "The Impact of Technological Change in a Small Industrial City".


"Thio IVIystioetl IV/lind oriVletn

Dr. John Barlow, Professor of Psychology, attended a workshop at Notre Dame on new behaviorial science etjuipment in order to prepare for the assembling of an operant conditioning laboratory at Hope. He is also awaiting the publication of his book STIMULUS AND RESPONSE.

Dr. Robert Brown is Assistant Professor of Psychology and director of the psychological services at Hope. He is a visiting professor to Michigan State University also. He h pre c ently working on research for a program of individual and group therapy at the Pasadena Community Clinic in Pasadena, California.

Dr. Leslie R. Beach of the Psychology Department is currently working on a study entitled "Learning and Student Interaction in Small Self-Directed College Groups". Another study concerning the identification of the potentially successful among marginal college entrants, involves the Hope College summer trial program. Both studies are supported by the U.S. Office of Education.


Dr. Roger Steenland became a part of the Psychology Department this year, as Assistant Professor of Psychology.

Dr. F. Phillip Van Eyl, Assistant Professor of Psychology, advises Psi Chi Fraternity. In-the field of sports, he is Hope's soccer coach and secretary of the M.I.I.C. Soccer Conference.

Last summer, Russell B. De Vette studied at Cortland State graduate school. He advised the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and coached football and basketball.


Rooroation eiricl F^hiysioetl R i t n o s s

Mr. Glen Van Wieren is involved with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. He coached cross-country, basketball, and baseball.

Miss Daughn Schipper is the adviser for WAA. and she coached women's athletic activities. During the summer, she worked toward her master's degree at Michigan State.

Dr. Lawrence Green is Professor of Physical Education has been on the faculty since 1952. He coaches the tennis and basketball teams.

Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Gordon Brewer, is the varsity track coach, and the assistant football coach. In January, he was Hope's delegate to the National Collegiate Athletic Association Convention in Houston. 191


Dr. Harry Frissel has been instrumental in obtaining several grants for the improvement of the science and math departments. He has been at Hope since 1948.

Ronald Beery joined Hope's Physics Department three years ago. This year he earned his Ph.D. for work in measuring muon scatterings in a spark chamber.

Dr. David Marker of the Physics Department is involved in calculating proton-proton bremsstrahlung cross-sections. He is head resident of Knickerbocker Hall.

In January. Dr. Elliot A Tanis, of the Mathematics Department, attended the annual meetings of the American Mathematical Society, and the Mathematical Association of America in Houston, Texas. Dr. Tanis is the faculty adviser for Alpha Phi Omega. 192

Dr. Richard Brockmeier participated this year in informal discussions with students on "Science and Society". He recently completed work on measuring isotope shifts of X-rays.


Mr. Frank Sherburne, Jr. attended meetings of two mathematics societies in Houston, Texas. He was the faculty adviser to WTAS, Hope's radio station.

Mr. John Whittle became an Instructor in Mathematics this year.

Mr. Charles A. Steketee, Associate Professor of Mathematics, is presently teaching courses in modern mathematics, analytical geometry, and calculus.

Dr. Jay E. Folkert, Chairman of the Mathematics Department, attended the meetings of two mathematical societies in Houston, and one in Kansas City. He was guest lecturer at Muskegon High School. Currently he is working on a curriculum revision for Hope's Mathematics Department.

I V I a s s ,

IVIotion, and IVl osis u r e ? rn o rrt Mr. Horace Chuang, of the Mathematics Department, is doing research on linear space in connection with his Ph.D. work at Wayne State University.


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195


Associate Professor of Chemistry, Dr. Dwight Smith is doing studies of infrared chemisorbed molecules. This is intended to increase the understanding of the mechanisms of catalysis. His investigations are supported by a grant from the Petroleum Research Fund. In 1964 he went to Amsterdam to attend an international conference on catalysis.

Dr. Eugene Jekel is director of Hope's Summer Institute supported by the National Science Foundation. It is a program for teachers of second year and advanced placement chemistry. During the year Dr. Jekel served as director of undergraduate research in "Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Solutions".

Supported by the Department of the Interior, Dr. David Klein and three student assistants studied the nucleation and precipitation of alkaline earth hydroxides. Dr. Klein advised the Chemistry Club also.

Dr. Douglas C. Neckers continued chemical research in his free time and worked on his chemistry textbook, "MECHANISTIC ORGANIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY", which was recently published.


/ V t o m s

sind

thio E l e m o n t s

This year Dr. Nancy Tooney joined the Hope College chemistry faculty as the Kettering Interne in Chemistry.

T

Dr. Irwin Brink, Chairman of the Chemistry Department, was awarded a National Science Foundation Science Faculty Fellowship. It will enable him to pursue courses in quantum mechanics and statistical thermodynamics at the University of Michigan.

D. Jerry R. Mohrig, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, worked with three senior students in the exploration of the mechanisms of certain chemical reactions in the area of physical organic chemistry. Dr. Mohrig was co-adviser to the Pre-Med Club.


Last summer, Dr. Norman Rieck attended an institute for college biology teachers at Wabash College in Indiana. He is currently building a collection of vertebrate brains for comparative study. Dr. Rieck was the faculty adviser for Alpha Epsilon Delta, the Honorary Pre-Med society.

In 1965, Dr. Eva B. Van Schaack traveled to Kew Library in England and to Edinburgh, Scotland to attend the tenth International Botanical Congress. At this time she traveled by bicycle to hunt for fungi. She is currently culturing a coprophilous fungus for fun.

Xhio Soiorioo oT Lifo

Dr. Ralph Ockerse is doing research on the determination of the fate of tryptophan by an enzyme system isolated from pea plants. He is also studying plant growth hormone interaction. Under his direction, two students are doing work in plant growth regulation.


Dr. Philip Crook spent last summer at the Iowa Lakeside Laboratory studying parasitology. He directed five students in undergraduate research in bacteriology and parasitology. He will be on a sabbatical leave next year in the Philippines.

Miss Barbara Clarke became an Instructor in Biology at Hope just last year.

Lin imin

Allen Brady Is Assistant Professor of Biology.

Dr. Norman Norton is involved in research on "Paleofloras of Devonian and Cretaceous Sediment." In connection with scientific research, he traveled to the Netherlands to present two papers before the International Palynology Conference. He is faculty adviser to Tri Beta Fraternity.


Freshman Class executives planned their first year's activities. Seated are Secretary Candy Chapman and President Don Farmer; standing are Mark Vander Laan, Vice President and Treasurer Ron Rector.

Rroshimon O r g a n i z e d for "THoir Rirsrt V ^ s t r or Run etnd Competition

The class of a new decade and a new century arrived as most classes do—with feelings of mixed emotion and anxiety. However, these feelings were quickly overcome with the excitement of orientation and the developing feeling of class spirit and unity as expressed in the Pull and the victorious Nykerk Cup Contest. Between serenades and waterfights, the class officers were elected. Under their direction a constitution was drawn up and ratified to last for four years. This document proved to be quite an innovation as it provided for the election of an advisory committee, the annual collection of dues, class activity cards and a class newsletter. All of these provisions were carried out with a now characteristic spirit of unity and enthusiasm. The class activity cards provided for reduced rates for the rather stormy formal, "Something Springy," the dance held in March and the beach party held in May. With the permanent constitution, the Class of 1970 looks forward to its next three years at Hope and considers its first year an honor and a memory in the Hope College community.


Pe

ggy Adams

Robb Adams

Connie Aldrich

Dave Allyn

Jeff Alperin

Becky Anderson

Ken Anderson

Karen Arnold

Andrew Atwood

William Atwood

Kate Bacon

Gwynne Bailey

Steve Baker

Janice Bakker

Pat Barendse

Robert Battjes

William Bauer

George Baxter

Katy Beard

Al Beauleaux

Jim Beckering

Robert Beisbuizen

Jane Benedict

Julie Beretz

George Bergevine

Nels Bergmark

Trail Berry

Charles Bigelow

Janice Blakley

Robert Block

Brenda Bloemers

Debby Blum

Don Abbring

James Adams

Lois Amidon


F

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©

Carter Bolton

Thomas Bos

Eugene Braaksma

Donna Brack

Ken Bradsell

Robert Branech

Susan Bray

Sue Brill

Roger Brink

Judy Brouwers

Joe Brown

Judy Brown

Nancy Brown

Norma Brown

Craig Brummel

Maryann Brvenik

Marilynn Buffum

Janet Bumford

Deanna Burke

Darlene Bush

Kathy Buurma

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l O T O

French can-can dancers Deborah Blum, Candy Chapman, Sandy Elden, performed during the French Carnival held in April.

Jody Byland

Kathy Canene

Jann Cathcart

White,

Jan Huizinga,

Candy Chapmai

and Mary

Carol Chapman

Dan Chapman

George Christian

Mary Cipolla

Jan Claerbout

Brian Clapham

John Clevering

Dan Colenbrander

Yvonne Cook

Dave Coons

Judi Cooper

Dave Corlett

Jerry Cripe

Monica Crossett

Karen Chase

Don Currie


R

r

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l

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William Davey

Shirley Curtis

Sue Daniels

John Delano

Arlene DenHaan

Jim DenHerder

Marc Deur

Jeanne DeVette

Dennis DeVries

t

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Judy Deenik

William DeGraaf

Leonard DenHouter

Dave DePagter

Dave Dethmers

Donna DeVries

Patricia DeVries

Kathy DeWitt

Janice DeBoer

Jean DeGraff

Vicki Detlefs

Peggy DeWitt

Debbie DeYoung

Mark DeYoung

Richard DeYoung

Dave Dievendorf

Chris Dinger

Steve Dunham

Betty Durling

Ken Dykhuis

Mary El den

Janet Elferink

John Elsinga

John Ely

Sue Elzerman

Bev Endweiss


Bonnie Everts

Blair Fraser

Don Farmer

Dave Folkert

Sharon Fortuin

Norma Foster

Laurie Fox

Richard Frank

Edith Frens

r

Paula Frissel

Jack Gaeb

Laurie Ry.enga

kept up l\ate aowies

morale during the Pull.

iRISI f

m Mary Gaeknoper

Eva Gersbacker

Cecile Gaillard

Denise Galloway

Brian Gibson

Beverly Glas

Joanne Gasperec

Barbara Gleichmann

Bertheria Gaston

Lynn Gonzalez

Georgia Gearhart

Nick Genovese

Barbara Gorden

Greg Gorman


R

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s

Avery Gould

h

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t

Holly Gow

n

C

l

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Joan Granzow

s

s

Beverly Greer

Martha Griff en

Joan Gundersen

Dave Gunn

•

Doug Haan

Steve Haveman

Bruce Heustis

Carol Hoogstra

Laurel Haines

Martha Haynes

Janice Hieftje

Beth Hook

Charles Hall

Dewayne Hellenga

Christine Hansen

Tom Henderson

Anne Hill

Harold Hilliard

Susan Hoover

Kathy Horosinski

Mike Hansen

Dennis Hendricks

Tom Harmelink

Jack Hendricks

Christine Hart

Marcia Herrema


Freshman

and their dales dressed

in fine style to enjoy their

first fornuil.

Michele Jewell

Jane Kasmersky

Shirley Jipping

Don Kazen

Fay Johnson

Carol Kearney

Art Horst

Richard Housman

Claire Houtman

Dianne Howard

Jan Huizenga

Rae Huizinga

Richard Humbert

Diane Hymans

Geraldine Immik

Eric Jones

Robert Kidd

Betty Ives

Laurie Jones

Robert Kieft

Martha Jennings

Marilyn Jones

Mark Keilhorn

Darlene Jesswein

Kristine Kammeraad

Joy Klaaren


R

r

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s

Kathryn Kleyn

h

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Jeff Kling

n

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Don Kolkman

t

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Julie Kooiman

Tom Kooistra

Stan Korwin

James Koster

Carol Koterski

Robert Kouw

Barry Kromer

William Kuh

Cathy Kuhl

Robert Kuhn

Herman Kuiper

Frank Lam

Jeff Lambkin

Steve Lammers

Donna Lampman

Linda Langstraat

Doug Lapham

Sue Larson

Carol Latham

Jill Leach

Rick Lemmer

Chuck Lieder

Mary Lievense

Tim Liggett

Sue Livesay

Janet Lounsbury

Dave Lowdermilk

Beth Lucas

Micki Luckey

Joyce Lukkes

John Lyons

Carolyn MacGregor


•

Margy MacLeod

Allen Maillet

Keith Marcotte

Don Marema

Steve Markel

Donna Martin

Jerry May

Bruce McCreary

Dave McDougall

Nancy McKenzie

Brad McLouth

Marcia Medema

Chris Meyers

Tom Meresma

Alan Miller

Kathy Miller

Donna Minet

Joyce Miyamoto

Ken Mol

Carol Mouw

Claudine Moore

Andrew Mulder

Ron Mosier

George Mulder

\

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o

Joe Masvero

Nancy Meeusen

Pam Moffett


Rroshimetn Oletss

I Fred Muller

Mary Neznek

Douglas Myers

Kim Nguyen

Lowly, greenied

Frosh appeared

before a stern Kangaroo Court.

I Julie Nichols

Robert Nienhuis

Judy Noggle

Kathy Notier

Carolyn Nutt

Randy Nyberg

Jill Nyboer

Marvin Oldenburger

John Oonk

Ruth Oosterbof

Ernest Otto

Donald Page

Beth Palmer

Sanderson Palmer

Ken Paulsen

Christine Peacock

Carol Pearce

John Pearson

Diane Parker

Steve Parker

Penny Parsons


1 9 T O

Alison Perry

Laura Peters

Sally Phillips

Sandra Pickut

Allen Petersen

Linda Plaggemars

Robert Peterson

Janice Peverly

Roger Plaxton

Janet Polcha

Cheryl Phillips

Nelleatha Postraa

Gregory Phillips

Dave Postmus

ML

Joyce Prange

Ron Rector

Robert Robbins

Barbe Prime

Donald Reinhard

Nathelee Roelofs

Janis Pruiksma

Eileen Reus

Kathie Rood

Dave Pruim

Judy Rickard

Charles Rowell

Janis Race

Eric Ratering

David Ri gg

Jill Risser

Barbara Roycraft

Carla Rubingh

Tuula Ravantti

Shirley Ristau

Harry Rumohr


R

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l

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krhti Gail Rutgers

Laurie Rycenga

Barbara Ryzenga

Jim Schipper

Charles Schoeneck

Ralph Schroeder

Sue Schumacher

Elizabeth Sidar

Barbara Skidmore

Dave Sevensma

Dave Short

Eva Safar

Michael Sawmelle

Eileen Schaafsma

John Schadler

Ed Schurr

Rebecca Seeley

Gil Seevers

Ginny Slater

Paul Sloan

Madeline Slovenz

Doug Smith

Grace Smith

Mike Smits

Cindy Sonneveldt

A1 Spitters

Janet Spooner

Barbara Staats

Sue Staples


Michael Stark

Jan Steininger

Paul Steketee

Alice Stephans

Stanley Sterk

Bob Stewart

Dan Stoepker

William Strampel

Paul Strong

Peter Struck

Dennis Taylor

Jean Taylor

William Tell

Lee Tempas

Lois TenHoor

Linda Teringer

Dave Thomas

Tom Thomas

Phyllis Thompson

Mary Thorne

Carolyn Tobert

Sue Topp

Prudy Tower

William VanAuken

Jennifer VanCor

Dave VandeBunte

Kendra Vandenberg

Mark VanderLaan

Mary VanderLinde


Rroslmmetn Class

Jane VanderMeulen

Connie VanderVelde

Chuck VanEngen

Bill VanFaasen

Sharon VanHeest

Maria Van Loan

Glenn VanNoord

Paul VanPernis

Linda VanSweden

Peter VanWingen

Bob Veeneman

Howard Veneklasen

Eileen Verduin

Karen Verduin

Joan Vickroy

Linda Visscher

Brian Vissers

Dan Vogel

Mark Volkers

Nancy Walcott

Marsha Wallace

Barbara Walvoord

Steve Ward

Bob Warner

Dorothy Warner

Jim Waters

Sharon Weaver

John Webinga

1

Carl Weblett

Marylou Weessies

Robert Weinstein

Tom Welscott

Anne Welton

Roy Welton

Joan Westhuis


Sandy White

Nancy Wickens

Sue Wiegerink

Sue Wierda

Wendell Wierenga

Gary Wiessner

Louise Williams

John Windover

Eric Witherspoon

Janice Wolf

Karen Woods

Harold Workman

Nancy Wornock

Cindy Wray

Troy Yanof

Rebecca Yee

Myrtie Yereb

Polly Yoder

J Carol Wilterdink

Sue Zonnebelt

Mary Zuidema

Mary Zandee

Ted Zwart


With the flip of a coin, another decision is made. Sophomore Class officers were Jim Piers, Vice President; Patty Dykstra, Treasurer; Bonnie Brandsma, Secretary; Don Luidens, President.

"The very best class that ever was, couldn't be anyone else but us—Get a load of the Class of '69". This was the battle cry heard at the beginning of the year which culminated in the Sophomore Pull Victory. It was quite a switch from our defeated, yet spirited efforts during freshman year. With our Sophomore year behind us now, we look back at this eventful year which marks the half-way point of our college years. Under the direction of Don Luidens, the officers and Class Council were busy organizing the Pull, Nykerk, (we lost), three all-school dances, and various money-raising activities. It seems incredible that two years have elapsed, but now we, as a class and as individuals, look forward to our two remaining years, and the decisions to be made, careers to be sought, and lives to be further enriched.

So phis Hetd thio Spirit


Dennis Alexander

Betsy Aardsma

Beppy Albers

June Armstrong

George Arwady

Mike Ashley

Lance Banninga

Rosalyn Barents

Barb Baron

Doug Barrow

Cheryl Berens

Lee Berens

Allen Aardsma

Barbara Andrews

Ford Berghorst

Eric Binder

George Allocca

Adrienne Andres

Emi Azeka

Cyndie Bache

Melinda Baker

Ruby Beatson

Phyllis Beck

Jane Becksford

David Allen

Betty Binson

Carl Black

Neil Blahut

Russ Bonnema

Jim Bosman

\ Mary Blann

Denny Bobeldyk

Debby Boles

Debbie Bolt

Lee Bolt


S

o

p

h

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o

r

^

C

Nathan Bowles

Craig Brandman

Bonnie Brandsma

Mary Browning

Rick Bruggers

Thorn Bruggink

Mike Bull

Rose Bursey

Miriam Butterfield

l

a

s

s

Jane Breckenridge

Terry Bremer

Lynda Brown

Shirley Brown

John Coffenberg

Mary Colenbrander

Lloyd Compton

P

Edith Byers

Elaine Carlin

Camy Carruthers

Dale-Lee Casey

Charles Cizek

Barb Claussen

Robert CI aver


Cindy Conn

Pe

ggy Dean

Sally Cook

Joan DeBoer

William Cook

Roger DeBoer

Sheryl Corcoran

Dale Dicker

Tim Crandall

Barbara DeHart

Eric Davis

Gilda Davis

Debbie Delp

Linda DenBesten

Enid Diamante

Henry Diggelmann

mJ' Gary Dennison

Judy Dirkse

J anice Drolen

Jack DenUyl

Edward Dobbin

Doug Duffy

David DeVries

Suzanne Dochez

Ann Dykema

David DeYoung

Jack DeZwaan


Sophiomore Class

Susan Emerick

Mike Elzerman

At

Intermission,

Jim

Slager

and

Bonnie

Norma Emerson

Brandsma

chatted

Jane Emmerson

about

the "Four

Jane Engelsman

Preps"

concert.

Ken Eriks

Eolkert Faber

Jane Fardink

Constance Fennema

Robert Flier

Elaine Eolkert

Ginny Eraser

Delcene F uller

Pam Fulton

Raymond Fylstra

Paul Gamper

Gary Ganger

Daniel Georges

Tod Gerard

Niki Gerow

Emily Gibson

Maryjo Girton

George Goehner

Carol Gauntlett

Phil Gorter


Karen Grabinski

Sue Graeff

Alice Grant

Jean Grant

Bonnie Gray

Donna Grasman

Jared Green

s

Jeff Green

Dale Grit

Nancy Groat

Barbara Gross

Ann Gunkler

Michael Gulish

Randy Gutwein

i 1 Laurie Hammon

Pat Hartsema

Dave Havinga

Ann Hazen

J J.

Julie Heger

Molly Helm

Betty Henderson

Julie Hendrickson

\

\

\

Harvey Heneveld

Janice Hennicken

Richard Herbig

Roger Herrick


Sophiomore Class

Sandy Heyer

Tom Hildebrandt

Bobbi Hixson

Barbara Hoeksema

Susan Hoerner

LaRae Hoffman

Pam Holcombe

Sue Holmes

Doug Honbolt

Sberri Hook

James Hosta

Marty Howell

Rosalie Hudnut

Lois Hultquist

Robin Huybregtse

Tom Huyer

Wendell Hyink

Priscilla Inkpen

Erwin Johnson

Sue Johnson

Suzanne Jordan

Jackie Junker

John Kallemyn

Harold Kamm

Pat Irwin

Willie Jackson

Ann Johnson


l o e o

Paul Kanetzky

Cam Karsten

Margo Kasmersky

Ruth King

Dianne Kinsey

William Klebe

John Kline

It happened

at the Happening

Mike Koets

during Dutch Treat /Teek.

Lynn Koop

Donna Koskie

Linda Kozel

Shirley Lawrence

John Leenhouts

Peter Leestma

Glenn Kuipers

Louise Lewis

Robert Klein

James Knott

Mary Kooiman

Charles Lang

Patricif Lang

Linda Larkin

Jack Ligtenberp; D D

Tamara Lockwood

Irwin Longacre


S o p h o m o r e

James Lotterman

James Marcus

Suzette Luckhardt

Judy Marks

C l a s s

Don Luidens

Mary Marosy

Sally MacBarron

Candy Marr

Lynn Mandeville

Thomas Maratea

Ken Martensen

Judy Marvin

Chris March

Sue Matlack

II Dale Mathews

Roderick Maxwell

Pam Mayeu

George McGeehan

Charles McMullin

Elizabeth Mehnert

Jeff Mcllwaine

Pe

ggy McNamara

James Meyer

Donna McKenzie

John McKenzie

Barb Meadows

Sherry Medendorp

Sherry Meyer

Richard Mezeske


John Michel

John Midavaine

Christina Mih

Bonney Miller

Marcia Miller

ram Miller

Marcia Mizevitz

Norman Mol

Jean Moyer

Jeff Mulder

Kathy Mulder

Judy Munro

Calvin Murray

Elliott Myers

Sandy Nagy

Pat Nevenhoven

Cindy Newcomb

Karen Nicholas

Doug Nichols

Leslie Nienhuis

Nancy Noggle

Marilyn Oet j en

IflLJ Shirley Nevins


S

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Peter Paplawsky

h

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Gary Parker

David Paterik

Sandra Poinsett

Lynn Poppink

l

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s

Jackie Pham Thi Dung

James Piers

Shirley Pikkaart

Linda Pletcher

Paula Raab

Karen Rach

\ Dennis Plockmeyer

Reynolds

Mary Richards

MeryLee Riether

Pat Priscoe

Joanne Rimondi

A1 Qualman

Jack Ritsema

o

Charyle Roden

Roger Rose

Joyce Rosema

David Ross

James Robertson

Marilyn Robson


Robert Schaap

Mary Rynbrant

Lloyd Schout

James Slager

Arlene Stehlik

Ken Schroeder

Stan Slingerland

Dave Stoepker

Roseann Schaap

Mary Schakel

Ernest Schneiders

Jean Schrotenboer

Jan Sebens

William Seiter

William Selanders

James Shalek

Barb Smallegan

Mary Sovern

Dorothy Spencer

Nancy Staffeld

David Stearns

Gayle Swart

Jackie Sytsma

Norma Strang;

Steve Struck

Dave Styf


S o p h i o m o r e

C l a s s

Si4

Timothy Tam

Christine Tempas

r

Martha Terpstra

Sally Ticknor

Barb Timmer

James Toothaker

Coert Vanderhill

Janine \ anWitzenburg

• i'

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loan DeBoer and Bob Woodger had to relax a while from the Happening.

Don Pruman

Kipp VanAken

Judy VanDam

Sheryl VandeBunte

Richard Vandenberg

Marta VanderKooi

Jean VanderLaan

Lee VandeWall

Joyce Van Dyke

David VanHeest

Carrie VanWieren

Colleen VerHage

A1 VerSchure

Ron Visscher

Valerie Voigt

Jan Voogd

Richard Viel


Lou Voskuil

Cheryl Walker

Carolyn Westlake

Vickie Whitfield

Mary Walker

Ginnie Wielhouwer

Peter Walther

James Wiley

Lucy Wang

Diana Williams

Jack Weber

Robert Williams

Ruth Welscott

Marsha Willingham

111

Tom Wilson

Patti Wood

Sharon Wilterdink

Thom Working

Judith Workman

Katherine Wright

Nancy Wright

Lynn Wyman

Marilyn Yzenbaard

John Zavacky

Mary Zeedyk

*

Karen Zeh

Joyce Zeller

Christy Zuverink


Junior Class officers were Dave Duitsman as Vice President, Bernie Brunsting, Secretary, Bob Thompson as President, and Ken Bruggers, Treasurer.

CleisŠ or 'â‚Ź>S Was Still United in Spirit

As Juniors, we have left behind us two successful years and have assumed the role of advisors to the Freshman Cljiss. After our two Pull victories and Nykerk wins, we attempted to help the Class of '70 in the capacity of coaches and trainers for their two competitions. A purely-Junior activity was held in the Fall. Pizza and dancing at the Old Crow kept our " '68 is Great" spirit burning;. Now we look forward to our remaining year with amazement that our college career is ending so soon.


Bob Aardema

Keith Abel

Sue Acherhof

Doreen Adolphs

Susan Albers

John Allan

Rick Appleton

Nancy Arendsen

Mary Atkinson

Nancy Aumann

Bob Austin

Jean Bacon

Nancy Baker

Emily Barnes

Tom Bast

Bruce Becker

Don Berger

A1 Bilyeu

Carol Bird

Bill Bischoff

Eric Blahut

Graydon Blank

Paul Bleau

Clint Blood

Margaret Bosker

Sue Bosnian

Nancy Broersma

William Boersma

Kathy Boezeman

Jennie Brown

Ken Bruggers

Suzanne Boonstra

David Bruininks

Susan Borst

Bernie Brunsting


* j L j n i o r

C

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Charlotte Buis

Carol Bultman

Judith Burnett

Pam Buteyn

Carol Byl

Karen Candelora

George Cook

Coreen Cramer

e

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s

Gail Bumford

Amid canvases inspiration.

James Cronk

and

paints,

Bonnie

Nancy Culver

Nancy Bunchey

Norma Butterworth

Elsie Bwanausi

her

Pat Canfteld

Candy Claassen

Don Damsteegt

Mary Damstra

Glenys Davidson

Timmer

got

1

$ Kitty ^av's

Paul Dayton

William DeBoer

Sandy Dekker

Joan DePree

Barbara DeVries

Mike Dillbeck


Sid Disbrow

Doug Dixon

Harry Dross

David Duitsman

Tim Dykstra

Irene Edbrooke

James Eenigenburg

Dick Engstrom

Denny Farmer

Mike Fitney

Dolores Floyd

Richard Formsma

Elaine Franco

Jeff Gale

Phillip Frens

Carole Garbrecht

Vicky Fris

Mary Gilder

Barbara Fugazzotto

Jerry Grissen

Karen Dykstra

John Evans

Ruth Dykstra

Audrey Evers

Sharon Dykstra

Edward Evertz


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Alan Griswold

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Deanna Gross

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s

Bob Gruetzmacher

Judy Hage

William Halter

George Harrison

Darlene Hansen

.X

It was Intermission, Civic Center.

Carolyn Hart

and

time

lor a little

Barb Hayes

socializing

in the

Jonathan Hearne

lobby

of the

Mary Hesselink

There is always time lor spoofing.

Joyce Hickel

Louise Hoedema

A1 Hoffman

Asismm Craig Holleman

Dick Holman

Dorothy Hull

Kazem Iravani

John Jaecker

Susan Jalving

Amy Johnson

>1


1

Marilyn Johnson

Mark Johnson

Boh Joseph

Jane Kallemyn

Janice Kemink

Barbara Kollen

Daniel Kershner

Marilyn Koman

Edward Kirk

Glenn Kooiker

Barb Klaasen

Mary Kleis

Linda Kloote

Joyce Knol

Menno Kraai

Jeanette Krauss

Irv Kuipers

Bob Kuligren

Sue Kutscher

Charles Lake

Amy Lam

Lyle Landhuis

Suzanne Larrabee

Ken Latwinski

Frank Leese

Margaret Lenel

Dave Lubbers

Frank Lundell

Bobbie Luyendyk

Irene Maatman

Dorothy Manuel

Andrea Martin

Patty Mateer

Alyce Meengs

Wayne Meerman


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Bruce Ming

Nancy Mitchell

Mary Muller

Lynn Nelson

Jayne Olsen

Kathy Olson

Jane Owen

Linda Patterson

Mary Pelon

Barbara Phail

Sharon Pierce

Mark Menning

Larry Metzger

Sandy Meyers

Bill Mills

Alan Myaard

Margo Naber

Simon Nagel

Judyth Paauwe

Cheryl Paeth

Mike Paliatsos


Steve Piersma

Dennis Raatjes

Carol R a j sky

Pam Reynolds

William Reynolds

Jerry Poortinga

Jeff Pruiksma

Robert Quist

Valerie Quist

Mike Reardon

Jane Riso

Steve Reynen

Rohn Ritzema

Cheryl Roberts

Carole Roden

Pam Roden

{

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Carole Rowe

Tibor Safar

Merryl Schaefer

Carol Schakel

John Schalk

Bob Schroeder

Edward Shaw


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s

Dick Shiels

Trish Sierdsma

Kawala Simwanza

Bette Smith

Melvin Smith

Peter Smith

Joan Soder

Susan Stoeckly

Jim Sutherland

Ann Sytsma

Jane Taylor

Keith Taylor

William Taylor

Carl Tenpas

Bob Terwilliger

Janet Thompson

Robert Thompson

Tom Thorne

Bonnie Timmer

Richard Timmer

Sandra Tomlinson

John Tysse

Ralph Valentine

David VanBeek

John VanBeek

Fred VanCor

Carol VandenHeuvel

Linda Vanderheide

Linda VanderLaan

William VanderLugt D

Dee \ ander\ lucht

Steve VanderWeele

Gretchen VanderWerf

Ann VanDeusen

Ann VanDorp


l o e s

Bill VanEck

Dennis VanHaitsma

Sue V anKoevering

Sharon VanLente

Jan VanSloten

Cheri VanVossen

Susan VanWyk

Robert Veldhoff

Helen VerHoek

Louise VerHoek

David Vogel

Ronelle Vollink

Ruth Wagner

Bob Wakeman

Frances Webinga

Janice Weener

Linda Weessies

Steve Weiden

Ernest Willcocks

Amy Wilson

Bob Woodger

Bonnie Woods

Eleanor Wybenga

William Wykhuis

Barb Zandstra

Pat Zoet

Margarita Zsulits


Officers of the Senior Class were Lois Dykema, Auten, Vice President; Bob Donia, President; Secretary.

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Treasurer; and Barb

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A I S I C H O R H

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s

Gerald Alhart,

As the Class of 1967, we greet graduation with a sigh and a sense of challenge. Leaving favorite professors and friends is a sorrow, but their impressions on us are indelible. Much of what we are and what we believe has been formulated here at Hope. For it is here that the frightened freshman boy became a man; the giggling girl became a woman; the student, a responsible citizen. Ours is a challenged generation, and we hope we have prepared to meet its challenges through our c tudies and life at Hope. Hope has helped us grow in academic wisdom and self-awareness, and by her example, has given us a stronger faith in God and humanity. We hope that we were able to contribute to the strength of Hope and that our loyalty to her and her purpose will continue to live in us.


TYSE ACHTERHOF Zeeland, Michigan Mathematics

BARBARA J E A N A L H A R T Rochester, New York English A l p h a Gamma P h i

MARY JAMES ADRION Holland, Michigan English

C O R N E L I U S O'VIGHO AGOKI-IWE Benin, Nigeria Chemistry

N A N C Y ELIZABETH ALEXANDER St. Paul, Minnesota Mathematics

DAVID L O R E A N D E R S O N Scotia, New York Chemistry Alpha P h i Omega

MELVIN ANDRINGA Holland, Michigan Art

JOHN APKARIAN Cleveland, Ohio Psychology

J O A N N B A R K E R ASS1NK South Haven, Michigan History

GERALD EARLE AUTEN Royal Oak, Michigan Economics Alpha Phi Omega

\ J A N E T SUSAN A R N O N E Syracuse, New York Sociology

JOHN JAMES ARNONE Syracuse, New York Religion Chi Phi Sigma


Senior Class

I BARBARA ALLAIRE BANG Syosset, New York Biology Sigma Iota Beta

M A R Y K A T H R Y N BARON Zeeland, Michigan Social Studies

F R A N C I S H. B A R R O N , J R . Beaumont, Texas Psychology P h i Tau Nu

DONALD B A T T J E S Grand Rapids, Michigan Art

K A R E N R U T H BECK Scotia, New York Humanities Kappa Beta Phi

J U D I T H ANN B E L L Kalamazoo, Michigan Biology Kappa Delta Chi

MARCIA R U T H B E N N I N K Kalamazoo, Michigan English Sigma Sigma

DAVID C A R L E T O N B E R G N E R Schenectady, New York Sociology Alpha Phi Omega

J A M E S GLEN B E U K E L M A N Pomona, California English

BONNIE J E A N BICKLE Traverse City, Michigan History

VICTOR BITAR Holland, Michigan

CALVIN P A U L BOER Holland, Michigan Business Administration Omicron K a p p a Epsilon


1&&T

WALTER LYNN BORSCHEL Kenmore, New York Religion Chi P h i Sigma

HAROLD DUDLEY BOUMAN Somerset, New Jersey Mathematics Alpha P h i Omega

L E S L I E ANN B R U E G G E M Y E R South Euclid, Ohio Biology Sigma Iota Beta Mortar Board

R A N D A L L W A Y N E BOS Holland, Michigan Physics

GEORGE THOMAS BREUR Zeeland, Michigan Political Science Chi P h i 5igma

BARBARA BRUNSON Sturgis, Michigan Speech Sigma Sigma

R O B E R T A R E N D BOSMAN End well, New York Political Science Chi P h i Sigma

KENNETH LEE BRINKS Zeeland, Michigan Chemistry

ALBERT BRUNSTING Holland, Michigan Physics

J A M E S BOUWMAN Holland, Michigan History Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

B E R N A R D L. B R O W E R Holland, Michigan Religion

L A W R E N C E CAIN St. Joseph, Michigan Economics Phi Kappa Alpha


Senior Class

K E N N E T H M. C A R P E N T E R Schenectady, New York Biology Kappa Eta Nu

SHARON CHAPMAN Hammond, Indiana Psychology Sigma Sigma

CONSTANCE CHAPPELL South Haven, Michigan Spanish

VICTORIA CHILDS Madison, Indiana Business Administration Kappa Delta Chi

CYNTHIA K A Y CLARK Elmhurst, Illinois English Delta P h i

S A R A H B. CLEVELAND Spring Lake, Michigan English

A N N E C H R I S T I N E COBB South Haven, Michigan Mathematics Sigma Iota Beta

L E S L I E L A W R E N C E COLE Williamson, New York Mathematics Phi Tau Nu

T H O M A S M. COOK Grand Rapids, Michigan History

LORNA H E L E N COONS German Town, New York Art

W I L L I A M COONS Hawthorne, New York English P h i Kappa Alpha

WAYNE G R E G G COTTS Hudsonville, Michigan Business Administration P h i Kappa Alpha


G W E N N B. DAGUS Dolton, Illinois Language Arts Delta P h i

GAROL J E A N N E D A L E B O U T Grand Rapids, Michigan Biology Alpha Gamma Phi

DAVID J A M E S C O U R T N E Y Monmouth, Illinois Art

J O A N E L A I N E GROSSMAN Benton Harbor, Michigan English Sigma Sigma

SUSAN M. D A M P M A N Teaneck, New Jersey Language Arts Delta P h i

D Y A N N LYN De A N G E L I S Dumont, New Jersey English Sigma Iota Beta

L A W R E N G E N E I L De BOER Grand Rapids, Michigan Biology Ghi P h i Sigma

GHERYL ANNE DEFENDORF Skaneateles, New York Music Sigma Sigma

MARGIA KAY D e G R A A F Grand Rapids, Michigan Music K a p p a Delta Ghi

DEAN R O L A N D D e M A S T E R Gedar Grove, Wisconsin Ghemistry P h i Tau Nu

DON M. D e M A S T E R Gedar Grove, Wisconsin Ghemistry Phi Tau Nu

DALE W. De RIDDER Holland, Michigan Business Administration


r

Sonior Cletss

R O B E R T F. De SAWAL Catskill, New York Mathematics Phi Tau Nu

J A M E S C H A R L E S De SMIDT Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin Religion Phi Kappa Alpha

R I C H A R D J. De VLAM1NG Welland, Ontario Psychology

ROBERTA KIRKPATRICK De VR1ES Holland, Michigan Language Arts

•

SUSAN-JANE De V R I E S Spring Lake, Michigan Psychology Sigma Sigma

D O N E L L E DIGGLE Harvey, Illinois Psychology Kappa Beta Phi

J O H N DANIEL DILLBECK, J R . Garden Grove, California Psychology P h i Tau Nu

F R E D R A L P H DOIDGE Lansing, Illinois English

R O B E R T DONIA Kalamazoo, Michigan History Chi P h i Sigma

T H O M A S LYNN D R A F T Spring Lake, Michigan Mathematics Phi K a p p a Alpha

JAMES DRESSEL Holland, Michigan Political Science

DONNA J E A N D R O P P E R S Oosthurg, Wisconsin Language Arts Alpha Gamma Phi


1&&T

J O H N B U R B A N K DRUGG Proctorsville, Vermont Biology

HENRY JAMES DYKEMA Grant, Michigan Chemistry P h i Tau Nu

LOIS J U N E D Y K E M A Zealand, Michigan Chemistry

SUSAN E D I T H E E N I G E N B U R G Holland, Michigan English K a p p a Delta Chi

F R E D E R I C ALVIN E M E R S O N , III Babylon, New York Biology

MARY MARGARET E N D E R L I N Prattsville, New York Language Arts K a p p a Beta Phi

R O B E R T L. E N G E L Muskegon, Michigan English

MARY I R E N E E S T H E R Quezon City, Philippines Art Alpha Gamma P h i

R O B E R T DAANE E T H E R I D G E Grand Rapids, Michigan Business Administration

ERIK ROBERT FAIR Washington, D. C. Sociology Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

FLOYD H O W A R D F A R M E R , J R . Twin Lake, Michigan Music

DIANA J E A N F I S H E R Tulsa, Oklahoma Biology


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n

i

o

r

C

l

a

s

s

f

vn

CAROLE F O L K E R T Muskegon, Michigan English Delta P h i

ELLEN R. F O L K E R T Lansing, Illinois Language Arts Delta P h i

GARY J O H N G A R W O O D Bloomfield Hills, Michigan Biology Omicron Kappa Epsilon

PATRICIA LUE GASPEREC Chicago, Illinois Language Arts Sigma Sigma

ETHEL ELAINE GLEICHMANN Queens Village, New York Social Studies Delta Phi

C H A R L O T T E ANN GOODRICH South Haven, Michigan Humanities Sigma Sigma

GLENN W I L L I A M G O U W E N S South Holland, Illinois English Chi P h i Sigma

L

R I C H A R D J O H N GELOK Clifton, New Jersey Biology P h i Tau Nu

BARBARA J E A N G R A N B E R G Orange City, Iowa History Alpha Gamma P h i

NORMA R E N S G R E E N F I E L D Holland, Michigan Science

:•

MARION R U T H G R E I N E R Queens Village, New York English Sigma Iota Beta

THOMAS GAINES GRIFFEN Hudson, New York Political Science Phi K a p p a Alpha


WAYNE GROESBECK Holland, Michigan English Alpha Phi Omega

KATHRYN WILMA HEADLEY Zeeland, Michigan English

MARSHA FAYE HENDRICKS Grand Rapids, Michigan English Delta P h i

DIANE HALE Amsterdam, New York Religion

J O A N N CAROL H E E R E N Forreston, Illinois English Sigma Sigma

ROBERT THOMAS H E R K N E R , JR. St. Joseph, Michigan Sociology Alpha P h i Omega

LINDA M A R I E H A M M I N G Pomona, California Biology Kappa Delta Chi

J O H N R. H E I L M A N , H I Holland, Michigan Psychology

T E R R Y LYNN H E U S I N K V E L D Holland, Michigan Sociology Chi P h i Sigma

MARY E L A I N E H A N D L O G T E N Coopersville, Michigan Chemistry Kappa Delta Chi

P A T R I C I A RAE H E L D E R Holland, Michigan Language Arts Sigma Iota Beta

MARCIA A N N E H E Y N S Grand Rapids, Michigan Sociology


riior Class

LOIS A N N E H I E M S T R A Grand Rapids, Michigan English Delta Phi

R U T H D. H O F S T R A Chicago, Illinois French

JACK W A R R E N HILL, J R . Byron Center, Michigan History

G A R Y C. HOLVICK Dearborn, Michigan Psychology Omicron Kappa Epsilon

F A Y E R E T A H1NES Louisville, Kentucky Language Arts

BYRON J A Y H O P M A Muskegon, Michigan Business Administration Omicron Kappa Epsilon

MARILYN J E A N H O F F M A N Muskegon, Michigan Political Science Sigma Iota Beta

HAROLD R E G I N A L D H U G G I N S Schenectady, New York Psychology Chi Phi Sigma

J J O H N DAVID H U I S M A N Grand Haven, Michigan Biology Omicron Kappa Epsilon

GREGORY STEPHEN HULSE Somerville, New Jersey Music

G E O R G E H U N G E R F O R D , JR. Saugatuck, Michigan Chemistry

MARJORIE HUNGERFORD Saugatuck, Michigan Humanities

flN t


-***

M A R J O R I E LEA H U N T Cambridge, New York Sociology

IRENE JAARSMA Holland, Michigan English

DIANE SUSAN J O L D E R S M A Westport, Connecticut English Sigma Sigma

t

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ii J E F F R E Y KING J O R G E N S E N Holland, Michigan English

MARGARET LYNNE JUNE Bell flower, California English

JEAN KAREN JUNG Wayne, New Jersey English

PETER STEPHEN KAMMERAAD Holland, Michigan Business Administration

MARGARET KAY KAPER Hamilton, Michigan Humanities

K E N N E T H G. K E E G S T R A Holland, Michigan Chemistry

G E R A L D OLEN K E E L Holland, Michigan Economics

ROBERT MARLEY KILBOURN Ortonville, Michigan Economics Omicron Kappa Epsilon

J A M E S WILLIAM K L E I N Berwyn, Illinois Chemistry Phi Kappa Alpha


Senior CistsŠ

J O H N P. K L E I S Hamilton, Michigan Language Arts

F R I T Z L. K L I P H U I S Holland, Michigan Chemistry

DARLENE JOY KOBES Holland, Michigan Biology

MARY LOU K O E M A N Holland, Michigan English

LYNN ELEANOR K R A M E R P a r k Ridge, Illinois History Sigma Iota Beta

RONALD J A Y K R O N E M E Y E R Grandville, Michigan Biology Omicron Kappa Epsilon

M I L T O N BRADLEY K L O W Bethesda, Maryland Biology Phi Kappa Alpha

R O B E R T CLAUDE K N O L Evergreen P a r k , Illinois Biology P h i Tau N u

MILICENT JOAN KOEMAN Hamilton, Michigan French Sigma Sigma

GORDON K. K O R S T A N G E Bellevue, Michigan English K a p p a Eta Nu

R I C H A R D KU1PER Kalamazoo, Michigan Economics Omicron Kappa Epsilon

DIXON L. K U I P E R S Holland, Michigan Biology


G E O R G E G. LABAN Winchester, Massachusetts Sociology

JAMES LEE LAMPEN Hamilton, Michigan Physics

CHARLES LANGELAND Muskegon, Michigan Business Administration

GLORIA J A N E L A N G S T R A A T Lynden, Washington Music Alpha Gamma P h i

S T E P H E N J. L A R K I N Benton Harbor, Michigan Political Science P h i Tau Nu

CHARLES PETER LATOWSKY Edgewater, New Jersey Spanish

MARGARET VIRGINIA LEE Paterson, New Jersey Biology Sigma Iota Beta

STUART LEVEY Grand Haven, Michigan Political Science

JUDITH ANNE LINDAUER Hillsdale, New Jersey Mathematics Alpha Gamma P h i

J A M E S P. L O H M A N Holland, Michigan English P h i Tau Nu

H A R V E Y M. LUCAS Holland, Michigan Music Chi Phi Sigma

J A M E S ALLEN MACE Jersey City, New Jersey History Phi Tau Nu


Sonior Class

P A T R I C I A LOU MAC E A C I 1 R 0 N Grandville, Michigan English Sigma Sigma

PRESTON JOST MARINO Troy, Michigan Omicron Kappa Epsilon

SUSAN H. MAC P H E E Ridgefield, New Jersey Language Arts

CAROL J O Y M A R N I E Harvey, Illinois English K a p p a Delta Chi

B E R T H A MAGAN Lima, Peru Spanish

WAYNE ROBERT MARSMAN Grand Rapids, Michigan Mathematics

LAURA L Y N N M A N A S E K Harvey, Illinois Language Arts Delta P h i

RONALD J. M A T T H E W S Muskegon, Michigan Chemistry

•

J O A N ELIZABETH M E D E M A Muskegon, Michigan English Alpha Gamma P h i

CAROL M E I E R Detroit, Michigan Spanish

W E S L E Y S C O T T MICHAELSON P a r k Ridge, Illinois Psychology Chi Phi Sigma

RANDALL M A R T I N MILLER Chicago, Illinois History Chi Phi Sigma


1&&T

R I C H A R D DAY M I L L E R Chicago, Illinois Political Science Chi P h i Sigma

D E L W Y N JACK M U L D E R Holland, Michigan Mathematics P h i Tau Nu

T H O M A S F R A N K M I N G , III Kinnelon, New Jersey Business Administration

JOHN MARK MULDER Chicago, Illinois Philosophy Chi P h i Sigma

SANDRA J A N E M I T T E R Orchard Lake, Michigan English

P A T R I C I A CAROL M Y E R S Albion, Michigan Psychology Kappa Beta Phi

JAMES FRANCIS MOORED Burnips, Michigan English P h i K a p p a Alpha

SUSAN ROSE N E H E R Bayside, New York Language Arts K a p p a Delta Chi

a J O Y C E EVELYN N E L S O N Queens Village, New York English Sigma Sigma

N A N C Y ANN N E W M A N Fair Lawn, New Jersey Art Sigma Sigma

MARIAN NIENHU1S Holland, Michigan Language Arts

ROGER G E O R G E N I E T E R I N G Grand Haven. Michigan Classics Phi Kappa Alpha


S e n i o r

C l a s s

DAVID M A R T I N N O E L Coldwater, Michigan History Phi Tau Nu

DALE L E S L I E O'DONNELL Clifton, New Jersey Biology

M A R T I N GARY O N D R U S Hinsdale, Illinois Chemistry P h i Tau Nu

L A U R E N D. N O E T Z E L Riverdale, Illinois English Kappa Delta Chi

T H E O D O R E R. OEGEMA, J R . Holland, Michigan Chemistry

MARLA J A N E OOSSE Grand Rapids, Michigan English Alpha Gamma P h i

DIANE DYKSTRA N O F F Z I G E R Trenton, New Jersey Speech Sigma Sigma

W. F R E D E R I C K O E T T L E Holland, Michigan Chemistry

ELIZABETH ANN OOSTING Dayton, Ohio Language Arts Sigma Iota Beta

J A C Q U E L Y N J A N NYBOER Rockford, Illinois Speech Delta Phi

T H O M A S L. OGREN Glen Ellyn, Illinois History Chi Phi Sigma

ELLEN O S T E R H A V E N Holland, Michigan German Delta Phi


1 0 Š T

MARK HENRY OUDERSLUYS Holland, Michigan Business Administration

RUTH PENNINGTON Cresskill, New Jersey Humanities Alpha Gamma Phi

J A M E S K. P O H L Naperville, Illinois Philosophy

E U G E N E A. P E A R S O N Anaheim, California Philosophy Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

M O R R I S LEON P E T E R S O N Spring Lake, Michigan Mathematics Phi Kappa Alpha

GENE ARLYN P O L L Hamilton. Michigan Religion Phi Tau Nu

GARRET LINWOOD P E I P E R Montvale, New Jersey Economics Chi P h i Sigma

SHARON EARLENE PHILLIPS St. Joseph, Michigan Social Studies

C H A R L E S H E N R Y POSTMA Holland. Michigan History Chi Phi Sigma

MAXINE ANNE PEMBROKE Marion, New York Biology

DAVID L E E P I E T Holland, Michigan English Chi Phi Sigma

J E F F R E Y MARK P O W E L L Miami, Florida History Chi Phi Sigma


Sonior C\sl&&

B R A D F O R D J. RACE, JR. Philmont, New York English Phi Kappa Alpha

J O A N DIANNE R E M T E M A Grandville, Michigan English Sigma Sigma

NANCY L E E R A J S K Y West Coxsackie, New York Biology

U P ABRAM R A U W E R D I N K Sheboygan, Michigan English Omirron Kappa Epsilon

P A U L ALLAN R E Y N E N Kalamazoo, Michigan Religion

S H A R O N J O Y R1GTERINK Hamilton, Michigan English Alpha Gamma Phi

VEKINUIN J A M E S KE1USMA Holland, Michigan Business Administration Kappa Eta Nn

H O P E R O S E RIMONDI Jersey City, New Jersey German Sigma Sigma

I E U G E N E EDWARD R O B E R T S Athens, New York History Phi Tau Nu

T H O M A S DeWAYNE R O S I N E Stiirgis, Michigan Biology

JANICE ROWEN Evansville, Indiana German

MARY P A T R I C I A R U S S E L L Massapequa Park, New York Music Kappa Delta Chi


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ARTHUR PAUL SCHAAP Edwardsburg, Michigan Chemistry

SANDRA L. S C H A P E R West Sayville, New York L a n g u a g e Arts Alpha Gamma P h i

NANCY L. S E I G H M A N Fairview P a r k , Ohio Humanities Sigma Sigma

P I E R R E D. S E N D E Bidjoka. Cameroon Biology

ADRIAN G. S L I K K E R S , J R . South Haven, Michigan Mathematics Omicron Kappa Epsilon

RICHARD WAYNE SMITH Wayne, New Jersey Sociology Phi Kappa Alpha

J A M E S R. SCHOON Phoenix, Arizona Psychology P h i K a p p a Alpha

SUSAN P A T R I C I A S H A N U Pompton Plains, New Jersey Psychology

DELWYN L. SNELLER Holland, Michigan English

CHERYL LEE SCHUENEMAN Elburn, Illinois Biology Sigma Iota Beta

TERRY RANDOLPH SHEFFIELD Grand Rapids, Michigan Political Science Omicron Kappa Epsilon

J O H N SOLODOW Albany, New York Biology


SUSAN ELLEN S O N N E V E L T Grand Rapids, Michigan Social Studies Delta Phi

HARVEY STREMLER Holland, Michigan Psychology P h i Tau Nu

SALLY A N N E S T R O M Rockville, Maryland English Alpha Gamma Phi

ANNA J E A N S Y P E R D A Muskegon, Michigan Biology Kappa Delta Chi

JOHN ALLEN TANIS Hamilton, Michigan Physics Phi Tau Nu

JUDITH TANIS Hudsonville, Michigan English

J E A N MARIE T E N B R I N K Fremont. Michigan English Sigma Iota Beta

ARLENE J O Y C E T E N C K I N C K Holland, Michigan Biology

KENNETH GLENN TEUSINK Glen Rock, New Jersey Business Administration Phi Kappa Alpha

VALERIE VERN SWART Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Biology

L A U R E N , J E A N TAYLOR Skokie, Illinois English

H O W A R D TIGELAAR Hudsonville, Michigan Chemistry P h i Kappa Alpha


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BEN TIMMER Holland, Michigan Business Administration Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

SUSAN U T Z I N G E R Muskegon, Michigan Psychology

DONALD P H I L I P T R O O S T Byron Center, Michigan Religion Phi K a p p a Alpha

R O N A L D VAN A U K E N Camillus, New York Religion P h i Tau Nu

JAMES FREDRICK TROST Rochester, New "York Psychology

T H E O D O R E R. VAN DAM Chine, California Chemistry Chi P h i Sigma

DAVID G E N E T U B E R G E N Holland, Michigan Music

L A R R Y DEAN VAN DE H O E F Englewood, California Mathematics P h i Tau Nu

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ALAN J A M E S VANDEN B E R G Holland, Michigan Biology

R E I N J O H N VANDER H I L L Holland. Michigan Art

A L B E R T VANDER MEER Holland, Michigan Religion

MARJORIE JACOBS VANDER MEER Holland, Michigan Art


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DAVID J A M E S V A N D E R W E L Spring Lake, Michigan English Phi Kappa Alpha

M A R G A R E T N. VAN D O N G E N Woodland Hills, California Language Arts K a p p a Delta Chi

ALAN P E T E R VAN DL'INEN Holland, Michigan Mathematics

PAULA WOLTERS VAN D U I N E N Holland, Michigan Biology

WILLIAM GERALD VAN D Y K E Holland, Michigan History

B E R N I C E ROSE VAN E N G E N San Cristobal, Mexico Speech

W A Y N E A. VAN K A M P E N Holland, Michigan Religion P h i Tau Nu

F R E D E R I C K VAN L E N T E Carbondale, Illinois Chemistry Chi P h i Sigma

CAROL VAN M I D D L E S W O R T H Fulton, Michigan Biology Sigma Iota Beta

MARY ANN VAN P E R N I S Rockford, Illinois English Alpha Gamma Phi

S H I R L E Y MAE VAN R A A L T E Holland, Michigan English Alpha Gamma P h i

P A U L L. V A N T HOE Grand Rapids, Michigan Biology Chi Phi Sigma


K E N N E T H J O H N VAN T O L Hawthorne, New Jersey Psychology P h i Tau Nu

CARL DALE W A L T E R S Holland, Michigan Biology Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

ALAN VAN W I E R E N Holland, Michigan Mathematics

CHARLES LEWIS WALVOORD Muskegon, Michigan Chemistry P h i K a p p a Alpha

CARL W. VAN WYK Richboro, Pennsylvania Physics Chi P h i Sigma

DIRK W A L V O O R D Glen Rock, New Jersey Music Chi P h i Sigma

P A U L H A R O L D VERDU1N Chicago Heights, Illinois Psychology Alpha T h e t a Chi

PHYLLIS WASHBURN St. Louis, Michigan Spanish

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DENNIS LEE WEENER Holland, Michigan Mathematics Chi Phi Sigma

J A N E ANN W E L L S River Forest, Illinois English Sicma Iota Beta

JOAN HELEN WELLS River Forest, Illinois English Sigma lota Beta

MARGARET JEAN WELMERS Li>s Angeles, California French


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BRADLEE SCOTT W E L T O N Saugerties, New York History Chi Phi Sigma

DIANE W H I T F I E L D Albany, New York English

MARTHA ELLEN WYATT Glen Ellyn, Illinois Biology

S T E P H E N F. W E S S L I N G South Haven, Michigan Biology

M A R Y ANN W E S T E N B R O E K Holland, Michigan Psychology

W I L L I A M H U G H W H A R Y , JR. Harrington Park, New Jersey Psychology Alpha Phi Omega

D E N N I S B R E N T WILCOX Grand Rapids, Michigan Psychology

DEANNA RUTH WILKENS Dumont, New Jersey History Sigma Sigma

SIEBRAND WILTS Londesboro, Ontario History

CARYL ANN YZENBAARD Kalamazoo, Michigan Political Science

R U T H E M I L I E ZIEMANN West Allis, Wisconsin German Sigma Sigma

J O H N LYLE Z I M M E R M A N River Forest, Illinois Chemistry Phi Tan Nu

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KENNETH LEE ZUITHOEE

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Chicago, Illinois Psychology Chi P h i Sigma

Kalamazoo, Michigan Biology Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

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The Class of 1967 faced a bright new f u t u r e as they left their Alma Mater.

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President and Mrs. Vunder Werf greeted Senior, Irene Jaarsma and her parents at the Commencement Day Breakfast in the Pine Grove. At Baccalaureate, Rev. Norman Thomas described "a dimension of life" to graduating Seniors as they sat in Dimnent Chapel for the last time.


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Commencement signifies beginning. At the June 5th ceremony, Seniors graduated from the tiny, secure life of a college student to the unpredictable, often harsh, life in that "outer world". College years should be a preparation to commence that life. A liberal education outside, as well as inside, the classroom, begins to mold a personality that will be able to cope with coming problems; it w lI lead to rich fulfillment of one's own life; it will help one determine how he can enrich the lives of others and contribute at least in small measure to a degree of betterment for the world. At Graduation, Seniors have an opportunity to reflect on all they have attempted, and all they, perhaps should have attempted. The feeling is often one of fear and apprehension, but, upheld by faith in the powers that be, as well as confidence in their own strength and intellect, they can, as everyone must, proceed to discover the "fair adventure of tomorrow."

Serious faces looked toward a new, perhaps

vague, future.

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English, mathematics, philosophy, art—all represented in the professorial procession.

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With tears and smiles, the long black line recessed to be greeted by family and friends.

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T"hio ISlow Beginning

Jack Hill and Mania Heyns discussed future a friend after the Commencement Ceremony.

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Mrs. Lenore Romney, wife of the Governor, challenged "Peril or Fulfillment". One should overflow with aliveness.

Seniors

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T o morrow. 1

"Lend me the stone strength of the past, and i will lend you the wings of the future. . . —Robinson Jeffers

270

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Then one morning we look out And it's spring. The tulips touristed— Minds examined— And a few stones overturned.


Ashes of soldiers, Dimnent chimes, Tremblings, Wanderings, W onderings— (What can a rocky, barely-poem say?) We proceed to fill the next fold— The fair adventure of tomorrow . . .

272



Times change


"Autumn to winter, winter into spring, Spring into summer, summer into fall,— So rolls the changins year, and so we change Motion so swift, we know not that we move." —Dinah Maria Mulock Craik



DIRECTORY

277


Organizations stnd Aotiviizios Dirootory

• j i i i in

'One mile is two in winter.

278


ADMINISTRATION ALPHA P H I S ALPHA PHI OMEGA ANCHOR STAFF ARCADIANS ART DEPARTMENT ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN STUDENTS BAND BASEBALL BASKETBALL BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT BIOLOGY HONORS BLUE KEY BUSINESS, ECONOMICS CLUB BUSINESS, ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT CENTURIANS CHAPEL CHOIR CHEERLEADERS CHEMISTRY CLUB CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT CHRISTMAS CLASSICS HONORS COLLEGE CHORUS COSMOPOLITANS CROSS COUNTRY CULTURAL AFFAIRS DEBATE SQUAD DELPHIS DORIANS EDUCATION DEPARTMENT EMERSONIANS ENGLISH DEPARTMENT FACULTY F E L L O W S H I P OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES FOOTBALL

160 73, 154 132 46 142 174 45 41 109 99 198 124 122 120 180 72, 134 36 115 121 196 64 125 38, 65 73, 141 91 66 32 73, 156 152 180 140 170 170-199 44 94

FRATERS FRENCH CLUB FRENCH HONORS FRESHMEN FRESHMAN ORIENTATION GENEVA RETREAT GERMAN CLUB GERMAN HONORS GOLF GRADUATION HIGHER HORIZONS HISTORY CLUB HISTORY DEPARTMENT HOMECOMING INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL INTERNATIONAL NIGHT INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB INTRAMURAL SPORTS JUNIORS JUNIOR VARSITY SPORTS KAPPA CHIS KNICKERBOCKERS LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT LITTLE THEATER MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT MAY DAY MILESTONE STAFF MORTAR BOARD MOTET CHOIR MUSIC DEPARTMENT NYKERK OPUS ORCHESTRA PALETTE AND MASQUE PAN-HELLENIC BOARD

57, 73, 77, 136 129 123 200-215 18 24 130 123 112 266 26 125 178 54 30 74 127 114 230-239 104 72, 146 73, 138 183 33 193 76 49 122 37, 63 172 86 48 40, 65 128 30


Orceinizsttiions etnd Aotivitios Direotory PARENT'S WEEKEND PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT PHYSICS DEPARTMENT POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT PRE-MEDICAL CLUB PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT

62 ' Z .'l88 iqi ^92 179

'ZZ"l89

P U L L

REGISTRATION-CONVOCATION RELIGION DEPARTMENT RESIDENT ADVISERS S.E.A SENIORS SIBYLLINES SINFONIA SOCCER SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT SOPHOMORES SOROSITES SPANISH CLUB SPANISH HONORS SPEECH CLUB SPEECH DEPARTMENT SPORTS

m

280

STUDENT CHURCH T L' STUDENT COURT STUDENT SENATE SYMPHONETTE TENNIS TRACK W.A.A. SPORTS : : : : : WINTER CARNIVAL ^ WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION WRESTLING WTAS YOUNG REPUBLICANS ' ' ' ' 7

Z

82 20 186

" 23 ^6 240-265 73, 150 129

92 igs .

..Z'"''"'216-239

57 73

14S

^ ^4 l26 182 91

32 29 29 ^ 113 106 116

72 44 105 3l

120


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Dirootory

AARDEMA, ROBERT AARDSMA, ALLEN AARDSMA, BETSY ABBRLNG, DONALD ABEL, DAVID ABEL, K E I T H ABEL, DAVID ACTERHOF, SUSAN ACHTERHOF, TYSE ADAMS, ALICE ADAMS, JAMES ADAMS, ROBB ADOLPHS, DOREEN ADRION, MARY A G O R M W E , CORNELIUS ALBERS, BEPPY ALBERS, SUSAN ALDRICH, CONNIE ALEXANDER, DENNIS ALEXANDER, JULIA ALEXANDER, NANCY ALHART, BARBARA ALLAN, JOHN ALLEN, DAVID ALLOCCA, A. GEORGE ALLYN, DAVID ALPERIN, J E F F R E Y AMI DON, LOIS ANDERSON, BECKY ANDERSON, DAVID ANDERSON, KENNETH ANDREAS, M ANDRES, ADRIENNE ANDREWS, BARBARA ANDRINGA, MELVIN ANGSTADT, RICHARD *ANKRUM, ELDON APKARIAN, JOHN APPLETON, RICHARD ARDAPPLE, JANE ARENDSEN, NANCY ARMSTRONG, J U N E ARMSTRONG, KARON ARMSTRONG, SUSAN ARNOLD, ELSA ARNOLD, KAREN

231 31, 36, 217 217 31, 201 96, 110, 145 94, 96, 98, 145, 231

127, 136,

74, 93, 121, 58, 60, 78, 149, 151, 107, 141, 40, 42, 36, 240, 40, 136, 120, 92, 93, 39, 154, 121, 133,

39, 146, 156, 33,

145,

231 241 201 201 201 231 241 241 217 231 201 217 36 241 241 231 217 217 201 201 201 201 241 201 141 217 217 241 46 164 241 231 231 217 121 29 201

ARNONE, JANET ARNONE, JOHN ARWADY, GEORGE *ASCHBRENNER, CHARLES ASHLEY, MILES ASSINK, JO ANN ATKINSON, MARY E ATWOOD, ANDREW AT WOOD, WILLIAM AUGUSTINE, RONALD AUMANN, NANCY AUSSICKER, LON AUSTIN. JAMES AUSTIN, KENNETH AUSTIN, ROBERT AUTEN, GERALD AVERY, H. GEORGE AZEKA, EMILIE BAAS, SARAH BACHE, CYNTHIA BACON, JEAN BACON, KATHERINE BAILEY, BRIAN BAILEY, GWYNNE BAKER, MELINDA BAKER, NANCY BAKER, STEVEN BAKKER, JANICE BANG, BARBARA BANNINGA, LANCE BAREMAN, GLENN BARENDSE, MICHAEL BARENDSE, PATRICIA BARENTS, ROSALYN * BARLOW, JOHN BARNES, EMILY BARON, BARBARA BARON, MARY BARRON. FRANCIS BARROW, DOUGLAS BAST. THOMAS BATTJES, DONALD BATTJES, ROBERT BAUER, WILLIAM BAUMGARDNER, LYNN BAXTER, GEORGE

241 241 47, 120, 141, 217 173 217 241 123, 231 39, 201 201 231

40, 41 231 133, 240, 241 41, 151, 217 44, 45, 152, 217 50, 231 39, 201 39, 201 41, 217 231 32, 126, 201 47, 201 62, 124, 242 41, 120, 141, 217

146,

77, 113, 33, 128, 141, 96,

201 217 189 231 217 242 242 217 231 242 201 201 201


Students and Faculty

*BEACH, LESLIE BEARD, CATHERINE BEATSON, RUBY BEAULEAUX, ALLEN BECK, KAREN BECK, PHYLLIS BECK, ROBERT BECKER, BRUCE BECKERING, JAMES BECKMAN, P H I L I P BECKSEORT, JANE BEEBE, MARSHA BEEBE, WILLIAM * BEERY, RONALD BEHRENS, PATRICIA BE1SHUIZEN, ROBERT BEKKERING, WILLIAM BELL, JUDITH BELL, SANDRA BFLTMAN, CALVIN BENEDICT, JANE BENJAMIN, MARY BENNETT, JAMES BENNINK, MARCIA BENTZ, ALLAN BENZENBERG, MARK BERENS, CHERYL BERENS, LEE BERETZ, JULIANNA BERGER, DONALD BERGEVINE, GEORGE BERGHORST, FORD BERGMARK, NELS BERGNER, DAVID BERRY, CLAYTON BERRY, MICHAEL BERRY, TRAIL BEUKELMAN, JAMES BEYER, BETTY BIBART, CHARLES BICKING, MARY BICKLE, BONNIE BIGELOW. CHARLES BIKLOW, F BILEYU, ALAN BINDER. ERIC BINDER, EUGENE BINSON. BETTY BIRD, CAROL BISCHOFF, WILLIAM BISSON, RICHARD BITAR, VICTOR BLACK, CARL

189 39, 201 127, 217 201 39, 242 117, 217 41 231 142, 201 154, 217 96 192 110, 201 104, 106. 107, 136 242 103 39, 201

28, 32, 36, 149, 242 40, 121, 133 136 30, 154, 217 96, 136, 217 39, 201 139, 231 141, 201 217 96, 110, 145, 201 242 40, 41 201 242 121 125, 242 145, 201 145 37, 40, 41, 231 217 139 129, 217 146, 231 133, 231 91, 107 242 217

Directory

BLAHUT. ERIC BLAHUT, NEIL * BLAKE. MARIAN BLAKI.EY. JANICE BLANK GRAYDON BLANN, MARY BLEAU, PAUL BLOCK. ROBERT BLOFMERS, BRENDA BT OOD. CLINTON BLUM, DEBORAH BOBELDYK. DENNIS BOER, CALVIN BOERS, ELAINE BOERSMA, JANICE BOERSMA, WILLIAM BOESE, RICHARD BOEZEMAN, KATHY BOEZEMAN, LARRY BOGUE, NANCY BOLES, DEBORAH BOLHUIS, THOMAS BOLT. DEBORAH BOLT. LEE BOLTON, CARTER PONE, LAWRENCE BONNEMA, RUSSELL BONNETTE, PAMELA BONSIGNORE. RICHARD BONT, RICHARD BOONSTRA, SUZANNE BORSCHEL, WALTER BORST. RONALD BOH ST. SUSAN BOS, RANDALL BOS. THOMAS *BOS. WILLIAM JR BOSKER. MARGARET BOSMAN, JAMES

125, 231 139, 217 164 201 141, 231 125, 151, 217 139, 231 141, 201 201 231 201, 203 112, 217 242

231 130, 231 154 149, 217 217 105, 142, 217 202 136 141, 217 145 136 231 32, 243 32, 156. 231 243 202 182 146, 231 142, 217


BOSMAN, ROBERT BOSMAN, SUSAN BOUMAN, JANE BOUMAN, SUSAN BOUWMAN, A. JAMES BOUWMAN, THOMAS BOWLES, NATHAN BOWMAN, HAROLD BOYINK, BARBARA BRAAKSMA, EUGENE BRACK, DONNA BRADSELL, K E N N E T H * BRADY, ALLEN BRADY, FLOYD BRANCH ROBERT * BRAND, EDWARD BRANDMAN, CRAIG BRANEN, ROB BRAUN, JOHN

32, 126, 142, 243 40, 42, 231

136, 205, 218 133, 243

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202 202 202 199 32, 100, 102, 1 0 3 , 1 3 6 39, 47, 202 170 142, 218

BRAY, SUSAN 4 ! 202 BRECKENRIDGE, JANE 154' 2 i 8 BREMER, THERESA 39 ; 74 218, BREUR, THOMAS ' ' 243 * BREWER, GORDON 107, 191 20? BRILL SUSAN * BRINK, IRWIN Z Z Z ' 197 BRINK, ROGER 245" 202 BRINKS, K E N N E T H 121^ 243 *BROCKMEIER, RICHARD DR ' 192 BROERSMA, NANCY 128 231 BROSSEIT, LARRY BROUWERS, J U D I T H 39 202 BROWER, BERNARD ' 243 BROWER, WEBSTER 127 BROWN, J E N N I E 37 40 231 BROWN, JOSEPH ' 9 6 202 BROWN, J U D I T H 29, 202 BROWN, LYNDA 42,' 218 BROWN, NANCY 39^ 202 BROWN, NORMA ' 202 * BROWN, ROBERT DR 62, 189 BROWN, SHIRLEY ' 218 BROWNING, MARY 148, 149, 218 BRUEGGEMANN, DAVID 91 BRUGGEMYER, LESLIE 122, 124, 128, 243 BRUGGERS, KENNETH 37, 141, 230, 231 BRUGGERS, RICHARD .... 44, 100, 106, 107, 108, 145, 218 BRUGGINK, THOMAS 105, 142, 218 BRUININKS, DAVID 231 187 * BRUINS, ELTON DR BRUMMEL, CRAIG 202 BRUNSON, BARBARA 44, 45, 243 BRUNSTING, ALBERT 243 BRUNSTING, BERNACE 151, 230, 231 BRVENIK, MARYANN BUEFUM, MARILYNN BUIS, CHARLOTTE BULL, MICHAEL

:/

243

202 202 124, 232 141, 218

BULTMAN, CAROL BUMFORD, GAIL BUMFORD, JANET BUNCHEY, NANCY BURKE, DEANNA BURNETT, J U D I T H BURRILL, LYNN •BURRILL, VIRGINIA BURSEY, ROSE BURT, CHARLES •BURTON, ROBERT BUSH, DARLENE BUTEYN, PAMELA BUTTERFIELD, MIRIAM BUTTERWORTH, NORMA BUURMA, KATHLEEN BWANAUSI, ELSIE BYERS, E D I T H BYL, CAROL BYLAND, JODY BYLSMA, NELENE CAIN, LAWRENCE CANDELORA, KAREN CANDELORA, KENT CANENE, KATHY CANFIELD, PATRICIA CAPRON, BOBBIA CARLIN, ELAINE CARLSON, PAUL CARLSON, TERRY CARPENTER, KENNETH CARR, BERNICE CARRUTHERS, CAMILLA CARTER. JAMES CASEY, DALE LEE CASSIDY, FREDERICK

36, 232 152, 232 39, 202 232 202 232 145 164 218 145 188 202 232 146, 218 36, 124, 232 40, 42, 202 125, 127, 232 218 151, 232 145, 203 243 149, 232 136 156, 203 47, 130, 232 125 218 40, 41 139, 244 218 218


Students and RstoLilty Directory CATHCART, JANET "CAVANAUGH, ROBERT DR "CECIL, ROBERT CHAMBERLAIN, SHARON CHAMPION, SANDRA CHAN, VINCENT CHANG, EDWARD CHAPMAN, CANDACE CHAPMAN, CAROLINE CHAPMAN, DANIEL CHAPMAN, SHARON CHAPPELL, CONSTANCE CHASE, KAREN CHEN, DANIEL CHERRY, CAROL CHILDS, TERRY CHILDS, VICTORIA CHIRIBOGA, GALES CHRISTENSEN, JAN CHRISTIAN, GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, PAUL •CHUNG, HORACE CHUNG, LING LING CIPOLLA, MARY CIZEK, CHARLES CLAASSEN, CANDACE CLAERBOUT, JANNA CLAPHAM, BRIAN CLARK, CYNTHIA •CLARK, DAVID DR * CLARKE, BARBARA CLAUSSEN, BARBARA CLAVER, ROBERT •CLELLAND, DONALD CLEVELAND, SARAH CLEVERING, JOHN CLIFFORD, DANIEL COBB. ANNE COFFENBERG, JOHN COLE, LESLIE COLEMAN, THOMAS COLENBRANDER, DANIEL COLENBRANDER, MARY COLLINS, DOUGLAS COLLINS, STEPHEN COMPTO.'N, LLOYD CONLON, EDWARD

39, 41, 203 174 41, 173

75 29, 39, 58, 60, 203 39, 149, 203 203 45, 149, 244 244 203 152 107 244 40 31 203

154, 36, 29, 130, 29, 32, 126, 127, 145, 44, 58, 60, 156, 125, 151, 127, 133,

151, 139, 28, 44, 107, 120, 141, 91, 104, 107,

198 74 203 218 232 203 203 244 178 199 218 218 188 244 203 141 244 218 244 33 203 218

218

CONN, CYNTHIA CONNOLLY, THOMAS CONOVER, GARRET CONRAD, BARBARA CONWAY, GREGG COOK, GARY COOK, GEORGE COOK, SALLY COOK, THOMAS COOK, WILLIAM COOK, YVONNE COONS, DAVID COONS, LORNA COONS, WILLIAM COOPER, JUDITH COOPER, MARVIN COOPER, RAYMOND CORCORAN, SHERYL CORLETT, DAVID CORNELISSEN, LESLIE COTTS, WAYNE COURTNEY, DAVID COX, JOHN CRAIG, SUZANNE CRAMER, COREEN CRANDALL, TIMOTHY •CRAWFORD, CLAUD DR CREUTZINGER, CAROL CRIPE, JERRY CRONK, JAMES •CROOK, P H I L I P DR CROSSETT, MONICA CROSSMAN, JOAN CROTHERS, DAVID CROZIER, JAMES CUBO, MANUEL CULVER, NANCY CUNNINGHAM, NEAL CUPERY, JOANNE CURRIE, DONALD CURRIE, WILLIAM CURTIS, SHIRLEY CUTICCHIA, PAUL CUTTING, WILLIAM SCOT DACUS, GWENN DAHM, JEANNETTE DALEBOUT, CAROL

219 136 36

105, 142, 112, 142, 154, 93, 105, 107, 142, 39,

36, 145, 156,

40 203 232 219 244 219 203 203 244 244 203

96, 136 219 136, 203 120, 126, 145, 244 51, 135, 245 46 36 232 41, 42, 219 180 203 36. 232 199 203 28, 149, 245 33, 34, 128

129, 154, 232

85, 136, 203 136 39, 154, 204 136 37, 129 156, 245 30, 45, 123, 124, 154, 245


DAMPMAN, SUSAN DAMSTEEGT, DON DAMSTRA, MARY DANIELS, BARBARA DANIELS, SUSAN DAUDT, CHRISTINE DAVEY, WILLIAM DAVIDSMEYER, DONA DAVIDSON, GLENYS DAVIS, ERIC DAVIS, GILDA DAVIS, K A T H E R I N E DAVIS, ROBERT * DAVIS, ROGER DAYTON, PAUL DEAN, PEGGY DEANGELIS, DYANN DE BOER, DALE DE BOER, JANICE DE BOER, JOAN DE BOER, LAWRENCE DE BOER, ROGER DE BOER, WILLIAM DEBRECENI, J O H N DECKER, DALE DEENIK, J U D I T H DEFENDORF, CHERYL DE FOUW, DAVID DE GOOD, JAMES *DE GRAAF, CLARENCE DR DE GRAAF, GARRY DE GRAAF, MARCIA DE GRAAF, JEAN DE GRAAF, WILLIAM DE GROFF, DAVID DE HAAN, JAMES *DE HAAN, ROBERT DR DE HART, BARBARA DEKKER, SANDRA DE KOCK, JOE DE KUIPER, THOMAS DELANO, JOHN DELL, CARL DELP, DEBORAH DE MAAT, DIANNA DE MASTER, DEAN DE MASTER, DON DE MEESTER, ROBERT DE MERCHANT, BLANCHARD DEN BESTEN, LINDA DEN HAAN, ARLENE DEN HERDER, JAMES DEN HOUTER, LEONARD DENNISON, GARY DEN UYL, JACK DE PAGTER, DAVID DE PREE, JOAN DE PREE, JODY DE PREE, STEVEN

156, 245 30, 135, 232 232 „

204

204 128, 152, 153 40, 42, 123, 129, 232 39, 219 149 219 50, 154^ 232 39, 65, 175 39, 135, 232 219 28, 151, 245 141 149, 204 154, 219, 228 40, 142, 245 36, 219 133, 232 39, 93 219 204 28, 36, 76, 88, 149, 245

171 36, 44, 146, 245 204 204

181 36, 37, 40, 41, 151, 219 232 135 91, 204 44, 116, 117, 156, 219 245 245 139 151, 219 204 204 204 219 219 146, 232

DE RIDDER, DALE DERKS, HARRY DE SAWAL, ROBERT DESHAZER, DOUGLAS DE SMIDT, JAMES DETHMERS, DAVID DETLEFS, VICKI DEUR, MARC DEURWAARDER, LINDA DE VELDER, ANNE DE VELDER, DAVID DE VETTE, J E A N N E • D E VETTE, RUSSELL DE VLAMING, RICHARD DE VRIES, BARBARA DE VRIES, DAVID DE VRIES, DENNIS DE VRIES, DONNA DE VRIES, PATRICIA DE VRIES ROBERTA DE VRIES, SUSAN DE WITT, KATHLEEN DE WITT, PEGGY DE YOUNG, DAVID DE YOUNG, DEBORAH DE YOUNG, DEMMEN DE YOUNG, MARK DE YOUNG, RICHARD *DE YOUNG, ROBERT DE ZWAAN, JACK DIAMANTE, ENID DICKINSON, KATHRYN DIETCH, ROGER DIEVENDORF, DAVID DIGGELMANN, HENRY DIGGLE, DONELLE DILLBECK, JOHN DILLBECK, MICHAEL DINGER, CHRISTINE DIRis.bE, JUU1TH *DIRKSE, LAMONT DISBROW, SIDNEY DIXON, R. DOUGLAS DMYTRIW, DARRYL DOBBIN, EDWARD — DOCHEZ, SUZANNE DOIDGE, F R E D DONIA, ROBERT DRAFT, THOMAS DREELAND, ELVIN DRESSEL, JAMES DROLEN, JANICE DROPPERS, DONNA DROSS, HARRY DRUGG, JOHN DUFFY, DOUGLAS DUITSMAN, DAVID * DUNBAR, DAVID DUNHAM, STEVEN

245 246 35 246 142' 204 39' 904 ' 20' " 79 39 45 93, '139 146,' 204 96, 100, W , 190 246 232 133, 219 204 2M 2M 246 246 39, 156, 204 115, 204 219 156, 204

39, 40, 154, _... 39, 40, 41, 29,

135,

^04 204 162 219 219 149 145 201 219 246 246 232 204

219 " 130 30, 40, 120, 135, 233 233 39, 41, 135, 219 156, 219 246 29, 47, 122, 125, 142, 240, 246 145, 246 36 246 219 28, 45, 154, 246 233 247 219 28, 107, 230, 233 184 204


DUNNICAN, JO ANN •DURAM, JAMES DURLING, ELIZABETH DYKE, NELSON DYKEMA ANN DYKEMA, HENRY DYKEMA, JON DYKEMA, LOIS DYKEMA, MARLA DYKHUIS, KENNETH DYKHUIZEN, ANN •DYKSTRA, D. IVAN, DR DYKSTRA, DIANE DYKSTRA JEROME DYKSTRA, KAREN DYKSTRA, PATRICIA DYKSTRA, RUTH DYKSTRA, SHARON DYKSTRA, THOMAS DYKSTRA, TIMOTHY DYKSTRA, THOMAS ROY EASTMAN, ROBERT EATON, PAMELA EDBROOKE, IRENE EENIGENBURG, JAMES EENIGENBURG, SUSAN EGY, DANIEL EHRLICH. JAMES ELDEN, MAKY ELFERINK, JANET ELSING, JOHN ELY, JOHN ELZERMAN, MICHAEL ELZERMAN, SUZANNE EMERICK, SUSAN EMERSON, FREDERICK EMERSON, NORMA EMMERSON, JANE, ENDERLIN, MARY ENDWEISS, BEVERLY ENGEL, ROBERT ENGELSMAN, JANE ENGSTROM, RICHARD ERIKS. KENNETH ESHBACH, CAROLYN ESHENAUR, ALLYN ESSINK, ROBERT ESTHER, MARY ETHERIDGE, ROBERT EVANS, JOHN EVERETT. HILARY EVERS, AUDREY EVERTS, BONITA EVERTZ, EDWARD FABER, FOLKERT •FAILING, GERTRUDE FAIR, ERIK FARBER. SHERMAN FARDINK, JANE

156 125, 179 44, 204 219 141, 247 36, 37 36, 121, 240, 247 151 204

-

62, 188 256 139 125, 149, 233 149 233 29, 156, 233 145 36, 141, 233 104

28, 51,123, 233 135, 233 36, 122, 247

203, 204 204 204 204 145, 220 204 40, 220 41, 247 40, 42, 130, 220 220 126, 152, 247 151, 204 247 156 139, 233 141, 220 149 141 124, 247 247 135, 233 39, 154 233 75, 127, 205 233 220 164 88, 136, 247 142 220

FARMER. DENNIS FARMER. DONALD FARMER. FLOYD FA VALE, JOSEPH FEIT. KENNETH FENNEMA, CONSTANCE PENNING, WENDY FERRELL, TIMOTHY FISHER. DIANA PITNEY, MICHAEL FLIER. JOHN FLOYD. DOLORES FOLKERT, CAROLE FOLKERT, DAVID FOLKERT, ELAINE FOLKERT, ELLEN * FOLKERT, JAY DR FORBES, WILLIAM FORDHAM, BARBARA FORMSMA. BRUCE FORMSMA, DOUGLAS FORMSMA, RICHARD FORTUIN. SHARON FOSTER. NORMA FOX. LORRAINE FRANCO. ELAINE FRANK. RICHARD FRANKE. NANCY FRANSFN. LINNEA FRASER. BLAIR ERASER. VIRGINIA FRATONI, SANDRA FRENS, E D I T H FRENS, GARY

29. 110, 136, 233 205 37, 40, 41, 42, 129, 247 135 96, 107, 136 220

FRENS, P H I L L I P FRESHOUR, JAYNE "FRIED, PAUL DR FRIS, VICTORIA •FRISSEL, HARRY DR FRISSEL, PAULA FUGAZZOTTO, BARBARA FULLER, DELCENE FULTON, PAMELA FUNG, DANIEL FLYSTRA, RAYMOND GAEB, JACK GAEKNOPER, MARY GAILLARD, CECILE GALE, JEFFREY GALLOWAY, DENISE CAMPER, PAUL GARBRECHT, CAROL GARWOOD, GARY GASPEREC, JOANNE GASPEREC, PATRICIA GASTON, BERTHERIA GAUGER, ALLAN GAUNTLETT, CAROL •GEARHART, EZRA DR

233 29, 45 125, 178 156, 233 192 149, 205 49, 233 154, 220 146, 220 133 32, 126, 135, 220 205 205 205 233 146, 205 220 233 136, 248 39, 205 248 149, 205 220 39, 40, 41, 42, 154, 220 185

144, 133, 51, 233, 87, 128, 156, 136, 125, 156,

145 247 233 220 234 248 205 220 248 193

40, 41, 42, 64, 107 91, 106, 107, 108 233 39, 205 205 39, 205 123, 233 96, 107, 136, 205 41 125, 205 39, 152. 220 205 96, 110


GREINER, MARION GREVIN, JULIA GRIESS, RONALD

etnd Retouilty Dirootory GEARHART, GEORGIA GELDERSMA, KAREN GELOK, RICHARD GENOVESE, NICHOLAS GEORGES, DANIEL GERARD, TOD GERIBO, DANIEL GEROW, NICOLE GERSBACHER, EVA GIBBS, GERALD WILLIAM GIBSON, BRIAN GIBSON, EMILY GIBSON, NORMAN GIES, T H O M A S GILBERT, KAREN GILBERT, NINA GILDER, MARY ANN GIRTON, MARY JO GIST, EDWARD GLAS, BEVERLY GLEICHMANN, BARBARA GLEICHMANN. ETHEL GLUPKER, CURTIS GOEHNER, GEORGE GONZALEZ, LYNN GOODFELLOW, THOMAS GOODRICH, CHARLOTTE GORDEN, BARBARA GORMAN, GREGORY GORTER, P H I L I P GOULD, AVERY GOUWENS, DAVID GOUWENS, GLENN COW, NORMA GRABINSKI, KAREN GRABO. ERIC GRAEEF, SUSAN GRAHAM, NANCY GRALOW, FRANCES GRANBERG, BARBARA GRANT, ALICE GRANT, JEAN GRANT. RODERICK GRANZOW. JOAN GRASMAN, DONNA GRAY, BONNIE GREEN, JARED GREEN, J E F F R E Y *GREEN, LAWRENCE DR GREENFIELD, NORMA GREEN WOLD, DUANE GREER. BEVERLY

149 205 141 248 31' 205 ' 220 220

ZZZ.Z. ..

145 220 205

'

205 39, 130, 220 32 142

156 233 154', 220 205 39^ 205 28 m ' 248 220 29 151 205 ' 135 149 248 ' 205 96, 110, 205 220 ' 206 41, 142, 24S 149 206 154 221 36, 45, 149, 221

248 221 117, 221 206 221 221 221 221 191 248 145 39, 206

36, 4l', 35, 96, 113, 136, 113, 122, 124, 154,

GRIFFEN, MARTHA GRIFFEN, THOMAS GRISSEN, JERRY GRISWOLD, ALAN GRIT, DALE GROAT, NANCY GROEN, KAREN GROESBECK, WAYNE GROOTERS, ELEANOR GROSS, BARBARA GROSS, DEANNA GROTELER, LOIS GRUETZACHER, ROBERT GULISH, MICHAEL GUNDERSEN, JOAN GUNKLER, ANN GUNN, DAVID GUNTHER, DONALD GUNTHER, JAMES GUTWEIN, RANDOLPH ^ HAAN, DOUGLAS HAGE, J U D I T H HAGER, VIRGINIA HAGLE, DIANNE HAGYMASY R U T H HAINES, LAUREL HAKKEN. MARCO HALE, DIANE HALL. CHARLES HALTER, WILLIAM HAMMING, LINDA HAMMON, LAURA *HANDLOGTEN, CLARENCE HANDLOGTEN, MARY HANKAMP, LAMAR HANSEN, CHRISTINE HANSEN, DARLENE HANSEN, MICHAEL HARDY, JAMES HARMELINK, THOMAS HARMS, STEVEN HARMSEN, LEANNE HARRINGSMA, PHYLLIS *HARRINGTON, STANLEY HARRISON, GEORGE HART, CAROLYN HART, CHRISTINE HARTMAN, PAUL HARTSEMA, PATRICIA HASPER, JOANNE HAVEMAN, STEPHAN HAVINGA, DAVID HAWORTH, CARLENE HAYES, BARBARA HAYNES, MARTHA

151 248

149, 206 71, 122 248 141, 233 92, 93, 120, 141, 234 145, 221 221 249 221 28, 45, 123, 130, 234 121, 141, 234 221 29, 39, 206 44, 221 141, 206 136 36, 41, 221 128, 206 123, 146, 234 129, 130 36, 40, 41 156, 206 40, 42 249 142, 206 234 249 221 162 249 26, 39, 146, 206 234 96, 206 121 104, 145, 206 105 206 175 139, 234 124, 130, 234 44, 50, 91, 106, 107, 142 221 206 221 234 206


HAZEN, MARY ANN HEADLEY, KATHRYN HEARNE, JONATHAN HEEREN, JOANN HEGER, JULIE HEILMAN, JOHN * HEINE, WERNER HELDER, PATRICIA HELGESEN, SUSAN HELLENGA, DEWAYNE HELM. MOLLY HENDERSON, BETTY HENDERSON, THOMAS HENDRICKS, DENNIS HENDRICKS, JACK HENDRICKS, MARSHA HENDRICKSSON, CARA HENDRICKSON, JULIE HENDRICKSON, THOMAS HFNEVELD, EDWARD HENEVELD, HARVEY HENNICKEN, JANICE HENNING, WILLIAM HERBIG, RICHARD HERKNER, ROBERT HERREMA, MARCIA HKRRICK. ROGER HERTEL, THERESA HESSELINK. MARY HEUSINKVELD, TERRY HEUSTIS, BRUCE HEYDENS, JOHN HEYER, SANDRA HEYNS, MARCIA HICKEL, JOYCE HIEFTJE, JANICE HIEMSTRA. LOIS HILDEBRAND. MARGERAE HILDEBRANDT. THOMAS HILL. ANNE HILL, BRIAN HILL. DONALD HILL, JACK *HILLEGONDS. WILLIAM REV HILLIARD. HAROLD *HILMERT, WILLIAM HILSON, GEORGE HINE. FRANKLIN HINES. FAYE HIXSON, BARBARA HOEDEMA, LOUISE HOEKSEMA, BARBARA HOEKSEMA, RONALD HOEKSTRA, JAMES HOERNER, SUSAN HOFFMAN, ALBERT HOFFMAN, MARILYN HOFFMANN, ALFRED HOFFMANN, LARAE

125, 221 249 234 28, 249 221 249 123, 185 30, 77, 151, 249 151 29, 206 221 221 206 145, 206 206 28, 45, 122, 156, 249 146 83, 221 30, 39, 77, 141 121, 142 221 221 96, 145, 221 123, 127, 249 154, 206 139, 221 -

32, 234 142, 249 206

115, 123, 130, 156, 222 249, 268 234 151, 206 250 36, 37, 47, 141, 222 206 41, 250, 61, 127, 112,

141 268 163 206 181

34, 35, 105, 128 250 222 234 222

,

93 154, 222 234 39, 151, 250 222

stnd Retouilty Di recto ry 250 222 37 29, 113, 136, 234 173 170 142 96, 136, 234 139 222

HOFSTRA, RUTH HOI.COMBE, PATRICIA HOLESINGER, JUDY HOT LEMAN, CRAIG *HOLLEMAN, JANTINA "HOLI.ENB \ C H . JOHN DR HOT I FNBACH. JOHN F HOI MAN, RICHARD HOLMES. DUDLEY HOLMES, SUSAN HOLTHUIS, ADELHEID HOT TSCLAW, JAMES HOLVICK, GARY "HOMES, P H I L I P HONHOLT, DOUGLAS HOOGSTRA, CAROL HOOGSTRA, WILLIAM HOOK, ELIZABETH HOOK, RONALD HOOK, SHARON HOOVER, SUSAN HOPMA, BYRON HORNBACHER, MARY HOROSINSKI, KATHLEEN HORST, ARTHUR HOSTA, JAMES •HOSTETTER, W I N I F R E D DR HOUSMAN, RICHARD HOUTMAN, CLAIRE HOUGHTALING, SUE HOVER, RICHARD HOWARD, ALICE HOWE, DANIEL HOWE, HARRY HOWELL, MARTIN

96, 250 174 30, 136, 222 45, 206 39, 206 142 146, 222 206 136, 250 37 206 207 222 125, 184 207 39, 154 152 207 142 142 222

HUBER, JOHANNES 0SALIE MHUENINK, 4 n c V v i M /JO ANNE HUGGINS, HAROLD HUISMAN, JOHN HUIZENGA, RAE

-

58

'

60

'

H : ;

HUI7ENGA, ROBERT

'

156

115

m.i.i'.noi'iv

'

222

16o iT, ^ J 250 ' ' 207

~ Z ~ .

J A N I C E

142

. 156, 203, 207 1 5 6 i 2 M

G R E G 0 R Y

u m ot t HULST, LARRY HULTQUIST, LOIS HUMBERT, RICHARD HUNGERFORD, GEORGE HLNGERFORD, MARJORIE . HUNT, MARJORIE .... *HUTTAR, CHARLES DR

117

37, 40, 250 222 207 Z ' Z Z ' Z Z 250 39 250 ' 251 Z Z Z Z Z Z I 171 ~


HUYBREGTSE, ROBIN HUYER, TOM HYINK, WENDELL HYMANS, DIANE IMMIK, GERALDINE . . . . INKPEN, PRISCILLA INSEL, JOHN IRAVANI, KAZEM IRWIN, PATRICIA ISHII, AKIKO IVES, BETTY JAARSMA, IRENE JACKSON, WILLIE JACOBUSSE, CAROL JAECKER, JOHN JALVING, SUSAN jay, K *JEKEL, EUGENE DR *JELLEMA, DIRK JENNINGS, MARTHA JENSEN, J U D I T H *JENTZ, ARTHUR DR JESSWEIN, DARLENE JEWELL, MICHELE J I P P I N G , SHIRLEY JOHNSON, AMY JOHNSON, ANN JOHNSON, ANN JOHNSON, DAVID JOHNSON, E R W I N JOHNSON, FAY JOHNSON, J E R E N E JOHNSON, JERRI JOHNSON, MARILYN JOHNSON, MARK TOHNSON, PAUL JOHNSON, RUSH TOHNSON, SUSAN JOHNSON, THEODORE JOLDERSMA, DIANE JONES, ALAN JONES, ALAN C JONES, DENNIS JONES, ERIC JONES, LAURIE JONES, MARILYN JONES, SUSAN TONKER, DUANE JORDAN, SUZANNE TORGENSEN. J E F F R E Y JOSEPH. ROBERT TOY. KENDRA TUNE. MARGARET TUNG. JEAN JUNKER. JACOUELINE TUSTESEN. ROY K MTT ER. TAIBI KALLEMYN, JANE KAT LEMYN. J O H N

127, 130, 222 222 222 39^ 154 207 ' 39' 207 Z I 2 , 36, 222 141 234 "129 222 207 ... 251, 266 32, 112, 126, 222 127 ; 234 35 234 : w, 196 138^ n o ' 207 27 "'iS7 207 39,' 207 ' 207 234 30, 39, 149, 222

222 207

124, 152, 235 110, 141, 235 136 39, 148, 149, 222 26, 48 77 149 251 ' 34', 128 145 34^ 139 " '207 207 40, 42, 207

222 96, 251 235 251 251 222 107 79, 149, 235 142. 222

KAMERLING, MARK KAMM. HAROLD KAMMERAAD, K R I S T I N E KAMMERAAD, PETER *K AMPFN MARTS. BEULA KANETZKY, P A U L

120. 141, 222 39, 207 251 183 223

KAPER, DALE KAPER, MARGARET 126, KARSTEN, CAMELLA 30, 44, 151, KASMERSKY, JANE 154, KASMERSKY, MARY 154, KATT, RICHARD KAZEN, DONALD 135, KEARNEY, CAROL 44, KEEGSTRA, K E N N E T H KEEL, GERALD 120, KEMINK, JANICE 29, 36, 124, KEMPKER, CLAVIN KERSHNER, DANIEL 135, KEUNING, EUNICE KIDD, ROBERT 136, KIEFT, ROBERT KIELHORN, MARK KILBOURN, ROBERT 136, KING, R U T H 156, KING, WILLIAM KINNEY, ALLAN 95, 96, 120, KINNEY, H I L I A R Y KINSEY, DIANE KIRK, LEONE KLAAREN, JOY 152, •KLAASEN, ADRIAN KLAASEN, BARBARA 149, KLAIN, PAUL KLEBE, WILLIAM 39, * KLEIN, DAVID DR 121, KLEIN, JAMES 29, 36, 78, 100, 103, 122, 145, KLEIN, NORMAN 106, KLEIN, ROBERT KLEINHEKSEL, RANDALL KLEIS, JOHN KLEIS, MARGARET KLEIS, MARY KLERK, WILLIAM KLEYN, KATHRYN KLINE, JOHN KLING, J E F F R E Y KLING, SUSAN KLIPHUIS, FRITZ KLOMPARENS, CHARLES KLOOTE, LINDA KLOW, MILTON KNEER, WILLIAM KNOL, JOYCE KNOL, ROBERT KNOPER, MARY KNOTT, JAMES KOBES, DARLENE

251 223 207 223 207 207 251 251 235 235 207 207 207 251 223 121 136 223 235 207 180 235 223 196 251 139 223 252

117, 146, 235 136 149, 208 223 39, 96, 107, 208 252 121, 125, 235 252 136 235 252 39, 41 223 252


a

n

d

R e t o L J l t y

Dirootory

KOEMAN, MARY KOEMAN, MILICENT KOEPPE, JOHN KOERSELMAN, LAURETTA KOETS, MICHAEL KOHRS, PAUL KOLKMAN, DONALD KOLLEN, BARBARA KOLLEN, KATHLEEN KOMAN, MARILYN KOOL RICHARD # KOOIKER, ANTHONY KOOIKER, GLENN KOOIMAN, JULIE KOOIMAN, MARY KOOISTRA. THOMAS KOOP, MARY LYNN KORSTANGE, GORDON KORWIN, STANLEY KOSKIE, DONNA KOSTER. JAMES KOSTER, RONALD KOTERSKI, CAROL KOUW, JANE KOUW, ROBERT KOZEL, LINDA KRAAL MENNO KRAEMER, LYNN KRAGT. TIMOTHY KRAUSS, JEANETTE KROMER. BARRY KRONEMEYER, DONALD KRONEMEYER, RONALD KROODSMA, DONALD KRUEGER, DANIEL KRUEGER, JAMES *KRUITHOF, BASTIAN KRITTHOF. GLENN

252 127, 130, 252 124 41, 223 39, 41, 141, 208 123, 235

40, 41, 42, 50, 91, 29, 39, 89, 151, 47, 48,

136,

235 29 173 235 208 223 208 223 252 208 223 208

29, 47, 208 208 146, 223 34, 36, 235 122, 151, 252 40, 41, 235 107, 208 28, 84, 252 109. 110 110 186

KRUIZENGA, SALLY KUH. WILLIAM KUHL, CATHY KUHN. ROBERT KUIPER. HERMAN KUIPER, RICHARD KUIPERS, DIXON KUIPERS. GLENN KUIPERS, IRVIN KUIPERS, RAYMOND KULLGREN, ROBERT KULP, ELLEN KUPFRIAN, LAURANCE KUSAK, JOSEPH KUTSCHER, SUSAN KUYERS, NANCY LABAN, GEORGE LAKE. CHARLES LAM, AMY LAM. DONALD LAM, FRANK LAM, JULIA LAMB, BARBARA LAMBKIN, JEFFREY LAMMERS, STEVEN LAMPEN, JAMES LAMPMAN, DONNA LAMSE, JUDY LANDHUIS, LYLE LANE, RICHARD LANG, CHARLES LANG, PATRICIA LANGELAND, CHARLES LANGELAND, SAMUEL LANGSTRAAT, GLORIA LANGSTRAAT, LINDA LANNING, CAROL LAPHAM, DOUGLAS LARKIN, STEVEN LARKIN, LINDA LARRABEE, SUZANNE LARSON, SUSAN LATHAM, CAROLINE LATOWSKY, CHARLES LATWINSKI, KENNETH LAWRENCE, SHIRLEY LEACH, JILL LEE, MARGARET LEE LUM, EDWARD LEECH, DONNA LEENHOUTS, JOHN LEESE, FRANKLIN

156 39, 208 208 208 41, 208 136, 252 252 141, 223 235 136 136, 235 40, 42, 154

40, 42, 123, 235 39 253 41, 129, 135, 235 74, 127, 235 208

27, 34, 128, 208 208 253 208 37 135, 235

41. 146, 96, 97, 98, 109, 110, 36, 122, 154, 154,

v

223 223 253 96 253 208

208 29, 120, 141, 253 156, 223 117, 151, 235 208 208 139, 253 235 223 208 151, 253

29, 44, 100, 145, 223 40, 42, 145, 235


LEESTMA, PETER LEIN, PAUL LEGGETT, RICHARD LEMMER, RICHARD LENEL, MARGARET LEVEY, STUART LEWIS, LOUISE LIEDER, CHARLES LIEVENSE, MARY LIGGETT, TIMOTHY LIGTENBERG, LOREN LINDAUER, J U D I T H LIVESAY, SUSAN LOCK WOOD. TAMARA LO GRIPPO, GERALD LOHMAN, JAMES LONGACRE, IRVIN LOOMAN, GLENN LOOTENS, ROBERT LOTTERMAN, JAMES LOUNSBURY, J A N E T LOVE, LINDA LOVELL, MARGARET LOWDERMILK, DAVID LOWDERMILK, VIRGINIA LUBBERS, DAVID LUBBERS, JEAN LUCAS, ELIZABETH LUCAS, HARVEY LUCKEY, MARY LUCKHARDT, SUZETTE LUIDENS, DONALD LUKKES, JOYCE LUNDELL, FRANKLIN LUNDQUIST, S T E P H E N LUYENDYK, ROBERTA LYONS, JOHN MAATMAN, IRENE MAC BARRON, SALLY MACE, JAMES MACE, JAMES MAC EACHRON, PATRICIA MAC GREGOR, CAROLYN MAC LEOD, MARGARET MAC PHEE, SUSAN MAC QUEEN, EWAN MAGAN, BERTHA MAILLET, ALLEN MAINES, P H I L I P MAINTENANCE MANASEK, LAURA MANDEVILLE, LYNN MANUEL, DOROTHY MARATEA, THOMAS MARCH, CHRISTINE MARCHAND, MELISSA MARCOTTE, K E I T H MARCUS, JAMES MAREMA, DONALD

30, 139, 223 40, 41 145, 208 36, 37, 128, 235 253 223 145, 208 40, 42, 149, 208 39, 208 141, 223 129, 130, 253 208 37, 40, 223

133, 47, 123, 130, 121, 142,

253 223 141 136 224 208

145, 208 124, 156 141, 235 40 208 36, 253 29, 41, 208 46, 224 29, 145, 224 208 96, 136, 235 29, 235 33, 128, 208 235 151, 224 136 253 254 29, 156, 208 209 254 39 254 209

156, 39, 146, 41, 154, 139,

165 254 224 235 224 224

209 142, 224 104, 136, 209

MARING, PRESTON MARKEL, STEVEN *MARKER. DAVID DR MARKS, J U D I T H MARNIE, CAROL MAROSY, MARY MARR, CANDACE MARSILJE, J U N E MARSMAN, WAYNE MARTENSEN, K E N N E T H MARTIN, ANDREA MARTIN, DONNA MARVIN, J U D I T H MASOURAS, CAROL MASVERO, J O S E P H MATEER, PATRICIA * M ATH IS. WILLI AM MATLACK. SUSAN MATTHEWS, DALE MATTHEWS, RONALD MAXWELL, RODERICK MAY, JERRY *MAY, JOHN MAYER, TIMOTHY MAYEU, PAMELA MC CLELLAN, SANDRA MC CREARY, BRUCE MC DOUGALL, DAVID MC GEEHAN, GEORGE MC GUIGAN, LINDA MC GUIGAN, MICHAEL MC ILWAINE, J E F F R E Y MC INTOSH, DONN MC KENZIE, DONNA MC KENZIE, JOHN MC KENZIE, NANCY MC LOUTH, BRADLEY MC MULLIN, CHARLES

79, 122, 136, 254 96, 141, 209 192 224 254 39, 224 120, 224

71,

96, 31, 151,

36, 41, 135, 142,

142,

254 224 235 209 224 128 209 235 162 224 224 254 224 209 163 136 224 40 209 209 224

224 37, 40, 41, 42, 141 151, 224 36, 135, 224 209 104, 209 142, 224

i


MC NAMARA, PEGGY MEADOWS, BARBARA MEADOWS, S MEDEMA, JOAN MEDEMA, JOYCE MEDEMA, MARCIA MEDENDORP, SHERYL MEENGS, ALYCE •MEENGS, JESSIE MEENGS, MARK MEERMAN, JOHN WAYNE MEEUSEN, NANCY *MEGOW, GEARHART DR MEHNERT, ELIZABETH MEIER, CAROL MENNING, MARK MEREDITH, RICHARD MESCHER, MATHEW METZGER, LAWRENCE MEYER, CORNELIUS MEYER, RUTH MEYER, SHERIDAN MEYERS, CHRISTINE MEYERS, RICHARD MEYERS, SANDRA MEZESKE, RICHARD MEYERS, SANDRA MEZESKE, RICHARD MICHAELSON, WESLEY *MICHEL, DELBERT MICHEL, JOHN MIDAVAINE, JOHN MIERSMA, THOMAS MIH, CHRISTINA *MIKLE, M. HAROLD MILLER, ALAN MILLER, BONNEY MILLER, J U D I T H MILLER, KATHY MILLER, MARCIA MILLER, PAMELA MILLER, RANDALL MILLER, RICHARD MILLS, SUSAN MILLS, WILLIAM MINET, DONNA MING, BRUCE MING, THOMAS MINOR, NANCY MITCHELL, NANCY MITTER, SANDRA MIXER, DAN MIYAMOTO, JOYCE MIZEVITZ, MARCIA MOCK, ANTHONY MOEHL, HELEN LOUISE MOFFETT. PAMELA *MOHRIG, JERRY, DR

45, 224 156, 224 154, 254 44, 146, 209 41, 154, 224 156, 235 164 91, 141, 235 209 185 224 254 30, 96, 121, 142, 143, 236

133, 236 224 224 209 236 224 236 224 32, 36, 79, 122, 142, 254 175 139, 225 225 18, 209 225 32, 126, 182 209 225 39 209 " l ^ , " ^ 225 225 79, 122, 125, 142, 254 X42 255 I

29, 136, 236 209 ^ 235 255 i ' 255 J45 US,"" 156, 209 225 ^5 209 197

MOL, KENNETH MOL, NORMAN MONSMA, JOEL MOORE. CLAUDINE MOORED, JAMES MOOSE, GEORGE MORGAN, JULIE •MORRISON, JOYCE MOSIER, RONALD MOTTAGHI, IRAVANI MOUW, CAROL MOYER, JEAN *MUELLER, JOHN DR MULDER, ANDREW MULDER, DELWYN MULDER, DENNIS MULDER. GEORGE . "MULDER, JANET MULDER, J E F F R E Y MULDER, JOHN MULDER. KATHLEEN MULFORD, VINCENT MULLER, FREDERICK MULLER, MARY MULVIHILL, CLIFFORD MUNRO, J U D I T H MURPHY, NELSON MURRAY, CALVIN MURRAY, LEO •MURRAY ZOE MUSSON, MARILYN MUYSKENS, DAVID MYAARD, ALAN MYERS, DOUGLAS MYERS, ELLIOTT MYERS, HERMAN MYERS, PATRICIA NABER, MARGO NADJOURMA, DE GAULLE NAGEL, CHRISTINE NAGEL, SIMON NAGY, SANDRA NAYLOR, DAVID NEBLETT, CARL •NECKERS, DOUGLAS, DR. NEHER, SUSAN NELLO, J NELSON, JOYCE NELSON, MERRY LYNN NETTLES, SALLY JO NEVERHOVEN, PATRICIA NEVINS, SHIRLEY NEWCOMB, CYNTHIA NEWMAN, NANCY NEZNEK, MARY NGUYEN, KIM-LAN NICHOLAS, KAREN NICHOLS, DOUGLAS NICHOLS, JULIE

39 209 3 ^ 225 45^ 209 28, 36, 145, 255 41 44 1 1 7 61' m ' 209

""""""

39 209 225 ' ^ 209 U 2 ' 255 ^

15? ono ' 163 " 225 45, 122, 142, 255 151 225 210 154 236 "" ' 14! MA 225 13 6 ) 225 xyo 154 139 236 ' 210 31 225 95' 136 45, 152, 153^ 255 236 74 1. 33 93, 125, 236 155, 225 35 196 126, 255 145 27, 149, 255 236

'

225 44, 151, 225 225 123 255 ~ 1 5 6 , 210 127, 129, 210 225 93, 107, 141, 225 210


StLidonts sind RetOLJlty Direotory NIENHUIS, JAN NIENHUIS, K E N N E T H NIENHUIS, LESLIE NIENHUIS, MARIAN NIENHUIS, ROBERT NIETERING, ROGER NIEUWSMA, MARK NIVALA, J O H N NOEL, DAVID NOETZEL, LAUREN NOGGLE, J U D I T H NOGGLE. NANCY NONHOF, JOHN

156 225 255 210 145 255

126. 141. 30. 36. 37, 146, 39 '

NONHOF, MARY • N O R T O N , NORMAN DR NOTIER, KATHRYN NUETZMAN, LENORE NUTT, CAROLYN NYBERG, RANDALL NYBOER, DALE NYBOER, JACQUELYN NYBOER, JILL NYKAMP, BENJAMIN O'CONNER, SHEILA O'DONNELL, DALE *OCKERSE, RALPH DR OEGEMA, THEODORE OETJEN, MARILYN OETTLE WILLIAM OGREN, THOMAS OHNSMAN, STEVEN OKABE, HIROYTIKI OLDENBERGER, MARVIN OLSEN, JAYNE OLSON, KATHLEEN OLTMANNS, EMMO ONDRUS, MARTIN O'NEILL, JAMES OONK, JOHN OONK, MICHAEL OOSSE, MARLA OOSTERHOF, RUTH OOSTING, ELIZABETH O'RIORDAN, MICHAEL OSBON, ANN OSBORN, JONATHAN OSTERHAVEN, CALVIN OSTERHAVEN, ELLEN OSTERINK, CAROLE *OTTIPOBY, LUCILLE OTTO, ERNEST OUDERSLUYS, MARK OVERBEEK, ROSS OVER WAY, DAVID OWEN, MARJORIE OWENS, RICHARD

141 256 256 210 225

199 ' 210 210 44, 104, 142, 210 ^6 44, 76," 787156, 256 115, 1 5 6 , 210 ^1 :

-

256 198 256 225 256 32, 142, 256 J20 210 149, 236 236 121 256

96, 105, 39, 107, 154 Z Z Z iO, 42,' 151, '

210 141 256 210 256 136

96 141 91' 142 122 256 164 142 210 ' 257

146 236 88 136

PAALMAN, GRETCHEN PAAUWE, J U D Y PADGETT, KATHY PAETH. CHERYL PAGE, DONALD PAGE, JEANNIE PALIATSOS, MICHAEL T A L M A , ROBERT PALMER, ELIZABETH *PALMER, LINDA PALMER, SANDERSON PALUMBO, JERRY PALUMBO, LINDA PAO VIVIE. MEIMEI PAPLAWSKY, PETER PARKER, DIANE PARKER, GARY PARKER, MELISSA PARKER, S T E P H A N PARKES, WILLIAM PARSONS, P E N N Y PATERIK, DAVID PATHUIS, FREDERICK PATTERSON, LINDA •PAUL, DANIEL PAUL, WARD PAULSEN, K E N N E T H PEACOCK, CHRISTINE PEACOCK, PHYLLIS PEARCE, CAROL PEARSON, ARTHUR GENE PEARSON, JOHN PEDERSEN, ALLEN PEDERSEN, ARTHUR PEELLE, GAIL P E I P E R , GARRET PELON, MARY PELON, THOMAS PEMBROKE, MAXINE PENNING, JAMES PENNINGTON, RUTH PERRY, ALISON * PERRY, RALPH DR PETERS, LAURA PETERSEN, ALLEN PETERSON, MORRIS PETERSON, ROBERT PETROELJE, ROBERT "PETROVICH, MICHAEL PEVERLY, JANICE PHAIL, BARBARA PHAM, JACKIE PHILLIPS, CHERYL PHILLIPS, GREGORY PHILLIPS, SARA PHILLIPS, SHARON

28 156 ' 236 236 46, 127, 129, 210 107 236 ' i86 210 133 31 210

40, 41, 42, 141, 226 210 " " " " 226 44, 115, 116, 117, 124. 156 142, 210 210 133, 226 79, 236 ' isi 210 39, 44, 210 79, 149 210 29, 122, 257 110, 142, 210 91, 141 156 91, 142, 143, 257 236 110, 111 257 141 257 18, 211 123, 184 211 211 145, 257 211 125, 40. 36, 37, 51, 87, 127, 39, 39, 40, 41, 117, 154,

178 211 236 226 211 211 211 257


StLJdonts etnd ReioLJlty Directory PICKARD, SUSAN PICKUT, SANDRA PIERCE, SHARON PIERS, JAMES PIERS. MARY PIERSMA, STEVEN PIET, DAVID PIKKAART. SHIRLEY PIKKAART, SUSAN PIXLEY. ZAIDE PIZARRO. MARIA PLAGENHOEF, VERNON PLAGGEMARS, LINDA ROWE, JOHN ROWELL, CHARLES ROWEN, JANICE ROYCRAET, RARBARA ROZEBOOM, ROGER ROZENDAL, DOUGLAS RUBINGH, CARLA RUMOHR, HARRY RUNCHEY, NANCY RUSSELL, MARY PAT RUTGERS, GAIL RYCENGA, LAURA RYNBRANDT, JAMES RYNRRANDT, MARY RYPMA, CHARLES RYPMA, GARY RYPMA, JOHN RYZENGA, BARBARA SAFAR. EVA SAFAR, TIBOR SANFORD, L. TOBEY SAWMELLE, MICHAEL SCHAAFSMA, EILEEN SCHAAP, ARTHUR PAUL SCHAAP, ROBERT SCHAAP. ROSEANN SCHADLER. JOHN SCHAEFER, MERRYL SCHAFTENAAR. RICHARD SCHAIBLE, PETER SCHAKEL, CAROL SCHAKEL. MARY SCHALK. JOHN SCHANTZ, ROBERT SCHAPER, SANDRA SCHILSTRA. W. CLINTON *SCHIPPER. DAUGHN SCHIPPER. JAMES SCHNEIDERS. ERNEST SCHOENECK. CHARLES

41, 146, 147 149, 211 236 29, 136, 226 239 96, 237 142, 257 146. 226 156 36 142 211 3 ! 211 ' 258 211 Z 36 142 ' 32 211 95 ; 95, n o , 211 _ 39 40 42 258 ' ' 212 149 ) 205, 212 24! 59, 6 o J l 5 , 227

ZZ.

ZZZZZ

100, 103, X36 39, 59, 60! 254 ^ 223

136 227 212 212 237

212 212 259 227 36 40 227 113 141" 919 ' 45' 237

29, 45. 129, 151, 237 149 227 36. 237 28, 45, 154, 44, 96, 44, 96 L.. 139,

259 142 142 212 227 212

•SCHOON. HELEN 181 SCHOON, JAMES 100, 101, 259 SCHOUT, LLOYD 100. 227 SCHOUTEN, JEROLD SCHOUTEN. SHARON SCHRA. KAREN SCHRA. ROBERT SCHREIBER. LINDA 124 SCHREINER. WILLIAM 182 *SCHRIER. WILLIAM DR SCHROEDER, K E N N E T H 107, 142, 227 SCHROEDER, RALPH 91, 212 SCHROEDER, ROBERT 31, 142, 143, 237 SCHROTENBOER, JEAN 227 SCHROTENBOER. KIM SCHUBIN, RONALD SCHUENEMAN, CHERYL 121, 123, 151, 259 SCHUMACHER, RICHARD SCHUMACHER, SUE 154, 212 SCHURR, EDWARD 212 SCHUTMAAT, FREDERICK 40, 42, 145 SCHWAB, NORMAN SCHWEGLER, ROBERT 40, 48, 123, 141 SCOTT, DONALD 31 SEBENS, JANET 44, 45, 154, 227 SEELEY, REBECCA 39, 212 39, 212 SEEVERS. GILES SEGEDIN, DEBORAH SEIGHMAN, NANCY 45,149. 259 SEISE. JEFFREY 36, 37, 135 SEITER. WILLIAM 141, 227 SELANDERS, WILLIAM 41, 227 SELANDERS, WILLIAM 41, 227 SELOVER. PRUDENCE 40 SENDE. P I E R R E 74, 93,121, 123, 127, 259 SENTMAN, SUSAN SEVENSMA, DAVID 212 SHALEK, JAMES 142, 227 SHAND, SUSAN 259 SHANLEY, BARRY SHAW, EDWARD 237 SHEFFIELD, TERRY 125, 136, 259 •SHERBURNE, FRANK 193 SHERMAN, MARGARET SHIELS, RICHARD 28, 29, 32, 125, 126, 141, 238 SHORT, DAVID 212 212 SIDAR, ELIZABETH SIERDSMA, PATRICIA 37, 238 SIMWANZA, KAMUTONDO 74, 93, 127, 238 SKIDMORE, BARBARA 146, 212 SKIVINGTON, JAMES SLAGER, JAMES 96, 145, 220, 227 SLATER, VIRGINIA 86, 212 SLAUGHTER. PATRICIA 128 SLENK. LARRY SLIKKERS, ADRIAN 259 SLIKKERS, DELORES SLINGERLAND. STANLEY 139, 227 SLOAN, PAUL 96, 107, 136, 212


SLOVENZ, MADELINE S M A U . E G . W . BARBARA" SMITH. BETTE "SMITH. DWIGHT DR SMITH, GRACE SMITH. JOHN • S M I T H , JON SMITH, MELVIN SMITH. PETER SMITH. OUENTIN DOUGLAS SMITH. RICHARD SMITS. MICHAEL SNELLER, DELWYN SNTTT .T F,R. WAYNE SNYDER, GRANT SOBANIA, NEAL SODER, JOAN SOLODOW, JOHN SONNEVELDT, LUCINDA SONNEVELDT, SUSAN

156,

121, 136, 145, 104.

212 227 238 1% 212 136 183 238 238 212 259 212 259

141 30, 146, 238 259 39, 87, 156, 212

28, 29, 36, 59, 6 0 , 1 2 2 , 1 2 5 , 1 5 6 , SOVERN, MARY SPENCER, DOROTHY SPITTERS, ALAN 142, SPITTERS, DIANE SPOONER, J A N E T SPOONHOWARD, RICHARD STAATS, BARBARA STAATS, SHARON STAFEELD. NANCY 146, STAPLES, SUSAN ' STARK, MICHAEL STEARNS, DAVID STEELE, NANCY •STEENLAND, ROGER DR STEHLIK, ARLENE •STEEPENS, HENRY STEININGER, JANET •STEKETEE, CHARLES STEKETEE, PAUL 107, 133, STEPHANS, ALICE 39, STERK, STANLEY 39, STERKEN, ROBERT STEVENS, HOSEA STEWART, ROBERT 41, STOECKLY. SUSAN 128, 146,' STOEPKER, DANIEL STOEPKER, DAVID 135, STRAMPEL. WILLIAM 96, STRANG, NORMA 44, 146, STREMLER, HARVEY 141, STREUR. WILLIAM STROM. SALLY STRONG, PAUL STRUCK, PETER 141, STRUCK. STEPHEN 139, • S T R U I K . BRUCE •STRYKER. MARIAN STUIT. JOHN

260 227 227 212 212 212 31 227 212 213 227 146 190 227 163 213 193 213 213 213

213 238 213 227 213 227 260 141 260 213 213 227 27 163

STYE. DAVID SU, T I M O T H Y SUTHERLAND, JAMES SWART, GAYLE SWART. VALERIE SWETS, F A I T H SYBESMA, DAVID SYPERDA, AN \ A JEAN SYPERDA, GLENN SYTSMA, ANN SYTSMA, JACQUELINE •TALLIS. JAMES TAM. T I M O T H Y •TANIS, ELLIOTT DR TANIS, JOHN TANIS, J U D I T H TAPIA, RUANO AMERICA TAYLOR. DENNIS TAYLOR. JANE TAYLOR. JEAN TAYLOR. K E I T H TAYLOR, LAUREN •TAYLOR. NANCY TAYLOR. NORMAN TAYLOR. WILLIAM TECHY, ANDREW TECHY. GEZA TELL. WILLIAM •TELLMAN, MARY TEMPAS, CHRISTINE TEMPAS, LEE TEN BRINK, JEAN TENCKINCK, ARLENE TENCKINCK, DELBERT • T E N HOOR. HENRY DR TEN HOOR. LOIS TENKLEY, ARLIN TENPAS, CARL TENPAS, NEIL TERINGER, LINDA TERPSTRA, MARTHA TERPSTRA, PAUL TERWILLIGER, ROBERT TEUSINK, KENNETH THOMAS, DAVID THOMAS, HERBERT THOMAS, JAMES THOMAS, THOMAS THOMPSON. JANET THIMPSON, PHYLLIS THOMPSON, ROBERT THORNE, MARY THORNE, THOMAS TICKNOR, SALLY TIGELAAR, HOWARD TILLEMA, JAMES TIMMER, BARBARA TIMMER, BEN TIMMER. BONNIE

po7 28, 32, 238 36, 227 260

' 7 149. 37, 127" 141, 125,

39 260 141 238 227 172 228 192 260 260

213 117,238 39, 213 36, 48, 238 260 172 136, 238

213 164 146. 228 213 125, 260 260 171 213 121, 238

120, 145, 108, 96,

213 228 142 238 260 213 136

151, 39, 142, 230, 149, 136, 32, 156, 121, 122,

213 238 213 238 213 238 228 260

105,

;

29, 32, 117, 149, 228 105,261 232, 238


TIMMER, RICHARD TOBERT, CAROLYN TOMLINSON, SANDRA TOMPKINS. BONNIE •TOONEY, NANCY DR TOONDER, KAREN TOOTHAKER, JAMES TOPP, SUE TOWER, PRUDENCE TROOST, DONALD TROST, JAMES TROTTER, MILTON TRUMAN, ALFRED TRUMAN, DONALD TUBERGEN, DAVID TURINSKY, LINDA TURKSTRA, BARBARA TYSSE, GERRIT J ULRICH, ROBERT UNDERWOOD, DAVID UTZINGER, DAVID UTZINCER, ROGER UTZINGER, SUE VALANTASIS, RICHARD VALENTINE, RALPH VAN AKEN, K I P P VAN ALLSBURG, DIANE VAN ALSBURG, JOHN VAN ARK, CHARLES VAN AUKEN, RONALD VAN AUKEN, WILLIAM VAN BEEK, DAVID VAN BEEK, JOHN VAN COR, FREDERICK VAN COR, JENNIFER VAN DAM, J U D I T H VAN DAM, THEODORE VANDE BUNTE, DAVID VANDE BUNTE, SHERYL VANDE BUNTE, SUSAN VAN DE HOEF, LARRY VANDEN BERG, ALAN VANDENBERG, KENDRA VANDENBERG, RICHARD VANDEN BOS, ROBERT VANDENBURG, RICHARD VANDEN HEUVEL, CAROL VANDEN HOEK, CAROL VAN DERAA, DALE VANDER BERG, ROBERT VANDER BROEK, FRANCES VANDER BURGH, RUTH *VANDERBUSH, ALVIN VANDERHAM, MARION *VANDERHAM, ROBERT VANDERHEIDE, LINDA VANDERHILL, COERT VANDER HILL, REIN

238 213 59, 60, 78, 154, 238 34 197 39 228 213 39, 41, 42 213 145, 261 261 142 142, 228 40, 42, 129, 261

30, 136, 238

100, 101, 141 261 141 31, 238 127, 228

41 31, 261

37" ' 30, 146, 78, 121,' 122' 50

213 238 238 238 213 228 261 213 228

31 ^ 261 ' ' 261 29, 39 149 213 ' i 3 6 ' 228 141

39 130 238 37 40 41 ' '

40 X79 188

238 228 261

*VANDER HILL, WARREN DR 125, 178 VANDER HYDE, GEORGE ' 104 VANDER KOOI, MARTA 228 VANDER LAAN, JEAN 36, 228 VANDER LAAN, LINDA ' 238 VANDER LAAN, MARK 136, 213 VANDER LINDE, MARY ' 213 VANDEK LUGT, WILLIAM 142, 238 *VANDER LUGT, WILLIAM DR ' 186 VANDERMAR. PAMELA VANDER MEER, ALBERT 36, 261 VANDER MEER. MARJORIE ' 261 VANDER MEULEN, JANE 39, 214 VANDERMYDE. CRYSTAL VANDER NAALD, LEWIS VANDER VELDE, CONSTANCE 149, 214 VANDER VLUCHT. DELORES 238 VANDERWEELE, STEPHEN 133, 238 VANDERWEL, DAVID 28, 32, 122, 145, 262 *VANDER WERF, CALVIN DR 62, 65, 160, 266 VANDER WERF, GRETCHEN 78, 125, 149, 238 VANDER WERP, MARCIA 39 VAN DEUSEN, ANN 124, 156, 238 VANDE WALL, LEE 145, 228 VANDE WEGE, JAMES 145 262 VAN DONGEN, MARGARET VAN DORP, ANN 36, 238 VAN DUINEN, ALAN 262 VAN DUINEN, PAULA 262 VAN DYKE, JOYCE 228 VAN DYKE, WILLIAM 262 VAN ECK, WILLIAM 239 *VAN EENENAAM, ISLA 162 VAN EENWYK, SHERRY VAN ENGEN, BERNICE 124, 126, 128, 262 VAN ENGEN, CHARLES 214 *VAN EYL, P H I L I P DR 93, 190 VAN FAASEN, WILLIAM 214 VAN HAITSMA. DENNIS 239 VAN HEEST, DAVID 135, 228 VAN HEEST, SHARON 214 VAN HOUZEN, MARTIN VAN HOVEN, SCOTT VAN HUIS, BRUCE 100, 101, 110, 111, 136 VAN KAMPEN, WARREN VAN KAMPEN. WAYNE 262 VAN KOEVERING, SUSAN 36, 149, 239 VAN LENTE, FREDERICK 122, 262 VAN LENTE, SHARON 239 VAN LOAN, MARIA 214 VAN MIDDLESWORTH, CAROL 262 VAN NOORD. CARL 39, 41, 129 VAN NOORD, GLENN 32 126 214 VAN PERNIS, MARY 28, 154, 262 VAN PERNIS, PAUL 142, 214 # V A N PUTTEN. JAMES DR 179 VAN RAALTE, SHIRLEY 44, 45, 154, 262 # V A N SCHAACK, EVA DR 198 VAN SLOTEN, JANNA 28, 239


stncl Retomlty Direotory VAN SWEDEN, LINDA VANT HOP, PAUL VAN TOL, KENNETH VAN VOSSEN, CHERYL VAN WIEREN, ALAN VAN WIEREN, CARRIE *VAN WIEREN, GLENN VAN WIEREN, JACK VAN WINGEN, PETER VAN WITZENBURG, JANINE VAN WYK, CARL VAN WYK, SUSAN VAUGHN, SHARON VEENEMAN, ROBERT VEENSTRA, RICHARD VELDHOFF, ROBERT VENEKLASEN, HOWARD .. VENEMA, R *VER BEEK, JOHN VERDUIN, EILEEN VERDUIN, KAREN VERDUIN, PAUL VER HAGE, COLLEEN .. . VER HOEK, HELEN VER HOEK, LOUISE VER SCHURE, ALAN VERWEY, BETTIE

44, 116, 154, 91, 110, 104,

214 262 263 239 263 228 191

145, ' 96, 127,

214 228 263 239

141, 124, 152, 153,'

214 29, 30, 141 133, 239 oU ^ "IO i q i ' o?* 30 2 U ^ 263

I

39' oor Z Z l s , ' ^ 239 28, 123, 154, 239 39 lofi 99ff 126, 228

VEURINK, BARBARA VICKROY, JOAN VIEL, JAMES RICHARD VISSCHER, GEORGE VISSCHER, JOAN VISSCHER, LINDA VISSCHER. RONALD VISSER, JOHN VISSERS, BRIAN VOGAS, MICHAEL VOGEL, DANIEL VOGEL, DAVID VOGEL, ROBERT VOIGT, VALERIE VOJAK, ELDORA VOLKERS. MARK VOLKERS, STUART VOLLINK. MARY R *VOOGD. HENRY DR VOOGD. JANICE v o s k u i l . LOU

149

2 U

' 228

113

214 121, 142, 228 139 g-f 214 34 ' 214 239 228 4 ! 214 45

239 187 en 000 154:229 U 9

'

'

VOSKUIL, SUSAN WABER. JACK WAGENVELD, EDWARD WAGNER. MICHAEL WAGNER. RUTH WAKEMAN, ROBERT WALCOTT, NANCY WALKER, CHERYL WALKER, MARY ALICE ... WALKER, SANDRA WALLACE, MARSHA WALTERS. CARL WALTERS. LAWRENCE WALTHER. PETER WALVOORD, BARBARA WALVOORD, CHARLES WALVOORD, DIRK WANG, LUCY WARD. STEPHEN WARNER, DOROTHY WARNER, ROBERT WARNER. WILLIAM WARNOCK, NANCY WASHBURN, PHYLLIS WATERMAN, JOHN WATTERS, JAMES WEAVER. SHARON WEBER, DALE WEBER, JACK WEBINGA, FRANCES WEBINGA, JOHN WEBLETT, CARL WEENER. DENNIS

239 239 127 214 ' 229 120 229

44, 100, 102, 103, 136, 39 40, 42' 122, MS, 36, 71, 142,' 143,' 104,"136, 149, '

214 263 ^5 229 214 263 263 229 214 214 214

39 40 215 ' ' 263 13 6 214 39 214 229 37, 40, 239 141' 214 ' 214 263


WEENER, JANICE WEENINK, JOHN WEESSIES, LINDA WEESSIES. MARYLOU WEIDEN, ROGER WEIDEN, STEPHAN WEINSTEIN, ROBERT WEITZEL, JOHN WELCH, ROBERT *WELLER, HUBERT DR *WELLER, KENNETH DR WELLS, JANE WELLS, JOAN WELMERS, MARGARET *WELMERS, WILLIAM DR WELSCOTT, RUTH WELSCOTT. THOMAS WELTON, ANNE WELTON, BRADLEE WELTON, ROY WESSLING, STEPHEN WESTENBOEK, MARY WESTER, FRITZ WESTERHOEF. DAVID WESTHUIS, JOAN WESTLAKE, CAROLYN WHARY, WILLIAM WHITE. BRUCE WHITE, SANDRA WHITFIELD. DIANE WHITFIELD, VICTORIA WHITNEY, MARY *WHITTLE, JOHN WICH, WILLIAM *WICHERS, NELL WICKENS, NANCY WIEGERINK, SUSAN WIELHOUWER, GINNIE WIERDA, SUSAN WIERENGA, WENDELL WIESSNER, GARY WILCOX, DENNIS WILDSCHUT, ALLEN WILEY, JAMES WILKENS, DEANNA WILLCOCKS, ERNEST WILLIAMS, DIANA WILLIAMS, LOUISE WILLIAMS, ROBERT WILLINGHAM, MARSHA WILLS, HAROLD WILSON, AMY WILSON, KATHLEEN WILSON, SALLY * WILSON, STUART WILSON, THOMAS WILSON, WILLIAM WILTERDINK, CAROL WILTERDINK, SHARON

239 28, 123, 130, 239 39, 214 142 40, 42, 239 41, 214

124, 184 180 151, 263 28, 151, 263 39, 48, 263 182 229 39, 41, 214 214 142, 264 214 264 264 141 214 229 133, 264 29, 145 151, 203, 215 264 156, 229 151 193 164 215 29, 154, 215 229 215 145, 215 215 264 229 28, 149, 264 239 36, 229 ' 215 229 229 36, 154, 239 30, 152 170 229 37, 141 39,' 215 229

WILTS, SIEBRAND WINDOVER, JOHN WISELEY, CLEO WITHERSPOON, ERIC WITZEL, JOHN WOLF, JANICE WONG, DAVID WOO, THOMAS WOOD, PATRICIA WOODBY, TIMOTHY WOODGER, ROBERT WOODS, BONNIE WOODS, KAREN WORKING, THOMAS WORKMAN, ALICE WORKMAN, CRAIG WORKMAN, HAROLD WORKMAN, J U D I T H WOZNIAK, SHARON WRAY, CYNTHIA -WRHEN, JUDITH WRIGHT, KATHERINE WRIGHT, NANCY WYATT. MARTHA WYBENGA, ELEANOR WYKHUIS, WILLIAM WYMAN, LYNN WYNGARDEN, DIANNE YANOF, TRAYAN YEE, BICK-YEE YEREB, MYRTIE *YNTEMA, DWIGHT DR YODER, POLLY YOUNG, K ATHLEEN * YOUNG. MARY EMMA YOUNG, VIRGINIA YOUNG, WILLIAM YZENBAARD. CARYL YZENBAARD, MARILYN ZAMORA, MARGUERITE ZANDEE, MARY ZANDSTRA, BARBARA ZAVACKY, JOHN ZEEDYK, MARY ZEH, KAREN ZEIGLER, RENEE ZELLER, JOYCE ZIEMANN, RUTH ZIMMERMAN, JOHN ZOET. PATRICIA *ZOETEWEY, JAMES ZONNEBELT, SUSAN *ZSIROS, JOSEPH DR ZSULITS, MARGARETHE ZUIDEMA, MARY ZUITHOFF, KENNETH ZUVERINK, CHRISTINE ZWART, JERRY ZWART, THEODORE

93, 125, 264 31, 215 135, 215 139 39, 215

31, 50, 229 145 28, 228, 239 41, 51, 130, 239 215 40, 41, 42, 129, 229 113, 136 96, 145, 215 229 215 130, 185 128, 229 ' 229 151, 264 37, 41, 239 ' 239 29, 229 ' 39 215 127 215 ' 215 180 149^ 215 164 40, 123, 156 122, 264 125, 146, 229 215 30, 152, 239 133, 229 229 ' 229 229 28, 29, 36, 122, 123, 149, 264 141, 264 156, 239

/

215 183 74, 130, 239 146, 215 36, 142,' 265 229 79, 122, 136, 265 104, 136, 215


We, the staff of MILESTONE 1967, wish to express our sincere appreciation to the following people for their help in producing this yearbook. Mr. Ted Junghlut, our photographer, for his unbelievable generosity and willingness during long hours of scheduled photos. Mr. Jack Marshall of Great Lakes Graphic Arts for his advice and aid throughout the year. Mr. Robert Miller of S. K. Smith Company for his kindness and advice in the production of our cover. Dr. Clarence De Graaf, our sponsor. Administration, faculty, and students for cooperation with questionnaires and picture schedules. All others who contributed their help and encouragement in many ways during the year for the sue• ' cess of this yearbook.

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