Milestone 1949

Page 1





Old (jlory Old Glory! Long may she wave O'er the la7id of the free and the home of the brave, Men fought for it; men died for it; Who isn't thrilled by the might and sight of it? There are many flags in many lands, There are flags of every hue, But there is no flag, however grand. Like our own "Red, White and Blue." She's up there — Old Glory — hoiv bright the stars stream! And the stripes like red signals of liberty gleam! And ive dare for her — living, or dream the last dream, 'Neath the flag of our country forever. So God bless our star-gemmed banner; Shake its folds out to the breeze. From church, from school, from house-top. O'er the city, over the seas. Paula Chaat


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BUSINESS MANAGER

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ASSOCIATE EDITOR

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LITERARY EDITOR

LORRAINE DRAKE

CO-DESK EDITORS

LARRY MASSE. GERTRUDE KLOOSTERMAN GORDON BELD

CO-ART EDITORS

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reword Seconds — minutes — hours — days — weeks — months — y e a r s — four y e a r s , a n d o u r c o l l e g e d a y s a r e g o n e . As the y e a r s p a s s w e will h a v e a y e a r n i n g to look b a c k w a r d a n d r e m i n i s c e on the i n c i d e n t s that h a v e p a s s e d from existe n c e a n d to r e m e m b e r o u r c o l l e g e d a y s w h i c h a r e s a i d to b e o u r h a p p i e s t times. It is to fulfill this y e a r n i n g that the Miles t o n e h a s b e e n c r e a t e d , a n d to p a s s on from g e n e r a t i o n to g e n e r a t i o n to b e t r e a s u r e d a n d c h e r i s h e d . A c o l l e g e y e a r b o o k s h o u l d b e the s t a g e u p o n w h i c h the s c e n e s of o u r m e m o r i e s a n d d r e a m s a r e r e - e n a c t e d . With this belief in mind, the Milestone for the y e a r 1949 h a s b e e n b o r n . The s t r a n d s of h u m o r , p a t h o s a n d i n t r i g u e w h i c h fill o u r coll e g e y e a r s h a v e b e e n w o v e n t o g e t h e r to form a plot far surp a s s i n g t h a t of a n y p l a y w r i g h t ' s p e n . As w i t h p r e c i o u s metals, the seemingly monotonous e v e r y d a y occurrences a n d humd r u m activities of school life, t a k e on a d d e d luster with the p a s s a g e of time. This Milestone h a s r e c o r d e d a n d d o c u m e n t e d t h e s e e x p e r i e n c e s so t h a t w e m a y r e m e m b e r , a n d in r e m e m bering, learn again.

L e a r n a g a i n to live, explore, a l w a y s

l e a r n i n g , a n d c o n s t a n t l y striving to dis cover t h e m e a n i n g of life, w e i g h i n g e v e r y t h i n g carefully, d i s c a r d i n g b a d , r e t a i n i n g good.

The r e s u l t i n g plot forms a p a t t e r n of living w h i c h w e

shall follow the rest of o u r lives. So, a s a clock h a s ticked a w a y the m i n u t e s to b e r e c o r d e d in the b o o k of time, the Milestone staff of 1949 h a s e n d e a v o r e d to c a t c h t h e m i n u t e s in the flight of time a n d r e c o r d t h e m for y o u . As the p l a y e r s of the p a s t p a s s in r e v u e u p o n this s t a g e , t h e p a g e s of o u r Milestone, m a y w e look b a c k with f o n d n e s s a n d t h a n k f u l n e s s in o u r h e a r t s on t h e s e m e m o r a b l e y e a r s . . .


MRS. B. KRONEMEYER Director Voorhees Hall

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MRS. E. DEN HERDER Director Van Week Hall


MRS. E. ROBINSON Director West Hall

MRS. N. ALDRICH Director Beach Cottage *£3

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Jack H. Schouten Administration,

Faculty,

Dr. E. D. Dimnent,

Secretaries

Rev. A. Strabbing,

Mrs. F. Otte, Rev. G.

Classes — Senior, Junior, Sophomore, Freshman, Special Dutch

Treat Week, Youth On The Campus

Athletics

— Fall, Winter,

.

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.

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Spring Sports

Campus Clubs, Organizations Musical Organizations Societies Campus Activities

— Parties, Programs,

Special Events


Dedication

Pages

10-

11

Pages

15-

26

H. Hospers, Rev. B. J. Lammers —Tribute

Pages

27-

29

Students

Pages

32-

77

Pages

80-

81

Pages

83-108

Pages

109-140

Pages

141-148

Pages

149-173

Pages

17 5-183


D E D I C A T I O N

Hack Schouten - - the Mottomble. Maidly. Helpful Person 10


D E D I C A T I O N

Jack, the Friend.

Jack, the C o a c h .

S o o n e r or later d u r i n g the term of s t u d y on H o p e ' s c a m p u s , all s t u d e n t s enter the w a r m s p h e r e of c o m r a d e s h i p c r e a t e d b y a m a n w h o s e s i n c e r e friendliness a n d g e n i a l n a t u r e h a s long e n d e a r e d him to s t u d e n t s a n d faculty alike. For Jack S c h o u t e n is, a n d h a s b e e n at the s a m e time, father, b r o t h e r , a n d friend to all. It w a s in the e a r l y n i n e t e e n t w e n t i e s that Jack first c a m e to b e r e c o g n i z e d a s the " f a t h e r of H o p e C o l l e g e athletics." He h a s held that distinction t h r o u g h the y e a r s until H o p e C o l l e g e athletics a n d Jack S c h o u t e n h a v e b e c o m e s y n o n y m o u s . W h e n athletics w a s in its i n f a n c y a t Hope, Jack g e n e r o u s l y v o l u n t e e r e d his s e r v i c e s to assist in fulfilling the i n c r e a s i n g d e m a n d for a full time athletic p r o g r a m . It w a s Jack a s a trainer, w h o in t h o s e first y e a r s of athletic competition b e c a m e k n o w n a s the h e a l e r of all ailments, p h y s i c a l a n d otherwise. His r e s p o n s i v e n a t u r e , r e a d y smile, a n d h e a r t y g r e e t i n g c o m b i n e d to m a k e him loved a n d r e v e r e d . From trainer to c o a c h w a s a m e r e t r a n s f e r r i n g of titles, for h e h a d long e v i n c e d g r e a t interest in c o a c h i n g . O u r first official c o a c h . Jack took over d u t i e s in football, b a s k e t b a l l , b a s e b a l l a n d track. It w a s Jack w h o i n s t i g a t e d p h y s i c a l t r a i n i n g p r o g r a m s for girls a n d m a d e g o o d sportsm a n s h i p a n d c l e a n living b y - w o r d s . A firm b e l i e v e r in both. Jack h a s long a d v o c a t e d the t h e o r y that a g o o d a t h l e t e will m a k e a g o o d citizen. A former a t h l e t e himself. Jack k n o w s t h e v a l u e of living right, not only in athletics, b u t in all things, a n d d a i l y h e strives to b e a living e x a m p l e of this. T o d a y , with o n e of the l a r g e s t enrollments in H o p e ' s history, a n d a g r e a t l y e x p a n d e d athletic p r o g r a m . Jack still finds time for m a k i n g the life of a s t u d e n t on H o p e ' s c a m p u s a fuller one. As Director of Physical E d u c a t i o n , trainer, a n d c o a c h of the b a s e b a l l s q u a d . Jack finds a m p l e o p p o r t u n i t y to m a k e f r i e n d s a n d i n f l u e n c e the lives of all with w h o m h e c o m e s in contact. E m e r s o n o n c e wrote, "In o r d e r to h a v e a friend, y o u must first b e o n e . " For over thirty y e a r s . Jack S c h o u t e n h a s lived a n d p r a c t i c e d this c r e e d . It is with a feeling of attection a n d pride, that this Milestone for the y e a r 1949 is d e d i c a t e d to him.

Jack, t h e Helper.

Jack, the Trainer. 11


President of

1

Mope College

DR. IRWIN I. LUBBERS

This June will m a r k the fourth y e a r that Dr. L u b b e r s h a s b e e n a t the h e l m of H o p e College. In s o m e r e s p e c t s t h e s e h a v e b e e n the most t r e a c h e r o u s y e a r s in the history of the college b e c a u s e of the i n c r e a s e d enrollment a n d the n u m e r o u s p r o b l e m s that h a v e a r i s e n out of this situation. As u s u a l , w h e n f a c e d with s u c h p r o b l e m s . Dr. L u b b e r s utilizes his wisdom, ingenuity, a n d p r a y e r to dis cover s u i t a b l e solutions. Thus h e is a b l e to l e a d the college a n d still r e t a i n its s t a n d a r d s a n d ideals. Last fall Dr. L u b b e r s h a d the distinct h o n o r of a t t e n d i n g the i n a u g u r a l services of Gen. Dwight D. E i s e n h o w e r w h e n h e b e c a m e President of C o l u m b i a University. By h a v i n g H o p e C o l l e g e r e p r e s e n t e d a t e v e n t s of this n a t u r e , the c o u n t r y will g r a d u a l l y realize the influence that a c h u r c h s p o n s o r e d college, s u c h a s Hope, c a n h a v e on the world. Also, information r e l a t e d at H o p e from s u c h e v e n t s t e n d s to m a k e the s t u d e n t s a n d faculty ol H o p e C o l l e g e m o r e c o n s c i o u s of the p r o b l e m s in the world a n d w h a t the c o n s e q u e n c e s of t h e s e will b e if a g r e e m e n t s a r e not r e a c h e d . Dr. L u b b e r s h a s m a d e n u m e r o u s trips a n d h a s a t t e n d e d m a n y i m p o r t a n t c o n f e r e n c e s in o r d e r to r e p r e s e n t H o p e C o l l e g e a n d the i d e a l s for which it s t a n d s . Dr. L u b b e r s ' faithful service to H o p e C o l l e g e is r e c o g n i z e d a n d d e e p l y a p p r e c i a t e d b y the entire s t u d e n t b o d y , faculty, a n d a l u m n i . His g u i d a n c e a n d w i s d o m h a v e encoura g e d m a n y on the long a n d often d i s c o u r a g i n g p a t h to h i g h e r l e a r n i n g . He h a s i m p l a n t e d in m a n y the desire for h i g h e r goals, v a l u e s , a n d p u r p o s e s in life. W e p r a y that G o d m a ^ w a t c h over our President in the f u t u r e y e a r s of g u i d i n g a n d s t e e r i n g the c o u r s e of H o p e College. 12


President of the Hoard of Zr ustees

DR. JOHN A. DYKSTRA

Dr. John A. Dykstra, P r e s i d e n t of the B o a r d of Trustees, r e s i d e s in G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. He is p a s t o r of the C e n t r a l R e f o r m e d C h u r c h , w h i c h is the oldest R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in the s t a t e of M i c h i g a n . Dr. Dykstra is a c t i v e in m a n y o r g a n i z a t i o n s a n d h e is r e c o g n i z e d b y t h e i n g e n u i t y a n d e n d l e s s e n e r g y with w h i c h h e m a s t e r s the t a s k s set b e f o r e him. The B o a r d of T r u s t e e s is t h e g o v e r n i n g b o d y of H o p e C o l l e g e a n d consists of forty-two m e m b e r s , a m o n g t h e m l a y m e n , l a y w o m e n , a n d ministers. The m e m b e r s a r e s e l e c t e d for a term of six y e a r s . At o n e of the r e c e n t m e e t i n g s , w h i c h w a s h e l d on H o p e ' s c a m p u s N o v e m b e r 2 a n d 3, 1948, the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s d i s c u s s e d a n d a p p r o v e d v a r i o u s resolutions. O n e of the most i m p o r t a n t w a s the a p p r o v a l of p l a n s for H o p e ' s n e w w o m e n ' s dormitory. A n o t h e r resolution a p p r o v e d b y the Board of T r u s t e e s is a s y s t e m for g r a n t i n g hono r a r y d e g r e e s . The p r o c e d u r e for g r a n t i n g the d e g r e e s will b e a s follows: a c o m m i t t e e will r e c o m m e n d n o m i n e e s to the B o a r d a t the fall m e e t i n g ; the n o m i n a t i o n must b e in writing a n d s i g n e d b y the T r u s t e e m a k i n g the r e c o m m e n d a t i o n ; voting for n o m i n a t i o n shall b e b y ballot, a n d a p u b l i c s t a t e m e n t will t h e n b e m a d e of the r e a s o n s for w h i c h the d e g r e e is to b e given. Possible h o n o r a r y d e g e e s a r e L.L.D., D.D., Litt. D., a n d D.Sc. U n d e r the a b l e direction of Dr. Dykstra, the Board c o n s t a n t l y k e e p s the s t a n d a r d "Faith of O u r F a t h e r s " b e f o r e t h e m w h e n m a k i n g decisions a s the g o v e r n i n g b o d y of H o p e College. 13


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A good book is o n e of Dr. L u b b e r s ' m a n y friends

Ji o m e

Prexy a n d his family

14



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The Director of Admissions, Prof. Albert Tim mer, r e v i e w s a p p l i c a t i o n s of p r o s p e c t i v e H o p e students, s e n d s out c a t a l o g u e s a n d letters informing s t u d e n t s of college e n t r a n c e r e g u i r e ments, a n d d e c i d e s the a c c e p t a n c e of students. Dr. Bruce R a y m o n d , g e n e r a l Business Mana g e r , is in c h a r g e of all college p u r c h a s i n g a n d g e n e r a l m a i n t e n a n c e work. The college T r e a s u r e r , Mr. H e n r y Steffens, d i s b u r s e s the f u n d s , k e e p s the books, a n d h a n d l e s billing a n d i n v e s t m e n t s m a d e b y the school. Mr. Geerlings, Director of H o p e ' s Publicity k e e p s the activities of the c a m p u s well publicized t h r o u g h school, local, a n d h o m e - t o w n papers. The Director of the Dining Halls, Mr. Rein Visscher, h a n d l e s the p u r c h a s i n g of all food for the school a n d is in c h a r g e of the Temple a n d V o o r h e e s dining r o o m s a n d kitchens. Mrs. Stryker, Associate Director of Alumni, h a n d l e s all information p e r t a i n i n g to former s t u d e n t s of Hope. Dr. Leenhouts, the c a m p u s physician, a n d Miss Jennie Spoelstra, c a m p u s n u r s e , p l a y a n i m p o r t a n t p a r t in k e e p i n g the s t u d e n t b o d y h e a l t h y a n d on their toes.

..

The D e a n of the Faculty, Dr. John W. Hollenb a c h , t h r o u g h the cffice of D e a n of the College, c o o r d i n a t e s the v a r i o u s courses, c h e c k s the p r e p a r a t i o n of the c l a s s s c h e d u l e , p r e p a r e s the e x a m s c h e d u l e , m a k e s n e c e s s a r y c h a n g e s in the college c a t a l o g u e , c h e c k s class a b s e n c e s , s u p e r v i s e s p u b l i c a t i o n of the daily bulletin, a n d works with the E d u c a t i o n a l Policies Committee. Miss E m m a Reeverts, D e a n of W o m e n , besides her t e a c h i n g role is a d v i s o r to the Alcor Society, the W o m e n ' s Activities L e a g u e , P a n Hellenic Board, a n d the W o m e n ' s H o u s e Board. D e a n Reeverts a l s o a c t s a s p e r s o n a l s u p e r v i s o r to all w o m e n s t u d e n t s on or off the C a m p u s . As D e a n of Men, D e a n H i n g a h a s c h a r g e of the h o u s i n g of the m e n s t u d e n t s on c a m p u s a s well a s a c t i n g a s a d v i s o r in h e l p i n g solve their p r o b l e m s , b e t h e y scholastic, disciplinary, or social. Rev. H i n k a m p in his c a p a c i t y a s Registrar of the College h a n d l e s the r e c o r d s of all s t u d e n t s on c a m p u s . V e t e r a n s ' , foreign students', a n d r e g u l a r s t u d e n t s ' c o m p l e t e r e c o r d s a r e filed. Diplomas a n d c o m m e n c e m e n t a r r a n g e m e n t s a r e also in the h a n d s of the Registrar.

faculty m e m b e r s . They, t h r o u g h their talents a n d e x p e r i e n c e s from w i d e fields of learning, a r e l a y i n g f o u n d a t i o n s for our future. At times w e h a v e b e e n d i s c o u r a g e d in o u r studies, b u t w e a l w a y s find h e l p f u l g u i d a n c e in our instructors. C e r t a i n l y w e o w e a g r e a t d e a l to the g r o u p of faculty w h o h a v e g i v e n so m u c h of their time a n d e n e r g y in not only instructing us, b u t in m e e t i n g the other d e m a n d s of a n increased student body. Even t h o u g h H o p e ' s enrollment h a s i n c r e a s e d a n d g r e a t e r responsibility h a s b e e n p l a c e d on e v e r y m e m b e r of the faculty, still, e a c h s t u d e n t is g i v e n the o p p o r t u n i t y to contact his faculty a d v i s o r a n d is a l w a y s confident of receiving c a r e f u l g u i d a n c e , helpful aid, a n d friendly s u g gestions.

faculty. . . H o p e College h a s a faculty of w h i c h e v e r y Hopeite s h o u l d b e p r o u d . A c a d e m i c a l l y , H o p e C o l l e g e s e e k s to build u p a faculty w h i c h will r a n k with the b e s t in the a c a d e m i c world in s c h o l a r s h i p a n d ability. These w o r d s w e r e t a k e n from "The Aims of H o p e College ', b u t w e s t u d e n t s k n o w that t h e r e is m o r e to it t h a n just the letters a f t e r their n a m e s ; it's their friendliness, their helpfulness, their e n c o u r a g e ment, a n d their Christian a t t i t u d e w h i c h m a k e s Hope, " a h o m e a w a y from h o m e " for us. It w o u l d b e a l m o s t i m possi bl e for most stud e n t s to i m a g i n e a single d a y w h e n t h e y w e r e not u n d e r the direct or indirect influence of the

T h e s e s e c r e t a r i e s a r e a l w a y s willing a n d r e a d y to help. Their c h e e r y smiles a n d understanding attitudes are deeply appreciated b y faculty a n d s t u d e n t s alike. W e all know Milton's w o r d s : "They also s e r v e w h o only s t a n d a n d wait". So often this is true of the office p e r s o n n e l a s they patiently wait on u s a n d our n e e d s . Yes, the s e c r e t a r i e s of H o p e C o l l e g e a r e also i n c l u d e d in our b i g h a p p y family. They c o n t r i b u t e their p a r t in a t t a i n i n g our goals. As w e s t e p a l o n g the stones of y e a r s a n d recall the m e m o r i e s of our A l m a Mater, the office p e r s o n n e l shall a l s o hold their p l a c e in our b o o k of memories. They too h a v e h e l p e d so m u c h in m a k i n g o u r s t a y h e r e a p l e a s a n t one.

Secretaries. . . Nor w o u l d w e forget our very efficient a n d c a p a b l e office personnel. The s t u d e n t s of H o p e College h a v e c o m e to k n o w t h e m a n d to a p p r e ciate their n o b l e efforts. The staff consists of twelve m e m b e r s a t the p r e s e n t time. They are: D i a n a A n d e r s o n , Secr e t a r y to the T r e a s u r e r ; Jean Brink, Switchb o a r d O p e r a t o r ; Mrs. Leon Dykstra, S e c r e t a r y to the Dean; Phyllis E n g e l s m a n , S e c r e t a r y to the Business M a n a g e r ; Mrs. Richard Flaherty, S e c r e t a r y to the English D e p a r t m e n t ; Mrs. Wm. H a a k , Cashier; Helen S a n d e r , S e c r e t a r y to the President; Mrs. Inez Tellinghuizen, S e c r e t a r y to the Registrar; D e n a Walters, S e c r e t a r y to the Director of Admissions. 16


A d minis t rat i on

IJ — Dr. J. W. H o l l e n b a c h D e a n of the C o l l e g e

E. M. Reeverts D e a n of W o m e n

M. L. H i n g a D e a n of Men

P. E. H i n k a m p Registrar

A. H. Timmer Director of A d m i s s i o n s

B M. R a y m o n d Business M a n a g e r

C. H. G e e r l i n g s Director of Publicity

Mrs. M. Stryker A s s o c i a t e Director Alumni Relations

R. Visscher Dining Halls Director

A. L e e n h o u t s College Physician

J. S p o e l s t r a Director of the H e a l t h Clinic

H, J. Steffens Treasurer



Prof, C l a r e n c e De G r a a f , Prof. E d w a r d Brand a n d Mr. E. Wilbur Boot of the En g l i s h D e p a r t m e n t .

faculty

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Prof. H e n r y Voogd of the Sociology D e p a r t m e n t a n d Prof. Lars G r a n b e r g a n d Prof. Harold H a v e r k a m p of the P s y c h o l o g y D e p a r t m e n t .

Kaalte

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T Prof. J a m e s Prins a n d Prof. H e n r y t e n Hoor of the English D e p a r t m e n t .

Prof. G a r r e t t V a n d e r Borgh a n d Prof. S t e p h e n P a r t i n g t o n of the E d u c a t i o n Department.

Prof. William Schrier a n d Mrs. Harry Harter of the S p e e c h D e p a r t m e n t .

Prof. Ella H a w k i n s o n , Prof. Metta Ross a n d Prof. Alvin V a n d e r b u s h of the History D e p a r t .

Prof. Lotus S n o w of the English Dep a r t m e n t a n d Mrs. H e n r y Schoon of the E d u c a t i o n D e p a r t m e n t .

Prof. Dwight Y n t e m a a n d Mr. D a n i e l Z w e m e r of t h e Business Administration D e p a r t m e n t a n d Prof-. W a l t e r Van S a u n of t h e Philosophy D e p a r t .

/ Prof. H e n r y Schoon of the G e r m a n D e p a r t m e n t a n d Prof. E d w a r d W a l t e r s of the Latin D e p a r t m e n t .

Prof. Albert Lampen, Prof. Jay Folkert a n d Prof. C h a r l e s S t e k e t e e of the M a t h e m a t i c s D e p a r t m e n t .



f a c u l t y

-

-

S c i e n c e

B u i l d i n g

••<%

UPPER LEFT: Prof, Harry Frissel a n d Prof. C l a r e n c e Kleis of the Physics D e p a r t m e n t . UPPER RIGHT: Prof. J. H a r v e y Kleinheksel a n d Prof. Gerrit V a n Zyl of the C h e m i s t r y D e p a r t m e n t . LOWER LEFT: Mr. Dirk G r i n g h u i s of the Art D e p a r t m e n t . LOWER MIDDLE: Prof. E d w a r d Avison of the S p e e c h D e p a r t m e n t . LOWER RIGHT: Prof. T h e o d o r e V a n d e r P l o e g of t h e Chemistry D e p a r t m e n t .

1 Prof. T e u n i s V e r g e e r of the Biology D e p a r t m e n t .

TOP: Mr. J a m e s Unger, s t a n d i n g , a n d Prof. O s c a r Thompson of the Biology Department. BOTTOM: Dr. William Moerdyk of the Biology D e p a r t m e n t .



f a c u l t y - - Qraves

TOP: Prof. Don C. M a d r i d a n d Miss N o r m a Wolcott of the S p a n i s h D e p a r t ment, Prof. M a r g u e r i t e Prins of the F r e n c h D e p a r t m e n t a n d Prof. D. Ivan Dykstra of the G r e e k D e p a r t m e n t . BOTTOM: M a r i a n Hietbrink, Alice Lammers, M a r i a n M a s t e n b r o o k a n d Mildred S c h u p p e r t , l i b r a r i a n s .

f a c u l t y

Mr. Jack S c h o u t e n of t h e P h y s i c a l E d u c a t i o n D e p artme nt.

-

-

Mall

Prof. Ernest Ellert a n d Prof, L a u r a Boyd of the G e r m a n D e p a r t m e n t .

C a r n e g i e

Miss Louise V a n D o m m e l e n of t h e Physical Education Department.

M a l l

Mr. Russell De Vette of the P h y s i c a l Education Department.



J a c u 11 y

-

Ck ap eI

-mm Wmmm

Upper left: Mrs. W. Curtis S n o w , M u s i c D e p a r t m e n t . Upper right: Dr. Joseph Zsiros a n d Dr. M. E u g e n e O s t e r h a v e n , Bible D e p a r t m e n t Lower left: Prof. Morrette Rider, M u s i c D e p a r t m e n t . Lower right: Mr. H e n r y De Pree, Religious E d u c a t i o n Department

faculty

-

Walsh

Music

Mall

/

Upper left: Miss J a n t i n a H o l l e m a n a n d Miss Norma B a u g h m a n , Music D e p a r t m e n t . Upper right; Prof. Milton Johnston a n d Prof. Robert C a v a n a u g h , Music D e p a r t m e n t Lower left: Mrs. H a r o l d Karsten, Music D e p a r t m e n t . Lower right Miss Hazel P a a l m a n , Music D e p a r t m e n t


Secretaries i

n

P e a r l Flaherty, S e c r e t a r y to the English D e p a r t m e n t

D i a n a Anderson, S e c r e t a r y to the Treasurer, a n d Helen S a n d e r , S e c r e t a r y to the President

Jean Brink, S w i t c h b o a r d O p e r a t o r

Top: Mrs. Leon Dykstra, S e c r e t a r y to the D e a n Middle: Mrs. William H a a k , Cashier, a n d Phyllis E n g e l s m a n , S e c r e t a r y to the Business Manager Bottom: Mrs. Inez Tellinghuizen, S e c r e t a r y to the Registrar

26


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TRIBUTE

DR. EDWARD DIMNENT After forty-nine y e a r s of self-sacrifice a n d d e v o t e d service to H o p e College, Dr. Edw a r d Dimnent retired from his position a s the h e a d of the Business Administration d e p a r t m e n t , a n d a s a professor on H o p e ' s C a m p u s . The half-century Dr. Dimnent d e v o t e d to the college he loved, h a d s e e n m a n y c h a n g e s , a n d h e w a s i n s t r u m e n t a l in i n a u g u r a t i n g m a n y of them. The college d o u b l e d in enrollment, a n d the financial s t a t u s w a s g r e a t l y improved. P e r h a p s the g r e a t e s t single a c h i e v e ment in those y e a r s w a s to act a s the guidincf h a n d in the b u i l d i n g of the H o p e Memorial C h a p e l . Its d e s i g n a n d its a w e s o m e b e a u t y w e r e entirely the p r o d u c t of his i m a g i n a tion a n d intellect. H o n o r e d a n d r e v e r e d , Dr. E d w a r d Dimnent is truly o n e of the g r e a t m e n of his g e n e r a tion. It is with a feeling of p r i d e in b e i n g a p a r t of the g r e a t tradition h e h a s left b e h i n d , that w e of the Milestone Staff of 1949, honor Dr. E d w a r d Dimnent, d i s t i n g u i s h e d President Emeritus of H o p e College.


TRIBUTE t,*,,»»*****»*•PHn! tut********** »»**$•*****•

Rev. Albert S t r a b b i n g

Mrs. F r a n c e s Otte

The Milestone of 1949 w i s h e s to p a y t r i b u t e to H o p e C o l l e g e ' s four oldest living g r a d u ates. Hamilton, M i c h i g a n , is the h o m e of the retired minister. Rev. Albert S t r a b b i n g , class of 1880. Before e n t e r i n g the ministry, Rev. S t r a b b i n g w a s a t e a c h e r in Forest G r o v e , Michig a n . He is n o w n i n e t y - t w o y e a r s old. Mrs. F r a n c e s Otte, c l a s s of 1882, is n o w living in Holland, Michigan, a f t e r a long, b u t v a l u a b l e term of s e r v i c e in the m i s s i o n a r y field with her h u s b a n d , the late John A. Otte. Mrs. O t t e ' s father, the l a t e Philip Phelps, w a s the first p r e s i d e n t of H o p e College. Mrs. O t t e is o n e of the first w o m e n g r a d u a t e s of Hope, a n d s h e is still a c t i v e in social a n d religious affairs. The y e a r 1884 m a r k s the g r a d u a t i o n of Rev. Gerrit H. Hospers, n o w a r e s i d e n t of East Williamson, N e w York. Rev. H o s p e r s s e r v e d s e v e r a l R e f o r m e d C h u r c h e s a n d h e is a l s o the a u t h o r of v a r i o u s books, t w o of his favorites b e i n g "The R e f o r m e d Principle of Authority," a n d "The S e c o n d A d v e n t From a R e f o r m e d S t a n d p o i n t . " In 1886, Rev. B. J. h a m m e r s g r a d u a t e d from o u r A l m a Mater. Upon l e a v i n g H o p e h e w e n t to N e w Brunswick S e m i n a r y . His first c h a r g e w a s in Iow a. At the p r e s e n t time, h e is r e s i d i n g in J a m e s t o w n , M i c h i g a n . T h e s e former H o p e s t u d e n t s a r e still active, a n d e x e m p l i f v in their d a i l y lives m u c h of the H o p e spirit w h i c h is p r e v a l e n t on C a m p u s t o d a y . The Milestone Staff of 1949 w i s h e s to p a y h i g h t r i b u t e to t h e s e four oldest living g r a d u a t e s of H o p e College. Truly they h a v e c r o s s e d m a n y a n d g r e a t Milestones in their lives.

Rev, Gerrit H. H o s p e r s

Rev. B. J. L a m m e r s


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C l a s s

O f f i c e r s

SENIOR James Stegeman D a v i d Dykstra Elizabeth W e a v e r lack Tirrell Walter Boerman

President Vice President Secretary Treasurer S t u d e n t Council R e p r e s e n t a t i v e SOPHOMORE E d w a r d Kerle President Nancy Vyverberg Vice President Marilyn V a n W e e l d e n Secretary John V a n E e n e n a a m Treasurer T h o m a s Smith S t u d e n t Council R e p r e s e n t a t i v e JUNIOR

William Ver H e y Gerard Gnade Doris K o s k a m p Eugene Marcus

President Vice President Secretary-Treasurer S t u d e n t Council R e p r e s e n t a t i v e FRESHMAN G o r d o n De Pree Betty Dowd Mary Houtman Roy L u m s d e n

32

President Vice President Secretary-Treasurer S t u d e n t Council R e p r e s e n t a t i v e


Wmlm mMmrn^

I

—^ | P; "

__


J O H N J. B E E R E B O O M , JR. Holland, M i c h i g a n

WILLIAM G. A N D E R S O N H a w t h o r n e , New Jersey

Major — Chemistry

Major — Biology K a p p a Eta Nu

W I L L I A M C. B E N N E T T W e e h a w k e n , N e w Jersey

GLADYS AVAKIAN New York, New York

M a j o r — History Phi T a u Nu

Major — Psychology Sigma Sigma

E L I Z A B E T H R. B O E L K I N S M u s k e g o n Heights, M i c h i g a n

EUGENE E BARENDSE Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — French a n d English Delta Phi

Major — Business Administration Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

W A L T E R J. B O E R M A N Pekin, Illinois

L E O N H. B A R N U M Mohawk, New York

Major — Chemistry Phi T a u Nu

Major — Sociology Phi Tau Nu

CLARENCE W. BOEVE Zeeland, M i c h i g a n

L E S T E R E. B A R T E L S M u s k e g o n Heights, M i c h i g a n

Major — History Phi T a u Nu

Major — Business Administration Transfer: M u s k e g o n Jr. College

S e n i o r s 34


D U A N E G. BOOI Ashkum, Illinois

LUCILLE B. B R U N S T I N G Hull, I o w a

Major — S p a n i s h Phi T a u Nu

Major — English S i g m a Iota Beta Transler: C e n t r a l C o l l e g e

K A R E L F. B O T E R M A N S Wassenaar, Netherlands

W A R R E N D. B U R G E S S Byron Center, M i c h i g a n

Major — Political S c i e n c e

PETER J. B R E E N Coopersville, M i c h i g a n

Major — History

•#*

R O B E R T D. B U R T O N Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — G r e e k

Major — Biology Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

D O N A L D G. BRUNSTETTER Metuchen, N e w Jersey

H A R O L D J. B U T E R Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major— Chemistry K a p p a Eta Nu

Major — Business Administration Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

JEAN SIBLEY B R U N S T E T T E R Jersey City, New Jersey

M A R I E E. B U T T L A R Warwick, New York

Major — History Sigma Sigma

Major — Psychology Delta Phi

S e n i o r s 35


L O I S E. D E KLEINE

T O L A N L. C H A P P E L L Petersburg, Indiana

Jamestown, M i c h i g a n Major — E d u c a t i o n Delta Phi

Major — Psychology Phi K a p p a A l p h a

G E R A R D D E L O O F , JR. Richland, M i c h i g a n

A L W I N B. C O L E M A N G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n

Major — English

Major — C h e m i s t r y Phi T a u Nu

WILLIAM A. DE MEESTER

DALMAN R O D G E R H. Holland, M i c h i g a n

Paterson, N e w Jersey Major — C h e m i s t r y K a p p a Eta Nu

M a j o r — History

JAMES DEN HERDER Holland, Michigan

D O R O T H Y M. DAVIS C u d d e b a c k v i l l e , New York

Major — Business Administration Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — English Delta Phi

B E T T Y J. D E R Y K E Kalamazoo, Michigan

R O G E R W . DECKER S l i n g e r l a n d s , New York

M a j o r —• Sociology T h e t a G a m m a Phi

Major — Biology K a p p a Eta Nu

S e n i o r s 36


LOWELL DE WEERD Holland, M i c h i g a n

E. D A V I D D Y K S T R A O r a n g e City, I o w a

Major — Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

Major — Philosophy Chi Phi S i g m a Transfer; Northwestern University

L E O N A R D J. D I C K Holland, M i c h i g a n

H A R O L D E. D Y K S T R A G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n

Major — Biology

M a j o r — English

M A R J O R I E E. D I X O N Voorheesville, N e w York

VERGIL H. D Y K S T R A O r a n g e City, I o w a

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s

Major — English a n d Philosophy Chi Phi S i g m a

W A R R E N B. E I C K E L B E R G Douglaston, Long Island, New York

V E R N O N E. D U I K E R Conrad, M o n t a n a Major — Biology

Major — Biology a n d C h e m i s t r y K a p p a Eta Nu

D O N A L D R. E V E R S

G E N E V I E V E P. D U I S E R Muskegon, M i c h i g a n

C h i c a g o , Illinois Major — English Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n

S e n i o r s 37


iiiifi

M A R I L Y N L. F R E Y G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n

H A R O L D S. FISHER Grand Haven, Michigan

Major — E d u c a t i o n S i g m a Iota Beta

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s

W A L L A C E FRIEDBERG New York, New York

T E D E. F L A H E R T Y Dearborn, Michigan

Major — Chemistry Phi K a p p a Alpha Transfer: Long Island U.

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s Chi Phi S i g m a

ROBERT C. FROELICH C l e v e l a n d , Ohio

ROBERT A. FOLKERT Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — Economics a n d Business Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — Greek Chi Phi S i g m a

R I C H A R D Z. G L E R U M Rochester, New York

J O H N H. F O R S T E N Z e e l a n d , Michigan

Major — Biology

Major — Mathematics

JAMES D. G R O O T E R S O r a n g e City, I o w a

HELEN G. FREDRICKS M u s k e g o n Heights, M i c h i g a n

Major — Chemistry Transfer: I o w a State

M a j o r — Englis h Sigma Sigma

S e n i o r s 38


E U N I C E E. G R O S S Brooklyn, N e w York

H A R V E Y R. H E E R S P I N K Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — Biology S i g m a Iota Beta

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s

H A R O L D P. G R O T H Plymouth, M i c h i g a n

E U N I C E J. H E I N E N Oostburg, Wisconsin Major — C h e m i s t r y T h e t a G a m m a Phi

Major — Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

M A R I O N S. D. H A N N A Jersey City, N e w Jersey

W A Y N E K. H E L L E N G A Grand Haven, Michigan

Major — S p a n i s h a n d F r e n c h S i g m a Iota Beta

Major — C h e m i s t r y Chi Phi S i g m a

MARY LOUISE HEPP Brooklyn, New York

TIMOTHY S. H A R R I S O N Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — English

Major — C h e m i s t r y Phi K a p p a A l p h a

IRENE C. H E E M S T R A Fenton, M i c h i g a n

ALIDA HIBMA O r a n g e City, I o w a

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s Delta Phi

Major — English S i g m a Iota Beta

S e n i o r s 39


HENRY W . HOFTIEZER O o s t b u r g , Wisconsin

CONSTANCE HINGA Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — Chemistry Phi K a p p a A l p h a

Major — E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n Sigma Sigma

M A R I A N A. H O L M A N

PAUL HINKAMP Holland, M i c h i g a n

Flint, M i c h i g a n Major — Biology S i g m a Iota Beta

Major — Chemistry Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

D A V I D M. H O O G E R H Y D E G r a n d Rapids, Michigan

R I C H A R D L. H O E B E K E G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n

Major — Economics Phi T a u Nu

Major — Chemistry Phi T a u Nu

R U S S E L L E. H O R T O N Paterson, New Jersey

DONALD HOEK Jenison, M i c h i g a n

Major — English

M a j o r — Music'

A L E X A N D E R M. HUMBERT Holland, M i c h i g a n

BENJAMIN H O F M E Y E R Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major •— Business Administration K a p p a Eta Nu

Major — Chemistry

S e n i o r s 40


DONALD IHRMAN

J A N L. J O L D E R S M A West Sayville, N e w York

Holland, M i c h i g a n Major — History Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — Social S t u d i e s Sigma Sigma

C A R O L Y N J. I N G H A M Ferndale, Michigan

H A R O L D L. K A M M E R A A D Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s Delta Phi

M a j o r — English

E D W A R D J. K A S S I G W o o d s i d e , Long Island, New York

V I R G I L B. J A N S S E N Zeeland, M i c h i g a n Major — English

Major — Chemistry K a p p a Eta Nu

ROGER KEMPERS Holland, M i c h i g a n

JOHN H. JESSER Hudsonville, M i c h i g a n

M a j o r — Chemistry Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

W A L T E R T. K E N N E D Y Holland, M i c h i g a n

RICHARD C. J O H N S O N Berwyn, Illinois

Major — History K a p p a Eta Nu

Major — E c o n o m i c s

S e n i o r s 41


O L G A K A T H E R I N E KILIAN Holland, M i c h i g a n

O W E N J. K O E P P E Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — Biology Delta Phi

Major — Chemistry Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

H U G H E. K I N N I S O N Lansing, M i c h i g a n

A M Y R. K O N I N G Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — BiologyPhi K a p p a A l p h a

Major — E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n Delta Phi

J A M E S T. K L O M P A R E N S Holland, M i c h i g a n

H O W A R D J. K O O P Holland, Michigan

M a j o r — Biology Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — History Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

KARL K L O M P A R E N S Holland, M i c h i g a n

R U T H J. K O O P Holland, Michigan

Major — C h e m i s t r y

Major — Social Service Delta Phi

S H I R L E Y J. K N O L W h e a t o n , Illinois

R U S S E L L J. K R A A Y Danforth, Illinois

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s S i g m a Iota Beta

Major —• Chemistry Chi Phi S i g m a

S e n i o r s 42


EARL K R A G T Holland, M i c h i g a n

C O R N E L I U S E. L A M P E N Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — English Chi Phi S i g m a

Major — English

M A R V I N N. K R A G T Holland, M i c h i g a n

C H A R L E S J. L A R S O N Manistique, Michigan

Major — Biology a n d C h e m i s t r y Chi Phi S i g m a

Major — C h e m i s t r y

D O N A L D A. LAM Holland, M i c h i g a n

R O B E R T B. L A T I M E R , JR. H a c k e n s a c k , N e w Jersey

Major — English

Major — History

ROBERT C. L A M A N Oaklyn, New Jersey

S H I R L E Y M . LESLIE S c h e n e c t a d y , N e w York

Major — English K a p p a Eta Nu

Major— Mathematics S i g m a Iota Beta

P H Y L L I S R. L A M B

M A R Y K. M c L E A N Holland, M i c h i g a n

Holland, M i c h i g a n Major — E d u c a t i o n

M a j o r — English Sigma Sigma

S e n i o r s 43


PHILIP G . M E E N G S Zeeland, M i c h i g a n

A L I C E B. M O O L E N A A R De Motte, I n d i a n a

Major — History K a p p a Eta Nu

M a j o r — English S i g m a Iota Beta

E R N E S T J. M E E U S E N Holland, M i c h i g a n

J O Y C E L. M U I L E N B U R G , R . N . Maurice, I o w a

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — Biology K a p p a Beta Phi

J. D A V I D M E N C H H O F E R II East Lansing, Michigan

JUDITH E. M U L D E R Metuchen, New Jersey

Major — Social Service Chi Phi S i g m a

M a j o r — Biology Delta Phi

R E G I N A E. M I H A L Y Raritan, New Jersey

Major — S p a n i s h a n d English Sigma Sigma

LOIS M. M U Y S K E N S O r a n g e City, I o w a Major — Sociology S i g m a Iota Beta

JO A N N E. M O E S S N E R Muskegon, Michigan

PAUL M. MYREHN C o s t a Mesa, California

Major — Social Studies Delta Phi Transfer; M u s k e g o n Jr. College

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s Phi T a u Nu

S e n i o r s 44


BERNICE H. N I C H O L S Fulton, New York Major — E d u c a t i o n Theta G a m m a Phi

R U S S E L L L. N O R D E N

R O B E R T L. P O N T I E R H a s b r o u c k Heights, New Jersey

G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n Major — English Phi T a u Nu

M a j o r — History Phi K a p p a A l p h a

^

\

R O B E R T P. N Y B O E R Holland, M i c h i g a n

S A M G. P O S T H U M A Friesland, W i s c o n s i n

Major — Biology Phi K a p p a A l p h a

Major — C h e m i s t r y Chi Phi S i g m a

D O R O T H Y M. O L D E N B U R G S h e l d r a k e , N e w York

M A R G U E R I T E J. P R I N S Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — G e r m a n a n d S p a n i s h S i g m a Iota Beta

Major — English Delta Phi

W I L L I A M J. O O S T E N D O R P Holland, M i c h i g a n

N O R W O O D K. R E C K Union City, N e w Jersey

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s

Major — English a n d History Phi T a u Nu

S e n i o r s 45


LEONARD

H E R M A N J. R I D D E R Lansing, Illinois

N.

SCHREGARDUS

Holland, Michigan Major— Mathematics

Major — English

M A R I A N M. SCHROEDER

D O N A L D E. R I N K U S Holland, M i c h i g a n

Paterson. New Jersey Major — Religion Theta G a m m a Phi

Major — Biology Phi K a p p a Epsilon

D A V I D E. S C O B I E West New York, New Jersey

J O H N C . R O B I N S , JR. Detroit, M i c h i g a n

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s

Major — Chemistry Phi K a p p a A l p h a

H E N R Y I. S H A W , JR. Smithtown Branch, Long Island, New York

JAY G . R U T G E R S Holland, Michigan Major — Chemistry

Major — History

J O A N A. SHEEL Hospers, I o w a

H A R O L D E. S C H A I B L E Altamont, New York

Major — History S i g m a Iota Beta

M a j o r — Philosophy

S e n i o r s 46


W I L L I A M P. S H E W A N

M A R I O N J. S N O W Holland, M i c h i g a n

Mount Vernon, N e w York Major — History K a p p a Eta Nu

M a j o r — English Sigma Sigma

ROBERT W. S N O W

D E N N I S E. S H O E M A K E R Hudsonville, M i c h i g a n

Holland, M i c h i g a n Major — Chemistry Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — History Chi Phi S i g m a

J A M E S F. S H R A M E K Holland, M i c h i g a n

THERESA C. S T A A L G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n

Major — Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Phi K a p p a A l p h a

M a j o r — History S i g m a Iota Beta

JAMES H. S T E G E M A N Decatur, M i c h i g a n

R O L A N D J. S I M M E L I N K Oostburg, Wisconsin

Major — C h e m i s t r y Chi Phi S i g m a

Major — Sociology Phi K a p p a A l p h a

JOHN M. SMITH G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n Major — English Chi Phi S i g m a

I

E D W A R D J. T A N G E N B E R G G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n M a j o r — English

S e n i o r s 47


ANNO

MINNIE H. T E R O N D E G r a n d Rapids, M i c h i g a n

ROBERT H. V A N D E R

J O H N E. TIRRELL Holland, M i c h i g a n

LAAN

Muskegon, Michigan Major — Chemistry a n d Math Phi T a u Nu

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

HAZEL M. V A N D E R

F U A D F. T O M A Basrah, Iraq

WOUDE

McBain, Michigan Major — English Theta G a m m a Phi

Major — Chemistry

B E T T Y I. V A N D E W E G E Holland, Michigan

A. V A N D E N B E R G

Morrison, Illinois

Major — E l e m e n t a r y Education Delta Phi

Major — English

DALE W. VANDEN Holland, Michigan

KOLK

Major — Biology a n d Chemistry K a p p a Eta Nu

M a j o r — S o c i a l Studies Theta G a m m a Phi

DONALD

M. V A N D E R

Zeeland, M i c h i g a n

B A R B A R A J. V A N D Y K E Zeeland, Michigan

BRINK

Major — E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n Delta Phi

M a j o r — Biology Phi K a p p a A l p h a

S e n i o r s 48


P. J A M E S V A N D Y K E Denver, C o l o r a d o

M A R Y E. V A N L O O Kalamazoo, Michigan

Major — English Chi Phi S i g m a

Major — English Sigma Sigma

GLENN A. V A N H A I T S M A Zeeland, M i c h i g a n

ARLENE RUTH V A N Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — English a n d G e r m a n Chi Phi S i g m a

RAALTE

M a j o r — English Delta Phi

C L A Y T O N E. V A N H A L L Grand Haven, Michigan

GERALD V A N SINGEL Grandville, M i c h i g a n

Major — C h e m i s t r y Phi K a p p a A l p h a

M a j o r — Biology Omicj-on K a p p a Epsilon

G E R A L D J. V A N H E E S T Catskill,. New York

ANDREW VAN'T Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — English Chi Phi S i g m a

SLOT

Major — Economics

L O I S J. V A N I N G E N Holland, M i c h i g a n

M A R Y J. V A N D E W E G E Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — English Delta Phi

M a j o r — English Delta Phi

S e n i o r s 49


HAROLD

R. V A N

GERALD VIENING Los Angeles, California

WIEREN

Holland, Michigan

Major — History Phi T a u Nu

Major — Mathematics Phi K a p p a A l p h a

WILLARD VOLLINK G r a n d Rapids, Michigan

HARVEY V A N WIEREN Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Major — C h e m i s t r y

M a j o r — Biology

T H E O D O R E J. V R E D E V E L D Z e e l a n d , Michigan

JEROME VELDHUIS Zealand, M i c h i g a n

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s Phi T a u Nu

Major — English K a p p a Eta Nu

DONALD WALCHENBACH H a w t h o r n e , New Jersey

F R E D J. V E L T M A N Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — Biology K a p p a Eta Nu

Major — Business Administration Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

ELIZABETH M. W E A V E R Williston Park, New York

B E T T Y J. V E N H U I Z E N Holland, Michigan

Major — E d u c a t i o n Delta Phi

Major — Social Studies

S e n i o r s 50


EARL WEENER

F R E D E. W I G H T

Holland, M i c h i g a n

Paterson, New Jersey

Major — C h e m i s t r y

Major — Psychology Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

JAY W E E N E R Holland, M i c h i g a n

SHIRLEY H. W I L L B R A N D T Muskegon, Michigan

Major — C o m p o s i t e

Major — E d u c a t i o n S i g m a lota Beta

f K PETER

D. W E S T E R H O F F

3

.f

STEPHEN

WISE

Midland Park, New Jersey

Dunbar, Pennsylvania

Major — Biology

Major — Biology

C L A I R E E. W I E R E N G A

A N N A RUTH W O R K M A N C e n t r a l Lake, M i c h i g a n

Grand Haven, Michigan Major — English a n d Music Delta Phi

Major — C h e m i s t r y

GEORGE A. ZEITO

J E A N M. W 1 E R S M A Holland, M i c h i g a n

Basrah, Iraq

Major — E d u c a t i o n

M a j o r — Chemistry a n d Biology

S e n i o r s 51


G E O R G E D. Z U I D E M A Holland, Michigan Major — Biology Phi K a p p a A l p h a

R O B E R T B. B A A R G r a n d Rapids, Michigan Major — Music E d u c a t i o n

L O U I S W . B I X B Y , JR. Saginaw, Michigan Major — Chemistry a n d English Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

M A L C O L M D. B R O W N Wycombe, Pennsylvania Major — English Transfer: Kings C o l l e g e

G E O R G E H. B U U R S M A Holland, Michigan

S A M U E L C. P I C K E N S Hankow, China

ROBERT S. HALL Holland, M i c h i g a n

Major — Biology

Major — English

WILLIAM C. H I L L E G O N D S C h i c a g o , Illinois

Major — History

Major — History B E R N A R D J. R O W A N Berkley, Michigan

GERRIT H. H O S P E R S O n t a r i o Center, N e w York

Major — English

Major — Chemistry Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

CHESTER M. SCHEMPER Holland, Michigan

SUMIYE KONOSHIMA New York, New York

Major — C o m p o s i t e L a n g u a g e

Major — Psychology a n d English

Major — Biology K a p p a Eta Nu

HERBERT C. SCHMALZRIEDT Rochelle Park, New Jersey

JOHN M. M A C D O N A L D O t s e g o , Michigan WILLIAM C A M E R O N Lansing, M i c h i g a n

A R T H U R H. P O N S T E I N Grand Haven, Michigan

Major — Chemistry Omicron K a p p a Epsilon

Major — L a n g u a g e Chi Phi S i g m a MORRIS A. S K A A L E N Boyd, M i n n e s o t a

Major — English

Major — M a t h e m a t i c s R O L L A N D E. D E I S I N G Holland, M i c h i g a n

ROBER MAJOR Muskegon, Michigan Major — Business Administration

Major — Business Administration

J O H N F. D E V R I E S Sibley, I o w a

Major — Chemistry JEAN C. M O O R E Flushing, Long Island, New York Major — E d u c a t i o n

Major — Philosophy

W I L L I A M D. D Y K S T R A G r a n d Rapids, Michigan Major — Economics

HAROLD GRISSEN Holland, M i c h i g a n Major — History K a p p a Eta Nu

C A S P E R ULTEE Hillegom, N e t h e r l a n d s

LLOYD H. V A N R A A L T E Holland, Michigan Major — Sociology

R O D G E R O. OLIVE Holland, Michigan Major — Psychology Transfer: St. Joseph's College

C L I F F O R D E. P A I N E , Fennville, Michigan Major — English

S e n i o r s 52

JR.

H A R R I S J. W O L B E R T Holland, Michigan Major — Chemistry C H A R L E S J. Z O E T Byron Center, Michigan Major — M a t h e m a t i c s Phi K a p p a Alpha


Class

)

r o p It e c y

SUFFERING HUMANITY: The centuries p a s s , a n d still w e a r e sick at heart, for w e find the torn r o a d of life torturous a n d long. O u r b l e e d i n g h a n d s a r e outstretched to the youth of the world, a n d w e cry in d e s p a i r , O youth, h e a r us a n d h e l p us, w e a r e the o p p r e s s e d , the s t a r v i n g a n d the sick, a n d w e a r e d y i n g . . . But our voices a r e w e a k ; a n d our cries b u t e m p t y s o u n d s in the c l a m o r o u s confusion of life, our p l e a s hollow mockery?

comes with pain. W h a t c a n we, our w e a k b o d i e s torn a n d rent with suffering, d o to s a v e ourselves? W e must look to y o u for help, for you a r e blazing b e a c o n s in a s e a of misery. W h a t will y o u do? YOUTH: W e will b e c o m e doctors a n d scientists, n u r s e s a n d r e s e a r c h workers. W e will train our h a n d s to cut with the scalpel a n d s e w with the n e e d l e so that y o u m a y live. O u r l a b o r a t o r i e s will find w a y s to c u r e y o u with d r u g s a n d medicines a n d w e will close your w o u n d s with the soothing b a l m of c a r e a n d kindness. W e will b e c o m e h e a l e r s a n d you will b e h e a l e d , our hospitals will grow, a n d you will b e rested. The everlasting s e a r c h for health will continue, a n d the dim glow of our k n o w l e d g e shall flame into a brilliant blaze. Health a n d h a p p i n e s s a r e the instruments with which to c u r e your sickness, time the healer.

YOUTH: Suffering h u m a n i t y , your voices a r e ringing cries of c h a l l e n g e a n d the call to battle. Your p l e a s stir in our b r e a s t s the iron coura g e n e e d e d to fight the g r e a t fight of life. If w e yield to evil, if the b u r d e n of b e i n g our brother's k e e p e r is too great, then w e must all perish. Yield . . . never! Let us r a n g e our forces on the side of Kindness a n d Justice, a n d with the b a n n e r of brotherh o o d gallantly w a v i n g on high, storm the m u r k y m o a t of injustice, a n d the grim, g r a y b a t t l e m e n t s of evil.

THE STARVING: War's devastation a n d Nature's wrath h a v e w r e a k e d h a v o c in our lands. F a m i n e is rife, the soil is idle, a n d w e a r e starving. How w o u l d you h a v e us fill our s t o m a c h s a n d fatten our children so that they m a y live? Will y o u h a v e us till the soil w h e n our only crop is bitter tears, a n d stones?

THE OPPRESSED: If y o u w o u l d h e l p us, first lift from our s h o u l d e r s the cutting yoke of o p p r e s s i o n that h a s b e e n so cruelly forced u p o n us. A merciless b u r d e n c h a i n e d in p l a c e b y those w h o d o not recognize a n y w a y of life but their own. Those w h o do not submit to their iron-fisted d o m i n a t i o n a r e b l i n d e d b y w a r ' s r e d glare. C u n n i n g with the c u n n i n g of cruelty, these b u t c h e r s of men a n d slayers of ideals a r e d a n g e r o u s . How c a n you h o p e to stop their evil a d v a n c e ? W e w e r e w e a k a n d failed; will y o u too fail?

YOUTH: W e will s h a r e the w e a l t h of our l a n d with you, the golden w h e a t of our plains, the beef of our cattle, a n d the milk of h u m a n kindness. W e will t e a c h your men of the l a n d h o w to till the soil a n d r e a p h a r v e s t s of plenty. W e will b e c o m e agriculturists a n d farmers, r a n c h e r s a n d d a i r y men. W e will s h a r e our a r s e n a l of m a c h i n e s a n d b r a w n with which to d o your work. Your l a n d s shall g r o w g r e e n u n d e r the clear skies of h a p p i n e s s a n d the blazing sun of freedom. You shall p r o s p e r a n d once more your child r e n will l a u g h a n d sing.

YOUTH: W e will not fail! W e will s m a s h the b o n d s of hatred, a n d the s h a c k l e s of t y r a n n y which bind your f r e e d o m loving spirits. The stagg e r i n g b u r d e n of oppression will b e lifted from y o u r b o w e d backs, a n d y o u shall b e m a d e strong a n d straight a g a i n . W e will b e c o m e diplomats a n d p e a c e m a k e r s , statesmen a n d thinkers. W e will m a k e l a w s protecting our children's children. W e will b e p e a c e a b l e b u t firm, living a s w e w a n t to live. The e s s e n c e of d e m o c r a c y a n d freedom shall g o forth, flowing a c r o s s the world in a pulsating, e v e r w i d e n i n g current of love a n d b r o t h e r h o o d . W e will t e a c h t h r o u g h living, so that others m a y s e e h o w w e flourish a n d w o n d e r . . .

YOUTH: W h a t e a c h of us c a n do is not g r e a t in c o m p a r i s o n to the t r e m e n d o u s weight of your b u r d e n s . But, if w e free you from oppression, h e a l your g a p i n g w o u n d s , a n d feed your children, then you will b e strengthe n e d . You will s e e that there is yet hope, that w h a t w e d o is b u t a b e g i n n i n g , a p r o p h e c y of w h a t c a n b e if w e a n d others like us b a n d together in c o m m o n c a u s e , uniting in a n effort to e a s e your suffering. It is then, that the g o o d w e d o shall b e a s a giant tidal w a v e , w a s h i n g b e f o r e it all that is evil, s u r m o u n t i n g the grim, g r a y b a t ^ e m e n t s of famine, pestilence a n d war. This then, is our destiny . . .

THE SICK: Death's black cloak casts a constant s h a d o w over our lives, a n d the dim twilight d e e p e n s . O u r b o d i e s a r e w r a c k e d with fever, a n d w e writhe in the a g o n y that 53


C l a s s We, the class of 1949 of Hope C o l l e g e , being' of s o u n d a n d disposing mind a n d memory, after four y e a r s of constant mental struggle, do h e r e b y solemnly d e c l a r e this to b e our last will a n d testament. To the faculty d o w e b e q u e a t h — nothing, since they h a v e at last convinced us that w e will n e e d everything w e possess. We, the English majors, will the terrific e x a m s of Dean Hollenbach to w h o m e v e r is foolish e n o u g h to take them. W e l e a v e the p r o f o u n d philosophy of Dr. DeGraaf to a n y o n e w h o s e mind is c a p a b l e of a b s o r b i n g it. r w n W e will the kindly m a n n e r s of Mr. b r a n a for those w h o shall n e e d them w h e n they write compositions. W e l e a v e the atrocious m u s t a c h e of Mr. Prins to the w a s t e b a s k e t . We, the history majors, l e a v e Prof. H i n g a ' s views concerning m a r r i a g e to those u n d e r classmen w h o intend s o m e d a y to indulge in matrimony. W e b e q u e a t h the a d m i r a t i o n which Miss Ross b e a r s for the G r e e k s to those w h o m a y h a v e opportunity of e n j o y i n g her lectures^ To those w h o e n j o y long a s s i g n m e n t s a n d spurts of excitement concerning political elections, w e l e a v e Mr. V a n d e r b u s h ' s clctssss We, the music majors, express our symp a t h y to those w h o in p a s s i n g t h r o u g h the c h a p e l halls expect to h e a r h a r m o n y . W e l e a v e our screeching voices a n d fumbling fingers to those w h o practice in future days. W e l e a v e Miss P a a l m a n ' s high e x p e c t a tions a n d obsession for punctuality to future choir m e m b e r s . We, the psychology majors, will the w o r d 'motivation'to a n y o n e who c a n use it a s successfully a s Mr. G r a n b e r g . W e l e a v e the calm p l e a s i n g m a n n e r s of Prof. H a v e r k a m p to others w h o shall struggle Over Munn's textbook. We, the e d u c a t i o n majors, will Mr. Yonder Borgh's inimitable style of expressing himself to future teachers. P e r h a p s they could u s e this: Without using that detesta b l e word, I i m a g i n e you know w h a t 1 m e a n . W e ' r e at the e n d of a section, a n d it would b e nice to h a v e a little evaluation. W e also l e a v e the e n j o y m e n t of Mr. Partington's various a m u s i n g facial expressions to other aspiring educators. We, the m a t h e m a t i c s majors, d o b e q u e a t h the o p e n book tests of Mr. Folkert to other fortunate students. W e l e a v e the u n d y i n a influence a n d kindly attitude of Prof. L a m p e n to those w h o m a y h a v e the privilege of k n o w i n g him in coming years. We, the l a n g u a g e majors, will the g o o d time h a d in our respective clubs to future members.

Will To the few o d d students w h o will take Latin do w e b e q u e a t h Mr. Walter's kind heart a n d wise philosophy. To those students of caliber w h o take Greek do w e b e q u e a t h the joyous smile of Dr. Dykstra. To Miss Boyd's classes do w e b e q u e a t h her n e v e r failing a p p e a r a n c e in the classroom. To Miss Meyer's classes w e will her love of phonetics, a n d her inimitable e-eu, a n d interest in a n y t h i n g French. To the Spanish classes w e leave this a d vice: "Don't walk out after five minutes of waiting. Mr. Madrid will surely arrive sometime." We, the biology majors, do b e q u e a t h Dr. Vergeer's interest in parasites, a n d his highly d i a g r a m m a t i c sketches to future r e s e a r c h workers. , v i We, the chemistry majors, will to the Kotfee Kletz all the m o n e y they h a v e n ' t received from us thus far. W e will Dr. Kleinheksel's faithfulness m a t t e n d i n g classes to those w h o a r e inclined not to do so. To Dr. V a n Zyl do w e b e q u e a t h a n e w test t u b e rack a n d brushes, h o p i n g that h e c a n m a k e his l a b a s n e a t a s Dr. Kleinheksel's. W e also l e a v e our winning streak over the b i o l o g y football t e a m to next y e a r ' s lab. We, the philosophy majors, will our d e e p e n t h u s i a s m for " S q u e a k y Van S a u n to others w h o learn in his classroom the true Christian philosophy of life. We. the socialoay majors, will the anim a t e d lectures of Dr. Voogd to a n y o n e w h o desires to listen. W e h o p e that they accomplish writina a s m a n y other a s s i g n m e n t s a n d letters d u r i n g these classes a s w e did. We, the religion a n d bible majors, leave "my son Alexander, the small" for Dr. Zsiros to mention in other classes. W e l e a v e his r e m a r k a b l e m a s t e r y of l a n g u a g e s to the a m a z e m e n t of future students. To those w h o a r e fortunate in h a v i n g Dr. O s t e r h a v e n w e l e a v e his "Now w h e n I w a s in college" stories, a n d his sincere desire to h e l p those in n e e d . We, w h o a r e interested in s p e e c h a n d dramatics, will Dr. Schrier s f a m o u s jokes to incoming S p e e c h classes. W e also leave Prof. Avison's constructive criticism to those w h o e n d e a v o r to interpret in future years. We, the economics majors, do b e q u e a t h our n e w law to prospective h u s b a n d s : "If your wife h a s her mind m a d e up, don t try to b u d g e t , " W e l e a v e our never-dying school loyalty a n d spirit to the underclassmen. May they prove worthy of it.


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j u n i o r s 56


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j u n i o r s 57


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R. D. K. R, G. D.

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D. Sutfin R Swander J, Taylor J. Ten H o e v e D. TerBeest L. Ter Borg

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H. V a n E g m o n d L. Van F a r o w e S. V a n Z a n t e n A. V a n Zyl J. V e r g e e r M. Ver Heist

f J. V i n k e m u l d e r M. Voskuil R. W a l c h e n b a c k P. W a r n s h u i s H. W e e n e r J. W i c k e r t

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J u n i o r s 60


M. A a r d e m a

G. G n a d e

B. M o d d e r s

H. A n d e r s

B. H a k k e n

A. M o e r l a n d

B. B a r e n s e

E. H a r s e v o o r t

P. M u l d e r

M. Baskett

H. Harter

D. M u y s k e n s

J. Bennett

P. Haskin

P. M u y s k e n s

H. B o u m a n

R. Hendricks

N. O o s t e r b a a n

C. Brillhart

P. H e n d r i c k s o n

J. Pfingstel

H. Bronkhorst

W. H o l w e r d a

C. Pindar

J. B u s m a n

C. Hopkins

R. R a b b e

J. Clark

J. Hornbrook

K. Ruys

E. C l o n a n

R. H o u t m a n

J. R y s k a m p

D. C o l e m a n

E. Jekel

1. S c a m e h o r n

R. Collins

T. Joseph

E. Scholten

D. C o n t a n t

J. Ketchum

G. Slikkers

P. Cook

P. Keyser

B. Smink

A. C o u s i n s

D. Kieft

N. S t e g e m a n

D. C r a w f o r d

H. Kieft

J. S t e p h e n s

A. C r o n h e i m

V. Kleinheksel

A. Stillman

R. D a a n e

K. Klies

W. Studdiford

J. D a l m a n

D. K a o p

C. S w a r t

J. D a n i e l s

M. Kooyers

A. S w e e t

E. DeBoom

P. K r a n e n d o n k

P. T h o m p s o n

E. De Groot

J. Kruithof

N. T h o m s o n

J. De H a a n

G. Lam

G. T i m m e r m a n

C. De Mull

J. L a m b

A. Tuls

M. DeVries

M. L a m b e r s

A. V a n d e r Sluis

C. DeWitt

E. L a n n i n g

R. V a n E e n e n a a m

D. De Witt

W. L a u g h l i n

G Van H o e v e n

W. De Witt

H. Lenters

C. V a n R a a l t e

N. De Wolfe

L. Londo

L. V a n R a a l t e

R. D o w n s

H Maatman

C. V a n W i e r e n

R. D r a p e r

J. M a c q u e e n

D. V e l t m a n

E. D u n n i n g

B. M a c k a y

W. Ver Hey

J, F a i l i n g

H. M a n k i n

H. Visser

H. Failor

C. M a s t e n b r o o k

C. W a l t e r s

C. Fikse

J. M c C a l l u m

M. Westcott

B. Folkert

T. Mc Fall

R. Westerhoff

A. F u n c k e e

W. Melpolder

M. W i e r d a

G. Gerritson

H. Meltvedt

S. G e s s

R. M e y e r

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G. Mills

j u n i o r s 61



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V. DeVecht K. DeWitt J. DeWolf J. De Y o u n g J. Dolink D. Dykstra

L. R. H. R. D. P.

England Erickson Essenberg Eyerly Fairchild Feenstra

Sophomores 64


D. F e n n e m a E. Fett W. Ford H. F r a n k e n D. Freyling O. Ganz

A. G r a v e n h o r s t J. H a a k s m a H. Hafer K Hagstrom J. H a k k e n M. H a l d e n w a n g

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Sophomores 65


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K. Liddle E. Lidston I. Little P. Lupkes T. Malewitz C. McConnell

H. H. H. D. R. R.

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Sophomores 66

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Sophomores 67


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Van N e u r e n Van Slooten Van W e e l d e n Van Wywen Van Zoeren Veltman

J. Ver Beek R. V e r h a g e J. Ver M e u l e n H. Visscher R. Visscher B. Vomastic

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Votaw Vruggink Vyverberg Whitford Wierenga Wieringa

L. W i e r s e m a R. W i n s h i p M. Wolbrink B. W o o d s J. W o r k m a n J. Zuroff

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Sophomores 68

E. Nelson C. Nordhof W. Norgrove R. O n d r a P. Petroelje J. Phillips G. Priest A, R a u s c h e n b a c h W. Richards E. Richardson T. R y c e n g a A. S a u d e r F. Scholten S. Schrier G. Schultz R. Schultz P. Scribner R. Simpson H. Smith K. S m o u s e

H. Speet R. Stark F. Sterk G. Sterken E. Van De W e g e R. Van Dyke H. Van F a r o w e D. Van K a m p e n W. Van't Hof T. Van W i n g e n L. Vollmer R. W a g n e r J. W i l d m a n R. W o j a h n W. Wolfe Y. Y a m a g u c h i V. Zelouf A. Z i m m e r m a n R. Zwemer



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Adams Adler Albers Allen Andrews Beach

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A. B e e k m a n J. Bennett L. BerKompas J. Bernius J. Beuker L. Bochniak

W. Bocks E. Bolthouse E. Bont C. Borgman A. Bos R. Bos

R. Bos D. Brandt K. Brinza R. Brokaw J. Brown B. Bruins

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f r e s h m e n 70


G. DePree M. DeValois B. DeVette J. DeVries B. DeWolf D. De Y o u n g

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Hoener Hoffman Hoffman Houtman Huff Hulst

M. Hulst J. Hunt I. Huyser D. Inglis B, Ireland E. lekel

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D. H. S. P. D. P.

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Jreshmen 72

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V. D. E. A. L. L.

Leestma Lemmen Liffers Linton Loula Lovelace

R. Lumley R. L u m s d e n R, M a c y J, M a r c u s s e E. M a y o F. McCormic.A

I. McLellan J. M e l l e m a Y. Menkir R. M e n n e n g a S. Michael E. M i l l s p a u g h

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J. Nyitray M. Olert R. O w e n s R. P a a r l b e r g J. Paffendorf H. P a r s o n s

J. P a r s o n s P. P a s D. Peekstok R. P e t e r s o n R. P e v e r l e y V. Piers

JR^I Jreskmen 73


J. P l a s m a n A. P o p p e n J. Pritchard W. P u t n a m S. Pyle C. R a b e y

L Renkema C. Reynolds T. Ritter S. Robinson R. Roeth M. R o m a n o

M. M. E. R. E. F.

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Rowan Ryan Schipper Schipper Schmidt Scholten

A. S c h o o n v e l d M. S c h o o n v e l d A. Siderius J. Siderius A. Silcox J, Skelton

R- S l o t s e m a J. Smit J. Spruit J. S p y k e r m a n R. S t e k e t e e F. S t e w a r t

E. Stickels C. Stolberg R. Strengholt J. Stryker M. Stuit J. Sutliff

D. Ten Brink N. Ten Brinke C. Ter H a a r G. T h o m a s D. Thompson J, Thompson

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J. Tien W. Tripp B. Turkstra L. V a n Bronkhorst H. Van D a h m A. V a n d e r Kolk

J, V a n d e r Toll J. V a n d e r Velde H. V a n d e r Wall W. V a n d e r Werff J. V a n d e w a r p R. V a n d e W a t e r

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N. V a n Dis P. V a n Duine D. Van G e s s e l M. V a n H a r n C. Van Heest J. Van Heest

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C. Van W. V a n E. Van C. Van G. V a n V. Van

Lare Raden Tuinen Zoeren Zyl Zyl

1 E. V e e n s h o t e n L. V e e n s t r a C. Veldhuis M. V e l d m a n j M. Ver S c h u r e 1 R. Visser

R. M H. A. R. T.

Voorhans Voss Wagemaker Watson Weisiger Westra

Ui B. W i e r e n g a D. Wilson C. W i n e s J. Winfield C. Wissink R. W i s e

Jreshmen 75


R. Wolters J. Woodruff M. Wright K. Yifru F. Y o n k m a n B. Y u r a s h \

M. Zech A. Zelinka M. Zweizig

D. Bakker

C. Holtrop

R. Roos

G. B a r e n d s e

A. Johnson

E. S e a l a n d e r

M. Barkel

D. Johnson

J. Sims

R. Bishop

G. Johnson

I. Smith

P. Blankestyn

K. Kuiper

G. T h o m a s

P. B l u e k a m p

L. L a m p e n

P. Twigg

K. B o u m a n

R. Lockwood

L. V e n d e r Muil

A. Bremer

D. Lokker

J. Van Dorple

J. Bremer

E. L u b b e r s

D. V a n Dort

R. Brink

R. Marion

M. V a n R a a l t e

D. Brinks

K. McConnell

A. Veltman

J. Cottrell

J. McLaren

I. Vollmer

R. Dennison

K. Muktar

E. W a l t e r s

J, De S p e l d e r

W. Mulder

R. Welton

E. F a s c h

H. Nelson

D. Wiseley

A. G e e n e n

J. Nienhuis

C. W i s n e r

D. G r e v e n g o o d

L. O l s e n

C. Zwemer

R. H a r p e r

E, R i b b e n s

C. Z w i e p

C. Hartley

N. Rieck

Jreshmen 76


Specials 1948-1949

....

Baker, Betsy

1st

Semester

Holland, Mich.

Boreel, Johan Jacob

The Hague, Netherlands

Borr, B a r b a r a

Holland, Mich.

Boss, Willis Simon

Zeeland, Mich.

Botkin, Charles

McWhorter, Ky.

Buis, Shirley L

Cicero, 111.

C a m p , Janet

Holland, Mich.

Elzinga, Muriel J

Hamilton, Mich.

Emmons, Harriet Florence

Holland, Mich.

Everett, Ransom W

Holland, Mich.

Fabunmi, Lawrence

Ilawe, Ikiti, Nigeria

Froelich, Ellen Beuker

Holland, Mich,

Geary, John J

Passaic, N. J.

G n a d e , Edith E

Schenectady, N. Y.

Hanhart, Karel

Heemstede, Netherlands

Holleman, Jantina Wilhelmina

Springfield, S. D.

Huizenga, Evelyn June

Zeeland, Mich.

Keane, Q u e e n i e M

Holland, Mich.

Lejeune, James F

Holland, Mich.

Marklein, Lothar K. W

Straubing, G e r m a n y

Mulder, Raymond Jay

Holland, Michigan

Prins, E d w a r d

Holland, Mich.

Pritchard, Mrs. Margaret L

Sharon, Pa.

Scharf, Dorothy

Hamilton, Mich.

Scheerens, Dan G

Holland, Mich.

Smith, G e o r g e

Holland, Michigan

Stegink, Jack E d w a r d

Holland, Mich.

Steketee, Katherine

Holland, Mich.

Vollink, Lois Gayle

Zeeland, Mich.

Weighmink, Dale W

Holland, Mich.

77



F r e s h m a n N i e u s m a e x p l a i n s the situation

Beauty, p o i s e a n d dignity a r e d i s c o v e r e d

The toe b o n e " c ' n e c t s " with the foot b o n e , the foot b o n e " c ' n e c t s " with the a n k l e b o n e , etc.

79


•WELKOM!'

FEATURE SECTION

S f t t e

f f j e r a B GRAND

RAPIDS.

MICH.

FEBRUARY

13,

What Happened to the DutrJi

1949

The Hope Collece Koffce KleU IS a Rood place for ft quick date, ftnd Ruth Koop. Holland Senior, and Paul Hendrlckson, Grand lUpldt Junior, Uke advantace of IU

"Don't look at me." aay* Max Freco, Holland Junior. "You're paylnc this check." And Molly Ryan. F»*»hman at Hope Oollece from Muskegon, dies Into her purs© In a rehearsal for Dutch Treat Week.

and date Rosslp hlchllcht plan* for Dutch Treat Week at Hope Collece. In yke (left) Zet land Senior, looks over list of men at Ihe bureau lolores Freylinf. Grand Kaplds Sophomore (center) and Dorothy C'ontant. Junlrouck Heights, N. J- Below. I'at Keyser irlchl) Kalamaioo Junior, tells about her lied lo rlRhtl ar<*: Henrletle Weener. Kalamar^io Junior; Dotty Milne. Junior d. Mavs ; IKirU Ko*Uarap. Junior from OostburK. Wis., ftnd Dorothy Kranendonk, r from the Wisconsin City.

Hope Coeds Pay During Big Week H O L L A N D — I n case you'd f o r g o t t c a , Monday is St. Valentine's Day. C e r t a i n l y s t u d e n t s at Hope College r e m e m b e r . Because w h a t ' s j u s t .St. Valentine s D a y t o t h e r e s t of Weste m Michigan is t h e first d a y of D u t c h T r e a t Week t o Hope College. T h a t ' s t h e week when it's p e r f e c t l y p r o p e r for a coed lo a s k f o r a d a t e w i t h the m a n of h e r choice, when even wives of m a r r i e d s t u d e n t s foot t h e bill w h e n t h e y go o u t w i t h t h e i r h u sb an d s. THEY'RE A L L SET ' Wait a m i n u t e ! calls H o w a r d Koop, Holland Senior who's : v e t e r a n of t h e A r m y Air Force and m a r r i e d . " D u t c h T r e a t Week w a s lots of f u n in m y college d a y s a s a n u n d e r c l a s s m a n . " he says, " b u t now w h e n m y wife a s k s me to go o u t I still h a v e to pay the bill . . . and she decides w h e r e we're going." B u t H o w a r d is in t h e m i n o r i t y : most of H o p e ' s s t u d e n t s are all s e t and w a i t i n g e a g e r l y f o r t h e event t h a t since inception in 1932 h a s become one of t h e most i m p o r t a n t a f f a i r s in Hope College's social season. Ann W o l t e r s , Hope Senior f r o m Holland, h a s d u g o u t a list of original rules f o r the e v e n t — t h e y go like t h i s ; 1. If a girl a s k s f o r a d a t e , s h e b e a r s half t h e expense. 2. If a boy asks, it's t h e s a m e old s t o r y — h e p a y s a s usual. 3. f r e s h m e n girls m u s t post on t h e college bulletin board r e s e t v a t i o n s f o r t h e "Spoon H o l d e r " ( a v e r y p o p u l a r bench on Uio r n m p u s l t h r e e d a y s in advance. T i m e limit, t w o h o u r s and six minutes. Capacity, 10 couples, exclusive of t h e f a c u l t y . 4 D a l e s negotiated t n r o u g h " s t u d e n t a d v e r t i s e m e n t s " in i h e A n c h o r . Hope College n e w s p a p e r , will n o t be D u t c h in respect. Girls m u s t p a y f o r t h e a d v e r t i s e m e n t " F o r a n e n t i r e week t h e g i r l s will be f r e e a s birds," A n n said. ONLY BRIEFLY A n d , in a s e n s e , ' t h a t ' s t r u e . B u t men w h o a r e used t o pa>i.i^ i.ie s n o t on every d a t e are j u s t as h a p p y a b o u t w h a t ' s corning up. It's a chance t o a s s u m e t h e role of t h e anxious ingenue, w a i t i n g f o r t h a t phone call, b u f i t l a s t s only a week, a n d t h e n t h e y can g e t back t o the m o r e s e c u r e life of t h e m a n w h o s p e a k s while t h e girl a n s w e r s . See DUTCH TREAT—Pftje 11

I I I |

j I ] I

P"' 3 •

I f (in picture aboNel of library by Betty Boelklns, Muskegon llelchts Senior, and Walter Borrman. Senior from Pekin. Ul. Below, till Papa who pa>! as Mrs. Drooj ftnd dauthter Chester DrooK, a married the situation. Cheryl tip a soda. Clerk Lawrence Wade enj<


HOPE COLLEGE SOPHOMORES, Gene Campbell, member of the varsity football team, of Muskegon, Mich., and D o l o r e s Freyling of Grand Rapids, Mich.

YOUTH ON THE CAMPUS At H o p e college, Holland, Mich. . . . Story in Grafic Magazine

WILLIAM JELLEMA. junior, and Lois England, sophomore. Both are of Chicago.

HOPE'S GOTHIC CHAPEL, considered the handsomest building on the campus. It was built in 1929.

A SOPHOMORE ART STUDENT, Joan Krekel of Miami, Fla. She is photografed in the "Garret," permanent new art and drama headquarters on top of Hope's Science hall.

\ MARILYN WOLBRINK of Grand Rapids and Don Hoeting of Teaneck, N. J. Both are sophomores.

DORIS HAR1NGSMA. freshman, of Holland

INA LINTON, freshman, of Yonkers. N. Y

ROVILLA GANOTE, junior, of Sc. Louis. Mo.


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V a n d e W a t e r , C a m p b e l l , Monroe, Kraak, V a n d e n b e r g , Ottipoby, a n d C o a c h Lars G r a n b e r g .

Cross Country With Lars G r a n b e r g t a k i n g over the role of cross c o u n t r y c o a c h , the H o p e h a r r i e r s clim a x e d a successful s e a s o n , g r a b b i n g third p l a c e in the M1AA m e e t at Alma in N o v e m b e r to n e t a third p l a c e tie with K a l a m a z o o in the s e a s o n ' s final s t a n d i n g s . The H o l l a n d e r s w e r e victorious in their first two d u a l meets, knocking off A d r i a n a n d Hillsdale, b u t faltering in the final three, b o w i n g to Albion, K a l a m a z o o , a n d Alma. Led b y C a p t a i n Collins Ottipoby, six m e n figu r e d in the H o p e cross country picture, a n d w e r e a w a r d e d letters for their p e r f o r m a n c e s . In a d d i t i o n to Ottipoby, t h e y w e r e Don V a n d e n b e r g , Pete Kraak, H a n k Parson, R a n d y V a n d e Water, a n d Hugh Campbell. In the M1AA m e e t at Alma, Albion g r a b b e d first p l a c e with 31 points, A l m a s e c o n d with 60, H o p e third with 80, K a l a m a z o o fourth with 81, A d r i a n fifth with 97, a n d Hillsdale sixth with 171. Final s t a n d i n g s in the MI A A cross country, including the MIAA a n d d u a l meets, g a v e Albion first with 100 points. A l m a s e c o n d with 70, H o p e a n d K a l a m a z o o third with 50 points e a c h , A d r i a n fifth with 20, a n d Hillsdale last with none.

Collins Ottipoby, c a p t a i n of the 1948 Hope harriers.

H o p e a n d A d r i a n college harriers t a k e off on a jaunt a r o u n d the Holland country-side. The Dutch g r a b b e d a n e a s y victory in this, their first meet of the s e a s o n .


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into p a y dirt from the one-foot line for the first score. Nick Yonker tossed a 27-Yard p a s s to Ted Barrett in the e n d zone to c o m p l e t e H o p e scoring. M o n m o u t h clicked on a 15-yard s c a m p e r b y Don Armstrong in the final f r a m e . Taking on Adrian in the first M1AA clash of the s e a s o n , the H o l l a n d e r s f o u n d their c u s t o m a r y 13 points a s h a d e too few, a n d w e r e h a n d e d a h e a r t r e n d i n g 14-13 d e f e a t b y the Bulldogs. Ted R y c e n g a h a n d e d H o p e a 6-0 l e a d in the first q u a r t e r with a f o u r - y a r d off-tackle t o u c h d o w n slant, b u t A d r i a n b o u n c e d b a c k with a Burkhardt-to-Hoben-to-Clark a e r i a l affair a n d a conversion b y Rice to lead, 7 to 6, a t the half. The Bulldogs i n c r e a s e d their m a r g i n e a r l y in the fourth q u a r t e r w h e n Gillis s l a n t e d off tackle from the o n e a n d Rice a g a i n a d d e d the point. Later in the s a m e frame, Yonker fired a p a s s to C l a r e DeMull for H o p e ' s s e c o n d tally.

football

Holtrop s l a m s into the Albion f o r w a r d wall d u r i n g the a n n u a l h o m e c o m i n g g a m e a t Riverside Park

U n d a u n t e d , the Dutch c a m e b a c k in their next a p p e a r a n c e a s t h e y t r a v e l l e d to Hillsdale a n d b l a s t e d the Dales' h o m e c o m i n g c e l e b r a t i o n with a thrilling 7-0 upset. Ted Barrett p r o v i d e d the s p a r k to ignite the H o p e t o u c h d o w n b l a z e a s h e r i p p e d u p 43 y a r d s from the Hollanders' 38 to the Hillsdale 19 in the s e c o n d q u a r t e r . A few p l a y s later Nick Yonker c o n n e c t e d wiin a n a e r i a l to Bill H o l w e r d a w h o g a t h e r e d in the l e a t h e r on the t w o - y a r d m a r k e r a n d slipped across. W r e c k i n g h o m e c o m i n g s w a s b e c o m i n g h a b i t u a l with the Hopeites a s they i n v a d e d G r a n d Rapids t h e following w e e k a n d p o u r e d cold w a t e r on Junior College's a l u m n i - a t t r a c t i n g .affair with a touchd o w n b a r r a g e that g a v e t h e m a 32-13 win. H o p e took a 12-0 first half l e a d on TD trips b y Barrett a n d V a n W i n g e n . The Dutch tallied in the s e c o n d half w h e n Pfingstel s l a s h e d a c r o s s from the five, a n d a g a i n a m o m e n t later w h e n Holtrop i n t e r c e p t e d a Raider p a s s a n d l a t e r a ^ d to Yonker for a net g a i n of 30 y a r d s a n d six points. The JC's slipped in a six-pointer b y Cornwall, b u t H o p e c a m e b a c k with a scoring p a s s from Yonker to H o l w e r d a . A T i e t e m a - t o - O w e n s a e r i a l c o m p l e t e d Raider scoring. It w a s h o m e c o m i n g time in Holland the next w e e k a n d the Dutch t o p p e d the festivities with their most impressive M1AA exhibition of the s e a s o n , d o w n i n g Albion, 33 to 6. R y c e n g a a n d Barrett s l a m m e d a c r o s s two quick t o u c h d o w n s for the Hopeites in first q u a r t e r play, but the Britons r e t a l i a t e d with a classy s c r e e n p a s s p l a y in the s e c o n d frame, f e a t u r i n g a Marvin-to-Martin a e r i a l for 61 y a r d s a n d a score. A b e M o e r l a n d set u p a t h i r d - q u a r t e r tally for the H o l l a n d e r s v/hen h e s n a g g e d a n Albion p a s s at midfield a n d r a c e d to the Briton 14. R y c e n g a hit p a y dirt a few p l a y s later. In the final f r a m e , Ted Barrett circled right e n d for a 40-yard g a i n a n d a n o t h e r t o u c h d o w n . H o p e ' s fifth tally c a m e late in the tilt on a H i n g a - t o - V a n d e W e g e p a s s . Lady Luck f r o w n e d u p o n the H o l l a n d e r s a s t h e y travelled to K a l a m a z o o for their next tilt. Not only did s h e frown u p o n them, b u t s h e a l s o h a n d e d t h e m a n o t h e r r o u g h b r e a k in the form of a s a f e t y w h e n Jim Pfingstel w a s t r a p p e d b e h i n d the g o a l line to give Kazoo its two-point m a r g i n of victory. T e d Barrett c a r e e n e d 79 y a r d s d o w n the field in the first q u a r t e r to net the Dutchmen the lead, b u t within three m i n u t e s the Hornets c a m e b a c k a s Flowers tossed to Poth w h o g a t h e r e d in the ball on t h e Hope 43 a n d s w e p t his w a y to scoring g r o u n d . The fourth q u a r t e r s a f e t y b r o k e a 7-7 d e a d l o c k which h a d existed since the initial f r a m e , a n d p r o v e d to b e the decisive factor in H o p e ' s s e c o n d defeat. A l m a b r o u g h t its u n d e f e a t e d Scots to Holland for the s e a s o n ' s final e n g a g e m e n t , a n d a f t e r first

I n Don Rinkus a n d Russ Norden, the only seniors on the '48 Hope grid s q u a d , talk over the s e a s o n ' s results

A b e Moerland, Nick Yonker, a n d C l a r e DeMull, Hope's three r e p r e s e n tatives on the 1948 All-MIAA e l e v e n 87


football q u a r t e r p l a y w h i c h s p o t t e d H o p e 13 points, it a p p e a r e d a s t h o u g h the Dutch might a s s u m e the role of giant-killers. H o w e v e r , a d e v a s t a t ing Alma a t t a c k knotted the score at 13-all b e fore the intermission, a n d s h o v e d t h e m into the l e a d in the final half, the contest e n d i n g with A l m a on the long e n d of a 25-13 count. C l a u s Holtrop p l o w e d a c r o s s for the first Dutch score, a n d m o m e n t s later Bill H o l w e r d a s c o o p e d u p a b l o c k e d p u n t a n d r a c e d into p a y dirt with the final H o p e tally. The Scots s c o r e d in e a c h of the four s t a n z a s , R o s e m a n g o i n g a c r o s s in the first, Slotnick in the s e c o n d , D e r b y in the third on a 5 0 - y a r d Kish-to-Thibedeau-to-Derby aerial, a n d R o s e m a n a g a i n in the fourth. A b e Moerland, C l a r e DeMull, a n d Nick Yonker g r a b b e d the g r e a t e s t s h a r e of p o s t - s e a s o n grid h o n o r s in the form of ALL-MIAA selections, h o n o r a r y c a p t a i n a p p o i n t m e n t s , a n d most valuable player awards. Moerland w a s n a m e d by his t e a m - m a t e s a s the most v a l u a b l e g r i d d e r on the 1948 Dutch eleven, a l s o w a s selected a s h o n o r a r y c o - c a p t a i n of the t e a m , a n d w a s selected a s a n All-MIAA g u a r d . Another AllMIAA choice w a s e n d C l a r e DeMull, w h o w a s a l s o v o t e d a n h o n o r a r y c o - c a p t a i n of the H o p e gridders. Nick Yonker, p a s s - t o s s i n g q u a r t e r b a c k , w a s a w a r d e d the All-MIAA q u a r t e r b a c k post for the third successive y e a r .

ABOVE, TOP — Nick Yonker t ak es off for a s i z e a b l e g a i n in the h o m e c o m i n g tilt a g a i n s t Albion a s Jim Carson, Briton fullback, comes in for the tackle. ABOVE, MIDDLE — With Paul Boerigter l e a d i n g the w a y , s p e e d y Ted Barrett flashes through Adrian's def e n s e in a night tilt at Riverview. ABOVE, BOTTOM — Ted R y c e n g a s l a m s across right tackle for Hope's first touchdown in the Albion encounter.

LEFT — Ted Barrett pulls in a long Yonker-tossed a e r i a l in the Albion g a m e a s Dick Huff of the Britons closes in.

88


Lalvin

K n i g h t s

Lose

to

H o p e

HopeHoopsters

oiland—In the traditional bat-: of the game had elasped as the tie'did a good job of controlling; before a capacity packed armory count v. as made. . 0 . . . ri y jrsd?.y night, Hope coliese five' Yonker then scored a short shot Rosendahl during the time ealcd the Calvin's basketball; to put Hope ahead for the fir-t •'e «n the game, Rosendahl was m 65 to 43. The contesl wp«jtlme, and the Dutch led the rest high point man for the Knight, •••;;t;onaUy fast and well played of the way. miw»iv><» «,.» ; h neither team giving any oddsi The half t i n e closed with Hope foul" :,hofs for l i " " ' my time. holding a 25-18 lead. :,r.H Knifii-.ts opened the seorlng The Hops five opened the scorm" ^conds of sparing, in tha >e;-ond period, a, —" ' m g a pushed at any t. Liardln got Hope i, .(control during if /)el ~ ooting by both I, jsscd d X t 2 •*Buter was high foi Xt" ^ I f l a * ~tlf* ofnts. Nick Yonks

p

roit "i l i

Wallop Knights fi^saiedTall] "ome Back -''^eriod |

Points

•J

isketball te points in ay night Ivin col! ? garae \ rgest ere at the Ai •y nook ; basket 1

1

or If

A d r i a n

D e f e «

53 • « > 4 9

53 t o

''cyjn h ^ 4 s i - S

Homeb I V W ow Win Over Hope five le

WITMS

tilg^ ^riar

nt Cal side «

27-26 •ian s nd bal inder

Out N a m

unusually s!ow-st£ After a full 10. minu teams were knotted, five minutes left; )ialf, the score was •7 count in Hope's 1

^ center

poi» t s

toh ft* lead H o p C in o j - G a m e Series W a r

w,- . He ^ e - KckT Yo hnZ bo star,er' 0 ?nter s

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47-44 scant s n t 47-44 A S .

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Hope college's ha, •verwhekned the A<fc •y a 73-60 count Sax t tlie Aitnory to stcj H •'ith Alma for fourth i he Bulldogs in MIAA 'he teams were tied lace going into Satui*4 T i e Dutch, sta v ' gait and and on the s{ I can't see iope is so f a r A andings,' said Wx»tt "of A<ji ian

K in s Fi

its

CO^.flVv* ,-o^ .e»s

Hope Overwheliiis Adrian Quintet in MIAA Contest ^

//,T

'.Guard Nick Yon |t before the pe lis long shots pi , Ut in front with iptermiss

Defeat

9

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d n g u n"d "e r" "the H, their flr<;f , e st ^ e t t e « h ^ r e c t ' o n of ^ ^ a m e ,\ct.orv ' a ^ H I L L S D A L E , Mich i/pi five'C^! H o p e c o i , ^ R u s s C v * <> <& • = - ~ 't o. " T tie in t h e last t h r e e m I n - J a y s c o r e d its basket? ^ ' ,00®^ ing

io V

Hope,

58 t o

55


TOP, left to right: C o a c h Russ DeVette, Paul Muyskens, Nick Yonker.

Varsity Basketball Although u n a b l e to entice "Lady Luck" over to its side, H o p e ' s 1948-49 b a s k e t b a l l s q u a d m a i n t a i n e d a position of respect in Michigan collegiate c a g e ranks, a n d w e r e d r e a d e d a s a p o i n t - p r o d u c i n g p o w e r h o u s e in the MIAA a s they succ e e d e d in knocking off all of the loop's quintets, except Kalamazoo, at least o n c e d u r i n g the s e a s o n . S e v e n d e f e a t s b y the n a r r o w e s t of m a r g i n s a c c o u n t e d for H o p e ' s r a t h e r grim r e c o r d a n d its fifth-place r a t i n g in the sixt e a m MIAA. H o w e v e r , those s e v e n d e f e a t s w e r e not ones of which to b e a s h a m e d . At n o time d u r i n g the s e a s o n w e r e the D u t c h m e n ever d e f e a t e d b y m o r e t h a n a slim four points, a n d the a g g r e g a t e total s e p a r a t i n g H o p e from its o p p o n e n t s in those s e v e n tilts w a s only 21 points, or a n a v e r a g e of three points a g a m e . So tight w a s the r a c e for the MIAA c a g e c r o w n d u r i n g the p a s t s e a s o n that, h a d the Hollanders b e e n a b l e to d e f e a t Alma in their last l e a g u e tussle, t h e y w o u l d h a v e g r a b b e d a s h a r e of s e c o n d p l a c e r a t h e r t h a n the fifth slot which w a s allotted t h e m a f t e r the Scots e d g e d them, 49 to 45. Another f e a t h e r in C o a c h Russ DeVette's c a p is the fact that his s q u a d w a s the only l e a g u e t e a m to d e f e a t Hillsdale's MIAA b a s k e t b a l l c h a m p i o n s . The Dutch took the Hillsdale five b y a 19-point m a r g i n , 63 to 44, a t the Armory to a v e n g e a n earlier three-point d e f e a t on the Dales' h a r d w o o d . The fact that the H o p e quint w a s r e g a r d e d a s more p o w e r f u l t h a n its fifth-place r a t i n g w o u l d indicate w a s p r o v e d a t the e n d of the s e a s o n w h e n MfAA officials p l a c e d two Dutch b a s k e t e e r s on the '48-'49 honor s q u a d . F o r w a r d s Herk Buter a n d Bud V a n d e W e g e b o t h w e r e a w a r d e d positions on the sixm a n all-MlAA t e a m . Hillsdale's title-snaring quint w a s the only other t e a m to p l a c e two m e n on the loop honor s q u a d . H o p e c o m m e n c e d its c a g e c a m p a i g n a g a i n s t Percy Jones a t the Armory a n d w a l k e d off the floor at the e n d of the tilt with a n impressive 69-42 victory over the medics. The following week, the Hollanders t r a v e l e d to G r a n d Rapids to t a k e on a n o t h e r n o n - l e a g u e foe. G r a n d Rapids Junior College, a n d o v e r c a m e the s c r a p p y Raider five b y a 47-32 count. LEFT: lohn Bremer, Bob Dennison. BOTTOM, left to right: M a n a g e r A b e Moerland, Bob W a g n e r , D u a n e Peekstok.


TOP, left to right: Bill Holwerda, Bud V a n d e W e g e , Herk Buter.

That s a m e w e e k m a r k e d the first MIAA contest for the Dutch five a n d a l s o the first blotch on their r e c o r d w h e n Hillsdale's Bear C a t s t u r n e d t h e m b a c k , 58 to 55. Misfortune struck a g a i n in the O r a n g e a n d Blue's next s c r a p w h e n the K a l a m a z o o Hornets s t u n g them, 46 to 44, in a n overtime tilt. This w a s H o p e s only loss on the A r m o r y court d u r i n g the entire s e a s o n . Two m o r e n o n - l o o p tilts then p r o v i d e d the H o l l a n d e r s with a n o t h e r b r a c e of victories. Percy Jones w a s h u m b l e d for the s e c o n d time b y a 72-32 c o u n t at Battle Creek, a n d Michigan Normal took a 51-50 s e t b a c k a t the h a n d s of the Dutch in a thrilling f r a c a s at the Armory. G e t t i n g b a c k into c o n f e r e n c e competition, the Dutch found the g o i n g a bit r o u g h a g a i n a s they t r a v e l e d to A d r i a n to a b s o r b a 53-49 d e f e a t , a n d then w e n t on to Albion w h e r e the Britons e k e d out a slim 60-62 victory. AA* ith four losses a n d n o wins in loop contests thus far, H o p e b u m p e d n o s e s with A l m a in Holland on the following T u e s d a y a n d h a n d e d the Scots a 74-65 d r u b b i n g for its first l e a g u e victory. P l a y i n g o n e of their most o u t s t a n d i n g g a m e s of the s e a s o n , the Dutch followed the A l m a win with a n impressive 63-44 triumph over Hillsdale's Bear Cats, 1948-49 MIAA c h a m p s . The H o l l a n d e r s then d r e w b l o o d from their a r c h rivals, Calvin, a s t h e y t h u m p e d the Knights b y a 21-point m a r g i n , 64 to 43, at the Armory. K a l a m a z o o c o n t i n u e d to b e a tack on the Dutch b e n c h w h e n the H o l l a n d e r s t r a v e l e d to Kazoo a n d r e c e i v e d their s e c o n d n a r r o w s e t b a c k of the s e a s o n a t the h a n d s of the Hornets 47 to 44. A d r i a n a n d Albion w e r e then p i n n e d d o w n b y the H o p e quint in r e v e n g e for a p a i r of s e t b a c k s earlier in the c a m p a i g n . The DeVette-men t r o u n c e d the Britons b y a 71-60 count, a n d then d u m p e d Adrian, 75 to 59. In a contest w h i c h w a s to d e c i d e w h e t h e r H o p e or Alma w o u l d g r a b a s h a r e of s e c o n d place, the loser to t a k e fifth, the Dutch j o u r n e y e d to the Scots' lair a n d t h e r e w e r e a m b u s h e d , 49 to 45, in their final MIAA scrap. Thus, four points s e p a r a t e d H o p e from a t h r e e - w a y tie for s e c o n d p l a c e in conf e r e n c e s t a n d i n g s a n d s h o v e d them into fifth. Traveling to Ypsilanti, the H o l l a n d e r s tallied a n o t h e r e a s y victory, setting b a c k Michigan Normal, 65 to 59. RIGHT: Jack M a r e m a , Dale VanDort. BOTTOM, left to right: Bill Hinga, Fred Brieve, M a n a g e r [ake Wolterbeek.


Uaskct Mall

1948-49 FINAL Ml A A STANDINGS Won

H o p e w e n t to G r a n d R a p i d s for the y e a r ' s w i n d u p affair, a n d b u m p e d u p a g a i n s t Calvin, a victory-thirsty quint. A l t h o u g h the Knights h a d d e f e a t e d the Dutch only twice in thirteen tussles, t h e y p r o v e d to b e a d e t e r m i n e d five. H o p e led t h r o u g h o u t most of the contest, b u t a t its conclusion the Calvin s u p p o r t e r s , h a v i n g dried their eyes, w e r e a s t o u n d e d to s e e that s c o r e b o a r d r e g i s t e r e d Calvin 49, H o p e 46.

Hope

9

1

.900

Albion

5

5

.500

Alma

5

5

.500

Kalamazoo

5

5

.500

Hope

4

6

.400

Adrian

2

8

.200

69 Percy Jones G r a n d R a p i d s Junior C o l l e g e . 47

42

Hillsdale

55

58

Kalamazoo

44

46

Percy Jones . . . .

72

32

Michigan Normal

51

50

Adrian

49

53

Albion

60

62

Alma

74

65

Hillsdale

63

44

Calvin

64

43

Kalamazoo

44

47

71

60

Adrian

...

32

Albion

75

59

Alma

45

49

Michigan Normal

65

59

Calvin

46

49

.

»

Oppon

10 wins, 7 losses

92

Pet.

Hillsdale

• 1948-49 SEASON RECORD

Lost

m .. • • •


f^pe

I 20

^QPr

n

FIRST ROW, left to right: Kruizenga, Thomas, Bocks, Cook. SECOND ROW: Monroe, Hulst, V a n d e r V e l d e , C o u s a r , Nieusma. THIRD ROW: M a n a g e r Muddle, H a n d y , Hoffman, Yonkman, Wissink, C o a c h Schouten.

Jreshman

Basketball

With only a m i n i m u m of p r a c t i c e — a n h o u r of drills o n c e or twice a week, s a n d w i c h e d in b e t w e e n varsity practice, interfrat tilts, a n d the w o m e n s p h y s - e d p r o g r a m in the o v e r c r o w d e d p r o g r a m of physical e d u c a t i o n utilizing C a r n e g i e g y m — C o a c h lack S c h o u t e n ' s 1948-49 frosh b a s k e t b a l l s q u a d closed the s e a s o n with a r e c o r d of four w i n s a n d five losses. C o n s i d e r i n g the limited a m o u n t of p r a c t i c e w h i c h the s q u a d w a s a l l o w e d , their p e r f o r m a n c e during the s e a s o n is certainly not to b e t a k e n lightly. C o a c h e d b y Jack Schouten, with the a s s i s t a n c e of Jim Muddle, the t e a m e n t e r t a i n e d e a r l y - c o m e r s to H o p e varsity tilts with their p r e l i m i n a r y contests at the Armory. The "frosh-five" also m a d e two r o a d trips d u r i n g the s e a s o n , o n e to K a l a m a z o o a n d o n e to G r a n d R a p i d s w h e r e t h e y met the Calvin f r e s h m a n t e a m . The t e a m o p e n e d its s c h e d u l e a g a i n s t K a l a m a z o o at the Armory a n d fell b e f o r e the classy Junior Hornets b y a 56-42 count. The next foe of the f r e s h m e n s q u a d w a s the Fox Jewelers outfit, w h i c h took a 69-58 b e a t i n g b y the Little Dutchmen. Pete's B a r b e q u e w a s easily b o w l e d over b y the S c h o u t e n men, 56 to 30, in the next g a m e on the Armory h a r d w o o d Downtown N a s h p r o v e d a m e a s u r e too t o u g h for the frosh a s t h e y p u l l e d a 55-31 victory out of the b a g in the t e a m ' s next a p p e a r a n c e . Calvin C o l l e g e ' s freshies a d d e d a n o t h e r defeat to the s q u a d ' s r e c o r d in the next clash w h e n they w a l k e d off the floor with a 39-29 win to their credit. The K a l a m a z o o f r esh m e n five l e n g t h e n e d H o p e ' s losing streak to t h r e e g a m e s w h e n t h e y s l a p p e d d o w n the Dutch frosh, 65 to 43, on the Kazoo floor. Hope Reformed C h u r c h of G r a n d R a p i d s sent its s q u a d to Holland for the next f r e s h m a n p r e l i m i n a r y g a m e , a n d the visitors w e r e sent h o m e with a 46-29 d e f e a t . Allen's Radio then b u m p e d u p a g a i n s t the frosh a n d b o u n c e d t h e m a r o u n d b y a 50-38 m a r g i n . In the final contest of the s e a s o n , the on Calvin in a thrilling tilt a t the G r a n d Completely o u t c l a s s i n g the Knighties in the g a m e , the H o p e frosh c o a s t e d in to a

Junior Hopeites took Rapids Burton court. the earlier portion of n a r r o w 52-50 victory. 93


J.

D. ÂŁ).

FIRST ROW: Prof. A. Lampen, C a r o l y n I n g h a m , Shirley Willbrandt. SECOND ROW: Mary Van Loo, J a y n e Baker, Shirley De Boer, Beatrice Folkert, Jean Snow, Hazel V a n d e V/oude. THIRD ROW: Katherine Ponstine, M a r c i a Jacobs, Shirley Knol, Mary Lou McRae, Doris Koskamp, Betty Boelkins.

Cheer

C ead ers

LEFT TO RIGHT: Irene Heemstra, Helen V a n d e r Wall, Betty Eskite, Vernon Leestma, June Dunster, Virginia Hesse, David Karsten, Lamont Dirkse.

94


lope Thinclads Aim to

4 L

-ong

loost P o o r ' 4 8 R e c o r d

By g< sick of tb11 AA t r a c t >y acq u in iTy in the F ( I p n ir H0Pe 0 ' )orted v , Holh

, Seminary, will asst --"rt 440 d e p a r t m e n / A . Qf

Team

Seen

Drills ,

^

^ 4

?Pe U,

A

%

; f. is* o p e n„ M3AA ee C0 ege fl5eei Arh-j/r, h e r ^ y in "9 C f VllbW i. comp 0 11 hhe Cy°*ch o « 11 hand - w ' .^ o -Ocl tution JAr!ti ^Tv i he o su t f j ^ l e o d

•««

*n 't£** en. y.

sh devotinga <& ,ck squad and Sp the Hope grid squad 4 w Phis year Vanderbush rbush w > ' f j - y r, wy c j v \ 4 V itrate on the S p r „i n g J A y S j \ ; % £ o 6 \ lis, while a new s t a f '?*• % > Track department. <> ol r>Xy tACK COACH ? ***£ (T • • Suss DeVette, h a v i n g reo </< ^ npleted his first season a s Ho, o> sketball coach, will t a k e over *%<6 > ys head-coaching position, while rj a rs Granberg, cross country men- Bob ^>' _ . / ', will serve as DeVette's as- in the * >%- ieot tant and t a k e c h a r g e of the j u m p e r s :> ^ tance runners. Bud VandeV Jlen Bruggers and Con Vande- K a m p h n i a jude, two 1948 Hope grada now idying a t W e s t e r n Theolgf^

As

Get

Hope

Under

'lege t r a c k m e n Bill Bocks and Bob Kamphuii in t h e col- Holland, H e k Par s ons of Bom De India n Siderus of L the squad, oby, cross-coui e r m a n , heads mile. Others ~ths a r e : P ', H u g h Camf al Heest of J freshmen, hold first , DeVette j will compet Bud Vai will lead pole vaul! 1 head t h e o l e t e schei mged. reporti'nj le squad, it to a h t h e fi sveral j In the

%

I

I

We

\M

Hope

K)\\eS°

'ed by cgun, who was m e fastest m e n in t h e M ~~^oason. Others are R fij-t t ^•'"and Rapids U tils ^ " 220 man f i

Gets Ready

jn.

/y.

cCj

Aima college cross-'V

e

^

The • HopeSattvCb^ team ^ 2 4 ternooti ^ 2 A l m a ' S O dinner ^ ^ 3.9 ^ fob l ^ . J V was ^

t^ Hie 1948 Hope college golf tov TYve ; ' + c a ^aa l \ v j a s ,, ment will get underway tod i J - s i :C^ ^ the Legion Memorial "cour / ' lb, according to Prof . A!' * C V ^ a c e fruner. Holland Memorial •w|by Bob 'J• 188 has donated a troph' jf~f aTk and CoUms /^ winner of the annual 3* ( finished to a lrth fnt v.So^oL* - round matclies u .p C j... ' Rrst a O u t npleted this week and •/ rf Q'J i/,.." f // / / „( s to Jy d round play will end ^ " ^ 7 :er fhe winner is na ' e s t ^/.J ^ 6^,, *r said. b S g scores are given acf a ' f^cT. 7 ' ^ HopJ^n i *n ** *hst0 fn ' C o ; following: One p o r ^ cls^ ^ ^ e atV W ^eff o ^ V L s t ' aiv a 0 V ^e/ •dal score for the fiVshS hu 1 Bn, i orf ,tyls a e point for the sec ^ ^ 0/ „ ^/f(,'^ 0 Pe Vs 0 " d two points for 4 > 0!° , /J^ ^ ' ' the 36-lioles. Q ^ ^ ^ 4 U be given for f ' V f ' ^ o o "a 1 ' -fof.re , .V ;\ d below pars on t /^e • v t < 0^ S 0 n :ond 18, and onr ' 0 1 h°!' ot s *sa "e 4^"° i k l ^ arded for the j n j low pars on the ' e ?cr y't/p- o 5 cording to ^ cto^s^-art, a winn^ ^ " •C \ 6 v fi'l h - J ^ r ' ^ g e 1 Hope

^ wfn

C

PVo O*"7

jm ! i. \ Level .Hand

on.

i 1947 s m, will o ets that e ^ ' ^e. t h e hut / Walt B 6 ^ee

Kalamazoo Edges Hope College Nin ^ B y Single Tally

> ^ V/

^

Each Team Credited With Three Singles, And Three Miscues

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a t K a l a m a z o o . T h e loss - t r a v / _ ^ ^ e e t VN e's f i r s t of t h e s e a s o n aga ; eeK for a the \wjns. \ast m finisihed vear. b u y — ^ p l a y i n g baseball f o r •iWie g a m e w a s in 1

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Walamazoo college's Ho eball team stung Hope col c 0 \. Uj a 1-0 defeat Tuesday al

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Gerry Mull tosses 'em u p for b a t t i n g practice

First b a s e m a n Jack M a r e m a

BASEBALL SCHEDULE

baseball

April

6

Aquinas

Here

April

9

M u s k e g o n JC

Here

April 12

Kalamazoo

There

April 14

Calvin

There

April 22

Alma

Here

April 26

Albion

There

April 27

Calvin

Here

April 28

M u s k e g o n JC

There

May-

3

Hillsdale

There

May

7

Kalamazoo

Here

May

11

Western Michigan

Here

May

12

G r a n d R a p i d s JC

There

May

14

Adrian

Theie

May

19

Ml A A Tourney at K a l a m a z o o

May

24

W e s t e r n Michigan

wmm L u b b e r s w a i t s in vain a s V a n W i e r e n s l a m s one out

96.

There


Baseball Long b e f o r e the last s n o w h a d m e l t e d a w a y a n d p a t c h e s of g r e e n h a d b e g u n to a p p e a r on the d i a m o n d at Riverview Park, v e t e r a n b a s e b a l l pilot lack S c h o u t e n called the prospects for his 1949 s q u a d into C a r n e g i e G y m for p r e - s e a s o n drills. From all a p p e a r a n c e s , Jack's early a n d rigorous training p e r i o d s h a v e not b e e n in vain, for a s h a s b e e n e v i d e n c e d in their first few starts, the D u t c h m e n a p p e a r to b e one of the top d e f e n s i v e units in MIAA circles a n d s h o u l d finish in the u p p e r b r a c k e t a f t e r loop competition this s e a s o n . The printer, like time a n d tide, w a i t s for no m a n , a n d a s the final p a g e s of the Milestone a c c u m u l a t e in the office of the printer, H o p e h a s c o m p l e t e d only four of the 15 g a m e s listed on its intensive 1949 s c h e d u l e . The Dutch nine's superiority in the d e f e n s i v e c a t e g o r y is clearly s h o w n b y the fact that in these four contests they h a v e a l l o w e d the opposition to r e a c h h o m e p l a t e b y w a y of third b a s e only twice. Offensively, the S c h o u t e n - m e n h a v e also b e e n d o i n g q u i t e well, p u s h i n g a c r o s s 18 runs, for a n a v e r a g e of better t h a n four a g a m e . In their o p e n e r , the D u t c h m e n t u r n e d b a c k A q u i n a s Coll e g e of G r a n d R a p i d s b y a 2-1 count. Then p l a y i n g host to M u s k e g o n Junior College, the H o l l a n d e r s r a n wild in chalking u p a n impressive 11-0 victory. K a l a m a z o o r e g i s t e r e d the first d e f e a t on H o p e ' s '49 record with a slim 1-0 victory g a i n e d on a n u n e a r n e d run. Traveling to G r a n d Rapids, the Dutch n o t c h e d their third win b y p u s h i n g a s i d e Calvin's Knights, 4 to 0.

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V a n H o v e n sets his sights for the g r a n d s t a n d

Six lettermen r e t u r n e d to bolster this y e a r ' s s q u a d : Jack M a r e m a , a pitcher of t h e 1 9 4 8 t e a m w a s s w i t c h e d to first b a s e ; Ernie Meussen r e t u r n e d to third; Harold Van W i e r e n a n d Tom V a n W i n g e n a r e b a c k in the outfield; a n d Bill Ver H e y a n d Mike S k a a l e n h a v e ret u r n e d a s the m a i n s t a y s of the m o u n d staff.

m

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wm

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Jack i m p a r t s a few w o r d s of wisdom to hurler Jim Fox

Looking for the o n e without a hole in it 97


Decker s h o w s how it's d o n e

Up, up, a n d over

Zrack H o p i n g to p r e v e n t a r e c u r r e n c e of last y e a r ' s r e c o r d which put t h e m in the MIAA cellar at the completion of the s e a s o n , a l a r g e g r o u p of Dutch thinclads hit the cinder trails early this Spring to p r e p a r e themselves for the long trek t h r o u g h a stiff s c h e d u l e of MIAA c o m p e tition. A1 V a n d e r b u s h , 1948 Hope track mentor, found that h e w a s u n a b l e to d e v o t e sufficient time to b o t h track a n d Spring football practice, a n d so this y e a r relinquished his track post to Russ DeVette, pilot of the b a s k e t b a l l s q u a d , a n d Lars G r a n b e r g , w h o s e p r e v i o u s c o a c h i n g e x p e r i e n c e h a s b e e n in the form of g u i d i n g H o p e cross country s q u a d s .

Veltman tosses his "flying s a u c e r "

Promises of a b e t t e r - t h a n - a v e r a g e s e a s o n w e r e evident w h e n over 50 hopefuls, a m o n g them ten lettermen, t u r n e d out for drills a s soon a s the last t r a c e s of Winter h a d f a d e d from the college cinder path. A m o n g the lettermen reporting for action a g a i n this s e a s o n • a r e Ted Barrett, Dutch s p e e d king in the 100 a n d 220-yard d a s h e s ; H u g h C a m p b e l l , memb e r of the cross country s q u a d w h o will r u n the mile this spring; Ken Decker, the only strong link in the w e a k hurdling d e p a r t m e n t

98


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Meulbroek p u t s

They're off

w h o will a l s o r u n the d a s h e s ; Bob Koop, w h o s e s p e e d will b e exhibited in the 440 a n d 880-yard runs; Pete K r a a k a n d Don Lee, 1946 MIA A 880-yard r u n c h a m p , w h o will return to run the half-mile; Collins Ottipoby, a n o t h e r H o p e h a r r i e r w h o h a s s w i t c h e d to the two-mile event for Spring competition; Fred Veltman, 1948 MIAA c h a m p i o n in the discus; a n d Jim L a m b a n d Ernie Ross, o u t s t a n d i n g pole vaulters. N e w c o m e r s w h o a r e e x p e c t e d to bolster the t e a m a r e Bob Brink in the mile run, Neil D r o p p e r s in the discus, Vern L e e s t m a in the p o l e vault, W a r r e n H u y s e r in the mile event, Fred Y o n k m a n in the discus, a n d Ed Leverette a n d Ralph L u d w i g in the d a s h e s .

Ludwig, Barrett, a n d E b n e t h r e a d y to t a k e off

TRACK SCHEDULE

99

April 21

I n t e r s g u a d Meet

April 26

Calvin

April 30

K a l a m a z o o . . .There

May

4

Calvin

May

10

G. R. JC

May

14

S t a t e meet a t Western Mich. College

May

20

MIAA m e e t a t Kalam a z o o College

There

Here There


C h a m p i o n Jack T irrell

The 1948 H o m e c o m i n g c e l e b r a t i o n w a s the s c e n e last fall of the s e c o n d a n n u a l m e n ' s fall tennis t o u r n a m e n t . Fifteen court e n t h u s i a s t s e n t e r e d the r u g g e d t o u r n e y for a c h a n c e to e a r n the gold m e d a l , which e a c h y e a r is a w a r d e d to the w i n n e r b y Duffy W a d e , local businessman. Competition w a s plenty t o u g h a n d w h e n the field w a s finally n a r r o w e d d o w n to the final two contenders. Jack Tirrell a n d G e n e B a r e n d s e f o u n d themselves on opposite sides of the net for the final r o u n d on H o m e c o m i n g d a y . After d r o p p i n g the first set, 4-6, Tirrell g a i n e d the n o d in the next, 6-2, a n d finally t o p p l e d B a r e n d s e b y a slim 7-5 count in the final set to win the t o u r n a m e n t a n d the m e d a l .


Spring Zemis April April April April May May May May May May

SPRING TENNIS SCHEDULE 15 G r a n d R a p i d s JC There 22 Alma There 26 Albion Here 28 Calvin There 4 Hillsdale Here 7 Kalamazoo There 9 G r a n d R a p i d s JC Here 14 Adrian Here 16 Calvin Here 19-20 C o n f e r e n c e Meet at K a l a m a z o o

BACK ROW: C. Votaw, J. T irrell, J. VanderVelde, K. Etterbeek, T. Drenton, N. VanDis. FRONT ROW: G. G n a d e , R. Becksfort, E. Bare.ndse, R. Humbert, R. N i e u s m a .

C o a c h H a r o l d H a v e r k a m p ' s p r o s p e c t s for a top-notch tennis s q u a d w e r e bright this Spring w h e n four lettermen t u r n e d out to form the n u c l e u s of a t w e l v e - m a n t e a m . The q u a r t e t of v e t e r a n p e r f o r m e r s a r e G e n e B a r e n d s e , Bob Becksfort, Ken Etterbee 1 :, a n d Jack Tiirell, all of Holland. Another four Holland l a d s a r e listed a m o n g the others on the s q u a d . They a r e G e r r y G n a d e , Jack V a n d e r V e l d e , Dick Nieusma, a n d Ray H u m b e r t . O t h e r m e m b e r s of the t e a m inc l u d e C h u c k V o t a w of M u s k e g o n , Tom Drenton of G r a n d Rapids, Neil VanDis of South H a v e n , a n d Bud VerHelst of G r a n d H a v e n . The Dutch n e t m e n h a v e b o o k e d a r u g g e d n i n e - m a t c h s c h e d u l e in a d d i t i o n to the M1AA meet to b e h e l d at K a l a m a z o o on M a y 19 a n d 20. In a d d i t i o n to its MIAA competition, H o p e m e e t s Calvin a n d G r a n d R a p i d s Junior Coll e g e for a p a i r of m a t c h e s e a c h .

V a n d e r V e l d e a w a i t s a return a s N i e u s m a a c c e p t s the serve

101


Del Koop

Bob Houtman

Golf a g a i n a s s u m e d a prominent role in the r e a l m of athletics at Hope this Spring, with C o a c h Albert Timmer once more directing the college club-wielders in their journeys from g r e e n to g r e e n on the local course. Four v e t e r a n s in the art of s p h e r e socking a n d s e e k i n g w e r e on h a n d at the start of the s e a s o n to boost the O r a n g e a n d Blue's c h a n c e s of a successful y e a r on the links. H o w a r d Jalving, Bob Houtman, Paul Mulder, a n d Henry Visser a r e the q u a r t e t of linksmen on this s e a s o n ' s s q u a d w h o w e r e a w a r d e d a letter for their action d u r i n g 1948. A m o n g the first-year m e n w h o h a v e b e e n s e e i n g a g o o d d e a l of action in early s e a s o n competition a r e Del Koop, A n d y Zimmerman, a n d Bill Kloote.

Heinie Visser

Kloote

102


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PA Fraters Tie Indiej 205 263 In ' A ' League Le 329 w L Pet. PF 299 Fraters 7 2 .778 316 373 Indies 7 2 .778 267 385 Emmies 6 3 .667 313 Knicks 5 4 .556 271 Arcadians 1 8 . 1 1 1 229 The Cosmos wrapped up the "B" Cosmos 1 8 .111 221 league crown with a convincing 44The final three games of the 20 win over the second place Fratschedule were set ba ers. The Cosmos led all the way •cause of the Hope-C their complete dominati?'»t week Wednesday. P boards proved the- ' ^ c S ? 0 •s, the Knicks ran lecksfort 1' eak to fojis-^- not tints, • n ved ui

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1 February 19, Hope College gi

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Ivin. J h e r i ^ l s arrived on a. m. in order ing a mixer, dvke 13^ 11 were played rls participat nch in the ale Room. In ig, badmin re played f nt of the ' day was s and a sJ ottage. from H ?etty We >heel, A tie, Jea Iden, I Ca pimahT Hane and Joyce Ba orence Stuai-t, Ike Heems '.rilyn Veldman, Doris Ads -b Van Neuren, Beth Thorn 10 qui Y / o r o e n h De Graaf. The W.A.A. Be nmutes. D score®the events. '.^^^Fvid-aV s

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PRATERS, "A" C h a m p s , BACK ROW: Buter, Visscher, Kalsbeek, Buckhout, Vanlngen. FRONT ROW: M e e u s e n , Visscher, Slikkers, Visser, Schippers.

COSMOS, "B" C h a m p s a n d w i n n e r s of playoff, FRONT ROW: Van Wieren, Van Hoven, Patterson, Becksfort, Harrison. BACK ROW: N e a t h a m m e r , Eikenhout, Lee, Zuidema, Kranendonk, Rinkus,

Jnterf rat Sports

104


Jht erf ra t

Sports


Women's Sports FRONT ROW: Mary Breid, Shirley Knol, Miss L. Van Dommelen, Carol Hartley, Connie Hinga. BACK ROW: Marguerite A a r d e m a , Eleanor Short, Mary V a n d e Wege, M a r g a r e t Moerdyk, Mary Coffey.

Under the l e a d e r s h i p of the W.A.A. Board consisting of one F r e s h m a n , two Sophomore, three Junior, a n d three Senior R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a n d g u i d e d b y Miss V a n Dommelen, w o m e n ' s sports at Hope this y e a r r e a c h e d a n e w high. The p r o g r a m of sports for w o m e n is d e s i g n e d to promote g o o d sportsmanship, to c r e a t e e n j o y m e n t for all a n d to provide e v e r y girl with interest in at least o n e sport. Interest in t e a m sports w a s g r e a t this year. In the fall, school h a d h a r d l y b e g u n w h e n Volleyball t e a m s w e r e b e i n g organized. A Volleyball round-robin t o u r n a m e n t w a s run-off with twelve t e a m s participating. Not to b e forgotten w a s the introduction of Field Hockey. The f u n d a m e n t a l s of the g a m e w e r e d e m o n s t r a t e d to the F r e s h m a n g y m classes, a n d despite m a n y bruises, they bec a m e quite proficient with the stick. P a u l a pitches

In the winter, t h o u g h t s t u r n e d to Basketball. Two l e a g u e s w e r e o r g a n i z e d with eight t e a m s in the "A" L e a g u e a n d six t e a m s (all Freshmen) in the "B" L e a g u e . G a m e s w e r e p l a y e d e a c h T h u r s d a y night in C a r n e g i e g y m a n d the s e a s o n w a s a g r e a t success.

Volleyball c h a m p s

106


Women

'

S p o r t s

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Basketball t e a m s w e r e picked to represent Hope in g a m e s with Calvin College a n d also with Holland High School. Softball w a s the other t e a m sport so p o p u l a r with all. Softball l e a g u e s w e r e formed with fourteen t e a m s m a d e u p of girls from various dorms a n d r a n d o m groups. G a m e s w e r e p l a y e d on M o n d a y , W e d n e s d a y , a n d Thursd a y e v e n in g s at the athletic field a n d at the VanRaalte H o m e s t e a d grounds. Four d i a m o n d s w e r e in use most of the time. Individual sports h a v e g r o w n considerably in popularity with the addition of several n e w sports. This y e a r H o r s e b a c k Riding w a s introduced

Wham

107

Put it across

into the p r o g r a m a n d w a s a c c e p t e d with great enthusiasm. G r o u p s of twelve girls rode e a c h W e d n e s d a y afternoon a n d S a t u r d a y morning at the K e e w a n o Stables. This w a s both a Fall a n d Spring activity. Golf, too, w a s a n e w c o m e r this year. Girls w e r e given credit t o w a r d a n a w a r d for golfing a s long a s their score c a r d s w e r e signed b y the "Pro" at the course on which they p l a y e d . Several sets of clubs w e r e p u r c h a s e d


Women's

S p o r t s

A bit dustier than on ice, but it's fun

Ow, my shins!

b y the Phys. Ed. D e p a r t m e n t for u s e in this sport.

College a n d on May 12, 13, 14, traveled to K a l a m a z o o to d e f e n d their title in the W.M.I. A.A. t o u r n a m e n t . There w a s a s t a n d i n g t e a m of eight m e m b e r s . There w a s also a n Intram u r a l tennis t o u r n a m e n t a n d a mixed d o u b l e s t o u r n a m e n t in which m a n y students participated.

An Indoor a n d O u t d o o r Archery R a n g e w a s set u p a n d the a r r o w s b e g a n to fly. This sport t a k e s n o little a m o u n t of skill a n d the girls really l e a r n e d h o w to h a n d l e that b o w . Archery w a s a d d e d to the p r o g r a m a n d w a s enjoyed b y all w h o p a r t i c i p a t e d . Badminton a n d Ping P o n g w e r e two of the most p o p u l a r individual sports. They w e r e not set t o u r n a m e n t s b u t w e r e c a r r i e d on in a n informal m a n n e r . For the first time the W.A.A, s p o n s o r e d a m i x e d - d o u b l e s t o u r n a m e n t in b a d minton. M a t c h e s w e r e p l a y e d in C a r n e g i e g y m e a c h M o n d a y night until late in the Spring. Bowling is a l w a y s g o o d sport for w o m e n . Friday afternoons s a w campus women heading for the alleys. W i n n e r s w e r e chosen b y individual s e a s o n a l a v e r a g e s a n d the highest individual score. The setting of pins s e e m e d to give a s m u c h exercise a s the b o w l i n g itself.

Girls w e r e e n t e r t a i n e d at a Play Day with K a l a m a z o o College a n d p l a y e d hostess to Calvin College. These p l a y d a y s included basketball, volleyball, deck tennis, b a d m i n t o n , ping pong, archery, relays, a n d a social time. M a y Day sports activities cannot b e left out of the p r o g r a m . On M a y Day r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s from e a c h class vie for p l a c e s in track a n d field events. The winning class t e a m receiving the most points receives a trophy. S o m e hiking h a s also b e e n a d d e d to the p r o g r a m , but h a s not a s yet b e e n included in the a w a r d system.

The W o m e n ' s Tennis T e a m p l a y e d m a t c h e s with Calvin College a n d Western Michigan

At the e n d of e a c h y e a r , a w a r d s a r e pres e n t e d to those w h o h a v e e a r n e d them u n d e r the n e w l y revised system.

Ballet or Volleyball?

C h a m p i o n s h i p form

108


V':' %


A l p h a A l p h a Chi w a s b r o u g h t into b e i n g s o m e y e a r s a g o to r e c o g n i z e t h o s e m e n on the c a m p u s p l a n n i n g on entering some active Christian field of service. It continues to b e o n e of the favorite organizations for such men. Helpful a n d inspiring m e e t i n g s a r e held the third M o n d a y of e v e r y month. At t h e s e meetings, a variety of topics on s o m e definite p h a s e of Christian work is p r e s e n t e d b y n o t e d s p e a k ers. Such topics h a v e b e e n "The Call of the Minister," "The True C h u r c h , " a n d "The Prep a r a t i o n of Sermons." A l p h a Chi h a s given its m e m b e r s a vision of future g o a l s a n d h e l p a n d e n c o u r a g e m e n t in m e e t i n g them. It h a s b e e n a m e a n s w h e r e b y the v e t e r a n s on the front line for the service of Christ h a v e i m p a r t e d of their k n o w l e d g e a n d skill to the volunteers c o m i n g to the front. The s p e a k e r s p r e s e n t e d w a y s a n d m e a n s of a v o i d ing the m a n y pit-falls c o m m o n to so m a n y in Christian service. They h a v a given the best m e t h o d of d e a l i n g with p e o p l e in p e r s o n a l contacts a n d of w i n n i n g the confidence of others in the social situation. O n e v e r y interesting m e e t i n g w a s held a t the h o m e of D e a n Milton Hinga, w h e n the topic "The Minister As a Regular Fella" w a s discussed.

C k i O n e of the projects this of studying the Scriptures, of it to m e m o r y in order to ly with the n e e d s of m e n

y e a r h a s b e e n that committing portions d e a l more effectivein p e r s o n a l work.

A l p h a Chi h a s b e e n held together b y a strong tie of true Christian love. Friendships h a v e b e e n formed a n d s t r e n g t h e n e d which will bind our c h u r c h e s together into a closer unit. S o m e of the highlights of the y e a r w e r e the meetings with other organizations of common interest. It h a s b e e n c u s t o m a r y to meet at least once a y e a r with the organization's sister society, K a p p a Delta. The Adelphin society, r e p r e s e n t i n g the semin a r y m e n of Western Theological S e m i n a r y also e x c h a n g e visits. These get-to-gethers give the p r e - s e m i n a r y student a n opportunity to get a c q u a i n t e d with the students a n d faculty of the s e m i n a r y a n d to establish friendly relations b e f o r e entering the a d v a n c e d school. The officers serving this y e a r were: G e r a r d De Loof, president; Walter Kline, vice-president; H o w a r d Newton, treasurer; a n d Robert Macy, secretary.

FIRST ROW: R. Macy, H. Cu p e r y , H. Newton, W. Kline, G. De Loof, J. Van Dyke, D. V a n d e n b e r g , R. Meyer, J. Menchofer. SECOND ROW: K. De Jong, N. Rieck, A, Friderici, B. Pennings, L, Lovelace, M. Breen, N. Reck, R. Folkert, L. Kraay, E, Kragt, F. McCormick. THIRD ROW: E. Eckerson, W. Tripp, J. De Vries, R. Bhe, H. Dean, D. Muyskens, P. Feenstra, R. Norden, W. Estell, H. Dykstra, P. Breen, E. Bruins, M. Shay. FOURTH ROW: D. Ter Beest, L. Sikkema, P. Lupkes, D. Hakken, L. Akker, R. Poppen, H. Heath, L. Dykstra, F. Goulooze, J. Smith, J. W e e n e r , P. M a s s e n , J. Hakken.


FIRST ROW; M. Schoonveld, C. Van Bruggen, L. Van Farowe, H. Vander Woude, P. Hendrieth, C. Nelson. SECOND ROW: M. Dixon, K. Hagstrom, ]. Smith, S. Hill, R. Richards, S. Roest, Mrs. G. Vander Borgh, THIRD ROW: R. Walters, K. Ponstine, G. Keizer, J. Be.-nius, T. Westra, M. De Valois, B. Nichols, M. Haldenwang. FOURTH ROW: L. Loula, M. Schoonveld, H Kleyn, F. Stewart, J. Wiersma, J. Smit.

D e l t a

K a p p a C o m p o s e d of girls interested in v a r i o u s types of Christian Service, K a p p a Delta h a s p r o v e d its worth d u r i n g its c o m p a r a t i v e l y short existe n c e of four years. The opportunities a n d problems of a Christian worker a r e p r e s e n t e d in m a n y w a y s , a n d a r e both a n inspiration a n d a c h a l l e n g e to its m e m b e r s .

This y e a r a n e w project h a s b e e n originated. The girls desired to learn b y doing a s well a s b y hearing, so a p p r o x i m a t e l y six G o o d News Clubs w e r e b e g u n in the city of Holland. These classes, held in private h o m e s after school hours, afford the girls the opportunity of presenting the m e s s a g e of Christ b y m e a n s of choruses, flannel g r a p h , a n d Bible stories to those w h o h a v e little other religious instruction.

The monthly meetings varied, b u t a l w a y s consisted of devotions led b y the m e m b e r s a n d a presentation of some p h a s e of Christian service. The n e e d for witnessing w a s m a d e effective b y m e a n s of a chalk talk. Hilda Baker a n d Evie V a n Dam r e p o r t e d on the mission conference they a t t e n d e d in Columbus, Ohio, this fall. Doctor Rottschaefer from India m a d e known to u s the n e e d s of the m a n y lepers in that country. Other s p e a k e r s included Mrs. I. J. Lubbers Mrs. Wells Thcms a n d Mrs Henry DePree.

In addition to this, the girls also support a patient in a leper hospital in a foreign country. They r a i s e d the m o n e y in v a r i o u s interesting w a y s . A special b i r t h d a y meeting w a s held in F e b r u a r y for this purpose, a n d "sacrifice w e e k " also p r o v e d beneficial. O n c e a g a i n a t Christm a s the mission box w a s p a c k e d ; this y e a r it w a s d e s i g n a t e d for the Indian mission station at Winnebago, Nebraska. The officers this y e a r include Hazel V a n d e r W o u d e , president; Lorraine Van Farowe, vicepresident; Cornelia Van Bruggen, treasurer; Florence Stewart, secretary; a n d M a r g a r e t Schoonveld, sergeant-at-arms.

A joint meeting with A l p h a Chi is a l w a y s popular, a n d this constituted the December meeting; Doctor Louis Benes, editor of the Church Herald w a s guest s p e a k e r . Christmas gifts w e r e b o u g h t to b e sent to S a r o s p a t a k , Hungary. Ill


S p a n i s h The S p a n i s h C l u b h a s h a d one of its most interesting a n d successful years. The t h e m e s of monthly m e e t i n g s h a v e b e e n timely a n d varied, with a s t u d y of S p a n i s h a n d Mexican songs, movies, a n d the literary a n d art works of the Latin American p e o p l e p r e s e n t e d in a n e n t e r t a i n i n g a n d highly informative m a n n e r . S e v e r a l movies w e r e s h o w n d u r i n g the y e a r , one p o r t r a y i n g the life of "Chico," the little Mexican b o y with a g r e a t love for n a t u r e . Another w a s entitled, "Romantic Old Madrid," a p i c t u r e s g u e t r a v e l o g u e to delight a n d enthrall. These movies a r e especially interesting a s they give S p a n i s h s tu de nt s a "close-up" view of the Latin p e o p l e a s they work a n d play, a n d give a d d e d e m p h a s i s to the r e a d i n g d o n e in the course. Singing r a n k s high a s a favorite m e t h o d for the s t u d y of S p a n i s h a n d Mexican folk-lore a n d l a n g u a g e s . The Latin strain p r e d o m i n a t i n g in the music gives it a w a r m , v i b r a n t rhythm, which m a k e s the singing particularly enjoya b l e . As in N e g r o spirituals, the h e a r t - b e a t of a r a c e c a n b e felt t h r o u g h its music, a n d it is t h r o u g h this m e d i u m that w e better u n d e r s t a n d our n e i g h b o r s to the South.

FIRST ROW: B. SECOND ROW: THIRD ROW: I. FOURTH ROW:

Club The highlight of the y e a r is Christmas, a n d the Christmas m e e t i n g is e a g e r l y a w a i t e d . The p u r p o s e of the m e e t i n g is to c e l e b r a t e the holid a y a s it w o u l d b e o b s e r v e d in the Latin American countries. There is the Mexican Pinata, a l a r g e b a g filled with s w e e t s a n d nuts of all kinds. A m e m b e r of the g r o u p is blindfolded, s p u n a r o u n d until dizzy, a n d given a stick with which he a t t e m p t s to b r e a k the b a g . W h e n he s u c c e e d s in doing this, the rest of the g r o u p a t t e m p t s to retrieve the fallen t r e a s u r e a n d there is fun a n d excitement for all present. For the very t h o u g h t f u l a n d a b l e sponsorship of the club, the g r o u p looked to Mr. Don Carlos Madrid a n d Miss N o r m a Wolcott. The student officers a n d their respective offices were: Mary Breid, President; Lois Hall, Vice-President; Esther Schmidt, Secretary; a n d D u a n e Booi, Treasurer. The success of the S p a n i s h Club is d u e in l a r g e p a r t to the cooperation of all its m e m bers. It is with the k n o w l e d g e of h a v i n g completed a highly successful y e a r that they bid e a c h other, " g r a c i a s , " a n d until next y e a r , " h a s t a luego."

Bruins, G. Gore, P. S h e r m a n , M, Breid, L. Hall, E. Schmidt, D. O l d e n b u r g . J. Van Kolken, N. Hoffman, G. Gore, C. R a b e y , Miss N. Wolcott, M. Kooyers, D. Freyling. Little, D. Booi, L. Olson, M. E a s t m a n , H. E ssen b er g , M. Wolffensperger, W. Vander Werff. Prof. D. Madrid, F. Brieve, R. P a a r l b e r g , D. H a z e k a m p , V. Elliott.

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FIRST ROW; Miss N. Meyer, J. Moessner, S. Konoshima, V. Heese, N. Hungerink, G, Hirschy, B. Boelkins, L. Hall, Mrs. P. Prins. SECOND ROW: H. Baker, J, Bernius, J. Smith, M. Van Weelden, E. Short, N. Corp, J. Van Kolken, N. Smith, M, Veldman. THIRD ROW: G. Avakian, J. Krekel, D. F e n n e m a , J. Kamp, J. Boeskool, B. Turkstra, A, Rynbrandt, J. Thatcher, G. Kooiker. FOURTH ROW: M. Wolffensperger, J. Plasman, R. G u n n , J. Zuroff, C. Kelley, J. Bennett, M. Baskett, D. Evers.

2 r eh ck The enthusiastic m e m b e r s of the French C l u b meet the s e c o n d M o n d a y of every month. The h o m e s of the faculty advisors, Miss Nella Meyer a n d Mrs. Peter Prins, w e r e the s c e n e s for the meetings. In order to a p p l y k n o w l e d g e of the l a n g u a g e , all conversation w a s c o n d u c t e d in French. Following the b u s i n e s s meeting, prog r a m s centering a r o u n d some p h a s e of French literature, art, music, or d r a m a w e r e presented b y various student m e m b e r s .

Club guest of the English Majors Club. A p a n e l discussion of the literature of the French heroine, Joan of Arc, w a s c o n d u c t e d with spirited enthusiasm. In March the club invited the Philo s o p h y a n d English Majors Clubs to a meeting to h e a r Dr. D. Ivan Dykstra s p e a k on the topic, "Existentialism." The French Club w a s h a p p y to secure a full length French film with English titles. This movie, "Le Colonel C h a b e r t , " w a s a d a p t e d from a novel b y Honore de Balzac. It told of the a d v e n t u r e s of C h a b e r t w h o w a s b u r i e d alive on the battle front, a n d h o w h e c a m e b a c k to his earlier s u r r o u n d i n g s to p r o v e his identity. It w a s interesting to c o m p a r e the French film tactics with those of America. All s tudents a n d t o w n s p e o p l e w h o w e r e attracted to this movie w e n t a w a y feeling that they h a d received something v a l u a b l e .

The October m e e t i n g w a s in the form of a n illustrated lecture entitled, " W h a t Is Modern Art?" This w a s p r e s e n t e d b y the guest speaker, Mrs. Wilma Reed. In Nove m be r a u n i q u e presentation, "France, 1948," w a s given b y m e a n s of a French television b r o a d c a s t . The condition of F r a n c e w a s d i s c u s s e d in the light of t o d a y ' s national affairs, literature, art, d r a m a , a n d music. Close to one h u n d r e d students e n j o y e d s p e n d i n g Christmas Eve in a gaily d e c o r a t e d French Cafe, "La Rue Pigale." They w e r e entertained in true French style b y singing waiters a n d waitresses, dancers, a n orchestra, a n d all other n e c e s s a r y a t m o s p h e r e .

The y e a r w a s concluded with a n outdoor picnic in the spring. The b u s i n e s s of electing officers for the following y e a r took p l a c e at this event. The officers of the organization for the y e a r 1948-49 were: president, Betty Boelkins; vicepresident, Roger Gunn; secretary, Hilda Baker; a n d treasurer. Norma Hungerink.

The club also held joint meetings with other c a m p u s clubs. In J a n u a r y the club w a s the 113


(j e r m a // The G e r m a n Club, or "Deutscher Verein," is the oldest d e p a r t m e n t a l c l u b on c a m p u s . T h r o u g h the y e a r s since its b e g i n n i n g , this g r o u p h a s s e r v e d a s a m e d i u m t h r o u g h which st u d e n ts of G e r m a n might m e e t with one a n other to e x c h a n g e their views a n d information c o n c e r n i n g G e r m a n culture a n d l a n g u a g e . In this w a y , the work d o n e in the classroom is s u p p l e m e n t e d a n d m a d e more interesting for s t u d e n t s a n d faculty alike.

Club not e n o u g h to u n d e r s t a n d the spirit of a nation a n d its people. It is t h r o u g h these informal sessions that the s tudents come into contact with the G e r m a n p e o p l e themselves, their writings, works, a n d pastimes. Thus, the s t u d y of the l a n g u a g e is greatly enriched, A further contact with the G e r m a n p e o p l e is p r o v i d e d b y writing letters to y o u n g p e o p l e in G e r m a n y . Along with this, the G e r m a n C l u b h a s b e e n a i d i n g y o u n g G e r m a n students for the p a s t two y e a r s with gifts of school supplies. These gifts a r e sent to the G e r m a n Youth Association which is s p o n s o r e d b y the Americ a n g o v e r n m e n t in O b e r a m m e r g a u .

The G e r m a n C l u b w a s in existence d u r i n g the e a r l y y e a r s of the college, b u t w a s disc o n t i n u e d d u r i n g World W a r I. However, reorganization took p l a c e a b o u t 1935, a n d since that time the club h a s b e e n active on Hope's campus.

An occasion of g r e a t anticipation is the a n n u a l Christmas p a r t y which is held at the h o m e of Miss L a u r a Boyd. The m e m b e r s enjoy a n e v e n i n g of Christmas music, stories, songs, a n d fellowship in the s a m e m a n n e r a s the G e r m a n youth o b s e r v e the Christmas season. Another highlight is the a n n u a l picnic at the close of e a c h year. After this picnic, the m e m b e r s of the G e r m a n Club bid e a c h other "Auf W i e d e r s e h n , " knowing that a n o t h e r successful y e a r of G e r m a n Club activities h a s b e e n completed.

The m e e t i n g s a r e held monthly, sometimes in the c h a p e l a n d in buildings on c a m p u s , b u t often in p r i v a t e h o m e s w h e r e informality is the rule. Various p r o g r a m s of musical, literary, a n d cultural n a t u r e a r e p r e s e n t e d at these meetings. Following the meetings, informal gettogethers a r e held in which G e r m a n g a m e s a r e p l a y e d , a n d a d e e p e r insight into the n a t u r e of the G e r m a n p e o p l e is given. It is this insight for which the G e r m a n C l u b strives. A s t u d y of the b a s i c e l e m e nt s of a l a n g u a g e is

FIRST ROW: A. Hibma, D. O l d e n b u r g , Miss L. Boyd, M. McLean, F. Hrbek. SECOND ROW: E. Schmidt, G. Van Haitsma, G. G o r m a n , M. Jacobs. THIRD: ROW: W. Friedberg, C. Van Wieren, A. Sikkel, H. Tuurling, H. D. Van Wieren.

L14


FIRST ROW: M. V a n d e Wege, C. Ingham, M. Van Loo, S. Konoshima, B. Boelkins, D. Davis, S. Willbrandt, G. Kloosterman. SECOND ROW: M. Prins, Miss E. Reeverts, S. Leslie, H. Baker, E. Van Dam, L. Brunsting, M. Kooyers, A. Moolenaar, J. Smith. THIRD ROW: Dr. C. De G r a a f , D. Goshorn, D. G. De Witt, G. Van Haitsma, D. Lam, J. Veldhuis, C. Lampen, A. Hibma, Joyce Baker, L. Van Ingen. FOURTH ROW: D. Dykstra, V. Dykstra, J. Smith, J. Dinger, R. Nbrden, Dr. J. Hollenbach.

Sng Ii s k

Majors

The English Majors C l u b w a s o r g a n i z e d to supplement the r e g u l a r classroom work in the field of literature. This y e a r a series of prog r a m s of varied content w e r e p l a n n e d a n d successfully e x e c u t e d b y the officers a n d members of the club. Meetings w e r e held on the third T h u r s d a y of e a c h month at Gilmore Cottage.

Club

a u t h o r s h a v e r e a c t e d to Joan of Arc, a fascinating c h a r a c t e r of history. In F e b r u a r y , in anticipation of his visit to the c a m p u s , the life a n d poetry of Dr. E d w a r d Davidson, Professor a n d C h a i r m a n of the Dep a r t m e n t of English at W a s h i n g t o n a n d Jefferson College w a s discussed. He is the a u t h o r of the volume of poetry entitled, "Harvest of Youth."

At the first m e e t i n g of the y e a r in October, Dr. John Hollenbach r e c o u n t e d some interesting p e r s o n a l reminiscences of William Ellery Leonard, poet a n d teacher, a n d concluded his dissertation with a sensitive r e a d i n g of a portion of Mr. Leonard's poem, "All O u r Lives." A trip to G r a n d Rapids w a s successfully m a d e b y the club in D e c e m b e r for the p u r p o s e of seeing a p e r f o r m a n c e of G e o r g e Bernard S h a w ' s play, "Pgymalion." Prior to this, at the November meeting, Mr. S h a w , a s a n individual, a s a social critic, a n d a s a dramatist w a s discussed. The p e r f o r m a n c e of the p l a y w a s excellent, a n d it w a s e n j o y e d b y all the m e m b e r s of the club.

W h e r e v e r he spoke. Dr. Davidson impressed e v e r y o n e with his u n i q u e a n d earnest personality, a n d with his w i d e r a n g e of k n o w l e d g e in the fields of poetry a n d literature. Dr. Davidson also a d d r e s s e d a special meeting of the faculty a n d c o n d u c t e d a clinic in creative writing. His thesis, that poetry should b e a n important a n d initial part of living, w a s e m p h a sized b y his expressive recitations. His visit w a s in m a n y w a y s the high point in the club's activities for the year. The officers of the club for the school y e a r were: Sumiye Konoshima, president; Carolyn Ingham, vice-president; Glenn V a n Haitsma, secretary-treasurer. Dr. DeGraaf served a s the faculty advisor, a n d w a s a b l y assisted b y the faculty m e m b e r s of the English Department.

The J a n u a r y joint meeting, with the French Club a s guests, w a s in the form of a r o u n d table discussion. The consideration s h o w e d h o w various English, American a n d E u r o p e a n 115


S o c i o l o g y

Club

n e y to the county court in Allegan. The general court p r o c e d u r e s w e r e o b s e r v e d a n d interesting e x p l a n a t i o n s w e r e given b y the m e n w h o h e a d e d the individual departments. Also, a trip w a s m a d e to G r a n d Rapids. Here the club m e m b e r s listened to a lecture given b y Mr. Harold Russel, n o t e d chiefly for his part in the film, "The Best Years of O u r Lives." Mr. Russel lost both of his a r m s in World W a r 11.

The Sociology C l u b is o n e of the y o u n g e r c l u b s on Hope's c a m p u s . A g e h a s very little p r e c e d e n c e , h o w e v e r , for the activities of the club w e r e filled with variety a n d interest this y ea r . At the close of its s e c o n d y e a r of existence a l a b e l of success could b e s t a m p e d a d e q u a t e l y a n d a c c u r a t e l y on the organization. The club, which h a s a n active m e m b e r s h i p of a p p r o x i m a t e l y twenty-five students, m e e t s on the first M o n d a y of e v e r y month. The meetings a r e o p e n to all s t u d e n t s m a j o r i n g in the field of sociology a n d a n y other p e r s o n s w h o a r e interested in social work a n d its progress. More a n d more the realization of the import a n c e of social work in our world t o d a y is b e c o m i n g known. Sociology is a field which c a n n o longer b e minimized.

Following the lecture, a tour w a s m a d e t h r o u g h the G r a n d Rapids Police Department. On the tour, the police staff introduced the club to the intricacies of the law-enforcement system. This m e t h o d of first-hand o b s e r v a n c e w a s found to b e most helpful. Also, the club memb e r s discovered a n d l e a r n e d more concerning delinquencies, their c a u s e s , a n d the ultimate effect a f t e r treatment. The m e a n s of treatment w a s a l s o o b s e r v e d . Before returning to the c a m p u s , a visit w a s m a d e to the Juvenile Home of G r a n d Rapids. Again a g u i d e c o n d u c t e d the student tour a n d pointed out the things of interest. Much practical benefit w a s derived from t h e s e trips.

The m e e t i n g s this school y e a r w e r e spiced with variety. M e m b e r s w e r e privileged to witn e s s n u m e r o u s o u t s t a n d i n g movies. Also, excellent l e a d e r s w e r e s e c u r e d from v a r i o u s fields of social work a n d their lectures w e r e g r e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e d a n d e n j o y e d . Lively discussions c o n c e r n i n g social p r o b l e m s a n d their implications w e r e c o n d u c t e d b y club m e m b e r s . This practical a s p e c t p r o v e d of benefit to e v e r y o n e . Various field trips w e r e p l a n n e d which w e r e found to b e highly e d u c a t i o n a l a n d beneficial. Included in these w a s a jour-

M a n y p l e a s a n t hours of sociability a n d relaxation w e r e interspersed with the r e g u l a r meetings. Sociability n a t u r a l l y w o u l d b e a b a s i c requisite of the Sociology Club. Dr. Henry Voogd's ever-present h e l p a s sponsor did m u c h to a i d the club d u r i n g the year.

FIRST ROW: D. Boss, J. Moessner, L. De Kleine, D. Milne, M. McLean, A. Rynbrandt, M. Te Ronde. SECOND ROW; Dr. H. Voogd, D. Paul, R. Hendricks, P. M a a s s e n , R. Bhe, R. lohnson, E. Fritzler.

116


P It i I o s o p h y

Club

The p o w e r of m a n ' s ability to think is a s yet u n f a t h o m a b l e . Aided b y thought, m a n h a s risen from w h a t e v e r he might h a v e b e e n to m a n the philosopher, m a n the scientist, m a n the artist, a n d , a b o v e all, m a n the prophet. Philosophy w a s b o r n w h e n t h e first m a n s c r a t c h e d his woolly h e a d a n d a s k e d "Why'?" W h a t might m a n be, h a d he n e v e r q u e s t i o n e d life?

a u t h o r of "Christian Paths to Self Acceptance." Calvin De Vries, Hope, '41, is a g r a d u a t e of the New Brunswick Theological Seminary, a n d is serving a s assistant-pastor of the Fourth Presbyterian Church in Chicago. Allen Dykstra, Hope, '48, served a s c h a i r m a n of the Philo s o p h y Club for two years, a n d is n o w a Regents Fellowship student at the University of Michigan.

About twelve y e a r s a g o Donald Martin, a Hope student, g a t h e r e d a few students together w h o w e r e a s k i n g that eternal question, a n d a s a result, the Philosophy C l u b met at the h o m e of Dr. Walter Van S a u n , w h e r e the founders g a t h e r e d to s h a r e their thoughts.

The Philosophy Club p r e s e n t e d a series of extremely interesting p a p e r s b e g i n n i n g with a study of the "History of Tolerance" which w a s r e a d b y Dr. Van Saun. Willard Curtis, a student at W e s t e r n T h e o l o g i c a l Seminary, p r e s e n t e d a p a p e r concerning "Kant's Critique of Pure Reason." David Dykstra, Vergil Dykstra, a n d John De Vries, w h o h a d p r e p a r e d p a p e r s for special r e a d i n g courses u n d e r the Philosophy Department, p r e s e n t e d their p a p e r s before the club. They were, respectively, "Albert Schweitzer, Successor a n d Critic of Kant a n d S h o p e n h a u e r " ; " T h e B a s i s of Kierk e g a a r d ' s Attack on Christiandom" a n d "An Introduction to Kierkegaard, a n Existentialist Philosopher."

The club is p r o u d of the records of not a few of its past m e m b e r s . D o n a l d Martin, founder of the Philosophy Club, g r a d u a t e d from H o p e in '37 a n d went to the University of Michigan for g r a d u a t e study. Donald Van Liere, Hope, '39, r e c e i v e d a Ph.D. d e g r e e from I n d i a n a University, a n d is n o w t e a c h i n g Psychology at that institution. Robert H. Bonthius, Hope, '40, a d d e d to his records a B.D. from San Francisco Theological S e m i n a r y in 1943, a n d a Ph.D. d e g r e e from C o l u m b i a in 1947. At present Dr. Bonthius is Assistant Professor of Religion at Wooster College, a n d is the

Officers for 1948-49 w e r e Edwin Nelson, president, Burrell Pennings, vice-president.

FIRST ROW: E. Nelson, B, Pennings, P. Breen, V. Dykstra. SECOND ROW: F. Goulooze, W. Jellema, J. Robins, D Muyskens, H. Dean. THIRD ROW: R. Folkert, D, Evers, J. Smith, D. Dykstra, N. Reck, W. Studdiford.

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FIRST ROW: Dr. G. Van Zyl, SECOND ROW: J. Rutgers, P. THIRD ROW: H. Hoftiezer, E. FOURTH ROW: C. Van Hall,

J. Beereboom, R. V a n d e r Laan, R. Hoebeke, R. Snow. Hinkamp, P. Cook, A. Stillman, D. Crawford, K. Klomparens. Dunning, O. Koeppe, R. Kempers, R. Kraay, D. Brunstetter. W. De Meester, Dr. J. H. Kleinheksel, Prof. T. V a n d e r Ploeg, E. W e e n e r .

C h e m i s t r y O n c e a month the Chemistry C l u b m e e t s to b r i n g together those chemistry m a j o r s w h o intend to m a k e chemistry their profession. W h e n the r e g u l a r b u s i n e s s of the club h a s b e e n transa c t e d , the m e e t i n g is b r o u g h t to its climax b y r e s e a r c h p a p e r s . These a r e r e a d b y senior m e m b e r s of the c l u b a n d concern significant topics in the field of chemistry. The p a p e r s a r e a u g m e n t e d b y talks given b y professionals in this specific field. In the s p r i n g the club also t a k e s a field trip; the p u r p o s e of this trip is to visit industry a n d to s e e chemistry a s it is p r a c ticed, This h a s b e e n a traditional p r o c e d u r e for the twenty-six y e a r s that the Chemistry C l u b h a s b e e n in existence. It w a s originally o r g a n i z e d b y thirteen chemistry m a j o r s to "enc o u r a g e the s t u d y of chemistry at Hope Col-

Club

lege a n d to p e r p e t u a t e a fraternal spirit a m o n g its m e m b e r s . " Under the g u i d i n g h a n d s of Dr. Van Zyl, Dr. Kleinheksel, a n d Prof. V a n d e r Ploeg, the organization h a s b e c o m e a part of the d e p a r t ment of chemistry a n d serves to unite its memb e r s in their c o m m o n interest. It also serves to provide a n extra-curricular a p p r o a c h to chemistry, to q u i c k e n interest in g r a d u a t e work, a n d to p r e p a r e its m e m b e r s for work in g r a d u a t e studies a n d in their profession. As a n extension of these aims, the Chemistry C l u b expects to b e c o m e a n affiliate of the A m e r i c a n Chemical Society. This will provide a closer link with the profession with which the club m e m b e r s will b e identified in later years.

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FIRST ROW: Y. Jensen, M. Radcliffe, J. Muilenburg, B. Koch, M. Buttlar, M. Moerdyke, D. Kranendonk, M. Jacobs, O. Kilian, N. Vyverberg. SECOND ROW: H. Van Wieren, J. Wolterbeek, G. Zuidema, E. Kassig, R. Burton, G. G n a d e , J. Klomparens, Dr. T. Vergeer. THIRD ROW: W Friedberg, D. V a n d e n Brink, G. V a n Singel, G. Lam, R. Decker, J. Robins, M. Kragt, C. Walters, W. Eickelberg. FOURTH ROW: R. Westerhoff, A. Vander Kolk, H. Fai'or, M. Noordhoff, N. Siderious, H, Bruggers, D. E. De Witt, P. Westerhoff, A. Arwe

U i oIo g y The Biology C l u b of H o p e College, u n d e r the c a p a b l e l e a d e r s h i p of President G e o r g e Zuid ema, g a v e its m e m b e r s d u r i n g the p a s t y e a r the most v a r i e d a n d e d u c a t i o n a l types of p r o g r a m s in its history. The club, consisting of biology m a j o r s a n d pre-medical students m a i n t a i n i n g a "B" a v e r a g e , e n j o y e d diversified scientific films a n d various s p e a k e r s which included domestic practicing scientists a n d those e n g a g e d in missiona r y work. O n e of the highlights of the y e a r ' s activities w a s the club's visit to the Upjohn P h a r m a c e u t i c a l C o m p a n y a n d the K a l a m a z o o State Hospital. At both of these institutions, a thorough tour w a s m a d e of the premises a n d complete information w a s given to the club members. The second highlight of the y e a r w a s the meeting at which the physicians of Holland a n d the surrounding a r e a w e r e the guests of the Biology Club. Two o u t s t a n d i n g medical films

Club

on the latest techniques of surgery w e r e sec u r e d from the Lahey Clinic in Boston for this meeting. After the presentation of the film, a social hour followed in which the practical side of medicine a n d biology w a s r e v i e w e d a n d discussed for the benefit of the club members. Also, d u r i n g the spring term, p l a n s w e r e formulated a n d a c t i o n t a k e n t o unite the Biology Club with a National Biology Honora r y Fraternity. The Biology Club w a s f o u n d e d with the purp o s e of fulfilling three objectives. First, to aid in furthering the scientific information of its m e m b e r s ; second, to p r o p a g a t e the necessity a n d v a l u e of Biology to the c a m p u s a n d community; third, to e n d o w its m e m b e r s with a Christian philosophy of science. With Dr. Teunis Vergeer's excellent g u i d a n c e , the Biology Club e n d e d its school y e a r h a v i n g completed its g o a l most successfully.

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Jnternattonal

Relations

T h r o u g h o u t the y e a r , International Relations C l u b m e e t s to provoke serious thought a n d discussion a b o u t the world situation. These discussions h a v e c e n t e r e d a r o u n d the Indonesian question, the m e n a c e of "Red" China, Communism in India, a n d the North Atlantic Security Pact. Along with these meetings, the club e n d e a v o r s to b r i n g to the c a m p u s special s p e a k e r s w h o a r e authorities in their respective fields. This e n a b l e s all st ude nt s to b e c o m e better a c q u a i n t e d with the p r o b l e m s a n d possibilities which c h a l l e n g e them t o d a y .

Ohio. The d e l e g a t e s w e r e a s k e d to formulate resolutions which they w o u l d like to h a v e a d o p t e d . These w e r e thoroughly discussed at the conference. The p r o p o s a l p r e s e n t e d b y the Hope delegation, with reference to the North Atlantic Security Pact, w a s one of the few to b e p a s s e d . The a d o p t e d m e a s u r e s w e r e then sent to their respective committees in the United States Congress. Thus w e s e e that l.R.C. c a n d o s o m e t h i n g worthwhile, a n d that the discussion- meetings b e a r fruit. The club h a s also b e e n active in sponsoring p a n e l discussions, a n d in furnishing s p e a k e r s for v a r i o u s organizations in the city a s well a s in n e i g h b o r i n g communities.

Each y e a r the club holds informative a n d interesting m e e t i n g s with the l.R.C. C l u b from G r a n d Rapids Junior College. Another of the special interests this y e a r w a s the participation of several H o p e st ude nt s in the Model United Nations C o n f e r e n c e held at Hillsdale College.

With Miss Metta Ross a s a b l e counselor, the following officers h a v e directed the activities of the c l u b this y e a r : Arthur Ponstein, president; P e g g y Prins, vice-president; Lillian High, secretary; S u m i y e Konoshima, treasurer.

The highlight of the y e a r c a m e , h o w e v e r , with the a t t e n d a n c e of five Hope d e l e g a t e s to the Foreign Policy C o n f e r e n c e a t C o l u m b u s ,

FIRST ROW: S. Leslie, S. Konoshima, M. Schoonveld, A. Hibma. SECOND ROW: M. Prins, G. Avakian, A. Moolenaar, M. Wolffensperger, F. Hrbek. THIRD ROW: A. Ponstine, J. Dinger, H. Dean, W. Hamelink, J. De H a a n .

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Math-Physics Club FIRST ROW: Prof. A. Lampen, I. Heenstra, S. Leslie, C. Ingham, Prof. C. Kleis. SECOND ROW: J. Wolterbeek, J. Ryskamp, C. Zoet, Prof. J. Folkert, V. Makowsky, W. Oostendorp. THIRD ROW: H. Heerspink, R. Hoebeke, Prof. H. Frissel.

An organization that h a s yet to b u r n its first b i r t h d a y candle, but feels it h a s g a i n e d its p l a c e a m o n g Hope ; s clubs a n d societies is the Math-Physics Club. O r g a n i z e d to stimulate interest a n d to provide a d d i t i o n a l information, those s tu d e n ts w h o h a d a y e a r of college physics w e r e eligible, a s w e r e also those w h o h a d m a s t e r e d the m a t h e m a t i c a l field through calculus. Under the g u i d a n c e of its sponsors. Prof. Jay Folkert a n d Prof. Harry Frissel, the infant organization p r e s e n t e d informatioh in a n interesting w a y to its m e m b e r s . Occasionally memb e r s r e a d v a r i o u s special p a p e r s on the history

of physics or some particular p h a s e of these two subjects. Various films of special interest w e r e shown, thus proving that the youth of this club in no w a y interfered with its efficiency. The first y e a r w a s l a b e l e d successful. H arvey Heerspink held the office of charter president; William O s t e n d o r p a c t e d a s assistant. Irene Heemstra kept the records, while John R y s k a m p h a n d l e d the accounts. All the charter m e m b e r s feel that a g o o d beginning h a s b e e n m a d e , a n d u p o n future memb e r s of this club confidence a n d e n c o u r a g e ment a r e bestowed.

Women's Mouse Hoard FIRST ROW: D. Davis, M. Buttlar, N. Corp, H. Baker. SECOND ROW: Miss E. Reeverts. A. Herder, L. Bochniak, B. Bruins, D. Milne,

The W o m e n ' s House Board r a t e s a n important position on Hope's c a m p u s — to the dormitory women. This is the g r o u p that e s t a b lishes the rules a n d regulations n e c e s s a r y for the well-being of those girls who, d u r i n g their school days, live in a " h o m e a w a y from h o m e " . This y e a r House Councils h a v e b e e n o p e r a t i n g in the individual dorms to meet the n e e d s of girls in that particular dorm.

Cooperation — p l a y a l a r g e part in the success of the n e w system which seeks to place individual responsibility on the girl rather than relying on "don'ts". Under the supervision of the Dean of Women, Miss Emma Reeverts, a n d the girls w h o constitute the Board — its elected officers a n d the individual dorm p r e s i d e n t s , d e c i s i o n s a r e r e a c h e d which a r e efficient, considerate, just, a n d beneficial to all.

The three C's — Courtesy, Consideration, a n d

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Pi Kappa 'Delta FIRST ROW: P. Breen, W. Jellema, V. Dykstra. SECOND ROW: H. Moes, D. Shoem a k e r , F. Goulooze.

Pi K a p p a Delta is the National H o n o r a r y Forensic Society on the c a m p u s . M e m b e r s of this o r g a n i z a t i o n a r e e l e c t e d in the s p r i n g of e a c h y e a r from those u p p e r c l a s s m e n w h o h a v e a c h i e v e d proficiency in inter-collegiate forensics. The M i c h i g a n G a m m a C h a p t e r at H o p e h a s a n e n v i a b l e r e c o r d since its inception in 1926. The p u r p o s e of Pi K a p p a Delta is the e n c o u r a g e m e n t of forensic activity in the student b o d y in the fields of d e b a t e , oratory, ext e m p o r a n e o u s s p e a k i n g , a n d g r o u p discussion.

F u n c t i o n a r y officers for 1948-49 a r e Henry S h a w , president, Floyd Goulooze, vice-president, a n d Dennis S h o e m a k e r , s e c r e t a r y t r e a s u r e r . M e m b e r s of the society h a v e particip a t e d in inter-collegiate forensic t o u r n a m e n t s t h r o u g h o u t the Middle-West a n d o b t a i n e d for H o p e College a n e x e m p l a r y record. M e m b e r s h i p in this n a t i o n a l o r g a n i z a t i o n is the c o v e t e d r e w a r d offered to those w h o h a v e r e p r e s e n t e d H o p e in forensic e n d e a v o r .

Debate D S h o e m a k e r , F. Goulooze, H. Grissen, H. Moes.

The d e b a t e t e a m s , r e p r e s e n t i n g H o p e C o l l e g e for 1948-49, w e r e f e w in n u m b e r a n d s o m e w h a t l a c k i n g in e x p e r i e n c e , b u t e v e r y m e m b e r s h o w e d k e e n interest in the q u e s t i o n — Resolved: "That F e d e r a l Aid s h o u l d b e given to Equalize E d u c a t i o n a l O p p o r t u n i t y By M e a n s of A n n u a l G r a n t s To Public Schools."

b a t e s , s e v e r a l of which took p l a c e b e f o r e local a u d i e n c e s , s u c h a s H o p e C h u r c h Adult Fellowship, Methodist C h u r c h M e n ' s Club, Froebel P. T. A., a n d W o m e n ' s Literary Club. Inter-collegiate competition consisted of p r a c tice r o u n d s with K a l a m a z o o College on the a f t e r n o o n of the Hope-Kazoo g a m e . Also, the "Big F o u r " t r a v e l e d to Bloomington, 111., for the S e v e n t e e n t h Invitational D e b a t e T o u r n a ment. The novices did r e m a r k a b l y well in the S t a t e Novice T o u r n a m e n t a t East Lansing. The "Big F o u r " t h e n w e n t to W a y n e University for the M. I. S. L. contest. Highlighting the entire y e a r , H o p e sent the two s q u a d s to the National Pi K a p p a Delta convention held a t Bradley Polytechnic Institute a t Peoria, 111., from April 10-14.

The t e a m s , c o a c h e d b y Mrs. H a r r y Harter, instructor in s p e e c h , consisted of two e x p e r i e n c e d s q u a d s k n o w n a s the "Big Four". Memb e r s w e r e : H a r o l d Grissen, Floyd Goulooze, H a r v e y Moes, a n d Dennis S h o e m a k e r . In a d dition to t h e s e two s q u a d s , t h e r e w e r e s e v e r a l n o v i c e s w h i c h s h o w e d g r e a t p r o m i s e in b o t h the w o m e n ' s a n d m e n ' s divisions. All t e a m s p a r t i c i p a t e d in i n t e r - s q u a d de122


Slementary Zeackers FIRST ROW: G, K l o o s t e r m a n , B Nichols, B. Scarlett, C. Hinga, J. Joldersma, A. Koninq, B. W e a v e r , B. Van Dyke, P. C h a a t , L. De Kleine. SECOND ROW: S. Gess, J. Toussaint, G. Avakian, I. Streur, B. Eilander, D. Davis, M, Kooyers, J. Rivenburgh, H. W e e n e r , S. Willbrandt. THIRD ROW: E. J a n n e n g a , N. Hunqerink, L, Drake, B. De Ryke, G. Duiser, H. Fredericks, Joyce Baker, M. V a n Loo, J a n e B a k e r , R. Swander.

The n e w l y - o r g a n i z e d E l e m e n t a r y T e a c h e r s ' Club is c o m p o s e d of junior a n d senior girls w h o a r e p l a n n i n g on t e a c h i n g in the e l e m e n tary g r a d e s . Meetings a r e held on the third M o n d a y of e a c h month.

m u n i c a b l e diseases, w e r e p r e s e n t e d . Mrs. Flore n c e French, h o u s e director at C o l u m b i a Cott a g e , a c g u a i n t e d the g r o u p with m a n y of her rich e x p e r i e n c e s in t e a c h i n g . A spring b e a c h p a r t y w a s also m a d e a p a r t of the y e a r ' s e v e n t s a n d a special m e e t i n g w a s held a t which full-time a n d practice t e a c h e r s s h a r e d their experiences. Mrs. Henry Schoon a n d Mr, S t e p h a n Partington a r e the club's advisors. Officers of the Teachers ' C l u b a r e B a r b a r a Van Dyke, president; Jan Joldersma, v i c e - p r e s i d e n t ; Betty W e a v e r , secretary; a n d A m y Koning, treasurer.

The ball s t a r t e d rolling in S e p t e m b e r with a n informal g e t - t o g e t h e r at the h o m e of Mrs. Henry Schoon. At this meeting, p l a n s w e r e m a d e for f u t u r e e v e n t s of the ye a r. Included in this y e a r ' s p r o g r a m w a s a talk b y the public h e a l t h n u r s e of O t t a w a County. Movies, s h o w i n g the w a r n i n g signs of com-

Who's Who FIRST ROW: P. Breen, T. Harrison, O. Koeppe, V. Dykstra. SECOND ROW: C. Ingham, J. Mulder, J. Brunstetter. THIRD ROW: H. Ridder, M. Buttlar, M. Prins, P. Hinkamp.

The honor of selection for the 1948-49 issue of 'Who's W h o A m o n g S t u d e n t s in A m e r i c a n Universities a n d C o l l e g e s " w a s given this y e a r to twelve o u t s t a n d i n g m e m b e r s of the senior class. Those selected for this recognition w e r e C a r o lyn I n g h a m , Judith Mulder, M a r g u e r i t e Prins, Jean Brunstetter, Marie Buttlar, Vergil Dykstra, Timothy Harrison, P a u l Hinkamp, Peter Breen, William Hillegonds, H e r m a n Bidder, a n d O w e n Koeppe. The p u r p o s e s of the n a t i o n a l publication a r e

to serve a s a n h o n o r a r y organization in w h i c h d e s e r v i n g students, a f t e r d i s p l a y i n g merit in college, w o u l d b e given recognition b y the publication of their b i o g r a p h i e s . It also e s t a b lishes a r e f e r e n c e volume of a u t h o r i t a t i v e information on the g r e a t b o d y of A m e r i c a ' s coll e g e students. Those thus h o n o r e d w e r e c h o s e n on a b a s i s of c h a r a c t e r , scholarship, l e a d e r ship in extra-curricular activities, a n d potentiality for future u s e f u l n e s s to b u s i n e s s a n d society.

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Camera Club FIRST ROW: R. Kraay, R. H o e b e k e , C. Votaw, J. S t e p h e n s . SECOND ROW: G. Schneider, D. H a k k e n , T. Flaherty, G. Van Singel, H. Tuurling.

H o p e C o l l e g e ' s Photo C l u b is a n o r g a n ization w h i c h offers m u c h to s t u d e n t s int e r e s t e d in a n y p h a s e of p h o t o g r a p h y . For it is the Photo C l u b w h i c h u n i t e s s t u d e n t s in a c o m m o n b o n d , a love for p h o t o g raphy. The Photo C l u b m e e t s bi-monthly. Its meetings a r e w e l l - a t t e n d e d , a n d offer a w i d e r a n g e of m a t e r i a l for the a m a t e u r p h o t o g r a p h e r . Prints a r e c o m p a r e d a n d j u d g e d for their b e a u t y a n d artistic excellence. The work of m e m b e r s is d i s c u s s e d , so that the b e n e f i t of c o m b i n e d e x p e r i e n c e m a y b e utilized. Instructive lectures a r e g i v e n on s u c h i n t e g r a t e d s u b jects a s lighting a n d p o s i n g , for t h e s e a r e the tools with w h i c h the p h o t o g r a p h e r must work.

Main e v e n t of the y e a r is the All-College Photo Contest in May. The contest is divided into v a r i o u s p h a s e s of c a m p u s life, a n d a g r a n d prize w i n n e r is selected. The excellent work of the p h o t o c l u b is indica t i v e of the c a l i b e r of its v a r i o u s m e m b e r s , led b y their president, Russell Kraay, a n d spons o r e d b y Mr. C l y d e G e e r l i n g s a n d Professor Harold H a v e r k a m p .

M op e - i ue s

FIRST ROW: Mrs. J. S t e p h e n s , Mrs. B. Yurash, Mrs. G. Schneider, Mrs. J. Blane, Mrs. D. C o l e m a n , Mrs. E. Kassig. SECOND ROW: Mrs. R. Flaherty, Mrs. D. W a l c h e n b a c h , Mrs. M. S k a a l e n , Mrs. L. Akker, Mrs. C. Zoet, Mrs. J. Veldhuis, Mrs. D. Brunstetter. THIRD ROW: Mrs. P. M a a s s e n , Mrs. H. S c h a i b l e , Mrs. H. Dykstra, Mrs. A. Stoner, Mrs. C. L a m p e n , Mrs. N. Reck, Mrs. H. Groth. 124


SEATED: Miss J. Brondyke, R.N.; Miss F. Hrbek, R.N.; Mrs. M. De Boer; Mrs. B. Kool, R.N.; Miss J. Muilenburg, R.N. STANDING: Miss J. Spoelstra, R.N.; Dr. Wm. J. Moerdyk, M.D.

M e a 11 h The H o p e C o l l e g e Health Service o r i g i n a t e d in 1946, Prior to that y e a r minor a i l m e n t s w e r e t r e a t e d within the confines of the n u r s e ' s dormitory room, a n d m o r e serious c a s e s w e r e referred to local physicians. In S e p t e m b e r , 1947, A b r a h a m Leenhouts, M.D., g r a d u a t e of the University of Michigan, h a v i n g just retired from active p r a c t i c e in Holland, w a s a s k e d to b e c o m e the first college physician. He b r o u g h t to the c a m p u s not only his e g u i p m e n t a n d k n o w l e d g e , b u t also a listening e a r a n d a friendly, Christian p h i l o s o p h y which h a s end e a r e d him to m a n y . He w a s a s s i s t e d b y two registered nurses a n d a nurse aide.

his stomach, Mrs. M. De Boer h a s often b e e n called the "heart of the clinic." While h e r culi n a r y art is justifiably her g r e a t pride, p a t i e n t s find that her cooking is also e m b e l l i s h e d with philosophical gems. S e p t e m b e r , 1948, b r o u g h t a n e w g r o u p of n u r s e s with A.B. aspirations. Shortly after Christmas, Dr. Leenhouts' h e a l t h m a d e it n e c e s s a r y for him to t a k e a rest in Florida. Miss Spoelstra ( a n d the clinic mascot. Ginger) ret u r n e d to the University of K a n s a s for completion of her m a s t e r ' s d e g r e e in p a r a s i t o l o g y , a n d Connie Bergers, R.N., t e r m i n a t e d her s t a y a t H o p e w h e n s h e b e c a m e Mrs. Bernard Kool. William Moerdyk, M.D., University of Michig a n g r a d u a t e , a n d Mrs. Moerdyk, R.N., Reformed C h u r c h missionaries h o m e on f u r l o u g h from A r a b i a , w e r e in c h a r g e of the Health Service while Dr. Leenhouts w a s g o n e . They w e r e a s s i s t e d b y senior Joyce Muilenburg, R.N., P r e s b y t e r i a n Hospital, C h i c a g o , Illinois; junior Felecia Hrbek, R.N., Christ Episcopal Hospital, Jersey City, New Jersey; a n d s o p h o m o r e Jean Brondyke, R.N., Jane L a m b Memorial Hospital, Clinton, Iowa. While routine colds constitute the n u m b e r one clinic complaint, such things a s typhoid fever, m u m p s , scarlet fever, t o b o g g a n accidents, s u n d r y sprains, e y e examinations, a n d l a b o r a t o r y m i s h a p s a r e also treated.

In F e b r u a r y , 194 7, Jennie Spoelstra, R.N., of P r e s b y t e r i a n Hospital, C h i c a g o , Illinois, a n d a g r a d u a t e of H o p e College, a r r i v e d to relieve the stress of the clinic responsibilities, a n d to o r g a n i z e it to m e e t m o r e fully the s t u d e n t s ' n e e d s . S h e w a s instrumental in s e c u r i n g fine e q u i p m e n t a n d in e n l a r g i n g facilities. Thus the Health Service w a s better e n a b l e d to fulfill its aim of providing a " h o m e a w a y from h o m e " for s tu d e n ts w h e n ill on the c a m p u s . Clinic a n d infirmary c a r e a r e n o w offered to e v e r y H o p e student, a n d the only c h a r g e s m a d e a r e nomin a l o n e s for penicillin injections, infirmary care, a n d special prescriptions. Since the w a y to a m a n ' s h e a r t is t h r o u g h

125

I

C l i n i c


FIRST ROW: C. SECOND ROW: THIRD ROW: E. FOURTH ROW:

H i n g a , N. Hoffman, B. Harris, M. Breid, J. Kamp. A. Hibma, D. K r a n e n d o n k , C, I n g h a m , E. V a n Dam. Marcus, L. M a s s e , T. Harrison, R. Lumsden, D. W a l c h e n b a c h . W. Boerman, F. Goulooze, W. Jellema, T. Smith, N. Yonkers.

S t u d e n t

C o u n c i l

This y e a r the S t u d e n t Council w a s u n d e r the a b l e direction of President Timothy Harrison. C a r o l y n I n g h a m h e l d the office of vice-president. The s i g n i f i c a n c e of t h e s e offices is p r o v e d b y the fact that the entire s t u d e n t b o d y particip a t e s in electing t h e s e t w o p e r s o n s . The rem a i n d e r of the council consists of r e p r e s e n t a tives from e a c h s o r o r i t y a n d f r a t e r n i t y , Y . M . C . A . , Y . W . C . A . , W o m e n ' s Activities L e a g u e , a n d e a c h class. M e e t i n g s a r e h e l d e v e r y other w e e k on Tuesd a y evenings. P r o b l e m s of b o t h the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d the s t u d e n t s a r e c o n s i d e r e d a n d better relationships are sought between them. M e e t i n g s of the council a r e o p e n to the s t u d e n t s so that a n y o n e c a n voice a n opinion or b r i n g a vital m a t t e r to light. This y e a r a c o m m i t t e e consisting of faculty m e m b e r s , the S t u d e n t Council President, a n d W.A.L. Presid e n t a r e w o r k i n g on i d e a s for closer ties b e t w e e n a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d s t u d e n t s a n d for a b e t t e r functioning, m o r e effective council. Next y e a r t h e s e p l a n s s h o u l d g o into effect. The council is the s t u d e n t ' s m e a n s of voicing opinions in c o l l e g e g o v e r n m e n t , a n d it is u p to the i n d i v i d u a l students, a n d the o r g a n i z a t i o n s , to m a k e u s e of this system. O n e m a y a s k just w h a t the council a c t u a l l y d o e s in p r o m o t i n g t h e s e relations m e n t i o n e d . O n e m e t h o d u s e d is the s p o n s o r i n g b y the council of m a n y m a j o r college e v e n t s t h r o u g h out the y e a r . S o m e minor activities a r e a l s o m a n a g e d b y the council. The F r e s h m a n initiation p e r i o d r u l e s a r e set forth b y the council a n d m e m b e r s a c t a s p o l i c e m e n t h r o u g h o u t the period. This y e a r Art Tuls a n d Nick Yonker a c t e d a s chief "sheriffs." O f f e n d e r s a r e tried

a n d s e n t e n c e d b e f o r e the council "jury." The b e g i n n i n g of the initiation p e r i o d w a s the AllC o l l e g e Mixer, at w h i c h time the " g r e e n s " w e r e p u r c h a s e d b y the F r e s h m e n . E a c h class pres e n t e d a skit a t the event a f t e r w h i c h the c o u n cil s e r v e d r e f r e s h m e n t s . "Burning of the g r e e n " a t the e n d of the initiation p e r i o d c a m e off in spite of the rainstorm that night. " H o m e c o m i n g , " o n e of the b i g g e s t e v e n t s of the y e a r , is s p o n s o r e d b y the council. Clayton V a n Hall a n d Jan Joldersma did a w o n d e r ful job a s c o - c h a i r m e n of the event. The n e w s y s t e m of c h o o s i n g a H o m e c o m i n g q u e e n a n d court p r o v e d v e r y successful. E a c h class e l e c t e d two girls a n d from t h e s e eight, a n a n o n y m o u s c o m m i t t e e of ten m e m b e r s selected a q u e e n , with the other s e v e n serving a s a q u e e n ' s court. A s p e c i a l F t u d e n t C o u n c i l treat this y e a r w a s the " W a s h i n g t o n C o n f e r e n c e " musical, a d d i n g a n e w s u c c e s s story to college events. Dutch Treat W e e k with all its benefits is s p o n s o r e d b y the council, a n d h a d Walt Boerm a n a n d C o n n i e H i n g a w o r k i n g on the project this y e a r . The All College Sing is a n o t h e r highlight of S t u d e n t Council s p o n s o r e d activities in the s p r i n g of e a c h college y e a r . The a s s e m b l y p e r i o d s e a c h w e e k , b r i n g i n g ' m a n y celebrities to the c a m p u s , a r e s p o n s o r e d b y the council with the a r r a n g e m e n t of the administration. The c o o p e r a t i o n of the s t u d e n t b o d y constitutes the b a c k b o n e of the council's success. It is the h o p e that the council m a y , in the future, h a v e m o r e opportunity for a d v a n c i n g college government. 126


I

L

FIRST ROW: S. Leslie, C. Hinga, M. Prins, B. Boelkins, M. V a n d e W e g e , B Van Dyke. SECOND ROW: S. Konoshima, Miss E. Reeverts, P. S h e r m a n , B. Folkert, J. Kamp, G. Kooiker, M. Wolbrink THIRD ROW: Mrs. F. French, E. Short, H. Baker, L. Brunsting, D. Milne.

Women's

Activities

C eag ue

O n e of the most r e p r e s e n t a t i v e w o m e n ' s g r o u p s on the c a m p u s is the W o m e n ' s Activities L e a g u e . It is c o m p o s e d of m e m b e r s of e v e r y class a n d of e v e r y w o m e n ' s o r g a n i z a t i o n on the c a m p u s .

F e b r u a r y held a prominent p l a c e on the c a l e n d a r this year. The e v e r - p o p u l a r M a s q u e r a d e Party this y e a r f e a t u r e d two sets of h o u s e directors, b e s i d e s a v a r i e t y of colorful, original, a n d a m u s i n g c o s t u m e s a n d skip presentations.

Under the c a p a b l e g u i d a n c e of D e a n Reeverts a n d Mrs. French a s counselors, this y e a r ' s b o a r d set u p a n extensive p r o g r a m a n d e a c h m e m b e r of the b o a r d w a s in c h a r g e of o n e of its entertaining, w o r t h w h i l e projects.

In March, the W.A.L. p r e s e n t e d its c a m p u s service project. This m e e t i n g w a s p l a n n e d to stress s o m e important p h a s e of life, w h e t h e r on c a m p u s or in the community. The P e n n y C a r n i v a l in April p r o v e d to b e a m o n e y - m a k i n g project for W.A.L. Each sorority a n d fraternity p r o v i d e d a b o o t h w h e r e e a g e r students, h a v i n g t u r n e d their p e n n y banks upside down, roamed, observed, a n d s p e n t their s a v i n g s to c o n t r i b u t e to s o m e w o r t h y organization selected b y the b o a r d .

The W.A.L. b e g a n its work b e f o r e school c o n v e n e d with the p u b l i c a t i o n of the bulletin outlining the c o m i n g events. These bulletins w e r e given to the girls d u r i n g registration, a s the f r e s h m e n joined a n d the old m e m b e r s ren e w e d their m e m b e r s h i p in the organization. The Orientation T e a g a v e the n e w girls on c a m p u s a c h a n c e to meet b o t h the w o m e n faculty m e m b e r s a n d the older Hope-ites. Activities r a n g e d from the f o r m a l i t y of the Orientation Tea to the informality of a b e a c h picnic. L a u g h t e r excelled a t the All-Girl Party. This w a s a n innovation this y e a r , a n d w a s a c c l a i m e d highly successful b y the girls on Hope's campus.

The M a y Day Celebration w a s a n a l l - d a y event, b e g i n n i n g i n t h e m o r n i n g with the w o m e n ' s sports events, followed b y the m e n ' s sports t o u r n a m e n t s , a n d c u l m i n a t i n g in the e v e n i n g b y the c r o w n i n g of the c a m p u s q u e e n a n d a formal b a n q u e t . Providing for the social n e e d s of the girls on c a m p u s h a s b e e n the chief function of the W.A.L. Board. Its activities h a v e d o n e m u c h to p r o v i d e those e x p e r i e n c e s which contribute tow a r d h a p p y , m e m o r a b l e times at H o p e College.

The final p r o g r a m b e f o r e the C h r i s t m a s v a cation w a s the All-College Holiday Mixer in C a r n e g i e G y m n a s i u m . This w a s w e l l - a t t e n d e d a n d well-received b y the s t u d e n t s w h o s o u g h t a n d r e c e i v e d a f u n - p a c k e d evening.

127


FIRST ROW: C. Fikse, J. Mulder, L. V a n F a r o w e , H. W e e n e r . SECOND ROW: E. Van Dam, 1. H e e m s t r a , K. Veltman, E. Schmidt, M. Prins. THIRD ROW: J. Ver Beek, L. Rozeboom, E. Short, J. Toussaint.

y. w. e.

A.

Work b e g i n s for the Y. W. C. A. C a b i n e t a t the S p r i n g Retreat. This y e a r it w a s h e l d a t the North Holland R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in coo p e r a t i o n with the Y, M. C. A. C a b i n e t . It is h e r e that the y e a r s ' activities a r e p l a n n e d , inc l u d i n g O r i e n t a t i o n W e e k , P r a y e r W e e k , Mission Drive, C a m p u s Visitors' W e e k , a n d the n u m e r o u s "Y" m e e t i n g s in the y e a r to come. Suggestions are made, committees appointed, a n d g o a l s a r e set.

C a b i n e t grams. Besides the four officers, the Y. W. C. A. C a b i n e t includes the following: the music chairm a n , w h o s e d u t y it is to a r r a n g e music for all m e e t i n g s a n d "Y" c o n d u c t e d c h a p e l p r o g r a m s ; the publicity c h a i r m a n , w h o m a k e s posters, a n n o u n c e m e n t s , a n d in other w a y s publicizes the work of "Y"; the missionary c h a i r m a n , w h o p l a n s a n d e x e c u t e s the Mission Drive; the d e p u tation c h a r i m a n , w h o s e d u t y it is to a r r a n g e all s t u d e n t d e p u t a t i o n t e a m s w h o conduct prog r a m s in the c h u r c h e s a n d o r g a n i z a t i o n s in Holland a n d vicinity; the m e m b e r s h i p chairm a n , w h o is in c h a r g e of the m e m b e r s h i p drive.

O r i e n t a t i o n W e e k is the first i m p o r t a n t event. The r e g u l a r drive for m e m b e r s h i p is c o n d u c t e d ; the Y-Fore is p u b l i s h e d a n d distributed, w h i c h i n c l u d e s information of the work of the "Y" o r g a n i z a t i o n s ; the H o p e Hi-Lights, a u s e f u l p o c k e t - c a l e n d a r n o t e b o o k is p r i n t e d for the s t u d e n t s a n d faculty; trains a n d b u s e s a r e met; a n information b o o t h is erected; a n d the highlight of the w e e k , the b e a c h pa rt y, is held for all n e w s t u d e n t s with fun, fellowship, a n d food.

Also, the social c h a i r m a n , the girl w h o p l a n s a n y parties, picnics, or social functions of "Y"; the p e r s o n a l c h a i r m a n , w h o a r r a n g e s for all the m e e t i n g s of "Y" a n d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n w h e n n e c e s s a r y ; the a r e a c h a i r m a n , w h o cont a c t s other "Y" o r g a n i z a t i o n s for i d e a s a n d fellowship; the big-sister c h a i r m a n , w h o s e d u t y is to a r r a n g e for e a c h f r e s h m a n to h a v e a b i g sister, a n u p p e r c l a s s m a n , t h r o u g h w h o m she c a n b e c o m e a c g u a i n t e d with H o p e College; a n d the F r e s h m a n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e , w h o a c t s a s a d e l e g a t e of the f r e s h m a n class a n d b e c o m e s a c q u a i n t e d with the work of the "Y."

During P r a y e r W e e k Dr. Will W. Orr c a m e to o u r c a m p u s a n d d e l i v e r e d a series of inspirational s e r m o n s a n d c o n d u c t e d s e v e r a l o u t s t a n d i n g informal discussions. By m e a n s of the Mission Drive over two t h o u s a n d dollars w a s collected to a i d the H o p e High School in India. W e e k l y m e e t i n g s of the Y. W. C. A. a n d the joint m e e t i n g s with the Y. M. C. A. afford limitless inspiration a n d g u i d a n c e for the s t u d e n t s on the c a m p u s . It is the w o r k of the "Y" C a b i n e t s to p l a n for all t h e s e m e e t i n g s a n d pro-

These m e m b e r s of the c a b i n e t with the two sponsors, Mrs. I. J. L u b b e r s a n d Miss Alice h a m m e r s , m e e t e v e r y M o n d a y a t five o'clock to p l a n a n d d i s c u s s the work of the Y. W. C. A.

128


FIRST ROW: G. De Loof, P. Breen, L. Dykstra, B. Phillips. SECOND ROW: B. P e n n i n g s , D. Hakken, P. M a a s s e n , F. Goulooze, F. Zwemer. THIRD ROW: }. C l e a s o n , H. Ritsema, W. Kline, W. Studdiford, T. Flaherty, E. Kragt.

y. M-

C. J . Cabinet

" W e l c o m e , H o p e S t u d e n t s ! " These w e r e the first w o r d s which g r e e t e d all H o p e s t u d e n t s a s they a r r i v e d at the d e p o t s in the b e g i n n i n g of the 1948-49 school y e a r . These w e r e not simply words, for in a d d i t i o n to m e e t i n g s t u d e n t s a t the d e p o t s a n d assisting t h e m in e v e r y possible w a y , the "Y's" p r e s e n t e d m a n y opportunities to m a k e n e w a c q u a i n t a n c e s b y m e a n s of the e v e n t s of Orientation Week. The first issue of the "Y-Fore" e x t e n d e d further welcome, a n d r e v e a l e d the h i g h m o r a l p u r p o s e of "Y". The " H o p e Hi-Lites" g a v e a further introduction to H o p e a n d to the c o m i n g activities of the y e a r . The b e a c h p a r t y for n e w s t u d e n t s left m a n y m e m o r i e s of fun, food, a n d fellowship which shall long outlast the four y e a r s at Hope.

far in excess of the two t h o u s a n d dollar goal. The p r e s e n c e of the Holy Spirit on the c a m p u s b e c a m e a d e e p e r reality to m a n y s t u d e n t s a n d faculty m e m b e r s a s a result of the inspired m e s s a g e s of Dr. Will W. Orr, p a s t o r of W e s t m i n s t e r United P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h in Des Moines, Iowa. The daily c h a p e l services, conferences, a f t e r n o o n p r a y e r services, a n d question box m e e t i n g will ever continue to b e r e m i n d e r s of d e e p spiritual a w a k e n i n g a n d s t r e n g t h e n i n g to those w h o w e r e willing to "Kneel to b e Knighted." Each T u e s d a y e v e n i n g p r e s e n t e d a chall e n g e a n d a variety of e x p e r i e n c e s which h a v e b e e n a continual e n c o u r a g e m e n t to Christian living. The Christian S e r v i c e S e r i e s which p r e s e n t e d such s p e a k e r s a s The Rev. Gill Dodds, Dr. Otto Pieper, a n d Dr. Wells Thorns p r o v e d a g r e a t success.

The a n n u a l mission project w a s u n u s u a l b e c a u s e of its timeliness a n d its relationship to our college. In 1916, the first mission project of H o p e College w a s the p a r t i a l s u p p o r t a n d e s t a b l i s h m e n t of H o p e High School in M a d a n apalli, India. The first principal of H o p e High School w a s Dr. John D. Muyskens. This y e a r the s p e a k e r for the mission drive w a s this s a m e Dr. Muyskens, a n d his c h a l l e n g e w a s to r e o p e n the d o o r s of the H o p e High School. The school h a d b e e n closed in 1920, a n d a n u r g e n t p l e a w a s m a d e in order that it might a g a i n b e c o m e a training center for Christian l e a d e r s h i p in India. The r e s p o n s e w a s in the form of p e r s o n a l contributions which totaled

The g o s p e l d e p u t a t i o n t e a m s h a v e b e e n a c tive t h r o u g h o u t the entire y e a r , a n d they h a v e b e e n a g r e a t m e a n s of g r o w t h ' to those w h o h a v e taken p a r t in them. The c h u r c h e s which h a v e h e a r d their m e s s a g e h a v e r e c e i v e d a blessing a n d h a v e a l s o b e e n a blessing. The d e v o t e d a n d sacrificial g u i d a n c e of Rev. William Miller a n d Dr. M. E u g e n e O s t e r h a v e n h a v e b e e n i n d i s p e n s a b l e t o w a r d the p l a n n i n g a n d promotion of a most p r o s p e r o u s y e a r .

129


FIRST ROW: J. Thatcher, D. Sluyter, D. C o n t a n t , V. Heese, B. Herr, M. Houtman, H. V a n d e r W o u d e , E. Schmidt. SECOND ROW: M. Van W e e l d e n , M. Van Loo, N. V y / e r b e r g , M. Jacobs, G. Kooiker, D. Davis, E. Van Dam, I. H e e m s t r a . THIRD ROW: H. Ridder, O. Koeppe, T. Flaherty, G. Z u i d e m a , J. Smith, E, Bruins, W. Studdiford.

Zke Mckor The y e a r 1948-49 s a w a r e v o l u t i o n a r y movem e n t in the o r g a n i z a t i o n a n d policy of the Anchor. This y e a r the editorial policy of the p a p e r w a s frankly a n d honestly stated. In the o p i n o n of Editor H e r m a n Ridder, a n d his staff, the A n c h o r w a s "the p l a c e for s t u d e n t opinion to b e a i r e d , " a n d " w h e r e e v e r y o n e c a n a p p r a i s e it." That simply w a s the editorial policy, b u t it m e a n t a n a w a k e n i n g of interest in h a v i n g the Anchor b e c o m e a p o t e n t force on c a m p u s , a p a p e r e d i t e d a n d p u b l i s h e d b y students, for students. With this g o a l in sight, the m a c h i n e r y w h i c h is the life b l o o d of a n e w s p a p e r s w u n g

into action. The editors s t a t e d their opinions a n d beliefs in s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d editorials, urgi n g that the s t u d e n t b o d y t a k e p a r t in the revitalizing process, in order that the opinions of the s t u d e n t b o d y w o u l d b e known. Issue a f t e r issue u r g e d that the s t u d e n t s p a r t i c i p a t e actively in their role a s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of the s t u d e n t b o d y . A n d s t u d e n t interest daily g r e w , until the S p r i n g of 1949 f o u n d a " n e w " Anchor, streamlined, with its finger on the p u l s e of student opinion. But the r e o r g a n i z a t i o n did not halt in the editorial d e p a r t m e n t . In the structure of the p a p e r itself c h a n g e s c o u l d b e seen. These

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A s s o c i a t e Editors Studdilord Sluyter check copy.

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M a a s s e n a n d Kiolt e x a m i n e a "cut". 130

H o e b e k e a n d Hoekstra t a k e in the " m o o l a " for the a d s .


FIRST ROW: G. Zuidema, P. M a a s s e n , H. Hoekstra, R. H o e b e k e . SECOND ROW: E. Kerle, C. Link.

Editor "Bud" Ridder looks like a r e a l journalist.

discussion of dining hall facilities a t H o p e led to a poll which i n d i c a t e d that the s t u d e n t b o d y w a s o p p o s e d to the existing system of dining. A presidential poll w a s t a k e n to discover h o w a cross-section of H o p e ' s s t u d e n t b o d y r e a c t e d to the political situation. A column entitled "Lab Notes" w a s b e g u n for s t u d e n t s interested in science, a n d a D e a n ' s List w a s p u b l i s h e d . The excellent work d o n e on this y e a r ' s Anchor c a n n o t b e credited to a n y o n e person, b u t is the result of c o o p e r a t i o n b e t w e e n the staff m e m b e r s of the p a p e r a n d the student b o d y , a s well a s the active interest s h o w n b y m e m b e r s of the faculty. Without this c o o p e r a tion, the Anchor could not h a v e d o n e such a s p l e n d i d piece of work. Sixty-one y e a r s of publication h a s s e e n the Anchor g r o w a n d improve, ever willing to seek that which is true. In p u r s u i n g this s e a r c h for t r u t h , t h e e d i t o r s a n d staff of the 1948-49 Anchor p r o u d l y e n d this y e a r , s e c u r e in the k n o w l e d g e that the torch of " f r e e d o m of the p r e s s " h a s b e e n c a r r i e d in the b e s t tradition.

Zke pucker c h a n g e s w e r e beneficial to the o p e r a t i o n of the p a p e r , a n d m a d e it m o r e effective. In the Busin e s s Staff definite c h a n g e s w e r e m a d e . An Assistant Business M a n a g e r a n d a n Advertising M a n a g e r w e r e instituted a s s e p a r a t e sub-divisions u n d e r the control of the Business M a n a ger. This m a d e the m a i n t e n a n c e of the p a p e r financially s o u n d in that the system of collection a n d selling w e r e g r e a t l y facilitated. In a d dition to this r e o r g a n i z a t i o n , the Business Staff originated a novel system whereby students w o u l d a d v e r t i s e in the classified section of the p a p e r for r e a s o n a b l e rates. Under the l e a d e r ship of Richard H o e b e k e , Business M a n a g e r , the Business Staff p e r f o r m e d c a p a b l y . The Anchor led the w a y in m a n y activities on c a m p u s , a n d a c t e d a s a s o u n d i n g b o a r d for v a r i o u s issues that a r o s e d u r i n g the y e a r . A

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Reporters Wilson, Smith, De Meester a n d V y v e r b e r g discuss their d e a d l i n e s .

Editors Koeppe, Davis, Van Loo a n d De Graaf p r e p a r e a n issue. 131


FIRST ROW: M. H a l d e n w a n g , B. Eskite, P. C h a a t , B. Harris, S. Gess, H. Baker. SECOND ROW: L. Van F a r o w e , E. J a n n e n g a , H. Dykstra, M. Reichert, P. Westerhoff.

Business M a n a g e r Bob Becksfort reports to Editor-in-Chief Max Frego on the financial s t a n d i n g of the MILESTONE.

Zke M ilestone Staff With a staff of t w e n t y - t h r e e p e o p l e , the MILESTONE for 1949 w a s b e g u n last M a y with the election of Max F r e g o a s editor-in-chief, a n d w a s c o m p l e t e d in e a r l y M a y of this y e a r w h e n the last b o o k w a s b o u n d . U n d e r the e n e r g e t i c g u i d a n c e of Business M a n a g e r Bob Becksfor t, the a d v e r t i s i n g section w a s c o m p l e t e d just a f t e r C h r i s t m a s v a c a t i o n . Local b u s i n e s s m e n a n d institutions in the surr o u n d i n g a r e a c o n t r i b u t e d to the s u c c e s s of this job b y willingly p u r c h a s i n g s p a c e in the MILESTONE. A s s o c i a t e Editor Evie V a n D a m w o r k e d h a r d in g e t t i n g all the stories in b e f o r e the e n d of March, a n d Literary Editor Lorraine D r a k e did her s h a r e b y p r o v i d i n g typists, c o p y r e a d i n g

material, r e t y p i n g stories a n d finishing m a n y minute, b u t important jobs. A b i g task w a s tackled b y Trudy Kloosterm a n , co-desk editor. S c h e d u l i n g individual a n d g r o u p pictures, a l p h a b e t i z i n g n a m e s , writing captions, a n d a h u n d r e d other things w e r e a p a r t of T r u d y ' s job. Larry M a s s e ' s work a s the other desk editor e n t a i l e d m u c h that ordinarily might h a v e g o n e u n d o n e . But Larry's a p t i t u d e c a r r i e d him into the midst of writing articles a n d c h e c k i n g pictures. G o r d Beld's d u t i e s a s sports editor w e r e also b u r d e n s o m e . He did his job, a n d he did it well. C o v e r i n g athletics w a s not a n e a s y job. With the last of the s p r i n g sports in, G o r d ' s work w a s completed. Ed Adler w a s b u s y from last S e p t e m b e r until late in M a r c h t a k i n g p i c t u r e s of buildings,

FIRST ROW: E. Adler, L. Drake, E. V a n Dam, G. Kloosterman, M. Frego. SECOND ROW: Joyce Baker, R. Becksford, J a y n e Baker.

P h o t o g r a p h e r s Jim Hoffman a n d Ed Adler discuss the m e c h a n i c s of a c a m e r a . 132


Mr. Albert Schaafsmcr a n d co-Desk Editor Larry M a s s e p o n d e r over various picture a r r a n g e m e n t s .

Co-Desk Editor Trudy Kloosterman e x p l a i n s the system of a l p h a b e t i z i n g pictures to Marie H a l d e n w a n g .

The finished p r o d u c t , t h e MILESTONE for 1949, w a s d u e to the untiring efforts a n d coo p e r a t i o n s h o w n b y the MILESTONE staff.

Zhe Milestone Staff g r o u p s of people, individuals; in fact, almost a n y t h i n g that p e r t a i n e d to H o p e ' s activities. His, a l s o w a s not a n e a s y task, b u t it s e e m e d a s t h o u g h the m o r e c o m p l e x the work a p p e a r e d , the better the job w a s d o n e . Jim H o f f m a n ' s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y w a s that of w o r k i n g close to G o r d Beld in t a k i n g pictures of s p r i n g sports. He h a d to work fast a n d work h a r d , b u t h e c a m e out on top in the end. The art editors, J a y n e a n d Joyce Baker, with the a s s i s t a n c e of Pete Westerhoff, c o n t r i b u t e d a n i m m e n s e a m o u n t of time a n d e n e r g y in des i g n i n g the division p a g e s , all the art work, a n d the most i m p o r t a n t art job, the cover. The c o v e r s w e r e o r d e r e d in December, a n d they a r r i v e d at the b i n d e r s in March. A1 S c h a a f s m a g a v e m u c h to the y e a r b o o k in the field of p h o t o g r a p h y , a n d Advisor Clyde G e e r l i n g s ' f a i t h f u l g u i d a n c e w a s of untold worth. The p e o p l e w h o s e r v e d u n d e r the vario u s editors held s u c h a position that without them n o book could h a v e b e e n p r o d u c e d .

Joyce a n d Jayne Baker, art editors, h a v e a good time while Pete Westerhoff finishes a sketch.

Associate Editor Evie Van Dam a n d Desk Editor Lorr a i n e Drake count the stories that a r e due.

Bob Van E e n e n a a m a n d G e n e Marcus c a l c u l a t e the a m o u n t of m o n e y a l r e a d y collected for a d s . 133

Sports Editor Gord Beld c o n c e n t r a t e s over a typewriter.


FIRST ROW: P. Huenink, M. H a n n a , B, Woods, I. H e e m s t r a , A. Koning, C. McConnell, S. Roest, J. Muilenb u r q , B. Dowd, L. Van Bronkhorst, P. I^each. SECOND ROW: A. Hibma, L. Brunsting, M. V a n d e W e g e , O. Kilian, J. Van Kolken, I. Little, B. Koch, N. Hungerink, F. Hrbek, M. Jacobs, P. Hendrieth, S. Lanning, J. Woodruff. THIRD ROW: Prof. E. Avison, Martin M e p y a n s , R. Stoppels, F. V a n d e n Bosch, R. Martin, C. Kelly, K. Smouse, D. C a m e r o n , W. V a n d e r Werff, J. Bennett, M. Voskuil. FOURTH ROW: M. H e r m a n c e , A. Arwe, R. Leonard, J. Boeskool, D. Evers, D. Karsten, J. Robins, Marvin M e p y a n s , R. G u n n .

Pallette and Masque Pallette a n d M a s q u e , u n d e r the direction of Professor E d w a r d S. Avison, h a s s p e n t a b u s y a n d p r o d u c t i v e y e a r d e v e l o p i n g the all-important backstage organization by building a n d e q u i p p i n g the n e w Little T h e a t e r on the fourth floor of the Science Building. The g r u n t s a n d g r o a n s of p r o d i g i o u s w o r k e r s h e a r d a r o u n d the S c i e n c e Building in O c t o b e r i s s u e d from P. a n d M. w o r k e r s w h o w e r e h a u l ing l u m b e r a n d s u p p l i e s to the c a r p e n t e r s on the third floor. A c o n s i d e r a b l e a m o u n t of h a r d work f o r m e d the b a s i s of the p l a y s h o p a s it a p p e a r s today. The t h e a t e r , P. a n d M.'s first p e r m a n e n t h o m e , consists of a n a u d i t o r i u m with a possible s e a t i n g c a p a c i t y of o n e - h u n d r e d a n d thirty p e o p l e , a g l a s s - e n c l o s e d control b o o t h for lighting, a traditional G r e e n Room, p r a c t i c e s t a g e , t h e a t e r office, a n d work a n d s t o r a g e a r e a s a s s i g n e d to the v a r i o u s crews. S t u d e n t s a r e u s i n g the e m b r y o r e c o r d i n g studio to perfect voice t e c h n i q u e s . S u c h e x t r a e q u i p m e n t a s • a piano, telephone, a n d speaker system bet w e e n b a c k s t a g e a n d control b o o t h i m p r o v e w o r k i n g conditions a n d m o r a l e . Even t h o u g h the d r a m a t i c s g r o u p w a s v e r y

134

b u s y p r e p a r i n g the n e w theater, p l a y p r o d u c tion w a s not entirely null. In the midst of carp e n t r y a n d painting, s t u d e n t s a n d friends v i e w e d "The Boor" b y Anton Chekov; "The M a n in the Bowler H a t " b y A. A. Milne; a n d "The P o w e r s That Be" b y S a r a S. a n d E. C l a y t o n McCarty. D o u g l a s C a m e r o n a n d Raym o n d Martin a s s i s t e d in direction. Even b e f o r e the last curtain r a n g d o w n on the one-act plays, D o u g l a s C a m e r o n s t a r t e d r e h e a r s a l s on "The Late Christopher Bean," a three-act c o m e d y b y S i d n e y H o w a r d . "Chris B e a n " w a s s e e n in J a n u a r y , a n d with this production, S a t u r d a y m a t i n e e s w e r e i n a u g u r a t e d . With e x a m s over, the morality play, " E v e r y m a n , " w a s cast a n d w e n t into r e h e a r s a l with Mr. Avison directing. That a n y g r o u p could a c c o m p l i s h building a theater, a n d p r o d u c e three one-act p l a y s a t the s a m e time is r e m a r k a b l e in itself, b u t P. a n d M. didn't stop there. The EickelbergK e n n e d y musical c o m e d y , " W a s h i n g t o n Conference," n e e d e d setting a n d lights, so a n alw a y s - a m b i t i o u s g r o u p willingly h e l p e d with the S t u d e n t Council project. Special mention is e x t e n d e d to Alfred A r w e a n d Adrian Bos


P.&M.' s n e w p l a y s h o p on the fourth floor of the Science building.

d e p a r t m e n t . Better-dressed s h o w s h a v e resulted from their set designs. C o s t u m e p l a t e s w e r e m a d e for " E v e r y m a n " to facilitate w a r d r o b e selection. A d i s p l a y of b l u e p r i n t s of the theater, p h o t o g r a p h s of plays, a n d c o s t u m e a n d s c e n e r y designs w e r e sent to W a s h i n g t o n , D. C., in Dec e m b e r to the c o n f e r e n c e of the A m e r i c a n E d u c a t i o n a l T h e a t e r Association. President D o u g l a s C a m e r o n led Pallette a n d M a s q u e t h r o u g h o u t the y e a r , a s s i s t e d b y VicePresident Irene Heemstra, a n d Secretary-Treasurer A n n e Cousins. U n d e r the c a p a b l e l e a d e r s h i p of Professor Avison, Pallette a n d M a s q u e h a s a d v a n c e d a l o n g the p a t h of service, p a s s i n g important milestones in its life. "The m a n b e h i n d the m a n b e h i n d the footlights" h a s c o m e into his own, a n d with a t h e a t e r of its o w n a n d a promising organization, P. a n d M. is p l a n n i n g m a n y m o r e p l a y s of high caliber.

Pallette and Masque for their p l a n n i n g a n d installation of the lighting e q u i p m e n t . J a m e s Bennett a s s t a g e m a n a g e r , Jean Woodruff a n d O l g a Kilian a s m a k e u p chief, Richard L e o n a r d a s h e a d of the p r o p e r t i e s division, a n d A n n e C o u s i n s a n d Martin M e p y a n s a s s u p e r v i s o r s of the b u s i n e s s staff all c o n t r i b u t e d in a s s u r i n g the success of this y e a r ' s plays. Not only h a s P. a n d M. b e e n active in c a m p u s life, b u t the d e m a n d for its services a r e i n c r e a s i n g in Holland a n d the s u r r o u n d i n g vicinity. P. a n d M. a c t o r s a n d b a c k s t a g e c r e w s f o u n d it is helpful to o b s e r v e other g r o u p s in action. M e m b e r s w e n t to Detroit in N o v e m b e r to s e e " S u m m e r a n d S m o k e " b y T e n n e s s e e Williams, a n d "The M e d e a " s t a r r i n g Judith Anderson. The s t a g i n g of p l a y s h a s b e e n m a d e more effective t h r o u g h the c o o p e r a t i o n of the Art

C o s t u m e s a n d m a k e u p a r e put on b e h i n d the s c e n e s .

Prof. Avison, left, instructs his prot e g e s in the art of expression. 135


Mommrif Mcor To h a v e the o u t s t a n d i n g honor of b e c o m i n g a m e m b e r of Alcor is a c h e r i s h e d i d e a l of e v e r y H o p e Co-ed. Every M a y Day, junior girls w h o h a v e met the r e q u i r e m e n t s of excellent scholarship, active p a r t i c i p a t i o n in c a m p u s activities, a n d h i g h c h a r a c t e r a r e t a p p e d into this senior w o m e n ' s h o n o r society. Alcor m e e t s o n c e a m o n t h at the h o m e of o n e of its p a t r o n e s s e s . Miss L a u r a Boyd a n d Miss Metta Ross, or at Gilmore C o t t a g e a s the g u e s t of the f a c u l t y advisor. Miss E m m a Reeverts. In the p a s t y e a r , the society h a s s e e n the p r e s e n tation of s o m e of the b e s t plays, s u c h a s "Ethan Frome."

O n e at a time girls

"that m o m e n t of relaxation." The selling of stationery a n d picture p o s t c a r d s f e a t u r i n g pictures of c a m p u s s c e n e s w a s a n e w a t t e m p t which w a s met with a p p r o v a l b y all students.

U n d e r the direction of C a r o l y n I n g h a m , p r e s i d e n t , Alcor p e r f o r m s m a n y w o r t h w h i l e activities for the students. O n T u e s d a y nights, Alcor girls visit e a c h w o m e n ' s dormitory to a p p e a s e the e v e r - a b u n d a n t a p p e t i t e s . The society offers p l e a s a n t m o m e n t s of r e l a x a t i o n a n d social life to all w h o d r o p in for a s n a c k a t the Alcor "Coffee," held o n c e a m o n t h in V o o r h e e s L o u n g e . This a f t e r n o o n s n a c k a t t r a c t s s t u d e n t s a n d faculty m e m b e r s w h o g r e a t l y a p p r e c i a t e

E a c h y e a r , a s c h o l a r s h i p is a w a r d e d to the s o p h o m o r e girl w h o h a s the highest scholastic s t a n d i n g in her class. This is a p a r t i n g gift from the organization. All other profits a r e p r e s e n t e d to the school in the form of a gift. Alcor looks to the highest i d e a l s of c a m p u s life a n d s t a n d s u n i t e d in Cooperation, Loyalty, a n d Service to H o p e College.

FIRST ROW: C I n g h a m , L. Brunsting, H. V a n d e r W o u d e . SECOND ROW: M. Prins M. Buttlar, A. M o o l e n a a r . THIRD ROW: Miss M. Ross, Miss E. Reeverts, Miss L. Boyd.

136


Orgamzat'ms which p r o d u c e d the Student G uide; the result w a s a n attractive a n d a c c u r a t e booklet. Howa r d Koop a n d Jack Tirrell w e r e in c h a r g e of the football p r o g r a m s , which w e r e sold a t all of the h o m e g a m e s . Later in the y e a r , Roger Kempers w a s in c h a r g e of the b a s k e t b a l l prog r a m s which w e r e distributed without c h a r g e at the g a m e s . O n c e a g a i n the largest project w a s the Blue Key Book Store, which, this y e a r , h a n d l e d the bulk of the textbooks a n d s u p p l i e s for s t u d e n t s a n d faculty. The m e n of Blue Key did their best to p r o v i d e efficient a n d r e a s o n a b l e service t h r o u g h o u t the y e a r . A definite decision h a s not b e e n m a d e conc e r n i n g the u s e of the profits which w e r e realized from the v a r i o u s projects. Last y e a r the c h a p t e r g a v e three t h o u s a n d dollars to the college for the p u r p o s e of p u r c h a s i n g n e w b o o k s for the library. E a c h y e a r the Blue Key's w o r t h w h i l e contribution is m a d e to the college. Vergil Dykstra a n d Bud Bidder a b l y repres e n t e d the Hope C h a p t e r at the Sixth Biennial National Blue Key Convention, which w a s held in C h i c a g o in December. T h r o u g h o u t the y e a r , monthly dinner meetings w e r e held, a t which the m e n e n j o y e d fellowship a n d d i s c u s s e d their b u s i n e s s activities. In the spring a b a n q u e t w a s held, at which the m e m b e r s for next y e a r w e r e formally received.

The Blue Key's b i g g e s t project

Elue Key The H o p e C h a p t e r of Blue Key b e g a n the current y e a r with a m e m b e r s h i p of ten m e n from the Senior class. Two m e n w e r e a d d e d a t the b e g i n n i n g of the first semester. The m e n of Blue Key b e g a n work on their projects e v e n b e f o r e the official o p e n i n g of the school y e a r . O w e n K o e p p e h e a d e d the staff

FIRST ROW, SEATED: R. De Vette, P. Meengs, O. Koeppe, H. Koop. SECOND ROW, SEATED: P. Breen, C. Droog, D e a n M. Hinga, Prof. A Lampen. FIRST ROW, STANDING: [. Tirrell, V. Dykstra, T. H a rison, P. Hinkamp, W. Boerman. SECOND ROW, STANDING: Dr. J. H. Kleinheksel, Dr. B. Raymond, J. S t e g e m a n , R, Kempers, H. Ridder.

137

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FIRST ROW: C h a r l e s Holkeboer, C a s e P a a u w e , Willard Curtis, Frank Lighthart. SECOND ROW: John Nyboer, Bill Reay, Harold Ver Berkmoes, John Bunker, Jake H a v i n g a . THIRD ROW: Holly Roosien, Bill V a n d e r Water, Burt Scholten, G a y l o r d Zylman, Lester Bunker.

Maintenance The n e a t g r o u n d s a n d freshly p a i n t e d buildings w h i c h m e e t the e y e s of H o p e s t u d e n t s in the Fall a r e the result of m u c h t h o u g h f u l attention a n d diligent c a r e on the p a r t of H o p e ' s m a i n t e n a n c e crew. T h e s e men, u n d e r the a b l e supervision of F r a n k Lighthart, a r e r e s p o n s i b l e for the u p k e e p of all school p r o p e r t y , a n d a r e the forces b e h i n d the scenes. For it is the m a i n t e n a n c e c r e w w h i c h p a i n t s the walls, c l e a n s the floors, r e p a i r s electrical fixtures, trims h e d g e s , a n d p e r f o r m s the t h o u s a n d a n d o n e o d d t a s k s w h i c h a r i s e d u r i n g the c o u r s e of a d a y . Perh a p s a g o o d classification of the m a i n t e n a n c e m a n is that h e is i n d e e d " a jack of all t r a d e s " for the t y p e of work d e m a n d e d of t h e s e m e n is v a r i e d a n d plentiful. The m a i n t e n a n c e c r e w swells its r a n k s dur-

ing the school y e a r b y enlisting the a i d of students. E a c h y e a r , m e m b e r s of the student b o d y work with this g r o u p , furthering the work which finds its culmination in a c a m p u s of which s t u d e n t s c a n b e p r o u d . This y e a r , the m a i n t e n a n c e c r e w h a s on its c a l e n d a r a task w h i c h will a d d i m m e a s u r a b l y to the b e a u t y of V a n R a a l t e Hall, a n d contribute to the w e l f a r e of faculty a n d s t u d e n t s alike. This will b e the installation of fluorescent lighting. The lighting is b e i n g given to the school b y H o p e ' s C h a p t e r of the Blue Key National Honor Fraternity. The role p l a y e d b y the m a i n t e n a n c e m e n a t H o p e is a m a j o r one, a n d it is d u e to their p e r s e v e r a n c e a n d diligence that y e a r a f t e r y e a r our c a m p u s i m p r o v e s a n d g r o w s more beautiful.

The finishing t o u ch es

So this is college life 138


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a

Miss J. Beintema, Mrs. H. C a a u w e , Mrs, D. Van Dyke, Mrs. E. Tripp, Mrs. M. Languis.

Mrs. J. Bonlekoe, Mrs. J. Bos, Mrs. K. C a d y , Mrs. A. D a l m a n .

D i n i n g

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W o r k e r s waiters, d i s h w a s h e r s , cooks, those w h o set the tables, a n d others w h o p r e p a r e the s a l a d s a n d the f a n c y trimmings. Even with the l a r g e a m o u n t of s t u d e n t s w h o e a t a t the halls three times a d a y , a n d the l a r g e a m o u n t of work e n t a i l e d in p r e p a r i n g a meal, the dining hall w o r k e r s a r e a l w a y s r e a d y a n d willing to d o their work cheerfully. Their d a y is a b u s y one a n d the work n e c e s s i t a t e s two shifts of cooks a n d kitchen h e l p at both of the college dining halls. S t u d e n t s w h o h a v e w o r k e d in the dining halls, a n d h a v e b e c o m e a c q u a i n t e d with the o p e r a t i o n of t h e s e two places, k n o w that it t a k e s c o o p e r a t i o n a n d a willing a t t i t u d e to m a k e it a success. Imagine, if y o u can, counting out over t h r e e h u n d r e d knives, forks a n d spoons, to s a y nothing of p l a t e s a n d g l a s s e s in Temple dining hall. Although there is a lot of work a n d the work is not so e a s y , the dining hall w o r k e r s a c c e p t their responsibility in a cheerful m a n n e r .

Since H o p e ' s enrollment i n c r e a s e d b y l e a p s a n d b o u n d s a f t e r the w a r , m a n y things h a v e c h a n g e d on the c a m p u s , a n d H o p e ' s dining halls a r e n o exception. The dining hall w o r k e r s a r e a vital p a r t in college life. This p e r t a i n s especially to the outof-town s t u d e n t s w h o e a t a t either Temple or V o o r h e e s Dining Halls. Mr. Rein Visscher is director of b o t h e a t i n g establishments. Temple Dining Hall e m p l o y s forty-two college s t u d e n t s a n d fourteen r e g u l a r help, a n d V o o r h e e s Hall m a i n t a i n s a staff of e i g h t e e n college p e o p l e a n d s e v e n full-time e m p l o y e e s . To s e e to it that e v e r y p e r s o n is served, Temple h a s two p e o p l e serving a s h e a d w a i t e r s a n d o n e h e a d waitress, a n d V o o r h e e s h a s one h e a d waitress. W a l t e r B o e r m a n a n d Clayton Van Hall a r e h e a d - w a i t e r s a n d Mrs. Marie L a n g u i s is h e a d - w a i t r e s s a t Temple while Betty W e a v e r is serving a s h e a d - w a i t r e s s a t Voorhees. O t h e r s w h o work in the dining halls include

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The d i n n e r s a r e a l w a y s delicious

S o m e b o d y will m a k e a good h u s b a n d 139



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BOTTOM ROW: P, K r a n e n d o n k , A. K. Cloetingh, E. Stetson, E. Eckerson, P. Fredrickson, K. Smouse, C. Kelley, G. Viening, L. S n e d e n , G. Z u i d e m a , R. Norden, Prof. R. C a v a n a u g h . MIDDLE ROW: R. K r a n e n d o n k , T. Harrison, Robert Miller, Richard Miller, N. S t e g e m a n , M. H e r m a n c e , K. De Jong, E. Dykstra, J. W e e n e r , J. Robins, C. Van Zanten. TOP ROW: R. Kempers, R. Westerhof, H. Failor, R. StDppels, R. Barr, J. Boeskool, R. Leonard, T. Smith, E. Harsevoort, C. V a n d e r Meer, W. Boerman, H. Ritsema.

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Spirited b y the return of t w e n t y - t w o m e m b e r s of the 1948 c l u b a n d the p r o s p e c t of a n E a s t e r n tour in the Spring, the 1949 version of the M e n ' s G l e e C l u b b e g a n r e h e a r s a l s imm e d i a t e l y a f t e r the o p e n i n g of school in Sept e m b e r . U n d e r t h e b a t o n of the a b l e a n d p o p u l a r Professor C a v a n a u g h , w h o s e g l e e c l u b s h a v e b e e n p e r e n n i a l s u c c e s s e s in the p a s t , the task of l e a r n i n g a n d p e r f e c t i n g the 1949 concert p r o g r a m w a s b e g u n with zest.

Club

dition to the c h u r c h concerts, the g r o u p a p p e a r e d in v a r i o u s high schools, at V a s s a r College, a n d a t the New Brunswick S e m i n a r y . Both b e f o r e a n d a f t e r the tour, v a r i o u s a p p e a r a n c e s w e r e m a d e b y the g l e e c l u b in a n d a r o u n d Holland, including the a n n u a l joint concert with the W o m e n ' s G l e e C l u b at Tulip Time. With t h e s e a p p e a r a n c e s in mind, the Men's G l e e C l u b chalks u p a n o t h e r successful s e a s o n in its history.

A full concert b y the g l e e c l u b i n c l u d e s a p proximately twenty numbers, which are about e v e n l y d i v i d e d b e t w e e n the s a c r e d a n d the s e c u l a r . I n c l u d e d in the s a c r e d g r o u p this y e a r w e r e a n a n t i p h o n a l a n t h e m b y Palestrina, a Russian liturgical chant, a n e g r o spiritual, the "Ave M a r i a " b y S c h u b e r t , a n d Brahms' m o v i n g a n t h e m , "How Lovely is Thy Dwelling P l a c e . " The s e c u l a r n u m b e r s w e r e e q u a l l y v a r i e d , including a comic satire on the v a r i o u s schools of the o p e r a , a Jugo-Slav folk-song, a s e r e n a d e , Friml's " M a r c h of the Musketeers", a m e d l e y of college songs, a n d the n e a r - c l a s s i c "Dry Bones." The g l e e c l u b c o n c l u d e s e a c h concert with the H o p e C o l l e g e A l m a Mater Hymn. O n M a r c h twenty-eight, the c l u b left on a t w o - w e e k tour that took t h e m a c r o s s N e w York s t a t e a n d into N e w Jersey a n d Pennsylv a n i a . Most of the tour c e n t e r e d a r o u n d the c h u r c h e s in the N e w York City a r e a . In a d -

The m e n look s h a r p just b e f o r e l e a v i n g on their tour of t h e East 142


BOTTOM ROW: E. Veenschoten, E, Pierce, P. S h e r m a n , B. Nichols, M. Van Raalte, B. Van Dyke, P. Haskin, M. V a n d e W e g e , J. Ten Hoeve, J. Mulder, Mrs. Snow. MIDDLE ROW: R. Koeppe, M. Droppers, F. Rose, G. Kooiker, L. Rozeboom, N. Corp, H. Van Egmond, E. Van Dam, 0 . Hinga, M. Prins, E. Short. TOP ROW: J. Snow, D. Ten Brink, M. Angus, H. Kleyn, M. V a n d e r Ley, C. W i e r e n g a , N. Smith, D. Sluyter, A. Van Zoeren, S. Pyle, M. Van W e e l d e n , L. Brunsting.

W o m e n ' s

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After their return from the trip, the G l e e C l u b w a s active in p a r t i c i p a t i n g in v a r i o u s concerts in Holland a n d the i m m e d i a t e a r e a .

The W o m e n ' s G l e e C l u b h a s for m a n y y e a r s p l a y e d a n important role on H o p e ' s C a m p u s . The b e a u t y of music is a n e v e r e n d i n g d e light, a n d the W o m e n ' s G l e e C l u b h a s a l w a y s p r e s e n t e d the s t u d e n t s with excellent programs.

The contribution this organization h a s m a d e d u r i n g this y e a r , a n d p a s t years, will a l w a y s b e r e m e m b e r e d for its loveliness a n d technical artistry. S u c h music is a s o u r c e of inspiration to all w h o listen.

Under the direction of Mrs. W. Curtis Snow, the G l e e C l u b h a s h a d o n e of its most active years. A n e w p r e c e d e n t w a s m a d e this y e a r with the a d v e n t of a W e s t e r n tour. Prior to this timte, a n Eastern tour w a s the culmination of m u c h p r a c t i c e a n d effort on the p a r t of the m e m b e r s a n d director. However, a g r e a t l y exp a n d e d m u s i c p r o g r a m e n a b l e d b o t h the Men's G l e e C l u b a n d the W o m e n ' s G l e e C l u b to travel this s e a s o n . The result w a s that thirtythree a m b a s s a d o r s of g o o d - w i l l left on a W e s t e r n tour the thirtieth of March. The itinerary e x t e n d e d into the Mid-Western s t a t e s of Wisconsin, Illinois, a n d I n d i a n a , a n d a u d i e n c e s in t h e s e s t a t e s w e r e thrilled b y the b e a u t y of s o n g w h e r e v e r the G l e e C l u b performed. To a d d to the c h a r m of the concerts, organist F r a n c e s Rose, a n d pianist Alicia V a n Zoeren p l a y e d s p e c i a l solos d u r i n g the intermissions.

W h e r e ' s " C u b b y " Drew?

143


Madrigal FIRST ROW: B. Damstra, J. Woodruff, J. Bos, A. Silcox. SECOND ROW: J. Vinkemulder, Miss J. Holleman, E. Robinson. THIRD ROW: J, Boes^ool, J. Smith, L. Dirkse, R. Meyer.

A l t h o u g h m o d e r n m u s i c is a l s o s u n g , the H o p e C o l l e g e M a d r i g a l S i n g e r s d e v o t e most of their time to the s t u d y of English m a d r i g a l s of the s e v e n t e e n t h century. The music is u n a c c o m p a n i e d a n d d e s i g n e d e s p e c i a l l y for a small informal g r o u p . It is e s p e c i a l l y v a l u a b l e in t e a c h i n g v o c a l i n d e p e n d e n c e a n d sight-singing.

c h a p e l , in addition to m o r e informal a p p e a r a n c e s . T h e y e n j o y e d a b e a c h p a r t y in the fall. The g r o u p w a s u n d e r the direction of Miss Jantina Holleman, assistant professor of music. It is with a n e n v i a b l e r e c o r d that the Musical Arts C l u b is p r o u d to b e o n e of the m a n y c l u b s on c a m p u s , a n d with a spirit of a successful s e a s o n it is striving for a n e v e n better one next year.

The M a d r i g a l S i n g e r s a p p e a r e d at the Christm a s v e s p e r , a n d g a v e a formal recital in the

Musical Arts FIRST ROW: B. Bruins, P. Sherm a n , F. Rose, K. Hagstrom, G. Keizer, E. Van Dam, O. Kilian. SECOND ROW: M. H e r m a n c e , H. Ritsema, J. Boeskool, D. Hoek, D. H a z e k a m p .

The Musical Arts Club, c o m p o s e d of music s t u d e n t s w h o s e e k to w i d e n their interest in music, s e r v e s a two-fold p u r p o s e on the c a m pus. It s p o n s o r s s e v e r a l all-school p r o g r a m s such a s the C h r i s t m a s Vesper Service given in Dec e m b e r , w h e n p r o c e e d s a r e d o n a t e d to the Red Cross, a n d the School S o n g Contest cond u c t e d in the Spring. Also, all u s h e r s for the

musical e v e n t s o n c a m p u s a r e p r o c u r e d t h r o u g h Musical Arts. Besides the r e g u l a r m e e t i n g s t h r o u g h o u t the y e a r , a n o u t s t a n d i n g e v e n t w a s the trip to G r a n d R a p i d s w h e r e m e m b e r s of the club w e r e the g u e s t s of the Calvin College Musician's guild. S e v e r a l H o p e s t u d e n t s took p a r t in the evening program.

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FIRST ROW: M. V a n d e r Ley, E. Veenschoten, P. S h e r m a n , E . Ihrman, Prof. H. P a a l m a n , M. Zech, M Van Raalte B Scarlett, B. Bruins. SECOND ROW: H. E s s e n b e r g , F. Rose, H. Van Egmond, G. Kooiker, E. C o o k m a n , B. Johnson, J. Ten Hoeve, E. Van Dam J. Ver Beek. THIRD ROW: J. Dunster, E. Mayo, M. Droppers, A. Silcox, J. Thatcher, B. Cross, M. Voskuil, M V e l d m a n E Short P Huenink, N. Smith. FOURTH ROW: M. Coffey, R. Koeppe, E. Schmidt, N. Hungerink, H. Kleyn, J. Van Heest, R. Johnson, J. Wilson, A Van Zoeren; S. Pyle, M. Moerdyke, M. A n g u s , E. Schipper. FIFTH ROW: G. Veining, C. Kelley, K. Little, S. Wise, P. Fredrickson, K. Smouse, B. Phillips, D. Wilson, H. Bronkhorst, C. Beukema, K. Lsestma, W. Plomp. SIXTH ROW: J. Boeskool, J. Tien, D. Hoek, D. H a z e k a m p , M, Rowan, H. Meyer, E. Bruins, J. Van E e n e n a a m , R. Norden, R Kranendonk, J. M a r e m a , R. Stoppels, E. T a n g e n b e r g , A. Cloetingh.

Chapel Ckoir The H o p e College C h a p e l Choir, a n o r g a n ization of eighty-five voices, led in almost all the d a i l y c h a p e l services this p a s t y e a r , a n d on special d a y s p r e s e n t e d s u i t a b l e choral a n t h e m s . A full-length p r o g r a m of s a c r e d a n d s e c u l a r music w a s p r e s e n t e d for a s p r i n g concert on April twenty-seven, a n d the p r o g r a m w a s r e p e a t e d in Muskegon, K a l a m a z o o a n d G r a n d R a p i d s later in the school y e a r .

recting the event. This y e a r the choir w a s outs t a n d i n g in all its p e r f o r m a n c e s . Under the c a p a b l e g u i d a n c e a n d a b l e direction of M i s s H a z e l P a a l m a n , a n i n v a l u a b l e musical f o u n d a t i o n w a s p r o c u r e d b y the choir m e m b e r s . It is b e c a u s e of her ability a n d the projection of the g o a l of p r o d u c i n g g o o d voices that Miss P a a l m a n ' s s t u d e n t s a r e t r a i n e d in b a s i c voice techniques. The choir is c o m p o s e d entirely of H o p e students, a n d its choral selections w e r e of a n exceptionally h i g h caliber this year. The officers of the g r o u p for the y e a r 194G-'19 w e r e Russell Norden, president; Eleanor Short, s e c r e t a r y ; Elizabeth C o o k m a n a n d M a r y Vander Ley, librarians.

During the first s e m e s t e r the choir p r e s e n t e d H a n d e l ' s Messiah. It w a s a u g m e n t e d b y excellent soloists, a c c o m p a n i e d b y the orchestra, o r g a n a n d piano. M a n y s t u d e n t s a n d faculty m e m b e r s w i s h e d to p a r t i c i p a t e a n d joined the choir in the rendition. This oratorio took p l a c e in December, with Professor C a v a n a u g h di-

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FIRST ROW: H. Koop, V. Dykstra, E. Kragt, H. Bos. SECOND ROW: H. Grissen, R. Van E e n e n a a m , J. Veldhuis, R. Draper.

J n t e r - 7 r a t e r n i t y The g o v e r n i n g b o d y of all the fraternities on c a m p u s is the Inter-Fraternity Council. As the fraternities a r e l a r g e in m e m b e r s h i p , a n d it is often difficult to a r r i v e r e a d i l y at a conclusion on m a t t e r s p e r t a i n i n g to inter-fraternity affairs, it h a s b e e n f o u n d e x p e d i e n t to m a i n t a i n a central council. The Inter-Fraternity Council is c o m p r i s e d of t w o m e m b e r s from e a c h fraternity on c a m p u s , a n d is s p o n s o r e d b y D e a n Milton Hinga. The ten fraternity r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a n d D e a n H i n g a d i s c u s s the v a r i o u s g u e s t i o n s w h i c h a r i s e during the y e a r . The conclusions t h e y r e a c h a r e t h e n r e l a y e d b a c k to the v a r i o u s g r o u p s r e p r e s e n t e d . It h a s g e n e r a l l y b e e n a c c e p t e d in the p a s t to h a v e the fraternities a b i d e b y the d e cisions r e a c h e d b y the council. A m o n g its m a n y duties, the council must s u p e r v i s e rushing, b i d d i n g , a n d initiating. These, in a d d i t i o n to the minor q u e s t i o n s arisi n g constantly, fill the a g e n d a . A n o t h e r i m p o r t a n t c a p a c i t y s e r v e d b y the council is that of o r g a n i z i n g a n d s u p e r v i s i n g inter-fraternity sports. Basketball, b o w l i n g , Softball, a n d other forms of r e c r e a t i o n p l a y a n i m p o r t a n t role in the fraternity activities for the year. The Inter-Fraternity Council h a s b e e n likened to the C o n g r e s s of the United S t a t e s in so far a s the m e n of the council a r e r e p r e s e n t i n g their fraternities, a n d m a k e the l a w s a n d r e g u l a t i o n s g o v e r n i n g the societies. This is true, for the fraternity r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a r e just that. The d e cisions t h e y r e a c h a r e j u d g e d to b e the b e s t for all c o n c e r n e d .

C o u n c i l

It is e::cent.al that h a r m o n y a n d c o o p e r a t i o n exist b e t w e e n the fraternities a n d the a d m i n i s tration. In his c a p a c i t y a s sponsor of the council. D e a n H i n g a p r o v i d e s the contact n e e d e d with the administration. As c o m p a c t g r o u p s , u n i t e d b e c a u s e of c o m m o n interests, a n d with fellowship a s their prime object, the fraternities c a n do m u c h g o o d for H o p e College. The fraternities c a n benefit from the a d ministration, a n d the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n c a n b e n e fit from the fraternities. It is t h r o u g h the m e d i u m of the Inter-Fraternity Council that t h e s e things c a n b e a c c o m p l i s h e d .

D e a n H i n g a ' s a d v i c e is highly v a l u e d

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FIRST ROW: Miss L. Boyd, B. Koch, M. Buttlar, N. Hungerink. SECOND ROW: L. Van Farowe, J. Brunstetter, E. Schmidt, J. Sheel. THIRD ROW: M. Reichert, L. Drake, K. Ponstine, Miss E. Reeverts.

P a u - M e l l e n i c The Pan-Hellenic Board is c o m p r i s e d of two elected m e m b e r s from e a c h of the sororities on c a m p u s . With M i s s L a u r a Boyd a n d Miss E m m a Reeverts, D e a n of W o m e n , a s directors, the b o a r d solves v a r i o u s i m p o r t a n t issues. The b o a r d m a k e s the rules, forms the policies of all the sororities on c a m p u s , a n d d i s c u s s e s m a n y other p r o b l e m s which a r i s e d u r i n g the y ea r . The decisions of Pan-Hellenic a r e of imm e d i a t e i m p o r t a n c e to e a c h sorority. In the b e g i n n i n g of the school y e a r it is this b o d y that d e t e r m i n e s the d a t e of the R o u n d Robin Tea, a n d p u b l i s h e s rules p e r t a i n i n g to rushing a n d b i d d i n g s o p h o m o r e a n d transfer students. Also, a list of girls desiring to b e l o n g to a sorority is given to e a c h sorority president. This is a proof a g a i n s t unconsciously eliminating a girl from b e c o m i n g a sorority m e m b e r . At a n y time q u e s t i o n s m a y b e b r o u g h t b e fore the b o a r d a n d this g r o u p u s e s e v e r y m e a n s possible in finding a solution to the situation. O n e p r o b l e m which is b e i n g w o r k e d out b y the g r o u p is the m e t h o d of selecting p l e d g e s for the v a r i o u s sororities. This p a r ticular i n s t a n c e involves all the sororities a n d it is with the i d e a of m a k i n g the p l e d g i n g p r o c e d u r e more uniform that Pan-Hellenic is s e e k i n g a n a c c e p t a b l e compromise. The b o a r d a l r e a d y h a s d i s c u s s e d this p r o b l e m a n d h a s r e c e i v e d s u g g e s t i o n s from e a c h sorority pert a i n i n g to the m e t h o d s n o w in existence.

Hoard

Pan-Hellenic occasionally m e e t s with the Inter-Fraternity Council to discuss items that concern b o t h the m e n a n d the w o m e n ' s socities. Under the c a p a b l e g u i d a n c e of President Jean Brunstetter, t h e P a n - H e l l e n i c Board w o r k e d efficiently in serving the sororities during the p a s t y e a r .

Pan-Hellenic promotes good-will

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An e a g e r t e a m of D e l p h i a n s r e s p o n d e d to the o p e n i n g whistle of the first s e m e s t e r a n d u n d e r the a b l e supervision of first term c o a c h B a r b a r a V a n Dyke, a s s i s t a n t c o a c h Lois De Kleine, a n d score k e e p e r Irene H e e m s t r a the g r o u p looked f o r w a r d to a successful y e a r of p l a y a n d competition. The first o p p o n e n t s w e r e the r a i n y w e a t h e r a n d s a n d m a n a t the traditional fall h o u s e party. But the Delphi c a m e t h r o u g h the victors with e n o u g h e n e r g y left to b e g i n r e d e c o r a t i o n of their h e a d g u a r t e r s .

Delta Phi

Koning. S l e e p w a s o u t p l a y e d a n d fun took the lead.

T e a m w o r k r e i g n e d s u p r e m e in daily p r a c tices for the " R o u n d Robin T e a . " After a hilario u s informal initiation, the time of the r e s e r v e s w a s over, a n d all b e c a m e full m e m b e r s of the varsity at a n inspiring formal c e r e m o n y .

Valentine's w e e k - e n d f o u n d a n i n c r e a s e in the varsity a s e a c h m e m b e r a d d e d a substitute a n d took time at Miller's Barn for a n informal d a t e night. C o n t i n u i n g a full s e c o n d term s c h e d u l e , the t e a m d o n n e d the g r e e n a n d p r o v e d its skill on St. Patrick's D a y b y m a k i n g the a n n u a l potluck its u s u a l success. As the s e a s o n w a s d r a w i n g to a finish, Delphi a d d e d a n a l l - d a y event a t S p r i n g Lake to the s c h e d ule. An a f t e r n o o n of play, c l i m a x e d b y a b a n q u e t a n d p r o g r a m , b r o u g h t a n o t h e r victory to the Delta Phis.

Time for r e l a x i n g a n d r e c u p e r a t i n g w a s called for C h r i s t m a s v a c a t i o n . The C h r i s t m a s t e a a n d a n e a r l y m o r n i n g b r e a k f a s t a t the Dutch Mill h e l p e d to a c h i e v e this end. During this b r e a t h i n g spell the varsity w a s h a n d e d to the n e w c o a c h . A m y Koning, with Ruth Koop a s a s s i s t a n t a n d O l g a Kilian k e e p i n g the score book.

Write u p s c o n c e r n i n g joint m e e t i n g s with the Sorosites, Knicks a n d Cosmos, a n d the All-College Sing s p e l l e d a successful y e a r .

The n e w y e a r b e g a n with e a c h varsity m e m b e r w o r k i n g for a s u c c e s s f u l g a m e a b o a r d the "Delphi S h o w b o a t , " the winter formal p a r t y . S t a r s for the e v e n i n g w e r e those w h o took p a r t in the original musicale.

The varsity g a t h e r e d for its last g a m e of the y e a r a t the lake shore. For m a n y it port r a y e d the final whistle, a n d s a d l y the seniors left for the h a r d e r p l a y of life. But r e m a i n i n g teammates eagerly anticipated another year of Delta Phi.

At the half-time all those t e a m m a t e s w h o h a d held the d e f e n s e a g a i n s t e x a m s a n d first s e m e s t e r worries g a t h e r e d t o g e t h e r for a n o t h e r h o u s e p a r t y a t the h o m e of H e a d C o a c h A m y

Delphis hold informal initiation

Westerhoff s h o w s the girls how it's d o n e

153


With the a d d e d s t a r s in the p r o g r a m , the Third S c e n e discloses the d a w n of Homecoming w h e n all Dorians a n d their A l u m n a e g a t h e r e d t o g e t h e r for a n e a r l y m o r n i n g b r e a k f a s t at the Dutch Mill r e s t a u r a n t . Then the Dorians a t t e n d e d the a n n u a l H o m e c o m i n g p a r a d e to a d d to the a l r e a d y overflowing college spirit. Next stop w a s the a f t e r n o o n football g a m e which the Dorians w i t n e s s e d a s a g r o u p in traditional m a n n e r . With the c o m i n g of Thanksgiving, the First Act c o m e s to a close a n d all u n a n i m o u s l y a g r e e , it w a s a fine b e g i n n i n g . The S e c o n d Act follows shortly with Director Joan Wilson t a k i n g over a n d Esther Schmidt assisting. Beth Thomson b e c o m e s script writer a n d Bea Folkert a n d P e g M o e r d y k e r e m a i n co-financers. The First S c e n e t a k e s p l a c e a t Christmas-time w h e n all g a t h e r e d for a h o l i d a y p a r t y a t the h o m e of a l u m n a Eleanor V a n D a h m . Dorians p l a y e d S a n t a C l a u s to a family of twelve in Kentucky a n d p a c k e d b o x e s of food, toys, a n d clothes to b e sent to them. The S e c o n d S c e n e introduces the New Year a n d the winter formal, "Continental C a r o u s e l " , w h i c h w a s held in the Continental Room of the Hotel Pantlind in G r a n d Rapids. A delicious dinner p a r t y w a s m a d e especially e n j o y a b l e b y the c o m p a n y of select guests. St. Valentine's D a y is the r o m a n t i c s c e n e of the S e c o n d Act w h i c h a d d s a bit of sentiment to the show. A h o l i d a y p a r t y w a s held in the Dorian room with r e f r e s h m e n t s s e r v e d a f t e r the "hearty" program. The Third Act of the K a p p a Beta Phi Revival w a s s t a g e d from M a r c h to June, a n d i n c l u d e d s u c h u n f o r g e t t a b l e s c e n e s a s the Dorian contribution to the P e n n y C a r n i v a l , participation in the All-College Sing, a n d the s p r i n g informal party. A n d so the curtain c o m e s d o w n a g a i n on a n o t h e r s u c c e s s f u l p r o d u c t i o n w h i c h certainly h a s b e e n r a t e d o n e of the v e r y b e s t in the h e a r t s of the Dorian Troupers.

Kappafteta Phi

K a p p a Beta Phi w o u l d like to s h a r e with y o u a Dorian Revival of this p a s t y e a r ' s events. H a v i n g m a d e its d e b u t in 1921, the p e r f o r m a n c e h a s g r o w n b e t t e r with e v e r y s u c c e e d i n g y e a r . The h o u s e lights of the Present dim a n d the s t a g e lights of the Past g r o w b r i g h t e r a s the c u r t a i n rises on the First Act. The setting is the fall of '48, a n d director at the time w a s Betty H a r r i s , w h o w a s a b l y a s s i s t e d b y Betty A n n Koch. Script writer w a s Esther Schmidt a n d c o - f i n a n c e r s w e r e Bea Folkert a n d P e g Moerdyke. The First S c e n e recalls a g a l a h o u s e p a r t y h e l d d u r i n g the o p e n i n g w e e k of school a t the c o t t a g e of Dorian M a r y Kooyers. Dorian Betty Harris, with h e r h a n d y c a m e r a , c a p t u r e d the high-lights of those two e v e n t f u l d a y s w h i c h w e r e r e p r o d u c e d in a set of hilarious s n a p s h o t s . The S e c o n d S c e n e r e v e a l s a s h o w within a s h o w . It's the 'Round Robin T e a " with Dorians p r e s e n t i n g a m u s i c a l skit for the e n t e r t a i n m e n t of all n e w s o p h o m o r e s a n d p r o s p e c t i v e pledges. All p l e d g e s looked f o r w a r d to " S l a v e W e e k " — or r a t h e r to the e n d of " S l a v e W e e k " — a n d all m a s t e r s a g r e e d that the b a r g a i n s in the s l a v e m a r k e t w e r e better this y e a r t h a n ever before. Following informal c e r e m o n i e s , the m o r e serious a n d i m p r e s s i v e formal initiation took p l a c e in the sorority room.

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Sibs hold a b r e a k f a s t m e e t i n g

Toussaint a n d Brunsting go "Dutch"

Sibyls g a t h e r e d t o g e t h e r at a jolly s l u m b e r p a r t y on the e v e of C o n v o c a t i o n a t Cool E d g e Inn on M a c a t a w a shores. Singing a n d l a u g h t e r filled the g r e a t e r p a r t of the d a y , b u t p l a n s w e r e a l s o d i s c u s s e d enthusiastically for the forthcoming y e a r .

The y e a r w a s b e g u n with a n "Old Times Review" a t the Rowe Hotel at w h i c h the Sibyls d i n e d a n d r e l a x e d to their h e a r t ' s content. In the springtime, all the Sibs w e r e kept b u s y . They g a t h e r e d together o n c e m o r e for "the d e v e l o p m e n t of t h e b o d y . " A f u n - p a c k e d d a y in the out-of-doors w a s c l i m a x e d b y playing games.

In the first s p e c i a l event of the y e a r , the '"Round Robin T e a , " Sibyls p r e s e n t e d the latest in the e n t e r t a i n m e n t field, "Television," in which t h e y s p o n s o r e d a b r o a d c a s t for hopefuls.

Never to b e forgotten w e r e the joint m e e t i n g s held with other sororities a n d fraternities. Sybils f o u n d them to b e e n l i g h t e n i n g a n d enriching.

Beautiful w e a t h e r a c c o m p a n i e d the "four-mile" hike, on w h i c h t w e n t y - t w o m e m b e r s w e r e cordially w e l c o m e d b y their n e w "sisters." Yet, to s e a l the b o n d of friendship, a formal initiation w a s solemnly held. Each n e w m e m b e r w a s p r e s e n t e d with a Sib Rose a n d oath, a n d r e c e i v e d the pin of a n old m e m b e r a s s y m b o l s of Sibyl a l l e g i a n c e .

Ends must c o m e to all g o o d things) But that is not so with all Sibyls. For, w h e n the seniors g r a d u a t e d , they h a d a l r e a d y met a n d h a d b e c o m e r e - a c q u a i n t e d with m e m b e r s of the A l u m n a e a t the s p r i n g tea.

Late in O c t o b e r c a m e " H o m e c o m i n g , " at which the current m e m b e r s g r e e t e d their faithful a l u m n a e at the y e a r l y Brunch. Amid m u c h reminiscence a n d enlightenings, Sibyllines did m a n a g e to e a t a little.

So, "farewells w e r e softly s p o k e n " on the s h o r e s of M a c a t a w a a t the overnight h o u s e party. F o u r t e e n seniors left the ranks. New officers w e r e c h o s e n to l e a d Sibyls t h r o u g h the tests of the n e w y e a r . To their high i d e a l s of purity of the mind, b o d y , a n d spirit, the Sibyls r e p l e d g e d themselves.

'"Life a b u n d a n t " is o n e of the a i m s of the Sibyls a n d t h e y s t a r t e d the n e w y e a r p u r s u i n g it.

157


Sorosis h a v e a n informal chat at a formal p a r t y

P l e d g e Van Kolken t a k e s the oath

S i g m a S i g m a , the first e s t a b l i s h e d sorority on c a m p u s , looks b a c k u p o n a y e a r of t e a m work, a n d the score is m a r k e d with signs of s u c c e s s a n d fun. S o p h o m o r e s w e r e e n t e r t a i n e d in typical French style at the "'Round Robin Tea," Bids h a v i n g b e e n a c c e p t e d , the door w a s o p e n e d to n e w p l e d g e s at a n a f t e r - c h u r c h s u p p e r . The following w e e k , the p l e d g e s m a s q u e r a d e d a n d w e r e e n t e r t a i n e d most informally, a f t e r w h i c h t h e y w e r e sold q u i t e inexpensively a s slaves. F o r m a l initiation h e l d the a c c u s t o m e d dignity a n d impressiveness a s each pledge partook in the lighting of her c a n d l e from the S i g m a S i g m a Crest.

Sorosites g a t h e r e d at the A m e r i c a n Legion C o u n t r y C l u b a s the fleeting spirit of Dutch Treat W e e k p a s s e d . This w a s Valentine d a t e night for that o n e a n d only. As S p r i n g a p p r o a c h e d , fullest efforts w e r e p u t forth for p a r t i c i p a t i o n in the All-College Sing. The Sorosites p r o v e d that their traditional h a r m o n y in spirit w a s s u r p a s s e d only b y their h a r m o n y of voice a s " W i e g e n l i e d " was rendered.

The A l u m n a e joined in a H o m e c o m i n g lunche o n at the Tulip Room in the W a r m Friend Hotel. M e m o r i e s of former d a y s joyously c a m e to life. Following the luncheon, all Sorosites a t t e n d e d the H o m e c o m i n g football g a m e , a n d p r o u d l y d i s p l a y e d the traditional c h r y s a n t h e m u m s a n d S i g m a S i g m a colors.

The informal s p r i n g p a r t y a n d the traditional Senior G r a d u a t i o n Breakfast w e r e the highlights of the S p r i n g a d v e n t u r e . By m e e t i n g with other sororities a n d fraternities, S i g m a S i g m a w a s a b l e to live u p to a n o t h e r ideal, that of f r i e n d s h i p b e y o n d its circle.

D e c e m b e r w a s a perfect m o n t h for Sorosis a s g u e s t s w e r e e n t e r t a i n e d a t the Pantlind Hotel in G r a n d Rapids. "Festival Airs" p e r m e a t e d the e v e n i n g in the true spirit of C h r i s t m a s a n d in the spirit of the "Gold a n d White." The C h r i s t m a s T e a a n d literary m e e t i n g crept into the h e a r t s of all Sorosites. As c a r o l s w e r e s u n g in the c a n d l e - l i g h t e d room, feelings of u n i t e d ties r a n t h r o u g h e a c h m e m b e r , a n d e a c h w i s h e d the other a h a p p y h o l i d a y .

Since its b e g i n n i n g in 1906, S i g m a S i g m a h a s stood for s t r e n g t h a n d honor, a n d a t the e n d of a n o t h e r y e a r , Sorosites a r e still f o u n d to b e willing, solicitous, a n d trustworthy — working a n d playing together a s a team.

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S p e n d i n g a few m o m e n t s in the library o n e d a y , the T h e s a u r i a n s d i s c o v e r e d a book b e a r ing the title "Theta Tales," 1948-49. A g l a n c e w a s given first to the T a b l e of Contents a n d it w a s found r a t h e r intriguing. "A D o u g l a s Cott a g e " w a s the s c e n e of the T h e t a h o u s e p a r t y . It w a s a lovely c o t t a g e , p i c t u r e s q u e a n d roomy, a n d so c o n d u c i v e for s l e e p or for talk. Despite food a n d fun, p l a n s w e r e laid for the next c h a p t e r , "Round Robin T e a . " E v e r y o n e w o r k e d t o g e t h e r for the interest of this c h a p t e r , with Betty De Ryke a s the a u t h o r , Kay Ponstine a s h e r assistant, Shirley De Boer a s literary editor, a n d Bernie Nichols h a n d l i n g the copyright fees.

Zhcta Qamma Pi

m a s m e e t i n g with the a l u m n a e . At that time the a l u m n a e p r e s e n t e d a lovely gift to the p r e s e n t Thetas.

" W e a r y Bones" h e a d s the next c h a p t e r a s T h e t a s a n d their p l e d g e s r o u n d e d the m a r s h e s on the "four-mile hike." Shrieks filled the air a s an occasional snake w a s encountered, but "all's well that e n d s well," a n d this c h a p t e r w a s c o n c l u d e d a s b a r b e c u e s , hot chocolate, ice c r e a m , a n d cherry pie w e r e e n j o y e d .

" S n o w m e n , " h m m m m — must b e winter, a n d that m e a n s the Theta informal party. All w e r e g l a d w h e n the p a r a g r a p h m e a n i n g C o u n t r y C l u b a n d food w a s finally r e a d . Then t h e r e c a m e a literary p a r a g r a p h with the o p e r a "Othello," a n d the c h a p t e r e n d e d a s the T h e t a s p r o m e n a d e d u n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n of Mr. C l a u d e Ketchum.

The next c h a p t e r w e n t to the d e e p South for " S l a v e W e e k . " S l a v e s r o a m e d over the aristocratic m a n s i o n s of V o o r h e e s a n d V a n Vleck a n d the suites of the old m e m b e r s took on " n e w looks" a s a result of m u c h s c r u b b i n g . The little m a i d s then g a t h e r e d in the s p a c i o u s dining room for formal initiation, receiving cors a g e s of white c a r n a t i o n s a s they r e p e a t e d the p l e d g e of loyalty.

"Mystery Melodies" then b e g a n issuing from the sorority room a s t h o u g h t s of the All-College Sing c a m e to mind. E v e r y o n e d r e a m e d of "Just a C o t t a g e Small" a s Kay Ponstine b e c a m e a u t h o r . Hazel V a n d e W o u d e , h e r assistant, a n d Eunice Heinen p a i d the p u b l i s h e r ' s fees.

" O u t w e i g h e d , O u t p l a y e d " b r i n g s to mind that exciting H o m e c o m i n g w e e k - e n d . A d e licious b r e a k f a s t w a s e n j o y e d with the a l u m n a e at the Dutch Mill r e s t a u r a n t , a n d a n important announcement w a s m a d e concerning the n e w A l u m n a e organization.

Then c a m e the closing c h a p t e r s with the s p r i n g p a r t y a n d g r a d u a t i o n . The senior c h a r a c t e r s Hazel, Kay, Leona, Minnie, a n d Eunice left the plot of ' T h e t a Tales." Friendship, Devotion, a n d Service h a v e filled the p a g e s of this book a n d the h o p e is that f u t u r e T h e t a s will b e a b l e to write "Finis" with a s g r e a t a flourish.

" S t a r s " w a s the h e a d i n g of the c h a p t e r which b r o u g h t b a c k m e m o r i e s of the Christ-

S c e n e of the Theta h o u s e p a r t y

T h e t a s Van F a r o w e , De Boer strike a striking p o s e

161


F r e s h m e n girls g a t h e r for a " g a b - f e s t " in W e s t Hall

A l p h a

S i g m a

A n o t h e r y e a r h a s g o n e by; a n o t h e r g r o u p of talented young freshmen has entered Hope College. The f r e s h m e n girls a r e e s p e c i a l l y p r o u d of their sorority, A l p h a S i g m a A l p h a . All the informal m e e t i n g s which w e r e held in West Hall l o u n g e , a n d the g a y p a r t i e s p r o v e d to b e of v a l u e . All the f r e s h m e n girls h a v e m a d e m a n y n e w friends, r e c e i v e d g o o d c o m p a n i o n ship, a n d h a v e h a d m a n y h a p p y times tog e t h e r b e c a u s e of A l p h a S i g m a Alpha.

A l p h a

A l p h a w a s s t a r t e d in the right p a t h s . Acknowle d g e m e n t is a l s o d u e to the s o p h o m o r e s w h o h e l p e d in the b e g i n n i n g of the y e a r . All the officers w e r e most c a p a b l e a n d their l e a d e r s h i p w a s v e r y satisfactory. To t h e s e officers a n d to the advisor, Miss N o r m a Wolcott, instructor in S p a n i s h , the f r e s h m e n girls g i v e their d e e p e s t a p p r e c i a t i o n . O n e of the most s u c c e s s f u l e v e n t s of the y e a r w a s the informal p a r t y w h i c h w a s held on J a n u a r y fifteenth at the W o m e n ' s Literary Club. The title g i v e n to the p a r t y w a s the "Sock Hop." Naturally, the t h e m e of the p a r t y c e n t e r e d a r o u n d "socks." Not only w e r e the c o a t s c h e c k e d a t the door, b u t a l s o the shoes. E v e r y o n e s p e n t the e v e n i n g in "sock feet." The formal p a r t y w a s also a g r a n d success. It w a s held on the twenty-ninth of April a t the W o m e n ' s Literary Club.

The g r o u p h a s b e e n e s p e c i a l l y active in m a n y of the c a m p u s activities of the college. The first u n d e r t a k i n g w a s the float w h i c h w a s d e s i g n e d for the H o m e c o m i n g p a r a d e . Just a s a n y other sorority or fraternity on the c a m p u s , a n Alumni b r e a k f a s t w a s held. The only missing factor w a s the lack of a n y Alumni; h o w ever, fun p r e v a i l e d . The a n n u a l All-College Sing w a s a c h a l l e n g e to the m u s i c a l talents which r e i g n e d h i g h in the g r o u p .

It w a s the c o o p e r a t i o n which w a s r e c e i v e d from the f r e s h m e n girls that m a d e all the activities of A l p h a S i g m a A l p h a s u c c e s s f u l this y e a r . The p a s t y e a r h a s truly b e e n g r a n d . It not only h a s b e e n of benefit to its m e m b e r s , b u t a l s o to the college a s a whole. It h a s b e e n a full y e a r , a n d a n active one. W o r k i n g t o g e t h e r h a s b r o u g h t the f r e s h m e n girls closer to e a c h other, a n d m a n y friendships h a v e b e e n g a i n e d .

Under the a b l e l e a d e r s h i p of efficient officers, A l p h a S i g m a A l p h a w a s o r g a n i z e d . It w a s b e c a u s e of the ability of the officers that the m e e t i n g s w e r e so v e r y interesting a n d worthwhile. To the first s e m e s t e r president, Doris A d a m s , the credit is d u e for the smooth b e g i n n i n g m e e t i n g s which w e r e the most difficult. U n d e r h e r a b l e l e a d e r s h i p A l p h a S i g m a

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De Young p u t s on a n act

Even the Old White Hen w a s "relieved" after Homecoming

A r c a d i a n s b e g a n the y e a r with a rip-roaring time at Tunnel Park the s e v e n t e e n t h of S e p t e m b e r . This w a s a s t a g p a r t y with plenty of food, songs, a n d l a u g h t e r , c l i m a x e d with a c a m p f i r e song-fest on the b e a c h .

jES)

Arcadian

Chi Phi S i g m a then settled d o w n to more serious duties, s u c h a s c h o o s i n g a d d i t i o n a l m e m b e r s from the vast store of n e w Hope-ites a n d b u i l d i n g the "Old White H e n " for Homecoming. This y e a r A r c a d i a n s e x p e r i e n c e d their first Alumni Breakfast a t H o m e c o m i n g time. This s e e m e d a bit u n u s u a l to s o m e b e c a u s e the fraternity h a s only b e e n in existence for a p e r i o d of two a n d one-half y e a r s . However, there is a continual g r o w i n g list of frat b r o t h e r s w h o a r e n o longer on the c a m p u s . Four of the Alumni a t t e n d e d the b r e a k f a s t a l o n g with forty h u n g r y m e m b e r s .

p u r p o s e of b u y i n g CARE p a c k a g e s , thirty of which h a v e b e e n p u r c h a s e d .

about

A r c a d i a n s e n j o y e d t a k i n g p a r t in m a n y other p r o g r a m s a n d activities in the c o m m u n i t y a s well a s a t the college. R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s particip a t e d in inter-fraternity sports. M a y D a y sports events, a n d the w e a r i n g of " d e b l a u w e Holl a n d s e Broek" in the Tulip Time p a r a d e . Taking p a r t in the street s c r u b b i n g h a s b e e n a n a n n u a l e v e n t for the A r c a d i a n s since 1947. A n d just like m a n y other Hope-ites, fraternity m e n w e r e often f o u n d t r a m p i n g the traditional old "four-mile hike" a l o n g Black River on a nice S u n d a y a f t e r n o o n .

R e g u l a r elections w e r e held in J a n u a r y . David Dykstra s u c c e e d e d Ted Flaherty in the office of president, Marvin Kragt r e p l a c e d Floyd Goulooze a s vice-president, Elton Bruins w a s elected s e c r e t a r y in p l a c e of W a l t e r Studdiford, a n d Bill Flaherty w a s elected to the t r e a s u r e r ' s post, which h a d b e e n v a c a t e d b y President Dykstra.

O n e of the a n n u a l important e v e n t s on H o p e ' s c a m p u s is the All-College Sing. The A r c a d i a n fraternity w o r k e d m a n y h o u r s b e f o r e the rendition of "Winter S o n g , " a n d efforts w e r e fruitfully a w a r d e d w h e n the prized t r o p h y a s a s y m b o l of first-place h o n o r w a s p r e s e n t e d to Director Kenneth Leest m a .

In J a n u a r y , the a n n u a l winter formal p a r t y took place. The t h e m e w a s "Sentimental Journ e y " a n d the G r a n d Central Station w a s the Morton H o u s e in G r a n d Rapids. Everyone a g r e e d that the p a r t y w a s a h u g e s u c c e s s a n d its m e m o r i e s shall linger long in the h e a r t s of all present.

Chi Phi S i g m a h a s e x p e r i e n c e d a most successful a n d e n j o y a b l e y e a r . Fraternity ties h a v e b o u n d the m e n in the true spirit of brotherhood, a n d benefits h a v e b e e n d e r i v e d b y the men, b y the c a m p u s , a n d b y the community.

A special p r o g r a m of interest w a s the p r e s e n tation of motion picture p r o g r a m s called the World A d v e n t u r e Series. This project r a p i d l y b e c a m e a r e g u l a r p a r t of c a m p u s a n d community life. All p r o c e e d s w e r e u s e d for the

165


a n d other w o r t h w h i l e literary activities. R o u n d i n g the turn in the backstretch, the w i n n i n g p a c e r s w e r e Clayton V a n Hall for w i e l d i n g the gavel, G e o r g e Z u i d e m a a s vicepresident a n d program chairman, and Harlan Failor a s secretary. At the b e g i n n i n g of the n e w semester, the C o s m o p o l i t a n s took a "Sentimental J o u r n e y " to the O c c i d e n t a l Hotel in M u s k e g o n . This winter's formal p a r t y w a s a true shining s u c c e s s for C o s m o s a n d their guests.

Phi Kappa Alpha

Cosmopolitans a g a i n acquired m a n y high r a t i n g s in the inter-fraternity activities. The "B" L e a g u e b a s k e t b a l l t e a m w a s h o n o r e d in w i n n i n g the Inter-Fraternity b a s k e t b a l l c h a m pionship. The All-College Sing w a s a n o t h e r highlight of the s e a s o n with the fraternity giving a v e r y fine s h o w i n g of excellent h a r m o n y .

This p a s t school y e a r of 1948-49 c a n b e m a r k e d a s a n o t h e r v e r y s u c c e s s f u l y e a r for Phi K a p p a A l p h a . In true C o s m o p o l i t a n tradition, the fraternity r a n k e d h i g h on the c a m p u s , b o t h in scholastics a n d in athletics. The C o s m o p o l i t a n s m a d e a v e r y fine start in the b e g i n n i n g of the n e w y e a r b y p l e d g i n g a fine a n d c a p a b l e g r o u p of y o u n g men. The officers for the fall term set a v e r y lively p a c e with Timothy Harrison a s president, a n d Clayton Van Hall a s s i s t i n g him in the c a p a c i t y of vice-president. The s e c r e t a r i a l work w a s a b l y h a n d l e d b y Allison V a n Zyl. Robert Becksfort s e r v e d a s t r e a s u r e r for the y e a r . Mr. C l y d e Geerling, director of H o p e C o l l e g e Publicity, a g a i n c o n s e n t e d to s e r v e a s s p o n s o r of the society.

The fraternity e l e v a t e d itself to a h i g h position this y e a r for in the latter p a r t of F e b r u a r y a third floor a p a r t m e n t in o n e of the d o w n t o w n b u i l d i n g s w a s s e c u r e d for the fraternity's use. A g r e a t d e a l of diligent work soon transf o r m e d it into a very h o s p i t a b l e lounge. The l o u n g e b e c a m e a definite b i n d i n g force in b r i n g i n g the fraternity m e m b e r s into closer cooperaiion. Phi K a p p a A l p h a f e a t u r e d its colors in truly c h a m p i o n s h i p fashion for the homestretch. S p r i n g sports w e r e e n t e r e d with a g r e a t d e a l of vigor. C o s m o s also g a v e their all to the M a y D a y activities. The S p r i n g Party p r o v e d to b e a fine finis to the y e a r ' s activities. A most e n j o y a b l e m e a l c o u p l e d with top e n t e r t a i n m e n t p r o v i d e d a h a p p y conclusion. Thus, a n o t h e r y e a r in the C o s m o p o l i t a n history c a n b e filed a w a y with fond memories. Phi K a p p a A l p h a ' s fervent h o p e is that the f u t u r e c a n b r i n g a s m u c h joy a s this y e a r h a s a f f o r d e d .

The r u s h i n g s e a s o n w a s c l i m a x e d with initiations, b o t h informal a n d formal. The n e w m e m b e r s g a v e their s o l e m n v o w to the timeh o n o r e d principles of Friendship, Truth, a n d Progress. The first term p r o v e d to b e a v e r y b u s y o n e for m e m b e r s of Phi K a p p a A l p h a , for t h e y e n t e r e d w h o l e h e a r t e d l y into the custom of initiating f r e s h m e n , voicing yells a s a unit at the varsity football g a m e s , a n d e n j o y ing m a n y informal parties, informal m e e t i n g s .

Karsten, Birce a n d Boeskool, historical c h a r a c t e r s on the C o s m o float

C o s m o s a n d their g u e s t s find time to chat d u r i n g their " S e n t i m e n t a l Journey"

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Ball tries to control himself at the Emmie-Frater m e e t i n g

The Emmies voice their v o cal s

The n i n e t e e n t h y e a r of E m e r s o n i a n on H o p e ' s c a m p u s w a s a n o t h e r Milestone in the principles of Love, Honor, Freedom, a n d Success. The y e a r ' s activities s t a r t e d rolling with a very successful a n d e n j o y a b l e r u s h i n g s e a s o n under the g u i d a n c e of David H o o g e r h y d e a s president. After q u e s t night a n d informal initiation, p l e d g i n g w a s c l i m a x e d b y the impressive, time-honored, formal initiation c e r e m o n y . Mr. J a m e s Prins s e r v e d v e r y c a p a b l y a s faculty a d v i s o r t h r o u g h o u t the y e a r . H o m e c o m i n g p r o v i d e d the o p p o r t u n i t y for active m e m b e r s a n d a l u m n i s p a c e to r e n e w friendships at the a l u m n i b a n q u e t . The Emmie S t a g Smoker a t the M a r q u e e w a s a n o t h e r h i g h point of the fall term. The T h u r s d a y e v e n i n g b e f o r e Christm a s w a s the s c e n e of the a n n u a l C h r i s t m a s p a r t y a n d dorm caroling. The "Emmie" S a n t a , arriving a t the girls' dorms, w a s w a r m l y welcomed.

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River," which w a s r e n d e r e d very c a p a b l y under the direction of Herbert Ritsema. E m e r s o n i a n a g a i n , a s in the past, w a s well r e p r e s e n t e d in all i n t r a m u r a l sports. Basketball w a s the center of attraction d u r i n g the winter term, with b a s e b a l l a n d the M a y Day track m e e t t a k i n g over the spotlight in the spring. S p r i n g v a c a t i o n e n d e d o n e of the most successful winter terms in the history of E m e r s o n i a n a n d l a y e d the f o u n d a t i o n for the s p r i n g term.

Ushering in the n e w y e a r , the winter term officers took over the reins of E m e r s o n i a n . Russell Norden s e r v e d a s president, with C r a i g V a n Zanten officiating a s vice-president. A v a r i e d a n d interesting g r o u p of m e e t i n g s w a s p l a n n e d . O n the e v e n i n g of J a n u a r y twentyone, Emmies a n d their guests, a f t e r dining, g a z e d u p o n " E m e r s o n i a n Portraits" a t the a n n u a l winter formal p a r t y held in the V.F.W. Hall in Holland. This w a s o n e of those n e v e r to b e forgotten e v e n i n g s which a r e c h a r a c t e r istic of E m e r s o n i a n winter parties. The AllCollege Sing on M a r c h e l e v e n c l i m a x e d m a n y h o u r s of h a r d a n d diligent p r a c t i c e on " D r e a m

In the s p r i n g a y o u n g m a n ' s f a n c y turns to t h o u g h t s of, a s Emersonians' did, joint meetings with s e v e r a l sororities. The s p r i n g p a r t y held in M a y w a s a fitting climax to the most successful y e a r of E m e r s o n i a n since the w a r . As the y e a r d r e w to a close, those that w e r e completing their college c a r e e r s looked b a c k on their s t a y in Emersonian, a n d looked e a r n estly into the future with the k n o w l e d g e that their efforts h a d p a v e d the w a y for the a d v a n c e m e n t of E m e r s o n i a n to n e w a n d m o r e glorious heights.

169


d a t i n g their own. The club w a s completely f u r n i s h e d with the h e l p of local b u s i n e s s e s t a b lishments a n d furniture h o u s e s , a n d will b e m a i n t a i n e d until Fraters s e c u r e a h o m e of their own.

Omicron Kappa

Highlight of the winter s e a s o n w a s the formal party, held in the Louis XV Room of the R o w e Hotel. Ably c h a p e r o n e d b y a l u m n u s , s p o n s o r Don Zwemer, a n d c o a c h Russ De Vette, the "Frater S u p p e r C l u b " p r o v e d to b e a n e x t r e m e l y zestful affair.

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The a n n u a l W a s h i n g t o n D a y S t a g w a s a g a i n h e l d in the M a r q u e e in a n a t m o s p h e r e of tenderloins, alumni, a n d festive song. An e x t r e m e ly well-thought-out p a p e r on "Bottles" w a s pres e n t e d b y a l u m n u s John K. V a n d e n Broek. Three n e w p l e d g e s w e r e w e l c o m e d in March, a n d two joint meetings, o n e with Sorosis a n d o n e with the Emersonians, highlighted the eng a g e m e n t s of the month. H i e a n n u a l All-Coll e g e Sing took p l a c e M a r c h 11th a n d Fraternal, a b l y d i r e c t e d b y Don Evers, c a p t u r e d a n hono r a b l e fourth position. The g l e e c l u b r e n d e r e d their version of " O l d M a n River" b y Jerome Kern.

M e m b e r s of F r a t e r n a l Society c o n c l u d e d a n other highly s u c c e s s f u l y e a r , the o n e h u n d r e d a n d fifteenth of its history. The oldest fraternity on H o p e ' s c a m p u s , a n d the sixth oldest G r e e k letter fraternity in the United States, p r o u d l y took its p l a c e of honor in the activities of the p a s t school y e a r . G u i d e d b y the Frater t h e m e " F e w a n d Chosen," actives pledged twenty n e w members w h o w e r e e n t h u s i a s t i c a l l y initiated into the r e a l m s of O.K.E. " L e o n i d u s " w a s o n c e m o r e e x h u m e d to i m p r e s s f r e s h m e n with the a g e a n d s a g a c i t y of the o r g a n i z a t i o n . Refreshm e n t s w e r e s e r v e d a la carte, with m a r s h m a l lows for dessert.

President H i n k a m p r e l i n q u i s h e d the g a v e l to Don Evers w h o led the fraternity to a s ucce ssful conclusion of a n o t h e r y e a r . Highlighted b y the fifth A n n u a l Frater Frolics, given t h r e e nights in M a y b e f o r e enthusiastic a u d i e n c e s , the m e m b e r s a n d g u e s t s closed a n o t h e r p a r t y c h a p t e r with the s p r i n g festivity. The traditional S w a n S o n g c o n c l u d e d y e a r 1948-49 in the history of Omicron K a p p a Epsilon.

Old g r a d s a n d y o u n g p l e d g e s sat s h o u l d e r to s h o u l d e r a t the first p a r t y of the s e a s o n , w h i c h followed the H o m e c o m i n g football g a m e in O c t o b e r . The affair, w h i c h w a s a g a i n held at the C o u n t r y Club, p r o v e d to b e v e r y s u c c e s s ful. F o r m a l initiation w a s c o n d u c t e d in Novemb e r b y first term p r e s i d e n t Howie Koop, w h o r e l i n g u i s h e d the g a v e l following the c e r e m o n y to n e w l y e l e c t e d p r e s i d e n t P a u l H i n k a m p .

So p a s s e d a n o t h e r s e a s o n in m a n y ; typical, yet o u t s t a n d i n g , a s e a s o n of successes, friendships, a n d l e a d e r s h i p on c a m p u s . A d o z e n seniors left the r a n k s with a s s u r a n c e of a job well d o n e , a n d a p l e d g e from a c t i v e s to k e e p the s u n of the F r a t e r n a l crest continually in ascendance.

Frater Alumni led the w a y in 1949, a n d h e l p e d the a c t i v e o r g a n i z a t i o n e s t a b l i s h itself in the n e w C l u b r o o m s in d o w n t o w n Holland. F r a t e r s o n c e a g a i n s c o r e d a first in a c c o m m o -

F r e s h m e n Fraters p a r a d e the streets

An a t m o s p h e r e of tenderloins, alumni, a n d festive s o n g s 170


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M e e n g s gives the oath

Eickelberg gets the g a v e l

Thirty-nine y e a r s a g o , a g r o u p of m e n inc o r p o r a t e d themselves a s the Knickerbocker Literary Society, a n d in later y e a r s t h e y h a v e b e e n k n o w n a l s o a s the K a p p a Eta Nu Fraternity. The p u r p o s e s for which it w a s f o u n d e d w e r e e m b o d i e d a s the r a y s of a triangle symbolizing the moral, intellectual, a n d social m o d e s of life.

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W e l c o m i n g the r e t u r n i n g c o - e d s to the c a m p u s with a n o c t u r n a l s e r e n a d e w a s the first spin of the KHN whirl; c o n d u c t i n g joint m e e t i n g s with the v a r i o u s sororities w a s a n other. The " d a t e n i g h t s " w e r e i n t e r s p e r s e d on the social c a l e n d a r . As usual, the Knickerb o c k e r s p a r t i c i p a t e d in the All-College Sing, this y e a r giving a rendition of " M e a d o w l a n d . " Climaxing the y e a r of Knickerbocker social e v e n t s w a s the " C a n d y l a n d C a r n i v a l , " the a n n u a l formal winter p a r t y held at the Morton H o u s e in G r a n d Rapids. The s e c o n d s e m e s t e r w a s t o p p e d b y the informal s p r i n g p a r t y which, to those present, will b e a s o u r c e of m e m o r i e s for s o m e time to come.

The fraternity w a s p r o u d to h a v e Professor Harold J. H a v e r k a m p a s its sponsor. The g r o u p is i n d e b t e d for his aid, e n c o u r a g e ment, inspiration, a n d v a l u a b l e advice. Justly p r o u d of its f a m e d a n d illustrious Alumni, KHN held " O p e n H o u s e " for former m e m b e r s at the Royal N e i g h b o r s Hall d u r i n g H o m e c o m i n g , a n d e x p e c t s b y next y e a r to h a v e a well-knit Alumni Association in o p e r a tion. Plans also a r e u n d e r w a y to honor those Knickerbockers w h o g a v e their lives in World W a r II d e f e n d i n g their ideals. The H o p e College Infirmary b e c a m e the recipient of three r a d i o s p u r c h a s e d b y KHN to alleviate the h a r d s h i p s of b e i n g ill.

Knickerbocker t e a m s w e r e in action in all p h a s e s of the i n t r a m u r a l sports p r o g r a m , a n d w e r e n o t e d for their tenacity a n d fine sportsm a n s h i p . Twice d u r i n g the school y e a r the traditional "Black a n d Blue" colors of p l e d g i n g b e c a m e the b a n n e r s that led p r o s p e c t i v e m e m b e r s to the fraternity.

This y e a r h a s b e e n a n o u t s t a n d i n g y e a r for Knickerbockers. Led b y c a p a b l e officers, m a n y n e w b o n d s of friendships h a v e b e e n f u s e d a n d m a n y older o n e s s t r e n g t h e n e d . To the Senior Knicks, the fraternity b i d s a cordial "Thank y o u " for a job well d o n e , a n d those w h o l e a v e will give this c h a r g e :

The literary m e e t i n g s a n d the ever-present b u s i n e s s m e e t i n g s w e r e dutifully a n d excellently g u i d e d b y President Phillip M e e n g s a n d Vice-President Harold Grissen d u r i n g the first semester, a n d b y President W a r r e n Eickelberg a n d Vice-President Roy W a l c h e n b a c h d u r i n g the s e c o n d semester.

"Keep the pledges thou hast made, Hold them always to thy heart; Ma/ntai)! truth, defend thy faith, From our standards never part."

173




Q u e e n Judy r e i g n s s u p r e m e at May Day c e r e m o n i e s


Amid shouts of glee, Don escorts Judy to the throne

The Daisy C h a i n m a k e s its w a y to the Pine Grove

M a y 'Day M a y D a y is the o n e event that is r e m e m b e r e d a n d c h e r i s h e d b y all b e c a u s e of its b e a u t y a n d excitement. C l a s s e s a r e a d j o u r n e d in the m i d d l e of the morning, a n d s t u d e n t s p r e p a r e for the n u m e r o u s activities that will c o n t i n u e t h r o u g h o u t the d a y .

b e h i n d the horizon, p l a y e d a c r o s s the lawn. Alcor girls a n d the p r e v i o u s q u e e n ' s court took their places, a n d the c e r e m o n i e s officially b e g a n . A short history of former M a y D a y a c tivities w a s then r e l a t e d b y the Master of C e r e m o n i e s , William Hillegonds

S t u d e n t s a n d faculty m e m b e r s g a t h e r on the athletic field in the m o r n i n g to o b s e r v e the competition b e t w e e n the girls' teams. These t e a m s a r e r e p r e s e n t e d b y the four c l a s s e s on c a m p u s . There a r e contests in track, highjumping, b r o a d - j u m p i n g , relays, d a s h e s , b a s e ball, a n d b a s k e t b a l l distant throwing. The s o p h o m o r e girls g a v e k e e n competition in all the v a r i e d sports this y e a r , a n d the close of the morning f o u n d them victorious.

The t a p p i n g of the junior girls w h o h a d b e e n c h o s e n to b e c o m e m e m b e r s of Alcor, the h o n o r a r y w o m e n ' s society, took place. Following this c a m e the l o n g - a w a i t e d a n n o u n c e ment of the six junior girls w h o h a d b e e n e l e c t e d to the q u e e n ' s court, a n d finally the a n n o u n c e m e n t of the n e w q u e e n . Q u e e n Judy, for H o p e ' s C a m p u s . In the e v e n i n g a delicious b a n q u e t w a s s e r v e d a t Temple Dining Hall, The q u e e n a n d her court w e r e given p l a c e s of honor a t the m a i n table. After dinner, a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of e a c h class w e l c o m e d t h e n e w l y c r o w n e d q u e e n , a n d w i s h e d her s u c c e s s a n d h a p p i n e s s .

After a r e f r e s h i n g lunch, w h i c h w a s cons u m e d with relish on the p a r t of the fairer sex, all p r e p a r e d to d e p a r t to the track g r o u n d s on t w e n t y - s e c o n d street. Here, the r o b u s t m a l e s d i s p l a y e d their p r o w e s s a n d skill abilities. These t e a m s w e r e c o m p o s e d of m e n r e p r e s e n t ing the five fraternities on c a m p u s , a n d t h e y c o m p e t e d in relays, h i g h - j u m p i n g , b r o a d jumping, pole-vaulting, javelin throwing, a n d other sports.

At this time s p e c i a l a w a r d s w e r e given to s t u d e n t s on c a m p u s . A m o n g those p r e s e n t e d w e r e the Alcor S c h o l a r s h i p A w a r d to M a r g a r e t Moerdyke, the W o m e n ' s Sports A w a r d to the w i n n i n g s o p h o m o r e girls, a n d the m e n ' s Sports A w a r d , w a s a w a r d e d to the F r a t e r n a l Society for its participation in the d a y s ' activities. The S t u d e n t Council officers for the e n s u i n g y e a r w e r e a n n o u n c e d b y Q u e e n Judy,

In the evening, a d a i s y c h a i n f o r m e d b y the f r es h me n girls w h o w e r e attired in p a s t e l formats, t h r e a d e d their w a y into the Pine Grove, A throne h a d b e e n e r e c t e d especially for the occasion of c r o w n i n g the q u e e n . The sun, in its full brilliance, just b e f o r e d r o p p i n g

M a y Day holds a choice p l a c e in the b o o k of m e m o r i e s of e v e r y Hope-ite, Truly this d a y is a n o u t s t a n d i n g Milestone on H o p e s C a m p u s ,

177


Momecoming

Doris K o s k a m p

Dorothy C o n t a n t

Delpha Siebers

Lois E n g l a n d

Q u e e n Toni Fredricks

G w e n Kooiker

Molly R y a n


B a r e n d s e won the tennis finals

F a i r b a n k s C o t t a g e won the Girls' Dorm Decorations Contest

H o p e ' s H o m e c o m i n g w e e k - e n d w a s o n e of the best in the school's history. Three perfect d a y s , p a c k e d with activities, b e c k o n e d to H o p e ' s m a n y a l u m n i w h o c a m e from all p a r t s of the world to e n j o y the festivities held on O c t o b e r 29-31. Four o'clock F r i d a y a f t e r n o o n f o u n d the b a n k s of Black River lined with e a g e r , a n x i o u s s t u d e n t s a n d alumni, a w a i t i n g the a n n u a l Frosh-Soph pull a c r o s s the icy w a t e r s . The m e n w o r k e d h a r d a n d the Frosh " m o r a l e b o o s t e r s " did their best, b u t the S o p h s w o n the first event of h o m e c o m i n g w e e k - e n d . F r i d a y night, in spite of the h e a v y d o w n pour, a p e p rally w a s held, this y e a r with a n e w innovation — that of the c r o w n i n g of the H o m e c o m i n g Q u e e n . Early in the fall, it w a s d e c i d e d that s o m e o n e other t h a n the M a y Day Q u e e n should reign for this w e e k - e n d . C o n s e q u e n t l y , e a c h class c h o s e two girls a s their c a n d i d a t e s for this distinction. From this g r o u p a committee of s t u d e n t s a n d faculty m e m b e r s m a d e the final selection. Thus, a t the p e p rally Miss Toni Fredricks, M u s k e g o n Senior, was crowned Homecoming Queen by Gordon Timmerman, with the Misses Dorothy Contant, Lois England, G w e n Kooiker, Doris Koskamp, Molly Ryan, D e l p h a Siebers, a n d M a r y V a n Loo forming her court. S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g f o u n d m a n y of the sororities on c a m p u s e n t e r t a i n i n g their a l u m n i at b r e a k f a s t , a n d then e v e r y o n e r u s h e d d o w n Prof. L a m p e n h e l p s himself at the Alumni B a n q u e t

Barrett r u n s for the g o a l posts

town to v i e w the p a r a d e , which w a s of exceptional caliber this y e a r . The F r e s h m a n class w o n first prize with their "Cannibalistic" s c e n e a n d the C o s m o p o l i t a n Fraternity c a m e in seco n d with their p o r t r a y a l of the Old North C h u r c h a n d the midnight ride of P a u l Revere, the t h e m e b e i n g , "The Britons a r e coming!" Yes, "they c a m e , t h e y s a w , a n d t h e y w e r e c o n q u e r e d . " Albion w a s d e f e a t e d , 33-6, on a w a r m lazy a f t e r n o o n b e f o r e a c r o w d of seve r a l t h o u s a n d people. After the g a m e , H o p e ' s a l u m n i g a t h e r e d in the p a r l o r s of H o p e R e f o r m e d C h u r c h for a buffet s u p p e r . G u e s t s w e r e p r e s e n t from m a n y different states, a n d delightful informality plus a b u n d a n c e of c h a t t e r a n d l a u g h t e r p r e v a i l e d a s friendships w e r e r e n e w e d . O n S a t u r d a y e v e n i n g m a n y of the fraternities held special m e e t i n g s in honor of their alumni. O t h e r s s p e n t a n e n j o y a b l e e v e n i n g visiting the v a r i o u s dormitories a n d a d m i r i n g the decorations. F a i r b a n k s C o t t a g e w o n first prize a m o n g the girls' d o r m s a n d T-Dorm c a p t u r e d it for the fellows. S u n d a y a f t e r n o o n ' s v e s p e r service, which w a s held in the C h a p e l , w a s p a c k e d with b o t h " a l u m n i a n d students. An inspiring,, r e l a x i n g p r o g r a m w a s p r e s e n t e d b y the Music Department, — a n d then it w a s over, the b u s y , b u t enjoyable week-end. The Frosh t a k e a

breather


A 11 - C o 11e g e For the sixth time, the a n n u a l All-College Sing h a s b e e n a g r e a t success. This inspiring d i s p l a y of s t u d e n t c o o p e r a t i o n a n d friendly competition h a s p r o v e d a s o u r c e of delight for all w h o a t t e n d . To s e e a n All-College Sing is to s e e A m e r i c a n y o u t h strikingly p o r t r a y e d , for all the e l e m e n t s of d e m o c r a t i c life a r e to b e f o u n d in this contest. The All-College Sing p r o v i d e s excellent stud e n t p a r t i c i p a t i o n d u r i n g the school y e a r .

Sing

Every sorority a n d fraternity on the c a m p u s e n t e r s the contest, a n d o n e of the rules of the contest is that e v e r y g r o u p must enter all its m e m b e r s in the contest. In this w a y , m a n y stud e n t s h a v e a c h a n c e to p a r t i c i p a t e in a n event w h i c h a n n u a l l y s e c u r e s for itself a g r e a t e r prestige on H o p e ' s c a m p u s . The j u d g e s for the Sing a r e c h o s e n from o u t s i d e of the school. The v a r i o u s g r o u p s a r e r a t e d on s e v e r a l points; tone, interpretation,

TOP: R, K r a n e n d o n k , Cosmopolitan; C. W i e r e n g a , Delphi; L. Brunsting, Sibylline. MIDDLE: M. Voskuil, Dorian; D. A d a m s , A. S. A.; D. Evers, Fraternal; K. Smouse, Knickerbocker. BOTTOM: P. Haskin, Sorosis; H. Ritsma, Emersonian; K. Leestma, Arcadian; G. Keizer, T h e s a u r i a n .

180


Delphi Sorority c a p t u r e d the trophy in the w o m e n ' s division

t e c h n i q u e , selection, direction, a n d g e n e r a l effect b e i n g the m a i n elements. The Sing is entirely the possession of the students. The g r o u p s select their songs, their leaders, a n d the Sing itself is directed b y stud e n t c h a i r m e n . There a r e n o e x p e r t s in the Sing; all a r e a m a t e u r s , a n d the finished p r o d uct is the result of m a n y h o u r s of practice. The All-College Sing this y e a r w a s e x c e p tionally n o t e w o r t h y in so far a s t h e r e w e r e ties for first p l a c e a m o n g b o t h sororities a n d fraternities. The final decision, h o w e v e r , p l a c e d Delta Phi Sorority a s first p l a c e w i n n e r a m o n g the sororities, a n d the A r c a d i a n Society a m o n g

the fraternities. S e c o n d p l a c e contestants w e r e Sorosis Sorority, a n d the E m e r s o n i a n Fraternity. Gold c u p s w e r e p r e s e n t e d to the winners. The s u c c e s s of e a c h All-College Sing is dep e n d e n t u p o n cooperation, b u t the g r e a t e s t single factor contributing to this s u c c e s s is the b o u n d l e s s e n t h u s i a s m of the s t u d e n t b o d y . A n d typical of this e n t h u s i a s m w a s the work a n d e n e r g y put into o r g a n i z i n g a n d directing this y e a r ' s Sing b y c o - C h a i r m e n Evie Van Dam a n d Russ Norden. It is t h r o u g h their work, a n d the work of h u n d r e d s like them, that the AllCollege Sing h a s b e c o m e o n e of the g r e a t highlights of e v e r y school year.

A r c a d i a n Fraternity, trophy w i n n e r s in the m e n ' s division

181


R e a d y for a n o t h e r lecture

R e l i g i o u s

Dr. Orr s t r e s s e s a point

E m p h a s i s

Dr. Will W. Orr of Des Moines, Iowa, w a s the g u e s t s p e a k e r for the a n n u a l Religious Emp h a s i s W e e k w h i c h w a s o b s e r v e d from Febr u a r y 7 to 11. Dr. Orr is p a s t o r of the Westminster United P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h of Des Moines. During his p a s t o r a t e t h e r e the c h u r c h h a s d e v e l o p e d into o n e of the largest o r g a n i z a t i o n s in the Middle West. Dr. Orr is especially n o t e d for his excellent y o u t h p r o g r a m which h a s h e l p e d to r e a c h so m a n y of the y o u n g p e o p l e in that a r e a . During p a s t y e a r s h e a n d Mrs. Orr h a v e o r g a n i z e d a n a n n u a l s u m m e r c a m p on the C a m p u s of C e n t r a l College, Pella, Iowa. Dr. Orr h a s also s e r v e d a s Vice-President of the Bible Institute of Los Angeles. He h a s b e e n a c t i v e in s t u d y i n g a possible unification of Ref o r m e d a n d United P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h e s into a single d e n o m i n a t i o n .

Week

the Y.M.C.A. a n d Y.W.C.A. societies. Donald V a n d e n b e r g p r o v i d e d s p e c i a l m u s i c . The Y.M.C.A. a n d Y.W.C.A. c a b i n e t s met a t Gilm o r e C o t t a g e a f t e r the service to m e e t Dr. Orr personally, a n d to s h a r e in the fun c r e a t e d b y his clever g a m e s a n d jovial mood. The " Q u e s t i o n Box M e e t i n g " w a s held on T h u r s d a y night with Dr. Orr a n s w e r i n g m a n y vital q u e s t i o n s p e r t a i n i n g to all p h a s e s of life. These q u e s t i o n s w e r e sent in b y students. The last of the s p e c i a l features, which w e r e cent e r e d a r o u n d Religious E m p h a s i s W e e k a n d Dr. Orr, w e r e the p r a y e r m e e t i n g s which w e r e held at five o'clock in the a f t e r n o o n in the C h a p e l b a s e m e n t . The faculty m e m b e r s in c h a r g e w e r e : M o n d a y , Dr. H e n r y Voogd; Tuesd a y , Mrs. Irwin J. Lubbers; W e d n e s d a y , Mr. E d w a r d W o l t e r s ; T h u r s d a y , Miss E m m a Reeverts. Those in c h a r g e c o n d u c t e d the entire service which i n c l u d e d a short s o n g service, a d e v o t i o n a l talk, a n d a p e r i o d of s e n t e n c e prayers.

During Religious E m p h a s i s Week, C h a p e l services w e r e held at ten o'clock in the morning. Besides Dr. O r r ' s a d d r e s s , t h e r e w a s s p e cial m u s i c e a c h m o r n i n g b y the W o m e n ' s G l e e Club, The Men's G l e e Club, C h a p e l Choir, F r a n c i s Rose a t the o r g a n , a n d a solo b y Timo t h y Harrison. Dr. O r r ' s daily inspirational m e s s a g e s w e r e entitled "Kneel to b e Knighted," "Putting Christianity to Work," "Resources Unlimited," "The Fighting S t a r s " a n d "The S w e a t of Thy F a c e . "

The origin of P r a y e r W e e k or Religious Emp h a s i s W e e k c a n b e t r a c e d b a c k to w h e n H o p e C o l l e g e w a s still in its youth. In 1887 the t h e m e for the w e e k w a s "The Salvation of Y o u n g Men," a n d the m e e t i n g s w e r e led b y p r o m i n e n t b u s i n e s s m e n from Holland. At that time the services w e r e p l a n n e d b y the Y.M.C.A., a s they a r e now. Since t h e r e w e r e few w o m e n on c a m p u s in 1887 n o Y.W.C.A. h a d b e e n formed a s yet. From that time on. P r a y e r W e e k h a s b e e n held e v e r y y e a r , u s u a l l y with o n e m a i n s p e a k e r , b u t s o m e t i m e s with a s m a n y a s five.

In a d d i t i o n to the m o r n i n g services. Dr. Orr h a d p r i v a t e c o n f e r e n c e s a n d talks with stud e n t s w h o w e r e i n t e r e s t e d in C h u r c h work a n d organization, a n d w h o h a d p e r s o n a l p r o b l e m s for which a d v i c e w a s n e e d e d . O n T u e s d a y e v e n i n g Dr. Orr a d d r e s s e d a joint m e e t i n g of

182


S n a p s

"Chris B e a n " w a s a w o n d e r f u l s u c c e s s

Hope-ives know the w a y to a m a n ' s h e a r t

mm: .

Sketch of the n e w w o m e n ' s dormitory a s v i e w e d from Van Vleck hall

Seniors a l r e a d y a r e on t h e "straight a n d n a r r o w " p a t h to s u c c e s s

Dr. Kuizenga, Mrs. Kollen, Dr. Lubbers, a n d Rev. Hoffman at g r a d u a t i o n exercises

183




Metkesda Sanatorium provides . . . Christian care and mndern scientific treatment far mental and nervans diseases, also tuberculosis.

Sana to riwm A physidan

and alsfr

i

nurses tra'med fn Psychiatry or interested

Established

by the Reformed

and Christian

186

in tbยง MeJd^m

Reformed

Churches of America


Michigan's

Automobile

Oldest

STUDEBAKER DEALER

FRED'S CAR LOT

VENHUIZEN AUTO CO.

G u a r a n t e e d Used Cars a n d C a m p i n g Trailers

17 West 6th St.

Phone 9292 HOLLAND

DECKER CHEVROLET, Inc. Sales and Service

Q u i c k Service on A l l Makes of Cars

MAIN AUTO SUPPLY

Barber

Shops HOLLAND

CENTRAL BARBER SHOP

MOTOR

"CHUCK"

Jobbers

RELIABLE

SUPPLY, Inc. and

Distributors

POST'S BARBER SHOP Phone 3 1 3 9 HOLLAND

WHITE CROSS BARBER SHOP

MICHIGAN

198 River A v e n u e

Authorized

Bakeries

Dealer

OLDSMOBILE

CADILLAC BARBARA JEAN BAKERY

G. M. C. TRUCKS SALES A N D

SERVICE

THE E. AND T. BAKE SHOP Guaranteed Used Cars

TRIUMPH BAKE SHOP

Complete Collision Service Genuine Parts All W o r k Guaranteed

Dry

Tires — Batteries — Accessories

Cleaners

Specialized Lubrication M o s t M o d e r n Building

and

IDEAL DRY CLEANERS

Equipment

Compliments

HENRY TER H A A R M O T O R SALES C O .

of

SUPREME DRY CLEANERS

71 1 Michigan Ave. — U.S.-31 Phone 6 5 9 5

WEST MICHIGAN LAUNDRY

Holland

187


R. E. BARBER, I N C .

Banks

Where

Service

Is A Habit

FIRST NATIONAL BANK Deposits Insured to $ 5 , 0 0 0 . 0 0

PEOPLE'S STATE BANK There's a Ford in your Future!

A C o n v e n i e n t a n d Friendly Place to Do Your B a n k i n g

• ZEELAND STATE BANK "You

Can

Always

Bank

On

HOLLAND'S

Us"

USED CAR HEADQUARTERS Book

Stores

Complete

Collision

BRINKS BOOK STORE

RETAIL WHOLESALE

FRIS'

HOLLAND

Service

C o l l e g e Textbooks a n d Supplies

Phone 3 1 9 5

UNITED MOTOR

1 59-1 63 River Ave.

Electric

SALES BOERIGTER APPLIANCE SHOP Exclusive H o t p o i n t Dealer

KAISER — FRAZER CARS

NELSON BOSMAN Radio a n d Sound

AND WILLYS-OVERLAND PRODUCTS

DE FOUW ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. Merchandising —

DOZEMAN

Complete

Contracting

REFRIGERATION

SALES A N D SERVICE

One Stop Service ESSENBURG ELECTRIC CO.

723-733

HOLLAND RADIO & APPLIANCE CO.

M I C H I G A N AVE.

188


Building

Supply

and Hardware

Furniture

CORNER HARDWARE

JAS. A. BROUWER CO. FINE FURNITURE

ESSENBURG BUILDING & LUMBER CO.

Compliments

of

BAY VIEW FURNITURE CO.

HOLLAND LUMBER & SUPPLY CO.

GEBBEN'S FURNITURE STORE

GEORGE M O O I ROOFING CO.

THE JOHN G O O D COMPANY

NIES HARDWARE CO.

Hotels Compliments

of

HOTEL NETHERLANDS

PLAGGEMAR'S HARDWARE

Compliments

of

THE WARM FRIEND TAVERN

TEERMAN HARDWARE CO.

Compliments of

VANDENBERG

AUTO

SALES

COMPANY

CHRYSLER — P L Y M O U T H

Sales and

MAYCROFT

&

MAC

Service

EACHRON

Home of Lincoln and Mercury

MOTOR

SALES

in Holland 16-22 W . 7th STREET

Phone 6 - 6 7 6 8

189


BUICK

PONTIAC Clothing

TER H A A R A U T O Sales and

Stores

CO.

Service

ALEXANDER'S DEPARTMENT STORE For Men, W o m e n and Children

G O O D WILL USED CARS

150 E. 8th St.

P. S. BOTER CO.

Holland, Mich.

Smart Men's W e a r

THE BOYS' SHOP

DU MEZ BROTHERS Compliments

Distinctive A p p a r e l

of FRENCH CLOAK SHOP BLUE B O O K

KEY HOMER HAYDEN'S

STORE

Smart Feminine Fashions

JEANE'S SHOP W a r m Friend Hotel

LOKKER-RUTGERS CO.

MARTIN STORES, Inc.

MORRIE'S W A S H I N G T O N SQUARE

A CUSTOMER Is Not Dependent W e Are Dependent

J. C. PENNY CO.

on Us on Him

RUBY'S APPAREL SHOP W A S H I N G T O N SQUARE

OTTAWA

AUTO

SALES

VAUPELL'S MEN'S SHOP

Incorporated HOLLAND

MICHIGAN

190


Drug

Stores Compliments

of

DE LOOP'S DRUG STORE

HOLLAND DOESBURG DRUG STORE

Compliments

FURNACE COMPANY

of

FABIANO'S CONFECTIONERY

HANSENS DRUG STORE "World's

Your Rexall Drug Store

Largest Installers

of Furnaces" MODEL DRUG STORE

PECK'S DRUG STORE

SMITH'S DRUG STORE

WADE DRUG STORE

Jewelry

Shops

FOX'S JEWELERS & OPTICIANS

HEERSPINK'S JEWELRY & GIFT SHOP

POST JEWELRY & GIFT SHOP Diamonds — Watches —

China

VANDENBERG JEWELRY

Warm of

WILLIAMS JEWELERS

191

Friends

Hope College


H E K M AIM'S

Grocers

DUTCH RUSK The Rusk Supreme

BUTER'S GROCERY

Look for the DUTCH BOY

J. & H. DE JONGH, GROCERIES

O n Every Package

DRAPER'S MARKET

Compliments

T. KEPPEL'S SONS Esf.

of

ECONOMY I.G.A.

1867

J O H N VANDER BROEK, Prop.

EL'S FOOD MARKET FUEL —

BUILDER'S SUPPLIES

PAINTS a n d WALLPAPER

HASKIN'S GROCERY

Holland 63 EAST 8TH ST.

Phone 2838

HULST SUPER MARKET

H. P. KLEIS, GROCERIES

CHARLES R. SLIGH C O .

PRINS I.G.A.

HOLLAND, M I C H I G A N Compliments

of

STEFFENS FOOD MARKET

V A N RY'S GROCERY

Compliments of

DU

SAAR

PHOTO

& GIFT

SHOP

10 East Eighth Street HOLLAND,

KODAKS

AND

FRAMING

MICHIGAN

.PHOTO AND

192

FINISHING GIFTS


Compliments

RUSSELL A .

Compliments

of

KLAASEN

VISSCHER

Realtor GENERAL

INS.

INSURANCE

36 West 8th St.

of

BROOKS

AGENCY

Phone 3 5 6 6

ALL TYPES Insurance

and

Real

Compliments

of

OF INSURANCE

Estate

SIMON BORR AGENCY

EQUITABLE LIFE INS. CO. of IOWA R. Van Eenenaam — L. Venhuizen

The FRANKLIN LIFE INS. CO. W . J. Olive — K. V. De Pree — E. A. Stegink

HOLLAND INSURANCE AGENCY Bruce G. Van Leuwen

GALIEN AGENCY ISAAC KOUW REALTY CO., Ltd.

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE

BENJ. LEMMEN AGENCY

16 West 8th St.

MARSILJE INSURANCE AGENCY

HOLLAND, M I C H I G A N

The NORTHWESTERN MUT. LIFE INS. CO.

Best Wishes to the Graduating Class

Arthur A. Visscher and Peter Marcusse

Compliments

of

HENRY OOSTING, REALTOR

MC

BRIDE I N S U R A N C E AGENCY

RAVEN-KRAMER-RAVEN Phone 2 7 4 7

The ROBERT F. TOPP AGENCY 193

194 River Ave.


We Are Proud to Have

Professional

Hope College as Our Neighbors

E. J. BACHELLER, D.C., P.h.C.

F. F. DE WEESE, D.D.S.

BAKER

W . HOEKSEMA, D.D.S.

FURNITURE, INC. C. L. LOEW, D.D.S. J. A. LUBBERS, D.D.S. • H. J. MASSELINK, D.D.S. S. S. TIESINGA, D.D.S. Makers of T. V A N HAITSMA, D.D.S.

Manufacturers

of Distinctive

Connoisseur Furniture

Furniture

C. V A N RAALTE, D.D.S.

XVierda NELSON H. CLARK, M.D.

UPHOLSTERING C O M P A N Y 153 W e s t 10th Street

H. D. DE VRIES, M.D.

Telephone 9789

Custom Recovering

— Reupholstering

DR. JOHN PIEPER, O.D. Compliments

of

R. H. SCHAFTENAAR, M.D. Compliments

of Compliments

DR. O. V A N DER VELDE, M.D.

HOLLAND HITCH CO. HOLLAND, M I C H I G A N

0

of

DR. JOHN K. WINTER, M.D.

>—1J0CSS0

DR. W M . G. WINTER, M.D.

194


Restaurants

Compliments

VOGUE

CUMERFORD'S RESTAURANT

of

RESTAURANT

MIKE and KAY

HAD'S SANDWICH SHOP AND SODA BAR HOFFMAN'S RESTAURANT

205

River Ave.

Phone 2 8 9 4

PARK VIEW LUNCH STAR SANDWICH SHOP

"The

Music Stores

Best In Home Cooking"

FIFTH WHEEL RESTAURANT

Compliments

of

MEYER MUSIC HOUSE

24 Hour Service

NETHERLANDS RECORD AND GIFT SHOP

7 0 0 M i c h i g a n Ave.

Phone 9 1 4 5

Industries

DUTCH

MILL

THE DE PREE COMPANY Manufacturers

of "Wheatamin"

Vitamin

Products

RESTAURANT Completely

GEERDS-VELTMAN, INC

Air Conditioned

HOLLAND CITY BOTTLING WORKS OUT OF THE ORDINARY FOODS

Drink " S q u i r t " Largest Selling Grape Fruit Drink in the W o r l d

SERVED WITH REAL HOLLAND HOSPITALITY

HOLLAND TRANSPLANTER CO. BANQUET ROOM FOR PRIVATE PARTIES ENJOY OUR EXCELLENT MEALS

WESTERN FOUNDRY CO.

DAILY AND SUNDAYS

Holland, Michigan

Paul A. Van Raalte, Owner

Telephone

Shoe

2587

5 W . 8th STREET

Repair

THE ELECTRIC SHOE HOSPITAL

HOLLAND

FAASEN'S RED LINE REPAIR

195


Church

Directory DUTCH B O Y BAKING COMPANY

BEECHWOOD REFORMED CHURCH REV. J O H N BENES

Movers of Dutch Boy Bread •

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH REV. KENNETH J. HOFFMASTER

FIRST REFORMED CHURCH

RELIABLE CYCLE SHOP

REV. BASTIAN KRUITHOF

BICYCLES FOR SALE OR RENT

FOURTH REFORMED CHURCH

Locks Repaired Keys Made

REV. HENRY V A N DYKE

VISIT OUR TOY DEPARTMENT Entire 2nd Floor

2 5 4 River Ave.

HOPE REFORMED CHURCH

Phone 7 6 0 3

REV. M A R I O N DE VELDER

MAPLE AVENUE Compliments

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH

of

REV. GARETH S. KOK

BULFORD Portrait

S T U D I O

Photography

MAPLEWOOD REFORMED CHURCH REV. JAMES BAAR

52 East Eighth

Phone 9 6 0 8

SIXTH REFORMED CHURCH REV. HENRY M O U W

DYKSTRA FUNERAL H O M E

THIRD REFORMED CHURCH

Funeral Directors

DR. J. J. SESSLER

GILBERT V A N DE WATER, Mgr. JULIUS KLEINHEKSEL

TRINITY REFORMED CHURCH

Call 2348 29 East 9th St.

REV. HENRY TER KUERST

HOLLAND

196


Miscellaneous

ANDES CANDIES

Compliments

of

ZEERIP'S DRIVE I N N BORR'S BOOTERY FINER SHOES FINE FOODS MALTEDS A N D SUNDAES

CARLEY AMUSEMENT CO. HOLLAND

CENTER

KoWaS

PARK

M - 2 1 — W e s t Limits

HOLLAND BOOK BINDING CO.

ZEELAND, M I C H I G A N

HOLLAND PRINTING CO.

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO. Compliments

of

NIEBLINK-NOTIER FUNERAL CHAPEL

H E R M A N MILLER CLOCK C O . ZEELAND

SEARS' ORDER OFFICE

[

SUPERIOR SPORT SHOP Holland's

Athletic

Headquarters

WARM FRIEND FLOWER SHOP

197


"Success is doing the common thing uncommonly well"

HERTEL

INSURANCE

29 East 8th Street

Beauty

Phone 2120

Shops

Hatcheries

PERSONALITY BEAUTY SALON

BRUMMER AND FREDRICKSON Poultry Farm and Hatchery

ROSE BEAUTY SHOPPE WARM FRIEND BEAUTY SHOP

CENTRAL FARMS HATCHERY

YE BEAUTY SHOPPE

LEMMEN LEGHORN FARM

Compliments of the

COLISEUM

SKATING

RINK

East Main Street at City Limits ZEELAND

198


Everything

From Our House

For Your "Home" Compliments

of

ZEELAND HATCHERY ZEELAND, M I C H I G A N

INTERIORS By

FURNITURE HOUSE — ( O ) —

Fairbanks Avenue Holland, Mich.

J.

RELIABLE GARAGE

Phone 6 - 6 3 9 5

KLAASEN

PRINTING COMPANY DeSoto —

Plymouth

GREAT CARS FINE SERVICE SQUARE DEALING Heinie Strabbing

136 East Eighth Street HOLLAND, M I C H I G A N

Ray Roelofs

D O W N T O W N

N A S H

SERVICE

AL. DE WEERD, M a n a g e r

GULF GAS A N D LUBRICATION

NASH SALES A N D SERVICE

Across From Holland Theatre

2 2 4 Central Ave.

Phone 2 5 1 1

Phone 6 - 6 5 1 1 MICHIGAN

HOLLAND

199


Ifear Books and Tine Catalog Printing THE

ZEELAND

145 Main Street, Zeeland, Michigan

o i i l r c i l Western

PRINT ::

Phones: 3636 and 2698

• i g r c i v i i i g t

Michigan's

Leading

RAPIDS 2,

200

Photo-Engravers

17 LYON STREET, N.E. GRAND

SHOP

MICHIGAN

o .