Page 1


c

ZJhe

MILESTONE 19 2 6 PUBLISHED

ANNUALLY

by the

JUNIOR CLASS of

HOPE COLLEGE

WILLIAM

G . MA

Editor-in-Chief CLYDE

H. GEERLINGS Business Manager

AT


poreword OPE COLLEGE stands for H Purposeful Christian Education. Each year tKe instruction is ^iven with the intent that the studentry shall more and more nearly attain to this ideal. Daily activities and experiences reflect the persistent and sturdy growth of this influence. Herein we have tried to picture faithfully the activity and the "spirit" of the past year on Hope's campus. If we have failed, our labor accepts only the censure due inability. If we have succeeded, we seek no praise, we desire no commendation—we have only accomplished that which we set out to do.


(^ontents DEDICATION THE

COLLEGE

Scenes Faculty Classes Activities Music Societies Forensics Athletics Dramatics PREPARATORY SEMIN

ARY

HUMOR and ADVERTISEMENTS


J^)edication HTO the sons and daughters of Hope, the courageous, heroic souls, who, obedient to the Master's command, left their native soil to carry the message of peace to others; who, in their staunch, unwavering, faith, saw across the waters the ^reat task, which, if undertaken, would brin^ to their fellowmen the blessings and reward of an Eternal King, through Jesus Christ, we, the class of 1927, reverently dedicate this Milestone.


"QO

YE into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature." Mark

16:15.


Had Hope's sons and daughters carried with them telegraph wires as they went to India, these lines would reach every station of the Arcot Mission area, and beyond to Pasumalai in the south. And were the score of representatives now on the field to call P r e x y ' s home, news f r o m school, f r o m villages, and f r o m towns would be brought in. And if one listens carefully he may hear the "Hope Yells" lustily given by the Indian youth f o r there is an Alma Mater called "Hope" f o r him too, the witness of the interest of the Hope at home. But with each message comes the cry of the youth of India to the student body at Hope, f o r brotherhood and fellowship. Rising on the wave of national aspirations the youth of India seeks a solution f o r the problems that confront his Motherland, yearns to see her take her place among the nations, and desires the secret of greatness for his countrymen. In the person of Christ he sees the embodiment of his ideals, and seeks ways of applying the teachings of the Master to his national life. T h e leaders of the Christian Church are asking f o r men and women who are willing to stand with them in this quest and to give their best for the church and f o r the country. To the Hopeites comes the challenge not only as REV. L . H E K H U I S , P H . D . , ' 1 3 f r o m youth to youth, but f r o m a land where Hope's Vellore, India. sons and daughters have borne the burdens for nearly a half century. Lives are needed and willing hands welcomed to write the chapter of Hope in the land of India, now in the throes of nationalism, and self-expression. And Hope will not fail. She cannot for the spirit of Hope is onward to the task. Founded on prevailing prayer, fostered by sacrificial service, expanded by generous gifts, and surrounded by a cloud of witnesses in every land arising to call her blessed, our Alma Mater's future is bright as the promises of God, so long as she thus continues to serve the Church and the Christ as one of the main spiritual power-houses where ability in terms of character and of service is emphasized. Greater numbers, better equipment, higher standards, moral tone and spiritual environment, all are assured Hope College, because she hews to this line, reveres the faith of the fathers, traces the will and the wisdom of God displayed in Nature and in Grace, and determines at all costs to use every God-given means, both old and new, without stint of men or money, yet withal to the glory of God. Hope's emphasis on perfect physique, undoubted moral integrity, intelligence of the highest order, and a double portion of the "milk of human kindness" with character conformed to the Christ, will enable her students, as they confront the world, to endure grave dangers and hardships, and to meet with precision and with courage the unexpected and perplexing problems. By inculcating in them the "will to do right", and enabling character to control conduct, Hope's graduates, as the "scrub-Oak" of America, are stripped by the rising tide of new life within, and themselves come to fruition in service for which conscientious training in their Alma Mater has fitted them. T h e Church must enable Hope College to continue in the van-guard. "Excelsior" and "Spera in Deo" R E V . H . P . BOOT, A . M . , ' 0 0 continue to be Hope's mottoes, and no one will take her crown. Amoy, China.

Page

Eight


T h e greater the span of years is that separates us f r o m the day upon which we received our diplomas and bid farewell to our Alma Mater the greater becomes our appreciation of all that Hope gave us. Is this mere sentiment? Hardly. As our years and experiences multiply we more and more learn to discriminate between the things that are of value in life and those that are not. In our day the students were no more inclined to make the best use of their opporcunities than the students of the present generation—• and no less so. W e had our fun and did our work. W e criticized and we grumbied. W i t h it all each of us got a fair amount of what the curriculum offered. That, however was not the most valuable nor the most lasting part of our training. Youth is a time of spiritual questioning and of a seeking a f t e r the true meaning of life. This does not always appear on the surface. Yet it is there none the less. T o help its students to find a satisfying answer to these questionings has ever been a strong feature of Hope. T h e emphasis laid upon religious faith and upon religious activities has inspired ideals that have left their impress upon the world. T h e inspiration to religious L I F E and religious S E R V I C E stand out in my memory as the greatest achievements of Hope.

REV. D . C . R U I G H , A . M . , ' 9 6

Nagasaki,

Japan.

Because Hope College claims to be Christian I judge it by its missionary output, both in numbers and quality. Its missionaries may remain at home as ministers, or laymen or lay women, or come and join us at the front, but they must be missionaries, sent, under a mandate. A soldier can desert and risk the consequences but he cannot politely resign under fire, and get away with it. America refused the mandate over Armenia, but a Christian or a Christian college cannot so easily dispose of the Divine mandate. It is up to the students of Hope College thus to challenge the Church.

REV. J O H N V A N E S S , D . D . , ' 9 9

Basrah, Mesopotamia.

Page Nine


Alumni Song of '87

By DR. H . E . DOSKER, ' 7 6

Old Hope ! 1 hy sons around thee standing, Now raise thy banner high above. To thee a song they sing, To thee their tribute bring, A tribute of praise and of love. Chorus— Shout a shout, sons of Hope, like a bugle blast! "Alma Mater sempiterna sit!" Sing in jolly college lays Of our golden college days And the merry, merry life of the past. Ye host of ancient classic worthies. Whom we loved or hated with a will. Your lore is half forgot, But your memory is not, For your ghosts are haunting us still. As boys we dreamed of days before us, Of a distant longed-for "by and by"; But now, amid the strife Of a noisy carping life, W e look at the past and we sigh. ' Many a one is silent at the roll-call— Never more they'll cheer us on the way; But our love for them will last With the memories of the past. Of our careless and bright college days. In the past we loved our Alma Mater, Tn the present do we love her still; And we make a solemn vow, As we sing this lyric now. That our boys our places shall fill!


I The College I —• «•


W I N A NTS C H A P E L

Page Eleven


CARNEGIE GYMNASIUM

Page Twelve


^^

VAN

J

VLECK

HALL

Page

Thirteen


GRAVES LIBRARY

Page Fourteen


VOORHEES H A L L

Page Fifteen


THE Page Sixteen

CHAPEL

PORCH


FHCUIiTY


E D W A R D D. D I M N E N T , A. M., Litt. D., L. H . D.. LL. D. President

Page

Eighteen


F R A N K N. P A T T E R S O N Professor

of Biology

A L B E R T H. T I M M E R Professor of Preparatory History and Latin

B. University of New Brunswick, 1902 M. University of New Brunswick, 1904

A. B. Hope College, 1923

A. M. H a r v a r d University, 1907 Ph. D. H a r v a r d University, 1908

FREDA HEITLAND Instructor

in Preparatory

English

M A G D A L E N E M. D E P R E E Librarian

A. B. Hope College, 1922

Page Nineteen


G E R R I T V A N ZYL Professor

ALBERTUS PIETERS

of Chemistry Professor

College Pastor of Biblical Literature

A. B. Hope College, 1918 M. S. University of Michigan, 1920

A. B. Hope College, 1887

Ph. D. University of Michigan, 1922

A. M. Hope College, 1890 Western Theological Seminary, 1891 D. D. Hope College, 1924

MRS. E D I T H W A L V O O R D Matron

MARIAN VAN DREZER Instructor

in French

A. B. Hope College, 1918

Page Twenty


A L B E R T E. L A M P E N Professor

of Mathei)iatics

E P H R A I M J. Z O O K Professor of Latin and History

A. B. Hope College, 1911 A. M. University of Michigan, 1915

Ph. B. Wooster College, 1901 A. M. Chicago University, 1905

AIRS. I R E N E B. V E R H U L S T Instructor

in Preparatory and English

History

M A R T H A J A N E GIBSON Instructor

in English

A. B. University of Cincinnati, 1912 A. B. Hope College, 1911

A. M. University of Cincinnati, 1914

Page

Twenty•(


EGBERT WINTER Professor

of Education

A. B. Hope College, 1901

J O H N B. N Y K E R K . Dean of Men Professor of English Public Speaking

and

A. M. University of Michigan, 1912 A. B. Hope College, 1885 A. M. Hope College, 1886 O x f o r d University ( E n g l a n d ) , 1906-1907

CLARENCE KLEIS Professor

MRS. W. H. D U R F E E

of Physics Instructor

Dean of Women in French and Dramatics

A. B. Hope College, 1919 A. B. University of New York, 1908 A. M. University of Wisconsin, 1917

Page

Twenty-two


GARRETT VANDER BORGH of Preparatory Professor Mathematics and Physics

T H O M A S E. W E L M E R S Professor

Registrar of Greek Language Literature

and

A. B. Hope College, 1920 A. B. Hope College, 1903 A. M. Hope College, 1906 B. D. Princeton Theological Seminary, 1906

LAURA ALICE BOYD Instructor

in German

ANNE EIKENHOUT Instructor

in French

A. B. T a r k i o College, 1906

A. B. Ohio State University, 1925

A. M. Missouri State University, 1907

B.Sc. in Education Ohio State University, 1925

Page

Twenty

three


P A U L E. H I N K A M P Professor

of Psychology

and Philosophy

I R W I N J. L U B B E R S of English Professor Coach of Debate

A. B. Hope College, 1907 A. M. Hope College, 1907 B, D. McCormick Theological Seminary, 1914

A. B. Hope College, 1917 . Columbia University, 1922 Pi Kappa Delta

B R U C E M. R A Y M O N D Professor

of History

A. B. University of Nebraska, 1922 A. M. University of Nebraska, 1923

C O R N E L I U S B. M U S T E Educational

Secretary

A, B. Hope College, 1914 A. Mi Hope College, 1917 New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1917

Page Twenty

four


HOSPERS

Senior Class The class of 1926 is about to sing its swan song. Dear old Hope with its kindly atmosphere of work and play! In our four happy years together we have grown to love our college and it is with a feeling of deep regret that we leave these halls. W e are about to enter a larger of our Alma Mater have become a has become our purpose. W e will For although the road to attainment ney Hope's light shall glow."

field with a larger responsibility. The ideals part of our inmost selves. Hope's purpose swerve neither to the right nor to the left. is rugged and steep, "Yet, over all the jour-

OFFICERS

Page

President

CORNELIUS A .

HOSPERS

Vice-Presidcnt

...JAMES

VER

MEULEN

Secretary.

.MILDRED

E.

Treasurer.

...BARNARD

Twenty-six

RAMAKER M.

LUBEN


GERRIT J . KEMME

Zccland, 'Michigan

"Witty to talk ivith." Science Course. Knickerbocker; Science Club; Pre-Medic Club; H . K. K., Secretary. DENA NETTINGA

Perkins,

loim

"IVhcn thought is spcech and specch is truth." Classical Course. Dorian, Pres. '25; Y. W . C. A. Cab. '26; Gospel T e a m '25, '26; Student Vol.; Sweater Club; House Com. LILLIAN E . SCOTT

Grand

Rapids,

Michigan

"I have that ivithin which passcth show." Modern-Language English Course. Grand Rapids Junior College '23. '24; Sorosis; Gospel Team '25, '26. CHESTER L . YNTEMA

Holland,

Michigan

"Your name is great in mouths of wisest censure." Science Course. Fraternal, V - P r e s . '26; Valedictorian; MILESTONE Editor-in-Chief '25 ; Science Club; Pre-Medic Club, Pres. '26; Orchestra, Pres. '25. ADRIAN F . ZWEMER

Holland,

Michigan

"Howe'er it be, it seems to me. 'Tis only noble to be good." Science Course. Knickerbocker; Men's Glee Club; Pre-Medic Club. A N N A BARKEMA

"She is a winsome zvee thing!" Modern-Language English Course. EDYTHE KLERK

Holland,

Michigan

Delphi; Girls' Glee Club '24-'26. Grand

Rapids,

Michigan

"We attract hearts by the qualities we display." History Course. Delphi; MILESTONE Staff A u x . '25; Girls' Glee Club; Sweater Club; Drama Class Play '25. F. ELLIOT WEIER

Flushing,

New

York

"No life can be pure in its purpose and strong in its strife And all life not be purer and stronger thereby." Science Course. Knickerbocker; MILESTONE Staff '25; Staff '25; Science Club; Pre-Medic Club.

Page

Anchor

Twenty-seven


RICHARD H . HAEKEMA

Holland,

Michigan

"He hath a daily beauty in his life." Science Course. Cosmopolitan, V - P r e s . '25. HARRIET J . VANDERBUSH

Baldwin,

Wisconsin

"Of what authority and shozv of truth." Modern-Language English Course. Dorian, Pres. '26; Y. W . C. A. Cab. '26; Gospel Team '25, '26; A. D. D . ; Drama Class Play '26; House Com. '24; House Pres. '26. HERMINA E . REINHART

Archer

Iowa

"There buds the promise of celestial worth." Modern-Language English Course. Y. W . C. A. Pres. '26; Gospel Team '25, '26; Student Vol.; Anchor Staff '25; Sweater Club. FRANKLIN J . H I N K A M P

Waupun,

Wisconsin

"In thy face I see the map of honor, truth and loyalty." History Course. Knickerbocker; Y. M. C. A. Cab. '26; Gospel Team '23-'26; Home Vol.; Men's Glee Club; Band. RUSSELL R . NYKAMP

Zeeland,

Michigan

"Genteel in personage." Science Course. JEANNETTE VELDMAN

GrandviUe,

Michigan

"As constant as the Northern star." Science Course. Sorosis ; Y. W . C. A. Cab. '24, '25 ; Gospel Team '26; Student Vol.; State Student Vol. Council '25; Cor. Sec'y Michigan Student Vol. Union '25 ; Student Council '25 ; MILESTONE Staff '25; Sweater Club; A. D. D . ; Athletic Board '25, '26; House Com. '23; S. G. A., President. ROSALIND M . O'LEARY

Holland,

Michigan

"I zvould study, I would know, I would admire forever." Modern-Language English Course. S. G. A., Secretary-Treasurer GEORGE GLAZAT

"Men of feiv words are the best men." History Course.

Page

Twenty-eight

Grand

Haven,

Michigan


MALCOLM DULL

Muskegon,

Michigan

"A man of good repute, carriage, bearing and estimation." Science Course. Emersonian, Pres. '26; Chemistry Club, Pres. '26. MILDRED E. RAMAKER Cedar Grove, Wisconsin "One who excels the quirks of blazoning pens." History Course. Delphi, V - P r e s . '25; Y. W . C. A. Cab. '26; Gospel Team '25, '26; Anchor Staff '25; A. D. D . ; Dramatic Club '24; House Com. '25. DOROTHY E . VANDER K O L K

Zeeland,

Michigan

"The noblest mind the best contentment has." Modern-Language English Course. Dorian. DWIGHT B. YNTEMA

Holland,

Michigan

"He zvho thinks for hinisclf is a free man." Mathematics Course. F r a t e r n a l ; Class Pres. '25; Debating Team '25; Mgr. '26; IIKA ; Anchor Editor-in-Chief '25; Science Club. G. MARION DE YOUNG

Orange

City,

Iowa

"Ambition has no rest." Science Course. Cosmopolitan, V - P r e s . '26; Pre-Medic Club; Men's Glee Club; Orchestra ; Band. MARGARET M . ANDERSON

Kansas,

Ohio

"Happy am I, from care I'm free." Modern-Language English Course. Sorosis, Pres.'26 ; Drama Class Play'25. LEONA SITHES

"The merit of originality is not novelty, Modern-Language English Course. Team '26; Sweater Club. THEODORE ESSEBAGGERS

Holland,

Michigan

it is sincerity." Dorian, Pres. '22; Muskegon,

Debating Michigan

"No jtar ever rose and set ivithout influence somewhere." History Course. Cosmopolitan, Pres. '25; Class Pres. '24; Debating Team '25, '26; ITKA; Y. M. C. A. Cab. '25, Pres. '26; Pres. State Student Council Y. M. C. A. '25-'26; Gospel Team '25; Student Council '24; Anchor Staff '24; Football '23-'25 ; Reserve Football '22; Reserve Basketball '22-'24; Monogram Club.

Page

Twenty-nine


CORNELIUS A . HOSPERS

Chicago,

Illinois

"Good sense which only is the gift of Heaven." Science Course. Cosmopolitan, Pres. '26; Class Pres. '26; Mgr. of Properties of P a g e a n t ; Student Council Pres. '26; MILESTONE Staff, Bus. Mgr. '25 ; Science Club; Pre-Medic Club; Orchestra ; Drama Class Play '26. WILHELMINA Bos Oak Park, Illinois "Those thousand decencies that daily flow from all her words and actions." Modern-Language English Course. Sibylline, Pres. '26; House Com. '26. EDITH D . BANNINGA

Grand

Rapids,

Michigan

"Thy spirit. Independence, let me share." Modern-Language English Course. D o r i a n ; Sweater Club. JAMES J . G-ALMAN

Hospers,

Iowa

"From toil he wins his spirits light." History Course. Cosmopolitan; Pre-Medic Club, Pres. '25 ; Drama Class Play '26. ALBERT SCHAAFSMA

Sangatuck,

Michigan

"When I am not walking, I am reading." History Course. Emersonian, V - P f e s . '26; Y. M. C. A. Cab. '25; Drama Class Play '26: Stage Mgr. '25; T r a c k '22. A N N A M . MEENGS

Holland,

Michigan

"The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good." Modern-Language English Course. Sorosis, Pres. '26; Y. W . C. A. Cab. '26; Gospel Team '25, '26; Student Council '23; Anchor Staff '25 ; Sweater Club; A. D. D . ; Drama Class Play '25. NELVINA WASSENAAR

"So active, so inquiring eye." Modern-Language English Course. '24-'2S ; Sibylline. MARION PENNINGS

Holland,

Michigan

Redlands University, California Orange

City,

Iowa

"Exceeding zvise, fair spoken and persuading." Classical Course. Cosmopolitan, Pres. '26; Gospel Team '24, '25; Student Vol., Pres. '26; Men's Glee Club; D r a m a Class Play, Bus. M g r . '26.

Page

Thirty


GEORGE H .

DAMSON

I-TNIIN„J

MR- ; •

"A man he zvas to all the country dear" ' H l s t ° 7 Course. Fraternal, Pres. '25; Class Pres. '22: Gosnel Team •25; Football '22-;25, M g r . '24, Capt. '25; Baseball ' 2 3 T A t W e t k N H

. Club A

V

E S ( '

I)

4

^T,C

B O A R D

OF

CONTRO1

'26; M o n o g r a m

Yellmaster 2 3 - 2 6 ; Dramatic Club; D r a m a Class Play '26

N N E WESTERHOFF

Glenn

Rock.

New

Jersey

Ihy smile and frown are not aloof from one another." Modern-Language English Course. Delphi, Pres. '25 ; D r a m a Class J- K o s s - Bradley, Michigan Cremime good taste consists m saying much in a few words." Modern-Language English Course. Western State N o r m a l ; Chicago University; Sorosis. " C ; ®osc« Holland. As a wit, if not first, tn the very first line.'3 Mathematics Course. F r a t e r n a l ; Dramatic Club.

ELBERT L . K I N N E Y . .

Kalamazoo,

Michigan

Michigan

J o put a girdle round about the world." History Course. Emersonian, Pres. '25; Y M C A Cab '25 V - P r e s . '26; Student Vol., Pres. '25; Track' '21-25,' Capt. '24 25 ; Athletic Board '26; Monogram Club; Drama Class Play 25. GLADYS J . KLEINHEKSEL. . _.

Holland,

Michigan

A peace above all dignities, a still and quiet conscience." Science Course. Student Vol. ANNA

M . TYSSE . . . .

Holland,

Michigan

I he power of thought, the magic of the mind." Modern-Language English Course. Sorosis, V - P r e s . '25; Debating Team '26; Student Council '24; MILESTONE Staff '25 • AnchorStaff '25; A. D. D. EVERETT D E W I T T

Him of the Western Dome." Modern-Language English Course. ensian.

Prairie

View,

Kansas

Grundy College '20-'22; Dick-

Page

Thirty-one


PAUL GEBHARD

Mount

Vernon,

New

York

"His heart was one of those which most enamour us." Modern-Language English Course. Fraternal, V - P r e s . '25; Bus. M g r . of P a g e a n t ; Y. M. C. A. Cab. '25; Gospel Team '23-'2S; Reserve Basketball '22, '23 ; Tennis Mgr. '23; Dramatic Club. BETTY . F . STEGENCA

Grand

Haven,

Michigan

"Her life ivas earnest work." Modern-Language English Course. Sweater Club. Lois G. BROCKMEIER Grand Rapids, Michigan "Poetry is itself a thing of God." Classical Course. Dorian, V - P r e s . '25; Author of the Pageant of 1926; Anchor Reporting Staff '25; Sweater Club: House Com. '26; S. G. A., Vice-President. NORMAN E . VANDER H A R T

Holland.

Michigan

"He sees with eyes of manly trust." Modern-Language English Course. Knickerbocker, V - P r e s . '26: Anchor Staff '24; Orchestra; Football '22-'25 ; Monogram Club: Drama Class Play '25. EDWARD J . FIELDHOUSE

Oak

Glen,

Illinois

"Music exalts each joy, allays each grief." Science Course. Knickerbocker ; Chemistry Club; Pre-Medic Club; Orchestra. BARNARD M . LUBEN

Coopersville,

Michigan

"A person possessed of these qualities is truly agreeable." Classical Course. Emersonian, V - P r e s . '25: Home Vol.. Pres. '25; Track '23-'25, Mgr. '24; Athletic Board '25; Monogram Club. FREDERICK H . OLERT

Holland,

Michigan

"Ease with dignity." Classical Course. Knickerbocker; General Director of Gospel Team '25; Home Vol. CHARLES D . VELDHUIS

Pageant;

Holland,

"A man of sovereign parts he is esteemed." History Course. Addison; Debating Team '26; IIKA.

Page

Thirty-two

Michigan


ANTHONY V A N ZVL S M I T H

Holland,

Michigan

"It is not ease bit! effort that makes men." Science Course. Pre-Medic Club. RUTH

M . NIBBELINK

Holland,

Michigan

"The most manifest sign of ivisdom is continued cheerfulness." Mathematics Course. Sorosis; MILESTONE Staff A u x . '25; Drama Class Play '26. KATHERINE E . TYNER

Holland.

"Dear, near and true." Modern-Language English Course.

Michigan

Sibylline, Pres. '25.

ALONZO WIERENGA

Fulton,

Illinois

"Strong reasons make strong actions." Mathematics Course. Emersonian, V - P r e s . '26; Men's Glee Club; Band. PETER WESSELINK

Sioux

Center,

lozva

"In all thy humours, zvhether grave or mellow, Thou art such a touchy, testy, pleasant fellow." History Course. Cosmopolitan; Debating Team '25, '26: ITKA; Mgr. of Oratory '26: MILESTONE Staff '25; Anchor Staff '25: Athletic Board Treas. '26; H . K. K., President. SIPFUNG CHEUNG

Hong

Kong,

China

"For just experience tells, in every soil, That those that think must govern those that toil." Modern-Language English Course. Asburg College '22-'23; Addison, V - P r e s . '26; Student Vol. CARL COOK

Zeeland,

Michigan

"He nothing common did. or mean." Science Course. Cosmopolitan; Pre-Medic Club. ALVIN J . NEEVEL

IVaupun,

Wisconsin

"Virtue is bold and goodness never fearful." Modern-Language English Course. Knickerbocker, Pres. '26; Gospel Team '23, '24; Student Council '26; Men's Glee Club; B a n d ; H . K. K., Vice-President.

Page

Thirty-three


Ar

™LD ,C V,AN ^ y k Sioux Center, Iowa Here s a heart for every fate. Science Course. Emersonian, Pres. '26; Track '25 E

"r* Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind Modern-Language English Course. Girls Glee Club 26.

Hamilton, Delphi;

MARTHENA BAYLES

N e w

Michigan

Gospel

Brunswick,

Team

'25-

New

Jersey

Her air, her manners, all zvho saw admired" Modern-Language English Course. Sorosis, V - P r e s . '26' House Com. '23. PUSSELL M

BUITENDORP

. ..

Muskegon,

Michigan

A man the monarch of his mmd. History Course. Dickensian; Home Vol. CLARENCE A

HESSELINK

Oostburg,

Wisconsin

Let knowledge groxv from more to more." Classical Course. Addison, V - P r e s . '24; H o m e Vol. THEODORE G

VAKDEN BRINK

Holland,

Michigan

1 he world belongs to the energetic." History Course. Cosmopolitan, V - P r e s . '26; Football '22-'25 ; Basball 23- 26; Baseball '25, '26; Monogram Club. JAMES L .

POPPEN...

Holland,

Michigan

Action ts eloquence. Science Course. Fraternal, V - P r e s . '26: Science Club; Pre-Medic Club, Pres. '24; Baskeiball '23-'26; Baseball '23, '24, '26 • Monogram Club. ^T'^^nEL- •^•LBERS Hamilton, Michigan 'All kinds of arguments and questions deep." History Course. Calvin College: Northwestern University. Addison, Pres. '26; Raven Oratorical Contest, first place '25; M O L. Pres. '26; Debating Team '25, '26; IIKA, Pres. '26.

Page

Thirty-four


GERARD C. POOL Midh)id Park, Nczu Jersey "He is a great observer, and he looks quite through the deeds of men." History Course. Knickerbocker, Pres. '25; Class V - P r e s . '25; Y. M. C. A. Cab. '24; Home Vol.; Student Council '24; Anchor Bus. Mgr. '24, '25 ; Van Vleck House Pres. '26. GERALDINE D Y K H U I S E N

Chicago,

Illinois

"Ever charming, ever new." Modern-Language English Course. Delphi, Pres. '26. MABELLE R. DU MEZ Holland, Michigan "I zvould help others, out of a fellozv-fecling." Modern-Language English Course. Dorian, V - P r e s . '25; Y. W . C. A. Cab. '25, '26; Gospel Team '25, '26; Sweater Club; A. D. D., Pres. '26. RAYMOND J . FIELDHOUSE

Oak

Glen,

Illinois

"Real worth requires no interpreter." Science Course. Knickerbocker, V - P r e s . '26; Chemistry Club ; Men's Glee Club; Orchestra, Pres. '26; T r a c k '25; Monogram Club. Mich. HENRY Bos Hudsonville, "In action faithful and i)i honor clear." History Course. Western State N o r m a l ; Addison. GEORGE V . STEKETEE

Holland,

Michigan

"Worth, courage, honor, these indeed Your sustenance and birthright are." Mathematics Course. Knickerbocker; Football '24; Baseball '23'26; Monogram Club; Drama Class Play Stage Mgr. '26. JAMES H . VANDER V E N

Holland,

Michigan

"He zvas ever faithful in promise keeping." Mathematics Course. Addison; Gospel Team '23, '24; Men's Glee Club; Orchestra. TIMOTHY A . CRAMER

Muskegon,

Michigan

"A mind not to be changed by time or place." History Course. Knickerbocker; Debating Team '26; ITKA ; Gospel Team '25; Home Vol.

I

Page

Thirty-five


JACOB GEERLINGS. . . . . . . . .

Holland,

Michigan

He was wont to speak plain and to the purpose." Classical Course. A

DEL A I DE

DYKHUIZEN

Chieacjo,

Illinois

Lrrace that won who saw to wish her stay." M o d e r n - L a n g u a g e English Course. Delphi, V - P r e s '26 E

N A M

' S i ^

M o d e r n - L a n g u a g e English Course.

Zee{a d

"'

Dorian.

C M BEVELANDER New York W e s t Sayville, Deeper than ere plummet sounded." Science Course. A d d i s o n ; Gospel T e a m '23, '24; P r e - M e d i c Club. KENRY N Y B O E R . . . . . . . . . . . . Holland. Michigan Acts of virtue ripen into habit." History Course. Addison; Gospel T e a m '25; H o m e Vol • MILESTONE S'AFF 'ZS; Reserve Football '25; D r a m a Class Plav '25 M a g e M g r . 25. RICHARD P . MALLERY

Peek skill,

New

York

rrovi grave to gay, from lively to severe." History Course. Fraternal, Pres. '26: Debating T e a m '26- IIKA • Y. M. C. A Cab. '25, '26; Gospel T e a m '23-'25; H o m e Vol., Pres. 26; Anchor Staff '24; D r a m a t i c Club Play '24; D r a m a Class Play '25. A

" T •' Lafayette, Indiana Music do I hear? H i s t o r y Course. P u r d u e University '22-'23; A d d i s o n ; H o m e Vol • Anchor Reporting Staff •23-'25 ; Band. LF£R,Y

J

-, V A N D U I N E

Holland,

Michigan

I he glory of a firm capacious mind." Science Course. Science Club; P r e - M e d i c Club, Pres. '24.

Page

Thirty-sit:


JOHN P . DE BELL

Passaic,

Nczv

Jersey

"The habit of looking on the best side of every event." Science Course. Addison, Pres. '26; Anchor Staff '25; MILESTONE Staff '25; Pre-Medic Club, Pres. '26; H . K. K., Treasurer. SARAH A . FREDRICKS

Muskegon,

Michigan

"A sweet attractive kind of grace." Modern-Language English Course. Sorosis; MILESTONE Staff Aux. '25 ; Sweater Club; House Com. '25. KATHRYN

KEPPEL

"Charms strike the History Course. STONE Staff Drama Class

Holland,

Michigan

sight, and merit wins the sold." Sorosis, V - P r e s . '26; MILESTONE Staff '25; MILEAux. '24, '26; Anchor Reporting Staff '24, '25; Play '25.

EDWIN A . DE JONG

Hospers,

loiva

"Moderation is the center zvhercin all philosophies meet." Science Course. Dickensian, V - P r e s . '26; Pre-Medic Club; Band. HARRY DE VRIES

Holland,

Michigan

"The true, strong and sound mind." Science Course. Addison ; Science Club ; Pre-Medic Club. RUSSELL L . V A N DYKE

Holland,

Michigan

"My heart is true as steel." History Course. Knickerbocker, Pres. '25; Debating Team '25; IIKA ; Men's Glee Club. JOHN J . VER BEEK

Hamilton,

Michigan

"The reason firm, the temperate will." Science Course. Science Club. BERNARD H . SHOEMAKER

Holland,

Michigan

"IVho spoke no slander, no nor listened to it." Science Course. Addison, V - P r e s . '26; Science Club; Chemistry Club.

Page

Thirty-seven


j0

"T7 R wLBEff ' y '; Holland, Michigan The gods approve the depth and not the tumult of the <:oul" ' Science Course. F r a t e r n a l : Class Pres. '24; Raven Oratorical Ton 25, M O I , thirf p T . c ' T K T S s t s . c 0 " d place . H ,}• ' ' 24, 26; Gospel 1 eam 23, '25; Student Council 23, MILESTONE Staff 25; A u x . '24, '26;Science Club, Pres '26BasketbaH 23-26 Mgr. '25, Capt. '26: Baseball '23-'26 M g r ' 24; Monogram Club; M g r . Lecture Course '26. K

^ .

0 N

.

K;

LAEPPLE.

...

Holland.

otiaightforzvard and simple integrity" History Course. Delphi; Girls' Glee Club '26. C

Michigan

HartesveldtHolland, Michigan 'he heart to conceive, the understanding to direct:' Modern-Language English Course, Sorosis, Pres. '25; Y. W C A Cab. '26; Student Council '26; D r a m a Class Play '26 JAMES F . DE PREE

Siou.r

Center,

Iowa

Me was one of those men who possess almost every gift" Science Course Fraternal, Pres. '26; Class Pres."'23; Y M rf K

r< ? O S P E L

T

^AM

'23-'2S;

MILESTONE S t a f f

'25;

C A Science

Club, O r c h e s t r a ; Baseball '24-'26, Mgr. '25; Athletic Board 25; Reserve Basketball '23- , 25; Monogram Club NELSON H . CLARK

Holland,

Michigan

rerseverance gives power. Science Course. Science Club; Pre-Medic Club; Orchestra JAMES VER MEULEN . . . . . .

Wan

pun,'

Wisconsin

Honorable conduct and noble disposition make men great." History Course. Knickerbocker, Pres. '26; Class V - P r e s . '26B a n d ; Football '22, '24, '25, Mgr. '25; Athletic Board 'i4-'26' D r a m a Class Play '26. D ™ J" H u e n i n k - • • • •.••••;, Cedar Grove, Wisconsin Hath he not always friends? Classical Course. Addison, Pres. '25; Reserve Football '23 Athletic Board '26.

Page

Thirty-eight

">4 •


SENIOR

GIRLS'

ASSOCIATION

H O P E K U R F E W KLUB

Page

Thirty-nine


Connie

The Dw\l Boy

VVIC> VfonT

"BsAiUXow Own Cwoi

Page Forty


KIK

Junior Class The spirit with which the class of 1927 entered Hope and which it has since showed, has been steadily increasing. The enthusiasm and loyalty of its members in all class activities have been proved again and again. W h a t we undertake we see through to a finish! But underneath that strong class spirit is a deeper, broader love for the high standards and lofty ideals of Hope. As a class, we reach upward to attain our work in upholding those standards and in maintaining those ideals. May we prove ourselves still more worthy in the one remaining year we have to be active Hopeites.

OFFICERS

President Vice-President Secretary Treasnrers....

Page

Forty-two

JACOB M . WILLIAM WlLHELMINA

M. T.

KIK

TUTTLE SpRICK

I H E N R I E T T A J . BEYERS, P E T E R V A N E S I H E S T E R A . OSSEWAARDE, D . H A R R I S S M I T I I


JAY A. WABEKE Paige Club Sedan—"Fear no follies !" HARRIET L . HENEVELD

Holland,

Michigan

Holland,

Michigan

Jewett Touring—"A triumph we never dreamed could be so complete" CARL E . BOVENKERK

Chicago,

Illinois

Case—-"Delivering the results" MATHILDA KORVER

Alton,

Iowa

Maxwell Touring—"Strengthening its place in public regard" BERTRAM G. V A N ' T HOF

Hull,

Iowa

Dodge—"World wide good will"

HARTGER E . WINTER

Holland,

Michigan

Chrysler Coach—"Reflects training and experience" SUSANNE DRAGT

Sioux

Center,

loiva

Chandler Comrade Roadster—"A thoroughbred !" MATTHEW PEELEN

Buick—"Everyone includes Buick" HELEN E. VAN ESS Remy—"Spirit of excellence" J . WILLIAM PEELEN

Sioux

Center,

Gansevoort, Sioux

Iowa

Neiv

York

Center.

Iowa

Franklin—"Opened a vein of popular f a v o r "

Page

Forty-three


CLYDE H .

GEERLINCS

Holland,

Michigan

Durant—"Combining business and pleasure" S. ELIZABETH MOIR

New

York,

Nezv

York

Briscoe—"It's a doer" LEE DE PREE Autocar—"Bound to win"

Holland,

MABELLE A . COBURN

Michigan Michigan

Zccland,

Diana—"Long looked f o r " WILLIAM

G. MAAT

Fulton,

Illinois

Copeland—"Gives results and possesses qualities which are not combined in any other"

EDWARD H . WAGENAAR

Constantinc,

Michigan

Sherwood—"Quieter performance" HELEN

OLGERS

Holland,

Michigan

Chandler Brougham—"Real backbone" FRANK R . WORKMAN

Fulton,

Illinois

Studebaker Sedan—"Built for a long quiet life not for spectacular stunts" MAE HADDEN Wills Sainte Claire—"Matchless taste" ERVIN R . VANDER JAGT

Federal Knight—"Substantial"

Page

Forty-four

Holland, Cedar

Michigan

Grove,

Wisconsin


CLARENCE BERKOMPAS

Rudyard,

Michigan

Star—"Standards of workmanship" ELSIE PEETS

Michigan

Zeeland,

Premier—"Never fails to realize your highest hopes" PETER VAN ES Orange Maxwell Sedan—"Superiority both hidden and obvious" EUNICE E . BROCKMEIER

Grand

City, Iowa

Rapids,

Michigan

Packard Sedan—"Based on knowledge" GEORGE L A MERE

Winnebago,

Nebraska

Oakland Roadster—"Harmonic Balancer"

ALBERT N . DOAK

Amsterdam,

New

York

Dodge Sedan—"Sturdy w o r t h " CORNELIA A . NETTINGA

Holland,

Michigan^

Oldsmobile Sedan—"Search everywhere and you'll find none to compare" THOMAS T E N HOEVE

Paterson,

New

Jersey

Fiat—"Measures up in every detail" ARDEAN VAN ARENDONK

Schuylerville,

Neiv

Grand

Rapids,

York

Auburn Six—-"Tone of H a r m o n y " NEIL G. VAN OOSTENBURG

Michigan

Gardner—"So has the public f a v o r been written beyond our power to amplify or improve"

Page

Forty-five


LAWRENCE J . BORST

Grand

Rapids,

Michigan

White Motor Truck—"Dependability" HESTER A . OSSEWAARDE

Marion,

Neiv

York

Chandler Metropolitan Sedan—"Wins quick praise" JACOB M. KIK Overland—"Leading the parade of progress"

Grand Rapids,

CECILIA A . VER HACE

Michigan

Zecland,

Michigan

Mercedes—"You see, you admire it" HENRY G. BOVENKERK

Muskegon,

Michigan

Reo—"Closer limits of precision"

GERRIT VEENBOER

Zccland,

Michigan

Davis—"Thinking always of superior strength" ALICE C. IHRMAN

ffolland,

Michigan

Velie—"Never before has there been offered to you so much of quality and individuality" HAROLD W .

BEERNINK

Holland,

Michigan

Elcar—"By any test Elcar will prove its worth" MARY D . CROUCH

Albany,

New

York

Rollins—"Strikingly individual" WILLIAM R . BUITENDORP

Hupmobile Roadster—"Gains by comparisons"

Page

Forty-six

Muskegon,

Michigan


MELVIN B . LUBBERS

Holland,

Michigan

Oldsmobile Coach—"Performance that inspires confidence" CATHALENE MERSEN

Holland,

Michigan

Lincoln—"Reserve power for any emergency" VERNON D . T E N GATE

Holland,

Michigan

Nash—"Distinction all its own" ALICE PLASM AN

Holland,

Michigan

Studebaker Roadster—"A car for sunshine or rain" SILAS C. WIERSMA

Holland,

Michigan

International Truck—"Mechanical Excellence"

DONALD J . V A N ALSBURG

Holland,

Michigan

Cleveland Standard Sedan—"Flashing, dashing qualities" RUTH VAN

KERSEN

Holland,

Michigan

Kissel—"Proud to have in any company" GARRETT J . VANDER BERG

Sioux

Center,

Iowa

Piedmont—"Matchless and downright quality" R U T H A . HYMA

Holland,

Michigan

Moon—"Indefinable something" ADRIAN G. BUYS

Grand

Rapids,

Michigan

Duesenberg—"Built f o r action"

Page

Forty-seven


CORNELIUS TEN PAS Pontiac—' Stamina, roadability"

Clymer,

HAZEL F . LOKKER

New

York

Holland,

Michigan

Hudson—"The secret of life is living" MARIE

DE

COOK

Orange

City,

Iowa

Cleveland Special Sedan—"One of the most sought a f t e r " KATHERINE A .

VANDER VEERE

Holland,

Michigan

Apperson— "Not even a murmur of roughness" WILLIAM

BONNEMA

Cicero,

Illinois

Hupmobile Sedan—"A valuable contribution"

JOHN

J.

SOETER

Chicago,

Illinois

Cadillac—"The embodiment of the invigorating, zestful atmosphere of America" SIMON DYKSHORN

Ireton,

loiva

McFarland—"Tremendous resources" SANDRENE A . SCHUTT

Holland,

Michigan

Stutz—"Destined to be very popular" EGBERT H . FELL

Holland.

Michigan

Dodge Coach—"Unfettered vision on all sides" CORNELIUS W . MUILENBURG

Chalmer—"Acceleration more spirited"

Page

Forty-eight

South

Holland,

Illinois


4 GARRETT E . WINTER

Holland,

Michigan

Willys-Knight—"The eye-center and talk-center of the crowds" IMAN

SCHURMA\

Holland,

Michigan

Locomobile—"Implicit confidence in any situation" PEARLE E . LEENHOUTS

Williamson,

Nciv

York

Rolls Royce—"Leadership that is undisputed" RICHARD A .

JACER

Chicago,

Illinois

Daniels—"Capable of giving years of constant service" GERALD ELENBAAS

Holland,

Michigan

Aztac—"Meets today's standards"

W I L L I A M M . TUTTLE

IVatkins,

New

York

Chrysler Touring—"A new air of verve and exclusiveness" RAYMOND GOUWENS

South

Holland,

Illinois

A j a x — " A whale of a lot of power" M I N N I E HUNDLEY

Annville,

Kentucky

Pierce A r r o w — " F a r beyond the ordinary" KRYN W .

BAARMAN

Zecland,

Michigan

Stearns—"At home in any company" HENRY BURGGRAAFF

Decatur,

Michigan

Cunningham—"Counted upon to create a f u r o r "

Page

Forty-nine


FRANK JANSMA

.Morrison,

Illinois

Rickenbacker—"Where dignity and reliability are f o u n d " MARINUS G. MOGF.T.

Holland,

Michigan

Cole—"More enduring" R U T H L . MARCOTTE

..Holland,

Michigan

Jewett Coach—"A study in smartness" RAYMOND K . KLAASEN

Holland,

Michigan

Auburn Eight—"Inherent fineness" ABRAHAM

POTT

Holland,

Michigan.

King—-"It looks and performs the part of a true aristocrat"

RUTHERFORD G. HUIZENGA

Holland,

Michigan

Packard Limousine—"Conquest car" THEODORE W . LUIDENS

Holland,

Michigan

Yellow Taxi—"Always at your service" GLADYS MOEKE

Zeeland,

Michigan

Jordan Brougham—"Come on! Let's go somewhere" JOSEPH W . H Y I N K

Manhattan,

Montana

Roth—"Magna-power quality" A . FREDERICK STEKETEE

Holland,

Marmon—"A new aggressiveness and a new eagerness"

Page

Fifty

Michigan


JACOB P . DE W I T T

Hudsonville,

Michigan

Pilot—"Reflecting the latest t r e n d " D.

HARRIS S M I T H . . .

LaGrange,

Illinois

Stevens—"Will tell its own story to you in its own w a y " LILLIAN

SCHMID

Holland,

Michigan

Chrysler Phaeton—"Its greatest values cannot be copied" BRUNO BRUNS

Mescrvcy,

loiva

Paige Limousine—"Steps out of the beaten path" LESTER G. DROPPERS

Cedar

Grove,

Wisconsin

Chandler Coach—"Smooth, steady ease"

RUSSELL D . DAMSTRA

Holland,

Michigan

Dort—"It's balanced" WILHELMINA T . SPRICK

Grand

Haven,

Michigan

Phoenix—"Nothing could be added to make it more acceptable" Rov NATTRESS Studebaker Coupe—"Long dependable service"

Spencer,

FLORENCE DULMES

Adell,

lozva JVisconsM

Jordan Sedan—"Friendly companionship that grows with the passing days" RALPH L . MULLER

^

Grandvillc,

Michigan

Lexington—"Combines new refinements"

Page

Fifty-one


VIOLA COOK

Holland,

Michigan

Oakland Coupe—"Appreciation of its inner worth" WILLIAM O . WOLFINGER

Hopkins,

Michigan

Essex Coach—"A totally different type" HAROLD J . D E VRIES

Holland,

Michigan

Haynes—"Brings a freedom and ease" HENRIETTA J . BEYERS

Orange

City,

Iowa

Peerless—"Personality and charm"

CLARENCE C. DEN HERDER

Chevrolet— : 'Seen everywhere" MARGARET DE WEERD

Grand

ttapids,

Michigan Holland,

Michigan

Mercer—"I don't want to be ordinary" GERHARDT J . DECKER

Flint-

Page

Fifty-two

Rock

Rapids,

Iowa


V^wn- iarr, - Vujfvv

'3^o^ your ov>" horn

iuo-o-osiWiU

^aUered

Poof

Cfowde^ ienemeni

miev \or

•HpSBP

WK.

L^nd l.U^JEV5 ^|©WM

|)USS^

Png^ Fifty three


To Our Classmates A little less than a year ago the Class of 1927 elected members from their number to produce their

These men were empowered to select

MILESTONE.

others and thus form an Annual Staff.

These others, in turn, were granted the

privilege of selecting helpers thereby forming the

MILESTONE

Auxiliary Staff.

The members of these two groups are the workers who made this Annual, together with the aid of the students and faculty who contributed articles and who subscribed for the book and together with the advertisers who helped to make its publication a possibility. We, as a staff, have strived to construct a book of which our classmates would be justly proud.

W e have honestly tried to meet your highest hopes.

W e felt \he faith you placed in us.

Urged on by this thought we utilized our

ability and originality to the utmost.

Have we failed?

takes.

The book contains mis-

Imperfect workers cannot produce a perfect product.

tains ne;v and unusual features. joice in our work.

W e thank you for this opportunity.

It has tested our capacities.

W e hope the book

W e hope we have not failed you. THE

Page Fifty four

It has given us

It has made this year a constant period

of joy because we were working for you and your school. is well received.

W e re-

W e want you to rejoice with us.

To our classmates! confidence.

The book con-

Hard workers can produce results.

1927

MILESTONE

STAFF


D E RUITER

MULDER

Sophomore Class "There is one element, which is worth its weight in gold and that is loyalty." The class of 1928 demonstrates the worth of this maxim in its loyalty to "dear old Hope" and to the Sophomore banner. This spirit of loyalty, and perseverance was rewarded at the beginning of the year by victory in the "tug" from which the class received an impetus for the year. The Sophomore class has contributed both men and women to the athletic, scholastic and forensic fields. And so, in some measure, we have realized the success sought the first year at Hope. However, all laurels are not won and in the two remaining years at Hope, we aspire to attain greater prestige by loyalty to Hope and our classmates.

OFFICERS

First Semester

Second

PETER D E R U I T E R CLINTON

S.

President

COLE

Vice-President

E D N A R . COOK MARGARET BOTER

Secretary )

WILLIAM B. HUGHES F

Page

Fifty-six

Semester

JOHN

MULDER

ALICE V A N

HATTEM

GRACE A .

MCCARROLL

T

F J . JEANE H I N K E N

Measurers

F

j

Harry

B r o w e r


E.Achicrhof.

L.ftosiard.

H.AIbcrs.

GScbrcnda.

M.Beld.

M.Botcr

E.Douchcr.

J.Bouma

rl.O rower

G.Cliqucnnoi.

C-Damson

E Damstra.

D.Dckkcr

C.Dc Klein.

H.Dicphu'is.

FTDunnewoki.

A.Dc o c y

G.DcKoninq.

R.DYksfra

-

TBoot.

I.Bosmon.

G.Dovcn

R.Drink.

C.Cole

E.Cook

A. D c Grooi,

M. D e G r o o t

M.De Yang

H . D c n Herder

5.Dc Wcerd.

L.DeYounq.

L.riiqhf.

Mnip^c.

H.Frankcn.

Page Fifty seven


<â&#x20AC;˘ r

L-Geerjings.

E.Goodwin.

M.GOrdon.

H.Crorvd.

H.Guhl.

E.HilaridtfA.

C.HHf.

A.Hoan.

L.Hawkcns.

O.Heldcr.

H.Hcaaclink.

O.Molkcboer.

HKoumes,

M.Hondelink.

W.Huqhes.

A. H y m a

M-lnqharr

J-Kfoasen.

W.Klein.

L.Klcis.

R.Kleis.

HKollen

H.Kote.

W,Kotj>.

H.Kraal.

R.Japinqa.

E.Kammcraoii.

W.Ktcrk..

D.Kloo^cr.

i..Kuiper,

G.Morta.

Page Fifty-eight

CLMcCarro!!

JMcCarroM.

H.Maa^elink.

C.Mcnftnk.


j, Moodi-

M.Mod«ye.,

T. Moot

K.riook..

I..Morr)»on.

F. MOAC

G.riywcide-

L.Oilers

W.Oorni

ENienhuia.

j.nybo«r.

W.Oosterhoff.

CPat«r-

H.Pohfmcin

A.Popma.

C.roppe

I. Raven

KRcinhart.

R.Rifchic.

M.Boqcra.

MRooka.

G.Rorcboom

J-Schippcr.

M,3ickman

M.Siqsfaee-

H.Sluyier.

F<.atnim.

M.Smit

A.Stuarl,

J.Tcr, Brink.

A Ter Louw.

B.'fc winkfe

F-TcWi^kk.

H.Tc Winkle,

ATys^e

O.rtoUitr

Page

Fifty

nine


K.V'^ndcn ^ o s c h ,

O.Vtmdtr Kolk.

r>.Van Mabcm,

C.Vdn Bsufscm.

M^WakSron.

a.Wolyoord,

A-Vanacr V^rrf.

N.Von Raoue

R.y/iiisctmaori.

l_.Vandc Wtrtcr.

C.Van Tomeien

T'Wlbon,

A.Voin Halicm.

M.Van LOO.

J.vort Zyi

PVer Mccr

B-VVyma.

J-f.Zander.

Spring's Revelry As spring comes on with balmy days,, And trees bud out with life anew It seems that nature teems with praise So glorious is her retinue. The spring's fresh spirit is a theme From nature blended measures bound And like a copious, tumbling stream, The echoes of the wood resound. The leaves and boughs in perfect union. Move with the motion of the air. And flowers, upturned in rapt communion, The wonders of the wood declare. In all is seen a subtle artâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Which soars above man's work, a tower; For God has chosen to impart His kinship through the tree and flower. P. A. E., '29

Page

Sn-ty


raU

.

ri\p v

H4ev>Tfxds \\,

w

4 WrneA f)c»id.

I\in\.

tell Hp l^wry!

GBA Trnf -

lu|te[ Po^!

tv>.i A

FuW C^ip'w

Page

Sixty-one


T u g of War

W e won-

but we made them work h a r d !

Page

Sixty-two


>#7/7


MARTIN

V A N ZANDEN

Freshman Class " H e a r ye! Hear ye! Hear ye! Hope's court of Public Opinion is now in session." Chief Justice: "Judges, what of the Class of 1929?" First Judge: "Your Honor, the Class of 1929 entered Hope with a spirit that has never been surpassed. They at once won the respect of the students and faculty of this college. They are the largest and the best class that ever Hope has seen." Chief Justice: "But how does the Class of 1929 show its spirit?" Second Judge: "Your Honor, of Hope's football men, fifty per cent are Frosh. Four Frosh were on the first team. Of the basketball squad, forty-five per cent are Frosh. There were five Frosh on the first squad. In the musical organizations twenty-five per cent are Frosh. The ability of the Class is recognized by all who know their work." Chief Justice: "Can the Class of 1929 be trusted with Hope's banners and Hope's traditions?" Thh'd Judge: "Your Honor, f r o m the Class of 1929 will come leaders for Hope's every activity. From its ranks will come our orators, athletes, musicians, statesmen. They will respect and keep Hope's traditions and raise her banners high. The Class of 1929 will bring honor to the college." Chief Justice: "Judges, your words are good. May the Class of 1929 be successful, even as other classes have been successful. May they be true to our emblems. May they leave their stamp on the college, that students in the future may say, 'This was done by the Class of 1929'." OFFICERS First

THOMAS VAN ZANDEN.... L A V E R N E J . VANDER H I L L S A R A H E . LACEY ROBERT J . H E M K E S

Page

Second

Semester

Sixty-four

. President Vice-President . Secretary . Treasurer

. . .

Semester

J. DEAN MARTIN BERNARD J . D E FREE L o i s C. H E I N Z PAUL R. VAN ESS


M.Barlow.

E.BcKkcn.

W.BMwick.

D.DIekkink

H.BIOemerj.

H.Boer.

O.Bolhuts.

A.Boone.

T; B o o n s .

H.Boone.

L-.Dosch

rc.Bremer.

E.Bnnk.

" Orokaw.

K.CampbcIl

H.Clark

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Sixty-five


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Sixty-six

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Sixty-seven


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Page Sixty-eight

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Sixty-nine


Arbor Day

Words of Earnestness

Old Glory Floats

Page Seventy


mmms


Armistice Day

OUR

BAND

T h e entire student body joined in a grand parade to celebrate before the Hope-Kalamazoo College football game on November eleventh.

L O T S OF P E P

THE

Page

Seventy-two

PRIZE FLOAT


Glory Day

T H E V I C T O R S HONORED

In spite of the inclement weather Hope students and faculty celebrated the M. O. L. victories.

" W i c h ' s " speech in chapel preceded the parade and class

parties were enjoyed in the evening.

:

=

I

SECTION OF PARADE

Page

Seventy-three


C.Hospers

C.NettincjQ.

C.Vcm Hartesveldl,

F, B o o n e

H.Albers

W . V a n d e Water.

A.Neevel

Student Council The purpose of the Student Council is to promote all student activities and to help build a bigger and better Hope. This year the Council has again sponsored the Honor Code and the Point System; both are proving effective. The financing of the Debating and Oratorical Leagues was also carried on by the Council. The Student Council wishes to thank the student body for the co-operation it has shown in the past year. OFFICERS President

CORNELIUS

Vice-President

A.

ALVIN

Secretary

CORNELIA

Treasurer

ROBERT

HOSITRS J.

A.

NEEVEL

NETTINGA

A.

RITCHIE

R E P R E S E N T A T I V E S

Senior

Class

Junior

Class

Sophomore Freshman

Page

Seventy-four

CAROL V A N

HARTESVELDT, A L V I N J .

CORNELIA A . Class Class

NEEVEL

N E T T I N G A , EGBERT H .

H A Z E L J . ALBERS, ROBERT A .

FELL

RITCHIE

FRIEDA BOONE, W I L L A R D L . V A N D E W A T E R


Page Seventy-five


Y. M. C. A. Cabinet President

THEODORE

Vice-President

ESSEBAGGERS

DELBERT L . K I N N E Y

Secretary

Roy

Treasurer

JACOB M . K I K

Personal

Work

Missions

PETER

School

Membership Publicity

Conference

Music and Gospel Team Preparatory Representative

Page

RICHARD P .

MALLERY

BRUNO

Social

Sunday

NATTRESS

Seventy-six

DE

RUSSELL D . CLYDE H . JOHN

BRUNS RUITER

DAMSTRA GEERLINCS H.

ALBERS

PETER V A N

ES

FRANKLIN J . H I N K A M P CLARENCE S. HOWARD


Y. M . C. A. In an out-of-the-way place which dates back to 18â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was recently discovered a sign welcoming men to the Hope Y. M . C. A. To-day that welcome is as strong as ever. The " Y " seeks to confront men with Christ; to create in men a desire to make Him real in their lives. On the campus we find the physical stimulus in the athletic; the intellectual in the academic;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the " Y " aims to provide the stimulus for the spiritual. With the realization of this aim comes the fellowship and brotherhood which characterize our Tuesday night meetings, where we meet on common ground. The spirit permeating all our work is, " T o Make Christ The King Of The Campus". The program of the " Y " extends beyond the campus, however. The Y. M. C. A. with the co-operation of the Y. W . C. A. conducts Sunday Schools in the outlying districts of Holland. Gospel Teams carry the Christian message to neighboring cities and villages which are in need of such influence. This year ten discussion group leaders were provided for the Michigan State Older Boys' Conference at Lansing, Michigan. The highest figure in our Mission work history was reached in supplying f u n d s for the Hope Hostel in India. This work is an Association Union project. One of the outstanding achievements of the year was realized during Prayer Week when Dr. F. F. Shannon of Chicago conducted the meetings. Hope enjoyed the privilege of holding the presidency of the Michigan State Student Council of the Y. M. C. A. during the past year. Every Monday night the Cabinet composed of thirteen men, meet in the " U p p e r Room" to conduct the Association's business, discuss campus problems, and seriously search for solution and guidance through prayer. Through the consecrated efforts of these men, the Association has been able to continue its worthwhile work for Christ's Kingdom.

Page

Seventy-seven


M.Ramoker.

H. Vanderbush.

M.Crouch.

H.Hencvcid

A. i hrman.

C.Van Hortgavcldf.

A.Kocmcii

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet President

HERMINA E . REINHART

Vice-President

m

Secretary Treasurer Religious

World

Fellowship

S

ELIZABETH MOIR

HENRIETTA J . BEYERS CAROL

VAN

HARTESVELDT

Publicity

MABELLE R .

M"S'C

HARRIET

Service

Employment

Seventy

L.

DU

eight

MEZ

HENEVELD

ALICE C. IHRMAN MARY D .

Gospel Teams Representative Preparatory

Page

NETTINGA

HARRIET J . VANDERBUSH

Meetings

SOC'AL

Social

Meengs

DENA

CROUCH

MILDRED E . RAMAKER A N N A KOEMAN


Y. W. C. A. Amid the rush and confusion of college life, there is always time for quiet thought and meditation. Only the girls who attend the regular Y. W . C. A. meetings know how the peaceful stillness of that twilight hour can rest the mind and refresh the soul. To many it is an hour of worship and of service. There soul communes with soul in prayer, heart is joined with heart in praise and minds are drawn together in a spirit of Christian fellowship. I he supreme aim of the \ . W . C. A. is to make "Christ the King of our campus . I o this end " Y " endeavors to instill within the life of every girl high moral and spiritual values, to strengthen her ideals, and to prepare her for Christian service. I he V W. C. A. carries its influences far beyond the campus. The three gospel teams are instrumental in bearing the message of peace and of hope to many in the neighboring towns. T he Christmas boxes which are sent to the various mission stations every year are the means of bringing to many children the realization of the true Christmas spirit. Then, too, the Y. W . C. A. together with the Y. M. C. A. at the annual Hope drive pledge their contributions for the support of missionary work abroad. So the Y. \V. C. A. is linked in an endless chain with men and women in all parts of the world for the good of all mankind.

Page Seventy-nine


H . Reinhart

WOMEN'S GOSPEL TEAMS H . Heneveld Meengs Morrison Du Mez Scott Albers Lokker Vanderbush Ossewaarde Olgers D. Nettinga Hinken Veldman Leenhouts Beyers Zander Schutt C. Nettinga

Ramaker

MEN'S GOSPEL TEAMS H o w a r d Hinkamp J. Albers Kuyper Holkeboer Luben Van Es V a n d e r V e n Ten Brink Damstra Kik Nattress Geerlings Bovenkerk Ritchie

Page

Eighty


Hogenboom Pennings Ooms Bruns Wiersma Kleinheksel Wilson Kinney D. Nettinga H. Olgers Cheung V. Cook Zander Beyers H. Heneveld Boucher Veldman

Student Volunteers "Go ye into all the world!" This was the last command f r o m the lips of the Master of men before He went to His heavenly home. It was not an empty command. The Gospel is not meant merely for a few nations but for every nation. W h e n Christ fed the five thousand He did not pass the food only to those in the front ranks but to all. "Go ye into all the world!" W h e n we consider the import of this statement we are amazed at the lethargy of the church. Every member of the church should have the missionary enterprise close to his heart. W e are convinced that if every Christian would take his share of the burden of carrying out the Lord's command, our motto, "The Evangelization of the World in This Generation", would be realized. "Go ye into all the world!" This command bears peculiar weight with us as Student Volunteers. W e have enlisted in the great enterprise to bring to the nations of the world the One Great Force without which all attempts of man to attain to supreme happiness and blessedness must ultimately fail. If the Lord wishes to use us there we purpose to serve Him in the foreign field to bring to them the dynamic messageâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Christ. OFFICERS President Vice-Prcsidcnt Secretary-T rcasurer

..MARION PENNINGS JEANNETTE VELDMAN PETER V A N E S

Page

Eighty-one


N. Van Raalte Nattress Franken Jager Luben Bossard Ritchie Borst Cramer L. Olgers Doak H . Hesselink Nyhof Mallery Grond W . Buitendorp Ten Hoeve De Ruiter Moedt

Home Volunteers Interested in the service of Christ through the ministry of the Gospel, we are banded together in this Society as those dedicated to a common cause. As we have realized more and more the greatness of our calling and the fact that the armor of the Christian servant must be put on with great care, sincere endeavor. and earnest prayer, we have taken this opportunity to become acquainted with our future task and to fit ourselves while in college for our life work. A very prosperous year has been enjoyed. W e can truly say that in this, the fifth year of the organization, the Home Volunteers have strived to realize the ideals we have set before us. O u r meetings have been delightfully interesting. O u r fellowship with each other and with God has strengthened our convictions and given us a greater zeal for our work. Interest in our calling has been deepened and its problems have become better known. May our cherished cause, in its triumphant onward march, be blessed and strengthened by God. OFFICERS

First Semester RICHARD P . MALLERY ROBERT A . R I T C H I E . . . T H O M A S T E N HOEVE.

Page

Eighty-two

Second .. .. President .... .. Vice-President .. Secretary-Treasurer

Semester

.BARNARD M . LUBEN R U S S E L L BUITENDORP ..ROBERT A . RITCHIE


Wagenaar

Van Duine Verbeek Fell Tuttle De Witt D. Yntema De Free Clark Kemme Huizinga C. Yntema

Albers DeVries

Shoemaker

Science Club To nurture the scientific attitude in the individual, whether he be meeting with his fellow Science Club members, or at work in the laboratory,â&#x20AC;&#x201D;such is the primary purpose of the Hope College Science Club. The essential qualification for membership in the Club is proved ability in and devotion to science. Members are regularly chosen from the science students of the Junior and Senior classes. The organization, necessarily, takes on many of the characteristics of an honorary science club. At meetings, which are held f r o m time to time, interesting scientific topics are discussed sometimes by the college science professors and sometimes by club members. These meetings, together with a "stag" in the spring, constitute the activities of the Science Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but the primary purpose is served in the everyday school work, the fostering of a scholarly scientific attitude. OFFICERS

President Vice-President Secretary. T reasurer

J O H N H . ALBERS CHESTER L . Y N T E M A . . . J O H N J . VERBEEK . . . N E L S O N H . CLARK

Page

Eighty-three


Vanden Bosch Wagenaar

De P r e e Sigsbee

Jansma Van Zyl

Bonnema Schurman Mosier Dull Shoemaker Tuttle

Chemistry Club The Hope College Chemistry Club is one of the most recent organizations on the campus. It was started in the year 1923 by the late Dr. Godfrey and has since that time been making rapid progress. Its membership consists of those persons who hope to make Chemistry their life work. Much praise is due Dr. Van Zyl whose undying interest has done much for the betterment of the club. Meetings are held every three weeks, at which numbers on chemistry are rendered by members and visiting speakers.

OFFICERS President Vice-President

Page

MALCOLM ,

IAMES F.

Secretary

WILLIAM

Treasurer

EDWARD

Eighty-four

M.

DULL

DE

FREE

TUTTLE

WAGENAAR


Clark Hyink Van Duine Kemme Dykshorn Vanderjagt Cook De Bell Berkompas Winter Klerk Pott Hospers Yntema De Young Popma Dejong

Galman

Pre-Medic Club The Pre-Medic Club is composed of college men who intend to study medicine. The Club was formed to promote good fellowship among the pre-medic group and to further the interest of its members in their chosen profession. Many instructive programs are given by the members throughout the year, and. when possible, the members attend local medical conventions to hear authorities lecture on their work. This year the charter members of the Pre-Medic Club graduate and they feel well satisfied with the organization they have founded because of the interest and enthusiasm it has aroused in its members for their life work.

OFFICERS

Second

First Semester CHESTER

L.

YNTEMA .

G. MARION D E CLARENCE

YOUNG

BERKOMPAS.

.... President .... .. Vice-President .. Sccrctary-Treasurcr

Semester

JOHN

P.

CORNELIUS

A.

SIMON

DE

BELL

HOSPERS

DYKSHORN

Page

Eighty-five


ATvsse.

D.Yntema.

R.Damstra.

RWesselink.

N.van Oostenberq

H.Reirfhart.

J.Ten B r i n k .

A.Meenqs.

S.Schutf.

7 J.Kik.

J.DeBell.

C.Bovenkerk, E.Weier.

G.Pool.

Anchor Staff Editor-in-Chief Associate Editor Associate Editor Head Reporter Campus News

D W I G H T B . YNTEMA A N N A M . TYSSE NEIL G. V A N OOSTENBERG JAMES T E N BRINK SANDRENE A . SCHUTT

Exchange Alumni Athletics Jokes Jokes Business

Assistant

Assistant

HERMINA

Manager Business

Business

Subscription

Pngc

Eighty-six

E.

REINHART

A N N A M . MEENGS RUSSELL D . DAMSTRA PETER J . D E BELL PETER W E S S E L I N K GERARD C. POOL

Manager

Manager

Manager

CARL E . BOVENKERK

JACOB M. KIK T . ELLIOT WEIER


A N C H O R REPORTING STAFF

Haan

H . Ossewaarde Ungersma Wiersma Keppel

L. Brockmeier ( J . Mulder)

H . Heneveld

The Anchor It is now thirty-nine years since the first Anchor went to press. For a time the paper was a monthly with decided literary aspirations; a change, however, was efifected in 1914 when the management decided in favor of weekly issues. During the past few years, the trend has been away f r o m a literary to a newspaper. Thus is a college publication forced to keep pace with its student subscribers. In the year that has just ended. The Anchor, as the students' weekly, has found its first duty to be that of a newspaper, reviewing for its readers the events of the past week and outlining the coming activities. If the Stafif could add here and there an artistic touchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;something to offset the drudgery of such routineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; they have felt happy indeed. But were this all a "paper" to do, its work would be futile. T h e Anchor Staff of '25 has tried to "sell" Hope College: first, to the students that they see beyond their cliques, a school unity and its advantages; then, to the Alumni and other friends who are interested, that they may feel justly proud of Hope.

Page

Eighty-seven


P.Leenhouis.

C.Geerlinq^.

E.Hoir.

RNattress.

M.Peelen.

G.Winter,

C.Mersen.

A.IHrman.

MILESTONE Editor-in-Chief

Associate

Editor

Literary

Editor

Subscription

Manager

Photography

Editor

Snapshot

Editor

Editor

Humor Athletic

Editor Editor

Typist

Page

W. 5 prick.

H.VanEss.

p . ^ E s

Staff WILLIAM

Manager Editor

Business Associate

Art

W.Maat

G.

MAAT

CLYDE H . GEERLINGS ALICE C. IHRMAN

ROY NATTRESS S . ELIZABETH MOIR

PETER VAN ES MATTHEW PEELEN

HELEN E. VAN ESS CATHALENE MERSEN

PEARL E . LEENHOUTS GARRETT E . WINTER W I L H E L M I N A T . SPRICK

Eighty-eight


Tysse

Albers Goodwin

MILESTONE AUXILIARY STAFF Luidens Keppel Hughes Peelen

Moedt Beyers

T h e 1 9 2 6 MILESTONE Again the Junior Class presents its MILESTONE. T h e first Htope College Annual appeared in 1905. Not until 1916 was another book edited, but since that time MILESTONES have appeared annually. Hope, like nearly all colleges in the land, makes a year book part of its college life. The object in publishing this Annual is threefold: "To bring the Alumni and friends into closer touch with the college; to foster and increase a feeling of unity among the students, and to advertise our beloved Hope." The staff of '27 hopes that this has been accomplished. To the merchants of Holland and of the vicinity we are deeply indebted. Their share in helping us was tremendous. During the early summer months Miss Jones of Holland took these beautiful scenic pictures which we have featured. Steketee-Van Huis Printing Company contributed both time and labor in cutting cardboard. Their co-operation is appreciated. The MILESTONE Auxiliary Staff merits much praise. William Peelen and 1 heodore Luidens assisted the Business Manager. Henrietta Beyers worked with the Literary Editor and William Hughes, assisted by Paul Van Ess, aided the Snapshot Editor. T o John Moedt we owe thanks for the uniform and distinctive printing, the society designs, and all the border line work. Others who contributed to the Art Department were Anna Mae Tysse, Earl Goodwin, Kathryn Keppel and John Henry Albers. The staff deemed it an honor and a pleasure to produce this ' 2 6 M I L E S T O N E .

Page Eighty-nine


Mulder Burggraaff Wabeke T e n Gate J. Albers V a n Dyke H . Heneveld Bruns T u t t l e C r a m e r Essebaggers Veldhuis Wesselink S. Albers D. Y n t e m a Mallery

Pi Kappa Delta The Michigan Gamma Chapter of the National Fraternity of growing.

IIKA

is steadily

During the past year a large number of new memhers have been added,

representing both Oratory and Debating.

With this increase in membership

the principles of Persuasion, Beauty, and Justice are carried in ever widening circles, bringing ever greater honors to our Alma Mater.

OFFICERS

President

Page

Ninety

STANLEY

Vice-president

..THEODORE

Secretary-Treasurer

RUSSELL

L.

ALBERS

ESSEBAGGERS VAN

DYKE


cgw


J O H N B. N Y K E R K , A. M., Litt. D.

Page Ninety-two


School of Music

MRS. A N N A MICHAELSON

Instructor

JOHN

LLOYD K O L L E N

Director

of Orchestra

in Voice

MRS.

D.

FENTON

Instructor in Voice Director of Glee Clubs

GEORGE L A M E R E

Instructor

GRACE

in 'Cello

OSCAR

Instructor

C . CRESS

in Piano

Page

Ninety-three


G. Moeke Van Kersen Van Ess Nettinga Sprick Morrison Ingham Weaver Klaasen Laepple Beyers M. Moeke Klerk Schutt Van Arendonk Albers Barkema

The Girls' Glee Club Due to the graduation of many members last year the Hope College Girls' Glee Club has undergone such a marked change in personnel, that in reality it is a new organization. The girls have realized that they have an enviable reputation to maintain, and in so far as it has been possible they have succeeded in maintaining it. The Club has not appeared as frequently before the public eye, as formerly, but the girls have spent much of their time practicing under the efficient directorship of Mrs. Fenton. Aside from giving concerts in several of the towns in our vicinity and singing in our local churches, no extensive work has been done. The girls feel confident of great success in the future, and believe that with a little more experience and practice they will be able to accomplish noteworthy achievements, and will have equaled, if not exceeded, the proficiency of the former club. Director

MRS.

WILLIAM

FENTON

OFFICERS President...

Viee-Presidcnt ^CCRETNI'X Treasurer..

Page Ninety-four

CORNELIA A .

WILHELMINA

NETTINGA

T.

SPRICK

I^NNE BARKEMA R U T H V A N KERSEN


Bolhuis Nienhuis Tysse Lokker De Cook Houmes Flipse Mulder Gulil Oudemool Vander Poel Schmid Walvoord Den H e r d e r Ver Meer Dulmes Heneveld J. Grooters M. Grooters Kots Fehner

Hondelink

The H o p e Harmony Glee Club This year has seen the advent of a new glee clnb on the campus. However, do not let the little word "new" deceive you, for the club's development under Mrs. Fenton and Cornelia Nettinga has been rapid. Many audiences have expressed their appreciation of the programs the club has rendered. Since we expect all our members to return next year, we hope to be able to develop for Hope some harmony worthy even of Hope's name.

Director

MRS.

WILLIAM

FENTON

OFFICERS Prcsdcut Secretary Treasurer Librarian

HARRIET

L.

HENEVELD

LILLIAN DOROTHY

I.

MARGUERITE C .

SCHMID MULDER FLIPSE

Page

Ninety-five


Soeter

Hinkamp Van't Hof Kuyper Pott Holkeboer Cole Neevel Luidens Van Dvke Wabeke Zwemer Fieldhouse Van Es Huizinga De Young Hemkes VanderVen Buitendorp Wierenga Baarman Mook Scholten Pennings Nattress De H a a n Beernink

The Men's Glee Club W h a t would a man be without love for music? who has no love for music:

Shakespeare says of the man

"The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds. Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils, The motions of his spirit are dull as night. And his affections dark as Erebus; Let no such man be trusted."

It was to fill this distinct need in the individual and college life that the Hope College Men's Glee Club was organized in the fall of 1924. The aim with which we started: to give Hope a Men's Glee Club of which she might be proud, we believe has to a certain extent been accomplished. Under the able direction of Mrs. Fenton the Club has been very successful this year. The Club has gone on several week end trips the past season and were well received wherever they went. Larger plans are being made for the ensuing year. Director

MRS.

WILLIAM

FENTON

OFFICERS

President Vice-President Secretary. Treasurer

Page

Ninety-six

..THEODORE W . LUIDENS A L V I N J . NEEVEL JAY A . WABEKE W I L L I A M R . BUITENDORP


Ten Gate Yntema Muilenburg Klaasen Muller Hemkes De Young Mersen Ingham Pelon Clark Kollen R. Fieldhouse E. Fieldhouse Hondelink Brovver Heneveld Vander H a r t Hospers Marcotte Klerk

H o p e Orchestra The Hope College Orchestra this year has a membership of twenty-four. Under the excellent leadership of John Lloyd Kollen it has certainly proved itself worthy of the support of the school. The type of music and the quality of rendition have been far superior to that of the past few years. One home and several out-of-town concerts have been scheduled besides the engagements for plays and Lecture Course numbers. The Hope Orchestra will also play for the Pageant to be given in June. This has been a profitable and very enjoyable year for all the members of the organization.

Director

JOHN

LLOYD K O L L E N

OFFICERS President

RAYMOND

Secretary-Treasurer

MARGARET E .

HONDELINK

EDWARD J .

FIELDHOUSE

Librarian

J.

FIELDHOUSE

Page

Ninety-seven


Osterhof, Kollen, Van't H o f , M. Peelen, Ver Meulen, Laug, Hemkes, Homkes, Soeter Slaughter, Ungersma, Wagenaar, Hinkamp, H a r m s . Steunnenberg, Ten Pas, Jager De Young, A. De Vries, Ten Gate, Muller, Neevel, M. De Jong, E. De Jong, Klaasen Stuart, J. De Vries, Wilson, Beernink, Hughes, Buitendorp, Muilenburg, W . Peelen, Kots

H o p e Band "Hats O f f ! Along the street there comes A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums,"

Due to the inspiration and leadership of James \ er Meulen, a well balanced band of thirty-five pieces was organized this year. To begin and to complete a task is very difficult, but the members sacrificed time and money and were awarded praise by the student body. W h a t is a college without a band ? Hope now knows that a good band is the only true source of "Pep". Hope " P e p " cannot be suppressed nor surpassed when the band fills the air with a lively march. W e owe a great deal of our success to Herman C. Johnson, our leader, who did all he could to make the organization what it proved to be. Leader

HERMAN

C. JOHNSON

OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Manager Librarian

Page

Ninety-eight

HAROLD W . B E E R N I N K G. MARION D E YOUNG A L V I N J . NEEVEL ALBERT S T U A R T JAMES VER MEULEN RAYMOND K . KLAASEN


WIETIES


R.Nibbclink.

M, Hundley

MWoldron.

J.KIaasen.

A Ihrmon.

M.C>roofer&.

E."T"Y33C..

Page One Hundred

C-Mcrjcn.

W.opnck.

M.Baylea-

M.Coburn.

M.Gordon

l_.Mawkens:

Mlnqham.

C.Van Harteavcldt.

O.CIcmcnfs.

D. Mc Cowan,

C.Pccta.

A.Ty^sc

H. Albert

J.Veldman

I.Townacnd.

J.Grdaters.

M.OeWolf.

L.Vandc Water.

G.Sorenson.

G.Van Voaem

C..Walvoord

A.Van Arcndonk,.

S.Wc«linq,

M. Hodden

E.Cook..

JKoninq.

J.Mulder.


Sorosis Society Sorosis has passed many milestones, and behind each has left records of happy and successful years.

Each passing year the Crescent grows brighter, ever

directing and encouraging its members in the light of Knowledge, T r u t h , and Friendship.

"Sigma,

Sigma's

To guide E'er Of

to bring those

light

shall

us youth's

hours

Oh,

Sorosis,

And

though

fond

so bright

thou fondest

art

the

shine,

Love

that

gay.

to us,

friends

fills

memories

and

dear

Be to us an ever-shining Of

ever

us on our way.

must

part,

emblem our

hearts."

OFFICERS

Fall

Term

President Vice-President

Winter CAROL V A N

Term

Spring

Term

HARTESVELDT. . . A N N A M . M E E N G S . . . .MARGARET M . ANDERSON

. . . A N N A M . TYSSE

Secretary

MARTHENA

BAYLES

Treasurer

W I L H E L M I N A T . SPRICK . . .

KATHRYN LILLIAN

E.

KEPPEL SCOTT

S A R A H A . FREDRICKS

MARTHENA JEANNETTE

BAYLES

VELDMAN

M A E HADDEN

Page One Hundred

One


C Dykhuircn.

ADykhuixen.

S.Dracjt.

aLacey-

T. Mooi.

G.Mc Carroll.

V;

D.Dekkcr.

H.Von C-ss.

R.Myma.

M.Dulmca.

H.Houmea.

M . V d n Bunrn.

Two

H.Beycra.

A.Wea\erho]

C.Poppcn.

Page One Hundred

C.NcHin<}a.

H.rchncr.

R. Marcoffc.

R V d n Dcr Linden.

C.L«orncd.

l-.Schmid

G.Ko«ppe

F. DulmcA.

R..K«nncU.

E.Hcncveld.

S.Kloostcr

M.Doter.

J.VanZyl

l_.Heinz..


Delphi Society With knowledge, truth, loyalty, service and love their watchwords, the hearts and prayers of forty girls have been brought together in Delphi.

Hoping and

working together, these girls have found the happiness of friendship as well as the joy of achievement.

Bound by the ties of the Gold and Blue, with loyalty

to one another, to Delphi and to Hope, they have been led over the rough as well as the smooth paths of college life; and now at the end of the year can say,â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hail Delphi! for we are the bigger and broader for having entered into thy portals."

OFFICERS

Fall

President Vice-President

Term

ANNE

Winter

WESTERHOF

Term

GERALDINE D V K H U I Z E N

. . . M I L D R E D E . R A M AKER. . .ADELAIDE D Y K H U I Z E N

Secretary

LILLIAN

Treasurer

SUZANNE

SCHMID DRAGT

Spring

ANNE

BARKEMA

LILLIAN HELEN

E.

SCHMID

VAN

SANDRENE A .

MARION K . LAEPPLE

Term

ESS

SCHUTT

FLORENCE D U L M E S

Page

One

Hundred

Three


K.Schoafsma .

G .Mocke.

J-Osscwisordc

W. Bos

R, Van Kcr^cn

H.Oudcmooi

M.Fhp-ac..

M. Rooks.

E-Huarides.

R. Dyk^stra

L.J=<.<aaK.

M Mockc.

â&#x20AC;˘ H-LokJcer

H.Van Loo

M . D c C^rool.

Page

One

Hundred

Four

M.Pbhimon

K. vander Veere.

E .Vandcr Fbtl.

K.Tyncr

N.Waascnaar

A naan .

C. P a + C

M.Du.Mcz

P. Bekmon.

Fi. D c V i n n c y


Sibylline Society "Before the cave of Cumae rolled the deep blue sea, crested with silvery ripples ; sun dappled, moon-frosted."

These the colors of Sibylline, the royal blue

and chaste silver represent to us the high ideals of the life abundant, the development of the body, the enrichment of the mind, and the sanctification of the spirit. It is the spirit of Sibylline that inspires us to greater achievement in college activities, greater service for God and for Hope, and a greater feeling of friendliness toward our fellow students. W h e n we think of the true and loyal friendships, of the glorious good times together, of the earnest striving for the best, we believe we a r e :

'Thrice

blessed, aye more are zve whose love,

Ne'er sundered Through

by the curse of strife

all events its zvorth can prove,

And only part with parting

life."

OFFICERS

Second Semester

First Semester KATHERINE E . TYNER

. President

PEARLE E .

Vice-President

ARLYNE RUTH

I.

LEENHOUTS

HAAN DE

VINNEY

.

WILHELMINA .ARLYNE

. Secretary

.

. Trcasurer

.

NELVINA

BOS

HAAN

WASSENAAR

ALICE M . H Y M A

Page

One

Hundred

Five


O.VonderKolk.

L.Moir.

D.NefHnqa.

C.MorriAon.

D-Kloo^ter.

A.Van Haflcm.

Six

L.Brockmeier.

M.Dc WÂŤrcl.

ri.Kot^s.

L SlfhC-S.

m G. Bchrends

A.Plasman

R.WilHamaon,

H.Doonc,

t-.Q rooters

H.Oasewoarde.

. EI. Von Elcnam.

C.De Klein.

M. Crouch.

C.Mentink.

A.L-ommcra.

El.Ver Wcy

Hundred

M . D u Mez

E.Brink.

J.DeKrakcr.

One

H.Vondcrbaah

C.VcrHaqc

F.Tc Winkle.

Page

E.Bflnninga.

A

M. Korvcr.

r. 3 c i b e r f

D.Heldcr.

M.Bclct.

n.Drockmeicr.


Dorian Society In the heart of a Dorian Sister there first dwells a love f o r Alma Mater

To

be worthy and honored daughters, they abide unswervingly by their motto. "Strength, Simplicity and T r u t h " .

In the realm of the world they will show

forever stronger and lovelier characters, because they are f a i t h f u l Dorians ami loyal Hopeites.

OFFICERS

Second

First Semester DENA

Lois

NETTINGA G.

BROCKMEIER. . .

President Vice-President

CECILIA A . V E R H A G E . .

Secretary

HESTER A .

Treasurer

OSSEWAARDE

HARRIET J .

Semester

VANDERBUSH

LEONA ....EDITH

D.

SITHES

BANNINGA

M A R Y D . CROUCH

Page

One

Hundred

Seven


â&#x20AC;˘ .RIcikKink.

H, Knutaon

L . D c n Herder.

i:. M'Gilvra

M. Roqcni

M.oickmon.

MiOrmts.

P.Vcr M r c r .

G.Gcrrits

B.Vandcr Kamp

E.Boucher

K.ouss.

Eight

A.Vandcr Werf

Anroov

G. , M a n s

K nondetink

H .Xantier

J.VfASCr,

G.Von

O.Wyrna

Page One Hundred

M.WcsWecr

E.Vandrr Vcn

t.. Nicnhuis.

H.Guhl

M.Tcr Vrcc


Alethian Society H u g h Black once said, "Comradeship is one of the finest facts and one of the strongest forces."

The purpose of Alethia is to establish true comradeship be-

tween its members, between all students on the campus and between students and faculty, that this comradeship may become a vital force for Christian service on Hope's campus and the world. So, under the guidance and the influence of the "blue and the rose, the symbols of truth and love", and with the gleaming "torch for a beacon and signal" we earnestly seek to so fulfill our mission that the influence of Alethia will be felt for years to come, for

'To Jive in hearts we leave behind Is not to die."

OFFICERS

Second Semester

First Semester REGINA

President

BUSS

MARGARET E .

HONDELINK,

PRISCILLA VER MEER

Vice-President

MARGARET S M I T S . . . .

Secretary

GERALDINE C . S M I E S

Treasnrcr

MARGARET FLIDA

Page

W.

SMITS

DEN

HERDER

MARJORIE

R O ERS

One

Hundred

Nine


RMallcrY-

J.Albcri,

C.Muiiertber^.

K.Vandcn Bosch.

J.Wabckc.

H.Wintcr.

C.Yntcma.

C.Geerh'rwjs

R.Rifch/e

R..Japinqa.

G>. B o t h u i s .

Page One Hundred

Ten

K Mook

M.WÂŤ strafe.

O-Ynfcma.

DYntcma.


Fraternal Society For ninety-one years Fraternal Spirit has been the guiding force in the hearts and minds of Fraters leading to a more extensive service in the greater activities of life. May the efforts of F. S. be untiring to hold high her standards.

May there

always be "Friendship, Love, and T r u t h " , in her ranks, f o r :

"It's always fair zvcather IVhen good Fraters

get together."

OFFICERS

Fall Term President Vice-President

GEORGE H . ...PAUL

Winter DAMSON

GEBHARD P.

MALLERY

Term

Spring

J A M E S F . D E FREE

RICHARII P .

CHESTER L . Y X T E M A

Secretary

RICHARD

Treasurer

RUTHERFORD G . H U I Z I N G A . J A M E S T E N

Term

MALLERY

JAMES L. POPPEN

CLYDE H . G E E R L I N G S

JAY A . WABEKE

BRINK

CARL W .

Page

One

Hundred

DAMSON

Eleven


R.Harkema

R Wesselink

C.Hospcri

R.Damsfra,

E.Oamatra.

A.Ter l.ouw.

L.Vredevooqci.

Page

One Hundred

K.Hymk

; DC Roitcr.

(.Tucker

R.Dc Maatcr.

Twelve

G.La Merc

L-Kuyper,

A. Pott.

A.^viyper.

p.Scholten

J.Caiman

N.Van Ooslenbero

J. Mc Carroll

L.Dc Free

KSluyier

W.Pcclen

W.KIerfc.

O.Holkeboer.

T. Eascbacjqeri -

C.COOK

M.PeclÂŤn

T-Vandcn Brink.

M.Dc Young

M Lubberi.

KPcnninqs.

H Oc- Yaun

H.Bloemcrs.

W.Jansacn

A. VanderbiASh

Vartder Hill

H Byragma}}


Cosmopolitan Society Cosmopolitan members may come and go but the ideals of Cosmos continue to live.

Established with the aim of promoting Friendship. Truth, and Progress,

the Society has been a unit for service for the members of the society, for the school, for our country, and for the world. It is the aim of the organization to make its members better fit to p e r f o r m some worthy service for mankind.

To do this, a constructively critical attitude is

cultivated by Cosmopolitans; high grade literary work is maintained; social and ethical graces are given proper attention. W i t h these working principles, the Cosmopolitan Society presses on with expectant hopes of rendering more service to mankind through Hope College.

OFFICERS

Fall Term President Vice-President

Winter

THEODORE ESSEBAGGERS ...RICHARD

H.

HARKEMA

Secretary

NEIL G. V A N

Treasurer

ABRAHAM

Term

MARION P E N N I N G S

Spring

CORNELIUS A . HOSPERS

THEODORE G . V A N D E N B R I N K . . G . M A R I O N D E YOUNG

OOSTENBERG . . R U S S E L L D . D A M S T R A

POTT

Term

WILLIAM

LESTER J . K U Y P E R

FEELEN

PETER D E RUITER

Page

One

Hundred

Thirteen


Er.ntldhou^e.

R-Von Dyke.

G.Stck^tec

G.Pool,

V.Tcn Catc

rwilson.

N.Prokken

RNoHrcas.

i_,Gccrlinq»,

C-RovenKerk.

Page

One

Hundred

J.VcrMculen.

G Kemmc

KOJert

A.Nccvd.

W.Muqhca

T.Cramer.

E.Wcicr.

H.Brower.

K Hatchman

a.Koatein

D.MarJin.

H-5feuncnb«rq.

FTBroVow.

J.Kollen.

PtVantroa-

J.Mulder,

W.fteawick.

Rfiddhouwi.

R Hemkea.

R.Moilcr.

G Oc Koning.

Q-aeverance

G-DccXer

Fourteen

N.Varttkr Marf.

l..K<cia

G.KiUey.

W.Tutfie

RHunter.

A.Zwcmer,

THinkamp.

W.Hoat

C.Caltf,

E.TeH.

TT5tek€te€,

J.Mulder.

R.Smilh.

G.KIoo»e.

H.Da Young.


Knickerbocker Society In all of its past activity, Knickerbocker has persistently aimed to intertwine the society's creed of Social, Moral and Intellectual advancement with the spirit and principles of our Alma Mater.

This year, remaining true to her glorious

precedent, she has faithfully maintained this enviable ideal.

Each member, filled

with ardor and enthusiasm, has sincerely given his best to the welfare of Hope and Knickerbocker.

Dear to every heart is the spirit of good fellowship and unity of

purpose, so prevalent within the organization, making for deeper understanding of one's fellows, and a close interweaving of ideas and ideals.

W e equally stress

the importance of clean sportsmanship, clean living and direct our thought and activity toward their attainment.

Always aware of the intellectual aim in col-

legiate work, we strive to put such material into our programs as will benefit both the participants and the audience. Undividedly we stand by Hope and endeavor to do those things of which she will be p r o u d ; working for the common Christian fellowship of men, under the dual emblem: "Ruby-black

'neath the Orange and Blue".

OFFICERS

Fall President Vice-President

Term

GERARD ...ALVIN

Winter

C. J.

Secretary

WILLIAM

Treasurer

JAMES

POOL

Term

Spring

A L V I N J . NEEVEL

JAMES VER MEULEN

NEEVEL

NORMAN E . VANDER H A R T

G.

VERNON

VER

MAAT MEULEN

D.

TEN

Term

GATE

RAYMOND J . FIELDHOUSE GEORGE V .

EGBERT H . F E L L

STEKETEE

ADRIAN F . ZWEMER

Page

One

Hundred

Fifteen


D-Klnncy

A.Wicnnga.

G.Cliquennoi.

A.Sfviart.

W.Dc Vclder.

W, BuUendorp

^•Dykahom.

Page

One Hundred

Sixteen

J.DeVri«».

C,Diephouac.

C.Klaa®cn.


Emersonian Society T r u e success is the coveted goal of all college students.

The purpose of the

literary society is to encourage its attainment through the literary and social development of the individual. Success through love and honor—this is Emersonian.

Inspired by the high

ideals and lofty principles for which Emersonian stands, the Society has enjoyed a year of great progress. The spirit of the ideal has pervaded the friendly and constructive criticism of the literary productions of the weekly meetings, made happy the social activities, and sweetened good fellowship. The spirit of the ideal—Hope and Emersonian—they are one.

OFFICERS

President Vice-President

Fall T cnn

IVinfer

DELBERT L . K I N N E Y

ARNOLD C . V A N

...BARNARD

M.

L U B E N . . . . ALONZO

Spring

Term

MALCOLM

WYK

ALBERT

WIERENGA. . . ,

Term DULL

SCHAAFSMA

Secretary

MALCOLM

DULL

D.

Trcasurer

IULIUS

SCHIPPER

GEORGE V . C L I Q U E N N O I . . . BERTRAM G . V A N ' T H O E

F.

HARRIS S M I T H

RAYMOND K .

Page

One

Huuared

KLAASEN

Seventeen


H. Nyboer

A. U n q e r a r n a

D Huenink.

B.Shoemaker

S.Albcra

m

rs.Doak..

i-oosaord,

J. Mocdt

rv Spocisffa.

C.HcAseiink.

One

Hundred

J . D e Bell.

J.VandcrVen

H.^>iqsbec.

C.Bcrkompas.

M. Mcxjet

o oruns

H.E)OvenK.erk

C.Vcldhvis

Vrics.

H.Hcoselink.

T T e n Hoevc.

Page

G.Bevelandcr.

S.Cheung

I--i5worJout.

t_ Hornsby.

H.Bos.

W. K b t ^ Âť .

K-Campbcll.

P-IInqcl.

J.Van D a m .

G.L-evvis

J.Nyboer

D.Vander

Kolk

R. Brink..

Eighteen

_j


Addison Society Progress has been called the "march of the intellect", and we believe that we have experienced this advancement.

For with the spirit of absolute loyalty to

the three basic principles Fidelity, Culture, and Leadership our society has completed another successful year. W e have endeavored to be f a i t h f u l to the ideals upon which our society was founded, and thus have shown ourselves to be in accord with the principles of Hope.

W e have sought to become expressive of refinement and intellectual de-

velopment. and through the carrying out of these aims hope to become true leaders, realizing that he who leads best must serve. In this onward trend we most heartily believe that.

'Nezv

occasions

They

must

tcach

upivard

nnv still

duties;

and

time

onward

makes

who

ancient

would

keep

good abreast

uncouth; of

truth.

OFFICERS

Fall President Vice-President

Term

DERWIN ...BRUNO

Winter J.

Term

H U E N I N K . . .PETER J . D E

BRUNS.

.BERNARD H .

Secretary

LESTER

BOSSARD.

GERRIT

T reasurer

HARRY

DE

JOHN

VRIES

Spring BELL

Term

. . STANLEY ALBERS

SHOEMAKER

. SIPFUNG

BEVELANDER . . . .

....BRUNO

MOEDT

...HAROLD

Page

One Hundred

CHEUNG BRUNS SIGSBEE

Nineteen


M.Hatfitfld.

H Frankcn,

D.omies.

G Boven,

FL j a p i n q a .

W. Donncma.

E . D e Jonq ,

G.Dc Roos.

GRozebooM.

D.Van Mabcm

J.Hyink

H . T e Winkle..

G.Rcz.clmon

B . T e Winklfc.

N.Von D u r c n .

\r.t\ M. Kaciein

Twenty

E.Vonder Jaql

L. Droppers

R.Jaqer

G. Dg Htaan.

Page One Hundred

U. VanOAt Berg

E De WiH

R,.Boiicnciorp-

J-t.Clark..

H. Knot.

G.Ru^schcr

N.Von Rcualte.

J H.Kraoi

TDunntwolcL

A r'opma

fi . K r a o i


Dickensian Society

"FOR

HOPE AND

OL R FELLOW

Upon the vast sea of life we are laboring.

MEN."

W e have left the shores of be-

ginning and are now heading for the goal of triumph.

Loyalty, the captain, is

ever on the alert to urge some one onward to do his duties toward God and his fellow men.

Friendship walks through the crowds looking about to see if per-

chance some one has need of him.

He is always busy and always finds something

to do; here he sends a smile and there a cheering word, as through the crowd he wanders.

"Friendship Motto,

and Loyalty

as through

Ever mindful

is our

life we go,

of that power

Which fills our hearts with a zcarm glow."

OFFICERS

Fall Term

President Vice-President

LESTER G . ...MARVIN

Secretary

GELMER

Treasurer

EDWIN

W.

IVinter

DROPPERS

ERVIN R .

D E JONG

HENRY

Spring

VANDER JAGT

HATFIELD. . . B E N J A M I N W .

BOVEN A.

Term

WILLIAM

BONNEMA

T E W I N K L E . . . .ALFRED M .

FRANKEN

HARRY J .

R I C H A R D A . JAGER

JOSEPH W .

Page

One

Hundred

Term

POPMA CLARK HYINK

Twenty-one


fcacy Keppel

X, ^ii\a.(riA?S XkviWs

TAmvmii J) Tlp^wins

Page

One Hundred

Twenty-two

jy\. 'S-e.YVKvW


3

M

W


PROFESSOR J . B . N Y K E R K

M . O . L. One of the most popular of all activities at Hope is that of public speech. This activity is made successful through the efforts of Dr. Nykerk, for years instructor in this department.

T h e general interest shown is due to his enthusiasm

and to the keen competition among the students.

Hope's coach is the only one

of the organizers of the Michigan Oratorical League still active as a teacher in public speaking. Hope has had the privilege of holding the presidency of the M. O. L. this year. On March 5th, 1926, the annual contest of the M. O. L. was held at Ypsilanti, Michigan.

This contest furnishes wholesome rivalry among the colleges of the

state and is credited with more prominence and publicity each year. The students again had cause to celebrate for Miss Harriet L. Heneveld won first place in the nineteenth annual Women's Contest and Mr. John H . Albers won third place in the twenty-ninth annual Men's Contest.

Page

One

Hundred

Twenty-four


HENEVELD

ALBERS

Hope's Orators T h e oration, "Poisoned Springs", written and delivered by Miss H a r r i e t L. Heneveld was awarded first place. Supporting her thoughts by indisputable logic and speaking with correct emphasis and expression she truly earned her victory.

W O M E N ' S

John Henry Alber's oration, " T a k e Down Your Sign", won third place in a keenly competitive contest. Speaking of the A m e r ican youth he presented his message in a forceful manner. His enthusiastic appeal was supported by wise convictions.

MEN'S CONTEST

C O N T E S T

M i s s HARRIET L. HENEVELD, H o p e C o l l e g e

First Place

MR.

CARL W .

EORSYTHE, M i c h i g a n

Normal College

State

First Place

M i s s GENEVIEVE ROWS, Hillsdale College Second Place

MR. RUPERT L. CORTRIGHT, A l b i o n C o l l e g e

M i s s ESTHER A. OLDT, Alma College Third Place

MR. JOHN H . ALBERS, H o p e C o l l e g e

Second Place Third Place

Page

One

Hundred

Twenty-five


Poisoned Springs By H A R R I E T L. H E N E V E L D Awarded

First Place in the Michigan

Oratorical

Contest for Women

W e are assembled here, as students representing various colleges, yet all one with one common purpose—to consider our modern problems and their solutions. This assembly has been made possible because of our far-reaching educational system. Never before has education been so wide-spread. Never have so many children been gathered into American school-rooms. Never have finer buildings been dedicated to education, nor teachers been held in such high esteem. But stop! Whence come these great blessings? Great teachers and great schools are not accidental. In analyzing our educational system, we find that while many factors have been c o n t r i b u t o r y , the ultimate cause lies in this fact — the sources of our education were Christian in spirit. T h e preamble of the North West Territorial Act of 1787 states: "Religion, morality, and knowledge being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools shall be forever encouraged." Religion ! Morality! Knowledge ! Such was the lofty aim of our forefathers. This Christian spirit is the pure spring, the Lebanon of education. As it wound its way down through the years into its crystal waters flowed so many streams of thought that to-day the little spring has become a swirling mass of rushing waters. H a s the spring retained its purity, or have bitter waters flowed in destroying its sweetness? Education has made strides: but do vou know that along with it crime has increased sixteen and six-tenths per cent between the years 1910 and 1922? W h a t means this New York Students Perverted Code? Forgery, gambling, and cheating, accepted as common practices! Only he who is caught, guilty of offense'! T o cheat, if one "gets away with it", is not immoral : but to be caught, that is inexcusable! Juvenile delinquency is alarmingly prevalent. Ninety per cent of our mitted by youth under twenty-one years of age. Every year three billion property is stolen in the United States. Is the American youth taught, steal?" Every year fifteen thousand persons die by murder and homicide. youth taught, "Thou shalt not kill?" Out of this lawlessness nigh unto challenge—What's wrong with our children?

crimes dollars "Thou Is the anarchy

are comworth of shalt not American rises the

W e answer with a voice not of pessimism but of deep alarm. There is something wrong with our children. This is not mere supposition, but a fact proved by scientists in pedagogy. In their experiments, stripping education of its glamour and pretense, they caused, "truth to stand bare and shiver." The facts they have gleaned are astounding. They have set our complacent minds to thinking. Some years ago, while at Columbia University, Dr. Voelker, former president of Olivet College, quietly experimented on the little rag-tag soul of the school lad, Jimmy. By a series of tests, Jimmy registered his slippery philosophy of life. H e lied. H e stole. H e cheated. Poor little lad—he didn't know any better. H e was never taught differently. H e thought that that was the way of life. Scientists worked on the stunted soul of Jimmy and instilled lofty principles of morality and religion. In three months, Jimmy increased three hundred per cent in honesty. Yes, morality can be taught. Dr. Voelker brought the educational world to its senses by proving that merely cramming the three R's into our children's heads is not producing men and women of character; that education lacks some vital force of spirituality; that that force applied works wonders in the famished soul of the child. Calvin Davis, P r o f e s s o r of Education in the University of Michigan, confirmed this truth by sending out a questionnaire concerning morality and religion to ten thousand High School students. T h e results were pathetic. These school boys and girls, in endeavoring to pick out the good and the bad, failed miserably. Infinitely sad is the picture they drew of

Page

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qualities would you d e ^ n d / ' 0 t h i T f o l t o w ^ third, the disposition of a g o o d m ° x e r a „ d ^ ^

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Jails are full of these y o u t h s " Today

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dictmTnt f^l'k ^ f l f 5 5 ' b e w i l d e r . e d - W h e r e 'jes the cause of this social dissociation? The indictment falls alike upon our homes, our schools, our churches, which have failed to feed the starving souls of the ch.ldren with morals and religion. Perhaps you s l y - t e a c h religion in t e schools Oh . that is the duty of the home and the church, not of the school Yes it is the duty of home and church, but do these fulfill their duty? Scientific research proves that in our country more than twenty-eight million children are unreached by the Sunday School Ten million homes, moreover, are unchurched. Moreover, the modern home, so involved in m g lnter st s 0 the da irfrcrh r l O U M / , y h e e d s n o t t h e cries of her children. As Rabbi prW t ' S a n greatest failure of the nineteenth century has been the failure of religious education Our public schools have not given character. They give the student power to do !vf r v! ^ V1 t h e mora! force and will to restrain him f r o m using that power. In educating the head and not the heart and soul, the public schools are failing at a crucial point." dot to s that ; r ' j u d ^ e s ' a " d churchmen point out the gravity of the situation and plead t at education include morals and religion. You shudder, perhaps, at the thought—religion in rnea b lckenn controve"' ? . & o v e r creeds, a quarrel between denominations, a controversy over canons? N o ! this is not true religion. If religion means naught but creeds, denommationahsm, dogmas, doctrines, then, I say, religion cannot be taught. But true reigion is man s effort to perfect himself through the appeal and aid of the Divine. If we 6 al n l/hl t6' / ? l l - e a s d e , v o t i o n t 0 m o r a l ideals, love f o r truth, appreciation beauty, and the aim of education as the development of man's ideal nature, then religion cannot be divorced f r o m education. Religion and education are, therefore, natural allies.

This principle contrasts sharply with the popular idea of training f o r efficiency Of course material efficiency is good in itself, but the time has come when efficiency the dollar sign, and selfishness are crowding out idealism. W h a t use is knowledge without right purpose? American children must be given a right purpose, be aroused to nobler emotions, endowed with worthy ideals of conduct, stirred to religious consciousness. Only education based on the Spirit of the Christ can accomplish the ideal goal of life. America is now paying the penalty of having discarded morals and religion, the most vital force m education. All our material prosperity and advance in science cannot save our nation f r o m ultimate decay, unless lawlessness is checked by religion. In the year 1914 the nations of Central Europe went to smash—for lack of brain? N o ! f o r lack of character. American youth now betray this same lack of character. \ \ e learn about Zeus, Brahma, and Mohammed, but the God of our civilization has been cast out. T h e Bible, the book by which men live, is read in the schools of only six states I ask, what objection can there be to teaching our children the Golden Rule, the t e n Commandments, the dishonorableness of cheating and lying, the joy of service? There can be no objection to interpreting the spiritual messages of history, fiterature, and art. The persever-

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ance of Columbus, the justice of Roger Williams, the manliness of Lincoln can instill these very virtues into children's hearts. Millet paints the Shepherdess. Peering into this devout peasant's soul, our hearts throb with inspiration to live purely. Beethoven composes a symphony. As the notes of true harmony ring out our soul fills with joy. Surely this is food for starved souls. Likewise, there can be no possible objection to holding up before our students the inspiring life of the lowly Man of Gallilee. T h e scene must have been tragic when the lawyer of a certain murderer cried out in the courtroom: " T h e r e I see the picture of the Crucified and I pay homage to it. But why do we not hear of H i m in our schools ? W h y does Sandat, the murderer, f o r the first time in his life see the Crucified here in this hall, where the law will punish him? If the attention of my client had been directed to the Crucified when he still sat on the benches of the school, he would not now sit on the bench of disgrace and i n f a m y ! " Educators and future leaders of men, can we not protect our children behind the barricade of religion? Can we not develop their souls to direct their energies f o r good? Yes. America can and will. Above the a w f u l din of despair rises the song of hope. America is tired of watching that ghastly line of ten thousand human beings die each year by homicide. Merchants are tired of being robbed of $1,000,000.00 every year. America is shocked by the scientific tests, revealing the starved souls of the children. Yes, America is going to do something. T h e present day witnesses a movement that is gripping social consciousness to provide a more systematic scheme for training the souls of children. In late years, scores of conferences met for this purpose. Last year, the annual convention of the National Education Association decided that the school should be preeminently a place for character building. A short time ago President Coolidge set aside one Education Week for this purpose. Our state legislature is considering a bill for introducing systematic Bible Training in Michigan schools. Ours is the task to aid in this great movement of instilling into the consciences of American children right habits of industry, justice, kindness, reverence for all that is sacred and holy. Fathers and mothers, your homes can cooperate with the school and church by nourishing the unfolding souls of your children with high ideals and habits. Church fathers, you can awaken dormant spirituality in the youth of our land. Teachers, you can mould the souls of children by your example and precept. Seniors, teachers of to-morrow, the river of education will be fed by your streams of thought. T h e river is calling for the pure waters of Lebanon to cleanse it of its bitterness. It sighs over the convicts, the murderers, the political bribers, the parasites of society who drink f r o m its defiled waters. It calls for religion and morality, so that its waters may give strength of true character. Teachers, educators, you can purify the poisoned waters. Students, you too must heed the call. Your contribution can be as telling as that of H o w a r d Arnold Walter, who a f t e r graduating f r o m Princeton University, decided to give his life in service for mankind. One Christmas day, he sent a poem, expressing his own heart life, to his mother. Though he died a few days later he still lives in his poem; "I I I I I I I I

Page One Hundred

would be true, for there are those who trust me; would be pure, f o r there are those who c a r e ; would be strong, for there is much to s u f f e r ; would be brave, f o r there is much to d a r e ; would be friend to allâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the foe, the friendless; would be giving and forget the g i f t ; would be humble, for I know my weakness ; would look up, and laugh, and love, and lift."

Twenty-eight


"Take Down Your Sign. . . By J O H N H E N R Y A L B E R S Awarded

Third Place in the Michigan

Oratorical

Contest for Men.

A few years ago, excavators of an old city in Egypt uncovered a stone with a written secret. A scholar decoded the inscription and revealed the story of how an old sage complained, three or f o u r thousand years ago, about the rising generation. T h e young people of his day, he wrote, were immoral, irresponsible, and careless. "They are not at all as they used to be in the good old times," he said. Now, the ancient stone typifies the attitude of the older generation in our own, or almost any period, of history. Youth always has been rebellious. Even among the writers of sacred scripture we can find those who complained of the immorality and indifference of youth. Sir Frances Drake's mother undoubtedly went sadly about the house, thinking that this passion f o r the sea had sprung up since her day, and that no good would come out of it. T h e f a t h e r of Columbus must have fervently urged his son to learn the fine points of wool-combing as he had done. In the ears of youth have always rung the condemnation of the age. Still there has never been a time when young people were so generally criticized as they are to-day. Whether or not the young people of this age are of preceding generations is a side issue. T h e main question is : A r e they, guilty of the charges brought against them? And if they are, what are the may these be remedied?

and so severely worse than those or are they not causes and how

T h e r e are two views of the modern youth. On the one hand, we have the picture of a young fellow, lazily puffing a cigarette as he reclines in a comfortable sport roadster. H e turns and smiles to his lady friend who, with one foot on the running board, is hastily putting the final touches upon her hand-made complexion. W i t h her frizzled bobbed hair, her short skirts, and rolled stockings, she represents one of the most vicious of her fast set. T h e young man of to-day has been accused of being careless, heedless, callous-â&#x20AC;&#x201D;-with little respect for age or f o r achievementâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;intent only upon his own pleasures. H e drinks freely, drives automobiles wildly, dances disgracefully, talks slangily, and jibes irreverently at parent manners and morals. Such is the pessimist's view of the modern youth. But I see another picture of youth as he sits at the Student Volunteer Convention in Indianapolis and at the Washington Student Conference. Here, thousands of students have gathered to discuss the economic and industrial problems of the present day. A spirit of brotherliness, of tolerance and service is present, while love rules every action. T h e sentiments of these people find best expression in the words of one of their n u m b e r : "I am tired of the farce of calling myself a Christian and sanctioning in my heart what I believe to be an unchristian societ}'." Tliis new spirit of a new type shows out still more clearly in the commitment drawn up by the Student Fellowship, reading: "I recognize the domination of pagan principles and motives in present-day business relationships, especially as shown in the flagrant disregard for human values in industry. I am confronted with the need for men and women with the spirit of Christ, who will, at whatever cost, strive to make the principles of love and service effective in all their relationships, thruout the world." These are facts. Nevertheless, the Public in its condemnation of youth fails to see the latter picture of hope and encouragement, while they continue to rail against the waywardness and irresponsibility of young people. Youth is misunderstood and needs to be defended. For youth has a wealth of fineness and courage that even socially cultivated filth cannot covcr. And beyond the cheap glitter of tainted pleasures and social excess, the young men and women still see visions. T h e seeming wildness of youth springs f r o m certain causes: first, the naturally venturesome spirit of the young. Youth is not satisfied to drift quietly down the stream of life.

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It is eager to explore the tempting little brooks and inlets, even if they do lead over the rocks of false doctrines and down the waterfalls of strange philosophies. And so youth travels on always yearning f o r the new and untried. Besides his natural daring, changed social conditions have also affected the modern youth. New forms of indulgence and so-called pleasure-seeking lure him. T h e younger generation has not learned to recognize the newly invented tools and poisonous gases of modern life. Motors, movies, jazz music, freedom of action, liberty of thought, and the rights of individuals^ all threaten, excite, tempt them. J. D. Rockefeller, Jr., says that "Civilization, the accumulation of mind and matter, has temporarily outstripped religion." Too much emphasis has been placed upon physical discoveries, materialistic philosophy, and the invention of new machines. W e have lacked the appreciation of human values and the spiritual development of the individual. Such problems youth must confront. Then, too, when we look f o r the mote in the eye of youth, we must also consider the beam in the eye of the parent. In a questionnaire sent recently to practically all the protestant clergymen in the United States, asking who is to blame f o r the conditions of the youth, seventy-eight per cent of all the writers mentioned as the cause, the bad examples and lax discipline of the parents. One of the great football players of a leading University in discussing the social conditions upon his campus, told how immediately following the Washington Student Conference on law enforcement, his college made a right-about face and student drinking became negligible. Any fellow who encouraged it was quickly ostracized. But when the alumni came back f o r commencement and for the social functions preceding the commencement, the campus went drunk again. Is youth always to blame? W e hear the accusation that the rising generation is seriously lacking in proper appreciation of spiritual values. But all too many modern parents have not done their part toward instilling into the minds and hearts of their growing children the foundation for a strong religious life. Many of the young people who are called wild have received nothing more stable upon which to build their morals than their own wills. In the fast and dizzy pace which the world is setting f o r us now, a young lad needs more to keep him straight than a strong will. H e needs the trust and confidence of Christian parents, the association with Christian organizations, and any other ties which will bind him to the truth. A good home, with wise and consecrated parents, means more in a young person's life than everything else combined. W h a t then shall be the remedy f o r our problem? T h e burden of responsibility must be shared by all. There are various ways in which parents can help their children and there are obligations which youth must assume. A parent should be, above all, a comrade of youth, a sympathetic and understanding companion whom youth can take into his confidence, and who can help him solve the perplexing problems of life. Such comradeship requires a parent's time. Parents plead business causes and social duties; but a successful social achievement or a thriving business is of no value if it is bought at the expense of a child's welfare. Do you remember t h e frantic father in the play, "The Fool", the father who had never known his little girl, and who awoke one morning to find that he never would know herâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;because she was dead? For that father there was some excuse. W o r k in the mines, f o r fourteen hours each day, and seven days a week, make fathers strangers to their children. But there are parents whose social and business pursuits cause them to neglect their children. They rob the cradle of the hand that moves the world. Moreover, a comradeship between parents and children demands not only that parents should get a knowledge of conditions as they really are, but also that parents should look at these problems f r o m a youth's viewpoint. Many parents resemble the spectators who sit along the sidelines of a football game, criticizing the players without knowing the rules of the game or the psychology of the players. Their attitude is hostile, not sympathetic. They are censors, not friends. And so, parents, we would ask you not to criticize youth, but to listen to youth. Listen not with a sneer as to some freakish novelty, not with scorn as to an enemy. Listen not as to a new and better authority. Look upon us children rather as fellow travelers and explorers who may possibly point out along the road of life what you have not yet seen; who may possibly remind you of something in the path already traversed that you have been ignoring; who may possibly realize the difficulties ahead and strengthen your courage to meet them.

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As youth on the other hand, we also have a grave responsibility. In a day of such unparalleled mechanical invention and discovery, it seems almost as if the Creator of men had said, It is time that these children of mine came to maturity. I will give them at last their Let us see full mastery over the earth and over the air and over the spirits of themselves how they bear themselves under these gifts." Thus comes a great challenge to human worth and human power. T o meet such a challenge requires more than our own weak strength. W e need the accumulated knowledge laid up by those who have preceded us along the trail All achievement is built upon past knowledge. And "the wisest man is not he who suggests the most new things, but he who building upon the firm foundation of the past and making full use of tried principles, best' helps to readjust the world in which he lives to new times and new conditions." Open defiance and advice and knowledge does not indicate a progressive spirit. W e must not go blindly groping f o r the truth. Rather we should benefit by the efforts of our elders who have blazed the trails and cut the paths f o r us to travel on. And when we come to the end of their trail we must carry on. ' "God give us men! A time like this demands Strong minds, great hearts, true faith and willing hands. Men whom the lust of office does not kill; Men whom the spoils of office cannot b u y ; Men who possess opinions and a will; Men who have honor, men who will not lie; Men who can stand before a demagogue, And damn his treacherous flatteries without winking; Tall men, sun crowned, who live above the f o g In public duty and in private thinking. For while they rabble with their thumb-worn creeds. Their professions and their little deeds Mingle in selfish strife, lo! Freedom weeps! W r o n g rules the land, and waiting justice sleeps! Can you say, 'Take down your sign, I'M your man?' "

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ALBERS

LUBBERS

Debating Debating activities occupy about four months of the school year.

During

this time, eliminations are held, the teams are chosen, and the inter-collegiate contests are held.

These matters are ably directed by Professor Irwin J. Lubbers.

T h e fact that he is coaching an activity of his Alma Mater in which he was formerly engaged gives him a broad field of experience to draw from.

To his

keen ability to judge the merit of a case goes much of the credit for any victories which Hope teams may gain and the debaters feel deeply grateful for the aid which he has given them. All of Hope's forensic activities are under the auspices of the nKA chapter of which Stanley Albers is president.

He has directed the organization through a

year of prosperity and shares in the honor for numerous debating victories.

As

a veteran debater he has assisted much in the coaching of new debaters and in his graduation Hope feels a great loss.

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Burggraaff

Wesselink

Mallery

Cramer

Ten Cate

Mulder

Men's Affirmative Debating the affirmative of the question: Resolved, that the United States should recognize the present government of Russia, John Mulder, Peter Wesselink and Richard Mallery represented Hope in three inter-collegiate debates. Opening the season by a debate against the Mt. Pleasant team, the Hope men gained their only victory on the Russian question. Ypsilanti was the next opposition and a f t e r an expert judge had credited Hope with the better speakers, the decision on the question was given to the Normal team. Calvin gave the team its final defeat in a post-season debate at Grand Rapids. Along with these debates, a non-decision contest was staged with Kalamazoo College in which Henry Burggraaff, Timothy Cramer and Vernon Ten Cate argued the affirmative for Hope. Fine argument was presented and it appeared that the Hope men had the advantage.

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Essebaggers

Albers

Veldhuis

Wabeke

Men's Negative Winning three of its four debates on the Russian question the Hope negative team composed of Theodore Essebaggers, Stanley Albers and Charles Veldhuis experienced a very successful season. The Detroit College of Law opposed the Hope representation in their first debate.

In this contest, an audience decision gave the team an overwhelming

victory.

Journeying to Albion, the squad met defeat in the foreign territory by a

two to one decision of the judges. lose to the Orange and Blue. Calvin College affirmative.

Kalamazoo Normal was the next team to

The final debate of the season was held with the

In this contest, Jay Wabeke substituted for Stanley

Albers and assisted in winning a two to one decision.

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Thirty-four


Tysse

Sithes

Zander

Ladies' Affirmative Co-ed inter-collegiate debating was a new venture for Hope in the past year.

F r o m the stand-point of victories gained the project was not a success but

an interest in the work has been awakened.

The question: Resolved that Con-

gress be empowered to control and regulate Child Labor, formed a balanced topic f o r debate. Helen Zander, Leona Sithes and Anna Tysse formed the affirmative team. 1 heir only debate was with Kalamazoo College in which the affirmative arguments were overthrown and a decision of two to one was rendered spelling defeat for Hope's team.

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Schutt

Olgers

Heneveld

Ihrman

Ladies' Negative A negative team composed of Sandrene Schutt. Alice Ihrman and Helen Olgers was chosen to represent Hope against Kalamazoo College and Kalamazoo Normal.

However, illness made it necessary for Miss Schutt to withdraw and

Ethel Heneveld was chosen to fill the vacancy. Both of the debates were hotly contested but Hope failed to win either of the decisions.

It appears that f u r t h e r experience is needed in co-ed debates and

Hope is looking forward to better success in the future.

Page One Hundred

Thirty-six


ATHLETICS


J O H N H . L. S C H O U T E N Director of Physical Education

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PET-AflUT

Tennis, 1925 Football, basketball, in the limelight on our was not until the spring sented our "Orange and

baseball and track have all been campus for severa" years, but it of '25 that a Tennis Team repreBlue" in a state meet.

At Kalamazoo, where the Michigan Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament was held last year, F. Yonkman, L. Kleis and E. Damstra represented Hope. Yonkman won a game of singles while Damstra and Kleis eliminated an Alma College pair. Western State Normal won the tournament but Hope made a modest beginning. An enthusiasm was created which in coming years will carry the "Orange and Blue" to victory.

RUSSELL D . DAMSTRA

Manager

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Schouten (Coach), Albers, Veldman, Nattress, Buikema, Steketee, Ritchie, Elenbaas, De Free De Groot, Ottipoby, Bovenkerk, Forsten, Vanden Brink, Van Lente, Riemersma, Cole

Baseball, 1925 The achievement of the varsity baseball squad for the 1925 season was a commendable one. The record of seven wins, with only four losses, in the regular schedule was something to cause rejoicing among all the fans of the Orange and Blue teams. An early spring made outdoor practice possible even before the spring recess. The squad soon gave evidence of the ability that was to carry it through a successful season. Albers, Buikema and Cole were retained as regular moundsmen. Several new faces appeared in the opening tilt with Kalamazoo Normal, some of whom won regular berths while others were held in reserve. Perhaps the most sensational game of the season was with Kalamazoo College. Airtight pitching by Albers, who retired seventeen men during the game was a main feature. Errorless ball-playing was also largely responsible for Hope's overwhelming victory. Excellent fielding, fair hitting and wise base-running combined with a dependable trio of hurlers to produce the following record:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2 17 6 8 1 9 2 3 4 9 16

Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope

Page One Hundred

Kalamazoo Normal Kalamazoo College Calvin College Calvin College Michigan State Normal Mt. Fleasant Normal Kalamazoo College St. Mary's College Mt. Fleasant Normal Ferris Institute Hope Alumni

10 0 2 2 13 6 4 2 0 11 0

Forty

u


"KENNY"

played at the keystone sack for his third

year, and in addition, proved to be a real captain, one whom Hope is proud to have represent the school.

K E N N E T H A . V A N LENTE Captain

"JIM" had a real schedule mapped out for the 1925 nine, and he also did good work in his regular outfield position to help average an excellent season.

JAMES F . D E FREE Manager

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BOVEZ

HEINIE

OPPIE

CHIEF

Page

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Forty-two


PERRY

CUNT

DUTCH

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Forty-three


Raymond (Coach), Burggraaff, Wiersma, Vanderbush, Samson, Martin, H . De Young, Nyboer, R. De Young, Kastein, Ver Meulen, Klay, Damson, Nelson ( C o a c h ) , Schouten (Coach) Buys, Hill, W . Peelen, Kole, Fell, Japinga, Vander H a r t , Essebaggers, Laug, M. Peelen, Gouwens Masselink, Beswick, Mook, Bovenkerk, Van Zanden, Damstra, Kleis, Elzinga, Tuttle

Football Playing throughout the season with the weather-man against them, the Orange and Blue gridders emerged at its close with a percentage of five hundredâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;two games won, two games lost, and one game tied. On only one occasion was a game played under normal weather conditions : the others were played on muddy or snow-covered gridirons. Coach Schouten had capable assistants in Professor Raymond, Mr. Nelson and "Ted" Vanden Brink. T h e season started off well with a 12-0 victory over Ferris Institute. T h e fellows were showing the results of excellent coaching and spirited scrimmage. On a sloppy and clay field at Detroit the following week, the City College aggregation got the only break of the game when a Hope punt was blocked and recovered by Detroit behind the Orange and Blue goal line. Straight football was the only thing the weather permitted, and Detroit bettered Hope 7-0. Over Junior College of Grand Rapids, the Orange and Blue eleven triumphed 3-0. A snow-covered field kept the score down for both of the teams. Findjay College travelled to Holland f r o m Ohio for the next game and rolled up thirteen points in the first half before the Orange and Blue jerseyed men knew the game was on. Some one must have given the password during the intermission, however, for the next half they came out and played inspired football. Thirteen points were credited to Hope in the last session, and the boys were on their way to the Findlay goal when the final whistle blew. On Armistice Day "Bob" Black and Co., representing Kalamazoo College, came to Holland and with one of the neatest aerial attacks ever witnessed on a Wooden Shoe gridiron they humbled the Hope warriors 34-0. 1 he fight and real Hope spirit displayed in every tilt is due in a large measure to the excellent support accorded the team by the student body. T h e band, which made its appearance at every home game, contributed no little share to one of the most successful seasons in the history of the school. Hope 12 Ferris Institute 0 Hope 0 Detroit City College 7 Hope 3 Grand Rapids Junior 0 Hope 13 Findlay ( O . ) College 13 Hope 0 Kalamazoo College 34

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An indomitable will combined with a thorough knowledge of

the game and

a co-operative spirit

among his team-mates, gave George the honor of captaining one of Hope's best elevens during his fourth year of intercollegiate competition.

2 GEORGE H . D A M S O N

Captain

Although he had hardly recovered from a serious operation, " J i m " will be long remembered by Hopeites for his great fighting spirit: displayed in every game of the '25 schedule.

JAMES VER

MEULEN

Manager

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NORM

BERNIE

Page One Hundred

Forty-six


TUBBY

SPIKE:

TOMMY

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Forty-seven


MASSIE

SQUIRT

DEAN

JACK

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Forty-eight

RA/MONO


moPEi

Kik

'HOPE

Cliquennoi

Fieldhouse

Luben

Van Ess

Kinney

Bossard

Track Less than a week a f t e r school opened last fall a call was issued for longdistance track men.

Three veterans and many new enthusiasts responded to the

summons and a f t e r several weeks of consistent training, they were well prepared for the final try-out.

Six men were selected to represent Hope at the Annual

Intercollegiate five mile grind at East Lansing on November seventeenth.

The

team continued its strenuous training a f t e r this try-out with a strong determination to raise Hope's record.

But largely due to keener competition and a new

course, the team was compelled to accept defeat from four other institutions at the meet. A dual cross-country meet was arranged with

Kalamazoo College, but

weather conditions prevented the run. There will be several fast men back next fall and Coach Schouten will be able to build up a record breaking outfit.

Page One Hundred

Forty-nine


â&#x20AC;˘ QPV. "JAKIE"

ran his second year for the Orange and

Blue, and but for a bit of hard luck entirely beyond his control, he undoubtedly would have finished among the first five at M. S. C.

* JACOB M .

KIK

Captain

10RI '"DEL"

was captain of the Hope "flying-squadron"

during 1924-1925, and he again showed excellent spirit and energy in serving Hope under Captain Kik during the present season.

DELBERT L . K I N N E Y Manager

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One

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Fifty


Luben

OPE

P A U L

Page One Hundred

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Schouten (Coach) Van Zanden Diephouse Japinga Lubbers Albers Kleis

Martin Vanden

Van Raalte Damstra Brink Poppen

Basketball W h e n the final whistle of 1925 brought to a close the last game of the season, it also concluded the activities of one of the greatest quintets that ever represented the Orange and Blue. Although faced with the difficult task of forming a new quintet, Coach Schouten was favored by having five veterans upon whom to rely. Some had had more experience than others, but due to the superior ability of the preceding five they had not had the opportunity of playing together very much before the opening of the present season. Four new-comers landed varsity berths along with the five veterans of last year's squad, and every one proved himself a capable performer and worthy of wearing the Orange and Blue. However, in the midst of a strenuous season two regulars were forced to leave the squad, and in spite of the fact that good men took their places, the effect of the blow was very noticeable. Compared with the 1925 record the one just hung up is not so impressive. A glance at the scores will bring out the fact, however, that in most cases only a few points separated winner from loser. T h e majority of the games were won only in the final minutes of play. The teams that opposed Hope on the court this year were of the highest possible caliber and in every game the characteristic Hope "spirit" was very evident. T h e five men on the floor gave their best and we are particularly proud of their ability. H a t s off, then, to the fighting spirit and gameness of the 1925-1926 Orange and Blue quintet! SCHEDULE 3S American Seaters SO Kalamazoo College Hope.. . 36 10 Hope.. . W Firlich H a Hope.. . 31 Albion 32 15 Hope.. . 35 Muskegon Hope... Hope.. . 77 Indianapolis " Y " 34 10 Hope.. . 34 Hope. . , 30 Mount Pleasant Normal..20 35 Hope.. . 26 Bethany C h u r c h . . . Hope... 31 St. Mary's 33 22 7K Manchester ( I n d . ) . 19 Concordia (Ind.) Hope... Hope... 25 36 75 Mount Pleasant No Hope.. . 19 17 Manchester (Ind.) 50 Hope.. . 15 Kalamazoo Normal Hope.. . 76 Kalamazoo College 31 Hope.. . 34 Hope.. . 3X Basch J e w e l e r s . . . . Hope... 3? Holland Furnaces 30 41 Hope ..48 31 Holland Furnaces.

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"HEINIE"

has played four years on Hope's court

teams, and his level headed, cool way of playing has saved many a close game from the opponents.

That

he will be missed next season goes without saying.

I

JOHN

H . ALBERS Captain

"LEFTY'S"

second year on the varsity gave Hope an

excellent forward.

Due to his hard work, Albion, St.

Mary's, Michigan State Normal and many other quintets played in Carnegie gym this season.

K M E L V I N B . L UB B E R S Manager

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One

Hundred

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HEIMIC

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TOMMY.

DEAN.

DIEPH

PEANUT.

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One Hundred

Fifty-five


De Master Bekken

Klay De Free

De Young Prakken

De Velder Vander Hill

Vanderbush Klaasen

Reserve Basketball The reserve team of the season just closed held a very unique position on the campus. Practically the whole squad was composed of Freshmen and from their excellent string of victories we have much to anticipate for the future. When a team can play as consistently as did our reserves and when it can show improvement over each preceding game, as they did, there is no doubt in the minds of Hopeites that two or three seasons hence will see another championship five wearing the Orange and Blue cavorting on Michigan college courts. With three or four first year men as reserves on the varsity and a whole squad of capable basketeers on the "scrubs" it is no small wonder that Coach "Jack" grins when the prospects for the next few years are discussed. Just you watch the 1926 Reserves!

Page

One

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Schouten (Coach) M. Peelen Luben Fieldhouse Kastein De Pree W . Peelen Lubbers Albers Cole Japinga Essebaggers Damstra Kinney Damson Buys De Groot Elenbaas

Monogram Club Baseball

Football

Basketball

T rack

J. Albers C. Bovenkerk C. Cole G. Damson A. De Groot J. De P r e e G. Elenbaas J. Poppen G. Steketee T . Vanden Brink

C. Bovenkerk A. Buys G. Damson R. Damstra T. Essebaggers E. Fell R. Gouwens C. Hill R. Japinga B. Kastein N. Keizer L. Kleis M. Peelen W . Peelen T. Vanden Brink N. Vander H a r t T . Van Zanden J. V e r Meulen

J. Albers C. Diephouse R. Japinga L. Kleis M. Lubbers D. Martin J. Poppen T. Vanden Brink

G. Cliquennoi R. Fieldhouse J. Kik D. Kinney B. Luben

â&#x20AC;˘

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A T H L E T I C DEBT DIGGERS Van Ess Haan Vanderbush Tysse Sprick Schutt De Cook Boter Cook Ramaker Meengs Du Mez Learned Veldman Leenhouts

GIRLS' S W E A T E R CLUB Ihrman, Hondelink, Reinhart, Van Hattem, Pater, Moir, De Cook, Banninga, Nettinga, Du Mez, Sprick, Van Ess Van Zyl. Schutt, Boucher, Ossewaarde, Reinhart, Olgers, Meengs, Den Herder, Smits, Ver Meer, Guhl Cook, Vander Veere, Crouch, Fredricks, Veldman, Albers, Rogers, Beyers

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Schouten G. D a m s o n

Wesselink Winter

Hinkamp Van

Kersen

Athletic Board of Control Athletic

Director

Athletic

Board Representative

President

Athletic

JOHN

Board

H.

SCHOUTEN

PETER WESSELINK GEORGE H .

DAMSON

Faculty Representative

PROF. P A U L E . H I N K A M P

Faculty Representative

P R O F . EGBERT W I N T E R

Alumni

Representative

DR. W .

T- V A N

Page One Hundred

KERSEN

Fifty-nine


Schouten Kinney Ver Meulen

Veldman Lubbers

Kuyper Damson

Van Ess Wesselink

Kik Bovenkerk Huenink

Athletic Board President Athletic

GEORGE H .

Director

Co-ed Representative Co-ed Representative Treasurer Assistant

Treasurer

SCHOUTEN

H .

HELEN

ESS

WESSELINK

JACOB M . DERWIN J.

Manager

VAN

E.

J E A N N E T T E \ ELDMAN PETER

Secretar\ Publicity

JOHN

DAMSON

KIK

HUENINK

LESTER J .

KUYPER

Football Manager

J A M E S \ ER M E U L E N

Baseball Manager

CARL E .

ROVENKERK

Track Manager

DELBERT

L.

KINNEY

MELVIN

B.

LUBBERS

Basketball

Manager

Tennis Manager

Page One Hundred

RUSSELL D .

Sixty

DAMSTRA


mrifmcs


Mrs. Durfee, Vanderbush, Schaafsma, Nattress, Dulmes, Ver Meulen, Steketee, Damson, Borst, Pennings Hospers, Van Hartesveldt, Nibbelink, Galman, Hyma, Moir, Soeter, (Bovenkerk)

Drama Class Play It was a happy thought of Doctor Dimnent to advance the status of the "Dramatic Club" to that of a regular "Drama Class" with curricular credit. The plays presented last year and this prove the ability of the students to study the technique of the drama, to analyze character, and then to put their studies into practice by assuming roles and working out their own interpretations, instead of merely accepting the directions of a coach. The play given the fourth and fifth of February, was the popular success, "The Goose Hangs H i g h " by Lewis Beach, based on the old saying, "Everything is lovely and the goose honks high", to indicate fair weather and favorable conditions. The purpose of the play is to show that, in spite of all the unfavorable criticism of the youth of today, and their apparent frivolities, they are still right at heart, and ready to show their appreciation of what their parents have done for them, as well as to help in time of need. The most difficult roles were those of the father and mother, played by Cornelius Hospers and Carol Van Hartesveldt; the liveliest action was demonstrated by the twins, Ruth Hyma and Jack Soeter: and the sentimental parts were ably sustained by Florence Dulmes and James Ver Meulen. Elizabeth Moir as "Granny", represented very cleverly the conservative element, seconded by Ruth Nibbelink as "Cousin Julia", who had kept her son "Ronald", Roy Nattress, at home. George Damson and James Galman were typical politicians, and Harriet Vanderbush, Albert Schaafsma, and Carl Bovenkerk rounded out this excellent cast, with the result that, as one of the Alumni phrased it: "No better acting was ever done on the Carnegie stage."

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The Book of Words of

THE PAGEANT OF 1926 Presented by

The Student Body of Hope College on the occasion of the Sixtieth Anniversary of the founding, of Hope College Sponsored by the Class of 1926

ON THE CAMPUS

Frederick H. Olert

-

Lois G. Brockmeier John Lloyd Kollen

JUNE,

Director of the Pageant -

-

Cornelius A. Hospers

-

-

Author

of the Book of Words

Composer and Director of the Music -

-

-

Manager of Properties

Paul Gebhard

Business Manager

Margaret M. Anderson Franklin J. H i n k a m p

Mistress Master

George V. Steketee

of the Robes

of the Costumes

Ivan A. Bosman

Henry N y b o e r

1926

Mechanician -

Stage Supt.

Manager

of Grounds

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J.L.KOLLEN.

We, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-Six, on the suggestion of the head of our English Department, resolved to present in a pageant the glorious past of Hope College in commemoration of her sixtieth anniversary. The Class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-Six graduates in a memorable year. It is the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the eightieth year since the first settlement in the city of Holland and the sixtieth anniversary of the founding of Hope College. At a meeting of the class to formulate plans for producing a festival which would celebrate these events. Miss Lois Brockmeier was chosen to write a book of words for a pageant. Paul Gebhard was selected for Business Manager; Cornelius Hospers was chosen the Manager of Properties: and Frederick Olert was elected General Director. John L. Kollen, the Director of the Orchestra, composed and will conduct the music. With this executive committee, supplemented by a helpful committee of the faculty, the work of making a pageant began. With whatever success our pageant will be crowned, let it be known that the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-Six does not wish to present a pageant for mere spectacular show. We act, not from a pardonable pride in the ability of our class to produce a successful historical pageant; but there is in the heart depths of the class members a glow of love for our Alma Mater and a patriotic pride in the achievements of the past. With deepest reverence we dedicate the Pageant of Nineteen Hundred and Twenty-Six to the glory of Hope.

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The Pageant of Nineteen-Hundred-Twenty-Six PROLOGUE

( A s the orchestra plays, there appears a long royal procession among whom are trumpeters; Father T i m e ; Queen Nineteen-Hundred-Twenty-Six; the three maids-of-honor, the Anniversaries of Seventeen-Hundred-Seventy-Six, EighteenHundred-Forty-Six, and Eighteen-Hundred-Sixty-Six, respectively; and the many Memories. Father Time and Queen Nineteen-Hundred-Twenty-Six seat themselves on the two thrones, around which all group themselves.) Chief Trumpeter: 0 massive throng, move gently lest thou rend The evening silence, as it softly falls, A mystic mantle, lending majesty To this great revelation. Now behold The enthroned monarch, even Father Time, The eldest, yet the youngest of us all. Being the Infinite, and at his side, The queen, sweet Nineteen-Hundred-Twenty-six, His royal daughter, ruling with her sire Throughout her brief twelve months upon the earth. H e r destined period. The gracious three, The maids-of-honor who attend the queen. Are anniversaries of years gone by. W h o entertain their mistress on this eve. And bring her royal glory. Each in turn Some wondrous revelation will bring forth. While all the watching world will loud exalt H e r Grace, sweet Nineteen-Hundred-Twenty-six. Father

Time: The earth stands hushed, while all spectators wait The opening of the night's festivities. A r t thou prepared, O Anniversary Of Seventy-six. to honor thy fair queen As thou hast promised?

Anniversary

of Seventeen

Hundred

Seventy-six:

And didest thou not know 1 always wait the pleasure of the queen And thee, good Father Time? Right instantly The evening's revelation shall u n f o l d ! O golden Memories that throng the throne. Now summon straight the waiting semblances Of famous characters of Seventy-six,

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To show how thirteen colonies defied The English tyrant, and to celebrate The signing of that famous document, Announcing liberty to those oppressed. ( T h e Memories of 1776 with fitting ceremony chant.) Memories: O Paul Revere, come boldly ride To waken all the country-side! O Minute-Men, with rifle run To rout the Reds from Lexington! O Colonies, rejoice and say "Thank God for Independence Day!"

EPISODE I.

Scene I. A peaceful night in the New England country. Paul Revere on horseback rides furiously past. Scene II. A dim morning in the New England country. Minute-Men assemble with their rude arms. A f t e r a large company has been organized, they march rapidly away. Scene I I I . A heavy ambush of trees near Lexington. The company of Minute-Men arrives and is ordered back of concealment. The Redcoats, coming from the opposite direction, are surprised by the Minute-Men and flee in terror. Scene IV. (July 4, 1776. A raised platform in an open place in Philadelphia. As the Liberty Bell is heard triumphantly ringing, a speaker mounts the platform. The noisy and rapidly collecting mob becomes hushed.) Speaker: My dear countrymen of the United States of America (loud cheers), no longer do we swear allegiance to England! (loud cheers). On this day, July 4, 1776, the Second Continental Congress has signed a unanimous Declaration of Independence, (loud cheers). Here it is! ( H e produces a paper and reads the first and last paragraphs of the Declaration of Independence.) My fellow patriots, the price of untold bloodshed remains still to be paid, but by the grace of God, not in vain! Our beautiful new flag, the Stars and Stripes will yet be raised in victory! Look, a company of our men is now coming, following the brave colors! God bless them!

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( 1 o the tune of ^ ankee Doodle, a company of American Bluecoats with fife and drum, passes by, following the flag. The crowd cheers. Many accompany the rapidly disappearing contingent. Soon all the people have dispersed.) INTERLUDE

I.

Father Time: Thou gracious maiden, Anniversary Of Seventeen-Seventy-six, thy Memories Have stirred the hearts of the observing throng With patriotic pride. Thy lovely queen Is flushed with joy. Cans't thou do e'en as well, Commemorating eighteen-forty-six, The coming of the Dutch to Michigan, To found with prayer the Holland "colony", O second maid-of-honor ? Anniversary

of Eighteen-Hundred-Forty-six: Would 'twere so, Good Father Time and Nineteen-Twenty-six! But of a certainty the Memories Will strive to worthily commemorate The famous year of eighteen-forty-six. (To the Memories) O Memories, the time now is at h a n d ! The many wait. Come forth, O eager ones, Do honor to thy queen, and celebrate The coming of the Dutch to Michigan! (Invocation by the Memories)

Memories: W e would see that sturdy band Sadly leave their native land. Stalwart D u t c h ! W e would see the ox-cart toil Slowly o'er the woodland soil Daring much ! W e would see the Indian send Gifts of food to his White Friend, And behold the settlers fight Grim disease and famine's plight. T r u s t their God throughout the test, And by Him who sees, thrice blest! EPISODE II.

Scene I. (Fall of 1846. The band of Hollanders who feel that God calls them to go to America to found a "colony" under the leadership of Dr. Albertus C. Van Raalte, are sorrowfully taking leave of the Netherlands. Prepared to board the ship and surrounded by their friends they sing the following song.)

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1. Farewell, O land of many dykes, Farewell, O land we love; Today it is we sail the sea. And never niore return to thee! So bids us God above. 2. There is a land, America Far, f a r across the sea Where we who journey may find rest. And build new homes, divinely blest. With sweetest liberty. 3. Beloved friends, refrain thy tears. Which now so sadly flow! If God commands, who hesitates? W e love Him mostâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the good ship waits: The time has come to go! 4. Farewell, O land of many dykes. Where never more we dwell! Farewell, O friends, we fondly pray T h a t you will follow us some day! Farewell, farewell, farewell! Scene II. February 9, 1827, between Allegan and the Black Lake region. George S. Harrington of Allegan is conveying in an ox-cart a small party consisting of six men and one wom a n: The Reverend A. C. Van Raalte, Evert Sagers, W . Notting and wife, J. Lankheet, J. Laarman, and Egbert Fredricks. ( M r . and Mrs. Grootenhuis have preceded these.) The seven are representatives of the band of Hollanders, temporarily stationed at Allegan. They are bound for the location selected by Dr. Van Raalte for the "colony". Scene I I I . ( T w o weeks after the arrival of the first contingent. In a little clearing stands the first log cabin. By the camp fire are Mrs. Notting and Mrs. Grootenhuis, attending the cooking. From the forest come the men, weary f r o m the day's chopping. At length there approaches the traditional band of Ottawas, accompanied by Mr. Isaac Fairbanks, a governmental agent appointed to teach the Indians farming, and the Reverend George N. Smith, the missionary. The Indians bear gifts from their fields.) Indian Chief: W h o are you, ye Pale-Face strangers. Wandering hither to our woodlands. To this land of lake and forest? W h o are you, ye Pale-Face strangers ? Are you like these White-Skin brothers. Brother Smith and Brother Fairbanks? Brother Smith loves Brother Red-Skin,

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Tells them of the great God-Spirit; Brother Fairbanks teaches Red-Skins H o w to grow their golden cornfields, If you love us as these brothers, W e will love you, you will love us-â&#x20AC;&#x201D; All of us are friends and brothers. Dr. Van Raalte: Brother Red-Skins, we are Dutchmen, Wandering hither to these woodlands, Where we hope to live and prosper Side by side with Red-Skin brothers. As the White-Men. Smith and Fairbanks, Peacefully have lived among you. So would we with peace and friendship Dwell among our Red-Skin brothers. Indian Chief: As a token of our friendship, W e would give to you these presents. Harvest fruits, stored o'er the winter. Products f r o m our golden cornfields. Rich rewards which cultivation Taught by Brother Fairbanks brought us. Dr. Van Raalte: Generous brothers of the woodlands, Generous tillers of the cornfields. W e appreciate the bounty Which our brother Red-Skins give us. Scarce, indeed, is food in spring time, Scarce is produce of the cornfield A f t e r the long lingering winter. And we thank the great God-Spirit For these kindly Red-Skin brothers W h o will share with us their blessings. ( T h e visitors then depart. Scene closes.) Scene IV. (Spring of 1847. There arrives the large body of the Van Raalte group who had been waiting at Allegan for summons to come. A f t e r the first welcoming scene. Dr. Van Raalte, taking an ax, exhibits it to the men of the party and speaks.) Dr. Van Raalte: Brothers, this ax is the implement of labor with which we must toil for many long days to come. Hundreds of trees must be felled to make clearings on which to build and to provide lumber with which to erect our future homes

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and our church. This work is not as easy as it may appear to you inexperienced woodsmen. But just as your sturdy Dutch fathers fought the sea, can you not wrestle with these giants of the forests? W h a t say you, my men? M en: Dr. Van Raalte, you can't beat the Dutch! (All seize axes, and, swinging them, sing the following song.) 1. Dutchmen are we From the old country, Where we conquered the sea, For you can't beat the Dutch! Refrain: Swing away ax, O never relax, 'Till wood is as wax. For you can't beat the Dutch! 2. W e For We For

crossed the sea more liberty, want to be free. you can't beat the D u t c h !

3. Woodlands we take; W a r m houses we make; The forest trees quake, For they can't beat the Dutch. Scene V. [Taken from the Pageant of 1916 written by Adrianna Kolyn (Mrs. T. H. E l f e r d i n k ) . ] Obstacles of the pioneers symbolically presented. Dr. Van Raalte enters, followed by men and women of his company. They carry tools for the clearing of the forest. My people, who have braved the stormy seas, That liberty and freedom may be ours To worship God in spirit and in truth, Grave trials more await u s : we must face The wilderness with all its perils dire. But we will conquerors be! Behold! W h a t figures wondrous strange are these ? ( E n t e r the genii of the waters. Several girls dressed in varying shades of green.) ZM Van Raalte: W h o are ye, and what seek ye here? Genius of Water: W e are the waters, our power is mighty. Bridges we sweep away, frail barks we shatter.

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Swirling and rushing our torrents in spring time, Little we care for the crops you have planted. Breathless and empty the hot fields in summer, When, in our pleasure, our power is withholden. Men, what art thou? W e defy thee! Dr. Van Raalte: O Spirits dire, we come of sturdy stock For centuries your power we have crushed. But who are these,â&#x20AC;&#x201D;more genii come to taunt ? ( E n t e r the genii of the cold. Girls in white.) Genius of the Cold: Spirits of cold, Cruel and bold. Chilling the soul with our ice breath. Tremble and quail, O mortal frail. Think of the winter's long, shuddering death! Dr. Van Raalte: Never can ye fright us, Spirits of the Cold. Within our homes, we'll keep the hearth-fires bright. Within our hearts, the love of God will glow. ( E n t e r the genii of the wilderness. Girls dressed in autumnal colors.) Genius

of the Wilderness: H o w darest thou to come within these trackless woods, To venture 'mong these silent hills; dost thou not know That these are ours alone ? Be gone!

( D r . V a n Raalte's followers come up to him and try to pull him back. H e becomes more determined.) Dr. Van Raalte: My people, courage take! O trust the Lord. T h e elements themselves we will d e f y ! ( E n t e r the winds. Girls dressed in pale blue.) First Wind: I am the North wind of wintry blasts. Second

Wind: I am the East Wind. Misfortune I bear you.

Third Wind: I am the West Wind. I send the storm.

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Fourth

Wind:

I am the South Wind of scorching breath. (Enter ghosts of Hunger, Cholera, and Malaria.) Hunger: Wailing of children, fainting of strong men. Madness of soul, Such do I bring you. Cholera: I am Cholera. When once I come Within thy villages, When once I gain a victim there. Then go I not away, but heartless still, Scatter rank poison Man and beast must die an awful death. T h a t is my pleasure. Beware! Malaria: I am the Spirit of wasting Malaria, Ling'ring, insidious bringer of death. Slowly I sap out the spirit and vigor Until the grim end. (A blinding flash of lightning follows, and a voice in the distance cries out.) Hilcha, T am the Lightning. ( I n the distance is heard a peal of thunder and a voice as from a sepulchre cries out.) Wulgudu, I am the Thunder. (Another flash of lightning follows and Death enters. He comes in through the rear entrance, walks between the elements, and comes up to Dr. Van Raalte. Dr. Van Raalte hides his face, overcome by the gruesome figure.) Death: These are my cohorts, and I am Death. Thou art but human. Dost thou defy me? Dr. Van Raalte: 0 Spirits, get you gone; I fear you not! Such dangers are but tools of Providence T o build a character. O Death, e'en thee 1 now defy. Be gone ! Death (after

a moment's

pause):

W e go, unconquerable man, we go. ( T h e other elements slowly withdraw.) Scene VI. Arrival of a later band of immigrants at Holland. They come in their Sunday best, expecting to find a great city. They sing as indicated:

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Song: Newcomers: O where, O where is the city of Holland? O where, O where can it be? They said it was here, But sadly we fear The city we nowhere can see. People of Holland: O here, O here is the city of Holland! O here, O here, can't you see? Mid maple and birch, Log houses and church Stands the new little settlement city! Newcomers: Can this, can this be the city of Holland? Can this, can this be the City? W h y did we expose O u r fine city clothes For what is not even a city? People of Holland: O this, O this is the city of Holland, A new, a new little city. W h a t did you suppose W h e n you put on your clothes? But they're not too good for our city! Newcomers: So this, so this is the City of Holland, These little log houses we see! But we must at least stay For one little day. In this queer little settlement city! People of Holland: O this, O this is the City of Holland And welcome, welcome are ye. For if ye but stay For one little day. You'll never depart f r o m our city! Scene Y I I . ( A quiet Sunday morning in the new city. Two engineers sent by the United States government to inspect harbor possibilities find no one at home. Log huts and alleys are deserted. Wondering whether all the settlers have perished, they stroll eastward over a well-trodden trail, where suddenly there bursts

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on their ears music like the sound of many waters. Following the direction from which the sound comes, they lind a block church in the woods, filled with people at worship.) Fii'st Engineer: This city of Holland seems utterly deserted. Not a soul in sight. can be the matter? Can it be that the inhabitants have beeen massacred?

What

Second Engineer: Surely, not by the Indians. Isaac Fairbanks says that his Ottawas are most docile. First Engineer: Listen! (The worshippers are heard singing Psalm 89, verse 7.) Second Engineer: It is like the sound of many waters. First Engineer: It is the voice of people singing! Second Engineer: Do you realize that today is Sunday? The Hollanders are all at church, I believe. Fifst Engineer: Then that accounts for the empty streets! Everyone in Holland goes to church! ('1 he singing stops, after a few moments people appear, many in family groups, going home from church. Dr. \ an Raalte welcomes the engineers.) INTERLUDE II.

Father

Time: W a s ever there a folk of greater faith In the Almighty than the sturdy Dutch? Was ever worship made more beautiful Than when a Holland congregation sings The sacred Psalms? O lovely maid, know well 1 he queen and I and the observing throng Are moved to silence, for more eloquent Than any tribute rendered thee by work. Now stands prepared to entertain the third And last fair maid-of-honor of the queen. Fhou, who celebratest eighteen-sixty-six The birthday of Hope College, we await Thy gracious pleasure.

Anniversary

of 1866: O good Father Time And Nineteen-Twenty-six, your majesties. Have heard how history hath blazed in gold

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The birthday of Hope College? Marvelous The many things which she hath writ thereby Upon the scroll. O joyous Memories, Call at once the Spirit of History. Memories

with fitting ceremony

chant:

Spirit of History, Come! The whole waiting world stands d u m b ! For thou boldest the past. The first and the last Of all that is written. O come! Spirit of History, Speed! Unroll thy great scroll and read, For thou boldest the past The first and the last Of Hope's golden record. O read! EPISODE H I .

( T h e Spirit of History appears, carrying a great scroll.) Spirit of History sings: Heeding thy call I come. Memories! â&#x20AC;˘ Swift I speed when you plead, Memories! My great scroll I unroll and I read W h a t is written in gold on the parchment. Behold, 'Tis History's record of Hope. Memories! ( T h e Spirit of History then holds out the scroll, thus inviting all to read. A voice is beard giving the interpretation.) THE

H I S T O R Y OF H O P E COLLEGE.

The history of Hope College is a glorious history, begun by that brave band of Dutch who left their native land, October 2, 1846, and settled the following spring on the banks of Black Lake. Dissatisfied because provisions were made only for elementary education, they longed for an institution of higher learning where their children might be taught the fundamentals of culture and religion, and where ministers and missionaries of the Gospel might be trained. The first institution of higher learning that the people of Holland founded was the Academy, established in 1851. This amounted to merely a Latin class, added to the regular elementary school taught by Mr. Taylor and his two daughters. Nevertheless, Dr. Van Raalte said of it, "This is my Anchor of Hope f o r my people in the f u t u r e . " In 1853 the Academy was separated from the public school and put under the care of the Board of Education of the General Synod. Because there was neither building nor equipment, Mr. John Van Vleck held bis class first in the second story of the public school building and later in the orphanage. Mr. Van Vleck was the successor of Mr. Taylor after the one intervening year of service by the Reverend Mr. Beidler. Both Mr. Taylor and Mr. Van Vleck were men of extreme devotion to their work in the school, sacrificing to its cause, health and salary.

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Seventy-five


To get the means to build an institution was a difficult matter to the "colonists". Dr. Van Raalte in his zeal donated five acres of ground. Money was not so easily obtained. A f t e r a great effort, however, twelve thousand dollars was raised with which a commodious building was erected, named Van \ leek Hall. "It had quarters for the Principal's family and dormitories for the young men, besides the necessary rooms for class and administrative purposes, and until the close of the century was the most important building on the campus." A f t e r the resignation of Mr. John Van Vleck, in 1859, the Reverend Mr. Philip Phelps of Hudson-on-the-Hudson was appointed to the position of principal. It was through his earnest, tireless efforts that the struggling little academy became a collegiate institution. In 1862 he enrolled graduates of the Academy as a Freshman college class. Co-operating with him, the Synod of Chicago entered upon a campaign to raise eighty-five thousand dollars for the development of the school. The solitary teaching responsibility was further more relieved by the addition of three worthy instructors. Thus it came about that in the golden year, 1866, the school was incorporated as a college under the laws of the State of Michigan. In these memorable days. Dr. Phelps was made first president of Hope College. In this year occurred the first College Commencement, on July 14, 1866. Sixty years have now passed. Sixty years of progress as shown by the enlargement of the campus, the construction of many buildings, the increased size of the faculty, and the swelling numbers of the student body. It has been sixty years of achievement as shown by the record of Hope College in the field of scholarship, of oratory, of forensics, of music, and of athletics. It has been sixty years ripe in the fulfillment of the highest aims of its founders, as shown by the character of the body of graduates who have gone into the world to serve and uplift mankind. The past of Hope is a challenge to its future, a future bright with the dawn of promise! ( A f t e r the voice has concluded the above interpretation. Queen NineteenHundred Twenty-six rises to speak.) Queen Nineteen-Hundrcd-Twenty-six: Spirit of History, who holds the past, Written in words of tested truth, 1 rise To thank thee and my Maid and Memories W h o brought thee forth. Hope College should rejoiceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; This record radiates the future's dawn. 'Tis marvelous. ( T h e Spirit of Hope College suddenly appears.) Spirit of Hope College : Hope College does rejoice! Queen Nineteen-Hundred-Twenty-six But who art thou?

Page One Hundred

Seventy-six

(in surprise): Whence come'st thou here?


Spirit of Hope College'. T i s I, The Spirit of Hope College, and I come T o verify this record. It is true. Queen

Nineteen-Hundred-Twenty-six: I am assured of it. But how dids't thou So suddenly appear ?

Spirit of Hope: O gentle queen, I am a spirit. Ever I abide Upon this campus. This bright torch, I hold. Continually pours forth its lustrous light. Though I am o f t unseen. Invisible, I here have witnessed all the livelong eve This celebration of thy noble maids, Which honor thee. O lovely queen, I too Would add to these festivities. Would'st thou Permit me now to summon on review All the departments and activities Of which Hope College boasts? Queen

Nineteen-Hundred-Tiventy-six: Right instantly. Sweet Spirit, call them forth for we acclaim All those that bear the proud insignia Of peerless Hope.

(There marches by a procession of Hope College students, representing the departments and activities of the college. They are singing "The Orange and Blue". A f t e r all have passed the Queen rises to speak.) Queen

Nineteen-Hundred-Tiventy-six: O Spirit of Hope College, who imparts The flame that feeds and burns in these young souls That here marched by, I would send heralds forth To summon all the peoples of the world To speak their fondest gratitude and love. And crown thee with the leaves of victory.

( T h e Queen ends out heralds. The people of the world come bearing laurels, and with fitting ceremony they crown the victorious Spirit of Hope College. The Spirit of Hope College then speaks.) Spirit of Hope College: O gracious Queen, sweet Nineteen Twenty-Six, And Father Time, and peoples of the world.

Page

One Hundred

Seventy-seven


No words of human speech can paint my joy Its color is too bright and beautiful To reproduce, but in the days to come, Mindful of this, I shall more zealously Press on into the future. Queen Nineteen-Hundred-Twenty-six: Press ever on, Hope Spirit, and keep bright Thy flaming torch. Illuminate the earth By service, knowledge, and the love of God, And so, O radiant one, press on. But now The time has come to close festivities. My maids-of-honor, very worthily Did ye commemorate those famous years Of which ye are the anniversaries, And royally dids't honor me, the queen. O massive throng, who witnessed what my maids Brought forth this eve, have ye at all been moved With pride of fatherland, when ye beheld The days that made those struggling colonies A land of promise to the sturdy Dutch, W h o in their new-made Holland kindled bright The torch which Hope's fair spirit holdeth high To light the world? If then thou art so moved. Before thou goest on thy homeward way Join heart in song, and sing America. (All spectators join in singing America in the Hope College way.)

Page One Hundred

Seventy-eight


w . v w 4i-\ rr- -v-m

i 1

%

¥

<

r -. • V» I

Preparatory


The Preparatory School Hail Hope P r e p ! This joysome echo rings throughout the ages in honor of the oldest educational institution in the city of Holland. " P r e p " with its wholesome surroundings and Christian influences scores another victory in giving another class of its best to the world. The year 1926 has brought out the fine spirit of friendliness and good fellowship which cannot be forgotten. The record of the baseball team is not brilliant, but by its victories and well fought defeats has brought honor to the name of " P r e p " . Our five on the basketball court have also established a name by their hard and persistent efiforts. Then we must not forget the pleasure of attending the class parties where many friendships have been strengthened. So Hail Hope Prep! Though small in body, we are great in spirit. OFFICERS

President

...CLARENCE

Vice-President

MARGUERITE

Secretary-Treasurer

..MARVIN

Page

S. A.

HOWARD BOLHUIS

H.

KUIZENGA

One

Hundred

Seventy-nine


MARTIN HUIZENGA

7â&#x20AC;&#x17E; R

"Despatch is the soul of business." Meliphone, V - P r e s . '25 ; Baseball '24-26 A

.

'

L B E R T A KLOMPARENS

lC ll9an

'

Hamilton,

Michigan

And join zmth thee calm peace and quiet." H a m i l t o n H i g h '23, '24; H o l l a n d H i g h '25. ANTHONY B . KEIZER

Hudsonville,

Michigan

A very clever man by nature. Meliphone; Science C l u b ; Basketball '26; J a m e s t o w n H i g h '23, '24. V l 0 I

; ^ / L .^ulDer 1 he joy of youth and health her eyes display'd." Holland H i g h '23, '24; Minerva, P r e s . '26.

JOSEPH W .

Holland,

ANTONIDES

Michigan

Jenison,

Michigan

Of such a merry, nimble, stirring spirit." Melip h o n e ; Science C l u b ; Basketball '26. CLARENCE S. HOWARD

Pompton

Lakes,

New

Jersey

He zvhose inborn worth his acts commend." Meliphone; " A " Class P r e s . ; Y. M. C. A. Cab. *26; Basketball '25, '26; Baseball '25, '26. MARGUERITE A . BOLHUIS

Coopersville,

Michigan

'A positive character." Minerva, V - P r e s . ' 2 6 ; H a r m o n y Glee Club. CORNELIUS J . V A N LEEUWEN

The incessant Meliphone.

Holland.

Michigan

care and labour of his mind."

CORNELIA M . KLOOSTER

Byron

Center,

Michigan

"Deeds, not words." J a m e s t o w n H i g h '23, '24; Holland H i g h '25; Minerva. MARVIN H . KUIZENGA

Holland,

Michigan

"The intellectual power through ivords and things." Meliphone, P r e s . '26; Class P r e s . '25; V a l e d i c t o r i a n ; Science Club, P r e s . '26.

Page

One Hundred

Eighty


HAROLD DYKHUIZEN

Holland,

Michigan

"O, he sits high in all the people's hearts." Austin H i g h '22-24; Meliphone; Baseball '25, '26; " A " Class Play '25. HELEN R . KUITE

Hamilton,

Michigan

'"Cause grace and virtue are within." Hamilton H i g h '23, '24; Minerva. HENRIETTA J . BEUKEMA

Holland,

Michigan

"The fountain of beauty is the heart." M i n e r v a ; Y. W . C. A. Cab. '25. JEANNETTE BOSCH

Jamestown,

Michigan

"Where music dwells." Jamestown H i g h '23, '24; Holland H i g h '25; Minerva. HARRY LEMMEN

Holland,

Michigan

"There is always room for a man of force." Meliphone, Pres. '26; Basketball '25, '26; Baseball '25, '26. GERRIT TYSSE

"Enjoy

Holland,

the luxury

HELENE M . BROEK

"Settledness

Michigan

of thought." Holland,

of mind, and a consistency

Michigan

within."

CATHERINE K E M M E

Zecland,

Michigan

Minerva, Pres. '26; Salutatorian. GRADUS B . WEDEVEN

"Good nature Meliphone.

regulated

Hollaiid,

Michigan

by good sense."

Page

One

Hundred

Eighty-one


Bolhuis

Buikema Rawls Kocman Kuizenga Klooster Kleinheksel Kuite Bruinix Hoeve Kemme Mulder Oonk Geerlings Bosch Wilterdink E. Mulder Molewyk

DeWitt

Minerva Society 1 he Minerva Society is the oldest of the girls' societies now existing upon the campus. It was founded in 1896. It has struggled to learn true wisdom and has given every Minervite the beauty of true friendship. It is an answer to all desires. In our hearts are enshrined Love, 1 ruth. Leadership and Friendship. May our lives ring with Honor and Love when we happily sing: 'Minerva to thee ive will ever be true, We will love thee till death do us part, IVe will honor thy name, we will e'er spread thy fame O Minerva, so dear to our hearts."

OFFICERS First Semester VIOLA

A.

HENRIETTA ANNA

A.

CORDELIA

Page

One

Second

MULDER KUIZENGA.. KOEMAN KLEINHEKSEL

Hundred

Eighty-two

. President . Vice-President . Secretary . . Treasurer .

Semester

CATHERINE CORDELIA

KEMME

KLEINHEKSEL

.EILEEN

MOLEWYK

HARRIET K .

OONK


Antonides Juist Gundlah Keizer Howard Lemmen Feenstra Kuizenga Roon Veele Huizenga Dykhuizen V a n Leeuwen Welmers De W i t t Boone Meurer Van H a r n Wiersma Having-a

Meliphone Society To tlie sixty-seven years of Meliphone's existence upon Hope's campus there has been added another which may truly be said to be one of great success. Meliphone lays claim to being one of the oldest literary societies in Western Michigan. People admire the type of men that it sends forth. This society is not merely of local repute, it has its members in all parts of the world. The weekly meetings are a source of inspiration and help to all its members. One of the largest and most attractive events is the staging of the annual play which is looked forward to by the community as a whole. The joint meetings of the Meliphone and Minerva societies add to the spirit and the fellowship of the Preparatory School. Thus Meliphone boasts of its illustrious past and foresees a glorious future. OFFICERS

Fall Term President Vice-President

MARVIN ...STEPHEN

IVinter H.

WIERSMA

Secretary

CLARENCE S .

Treasurer

MARTIN

Term

KUIZENGA. .STEPHEN

Spring

WIERSMA

HARRY

Term

LEMMEN

HARRY L E M M E N

ERNEST F . KEIZER

HOWARD. . .BERNARD KEIZER

MARTIN HUIZENGA

HUIZENGA

CORNELIUS V A N

LEEUWEN

Page

DANIEL E .

One

Hundred

BOONE

Eighty-three


Knol

Juist Wright

Ritchie Wyngarden

Howard Lemmen

Bosch Wiersma

Veldman (Coach) Dykhuizen

Baseball, 1925 The Preparatory Baseball team surprised everyone this year.

With much

untrained material, Coaches Schouten and Veldman succeeded in placing a strong team on the field. The students showed their interest by attending both home games and those played out of town.

The biggest game of the year was

with Zeeland when our team was victorious in a hard fought contest. High and Hudsonville were soon added to the list of victories.

Christian

At a return game

with Hudsonville the team suffered its only defeat in being nosed out by one run. Next year's team will find five regulars in the line-up, and has all promises for a banner year.

Page

One Hundred

Eighty-four


E. Keizer B. Keizer

Howard

Lemmen Wiersma

Juist Antonides

Basketball, 1926 The 1926 basketball season found the " P r e p s " once more represented on the court.

W i t h H a r r y Lemmen as manager and Stephen Wiersma as captain the

team had a very good season.

Each year the call is given for new players, but this

year many responded and two teams were formed from which the best men were selected.

Among the teams played were Jamestown Reserves, Christian High

Reserves, Zeeland Reserves and the National Guards.

The team suffered defeats

at Jamestown and Christian High, but succeeded in defeating Zeeland by one point.

Page

One Hundred

Eighty-five


H o p e Preparatory School

By

the

REV. THOMAS E . WELMERS

She needs no introduction; rather is introduction to her needful.

W e often

fail to appreciate the acres of diamonds on which we are treading; and that which is nearest and best is time and again overlooked. For more than three score and ten years Hope Prep has filled a leading place in the cultural development of the community, and contributed no mean part to the blessing which the Reformed Church in America has been to the world.

It

would be folly to attempt to estimate what the institution has meant for many an individual, for our country, and for the world. than they knew.

Glory has crowned their labors.

Our fathers planted better

May their bones rest in peace.

Therefore, though we can boast a glorious past, we would not live on it alone. age.

The incoming generations with their fresh young blood prevent decrepit Though we can not boast of large numbers, we have learned that numbers

is sometimes idol worship.

Our spirit is not dead, but wholesome and enthusiastic.

Proximity and association with college men and women we count as salubrious. O u r literary organizations are prosperous.

Fellowship is intimate.

This we

know, that success depends upon ourselves largely, and to this end we labor. Soon we shall be scattered to the four winds and here we are laying within ourselves that which will prevent our being scattered by the winds. Nor have we an apology to offer for the future. On the contrary our faith is strong, and what or who can resist faith ? Our institution has a place and that a unique one to fill. It shall be our aim to maintain the good of the past, add to it a star or two, and hand it down to our successors with the sincere hope and wish that they may cherish as we have done and are doing the blessings of Hope Preparatory School.

Page

One Hundred

Eighty-six

"Vivat, Crescat, Floreat Academia."


Seminary


W E S T E R N THEOLOGICAL S E M I N A R Y

Greetings from The Seminary In the spirit of Christian fellowship and communal interest Western Theological Seminary extends its greetings to the student body of Hope. The bonds between Western and Hope have always been those of Christian brotherhood and fellowship; so closely have they been bound together, that many, who are not properly informed, consider them not as two separate institutions as they really are, but as one. However mistaken this notion may be, it does bear witness to the fact of our complete agreement and unity of spirit. This is as it should be. Though we of the seminary are taking up specialized work for service in the kingdom of Christ, we feel in our associations with the friends across the way that the same Christian spirit and purpose is predominant among them, as here among us. So f a r as Spirit is concerned we are absolutely one. Hope's spirit seems to be contagious. This is evident in a special sense to those of us who have taken our work preparatory to entering Western, at other colleges. Before entering Western we had very little, if any, feeling for Hope, naturally we couldn't have, but it didn't take much time to win us over to a w a r m friendship for, and a feeling of identity with, the students across the way. Again let us assure you of our deeply felt interest in and for you. W e are all happy to be here at Western, and not least among the reasons for that is the fact that Western links itself so closely with the spirit, name, and fame of Hope.

Page

One

Hundred

Eighty-seven


Seminary Faculty J O H N E. K U I Z E N G A

HENRY HOSPERS

President of Practical

Professor of Old Testament Languages and Literature In charge of Student Preaching

Professor

Theology

A. B. Hope College, 1899 A. M. University of Michigan, 1915 D. D. Hope College, 1916

A. B. Hope College, 1899 A. M. Hope College, 1902 D. D. Hope College, 1916

JACOB VANDER MEULEN

S I E B E C. N E T T I N G A

Professor of New Testament Language and Literature Secretary of the Faculty

Professor of Historical Theology Treasurer of the Trustees of the Seminary

A. B.Hope College, 1897 A. M. Hope College, 1900 D. D. Hope Colleg,e 1920

A. B. Hope College, 1900 A. M. Hope College, 1903 D. D. Hope College, 1919 E V A R T J. B L E K K I N K

Professor

of Systematic Librarian

Theology

A. B. Hope College, 1883 A. M. Hope College, 1886 D. D. Rutgers University, 1920

Page One

Hundred

Eighty

eight


The Seminary L. BRUNSTING

P. R.

VAN

FAROWE

D E BEER J.

C. DE BRUIN

C. NIEUWENHUIS

HOGENBOOM

G.

A . HELLENGA

R . L UB B E R S

P. KINKEMA

I. SCHERPENISSE

G. MENNENGA

D R . VANDER M E U L E N

J.

PRINS

GOULOOZE

R.

G. FLIKKEMA

J. VELDMAN

H.

M . STEINKAMP B . BROWER

A . V A N ZANTE

DR. NETTINGA

W.

ROZEBOOM

C. LAMAN

J. BLAAUW C. R o o s

J . D E JONG

DR. HOSPERS

SHERMER

D E JONG J.

RIKKERS

H.

VOS

ROZENDAAL R . DYKSTRA

A . MEENGS

P. KUIKEN

A.

F.

FRYLING

L . D E MOOR

DR. KUIZENGA

Page

One

J . OTTIPOBY

DR. BLEKKINK

Hundred

Eighty-nine


Why Become a Minister? By

THE REV. J O H N

E.

KUIZENGA

Why indeed?—There are those who look upon the ministry as about the last job a live young man would choose. Have they thought the matter out carefully to come to such a conclusion? It does not seem so to me. T H E CHALLENGE OF A HARD T A S K . The real minister faces work that will call for every power of his whole self. Oratory—be it remembered the minister preaches over a hundred sermons every year, and has innumerable opportunities to speak in addition—oratory calls for the highest self discipline and self control. The minister has as much opportunity to teach as most teachers. The organizing and directing of a church calls for considerable administrative ability. The minister must meet all professions and all types of humanity on a footing where he must maintain respect for himself and for his office. W e talk familiarly these days of a "big job", and the ministry is such, particularly now when some doubt its place. T H E CHALLENGE OF A NECESSARY T A S K . In a sense all the professions and trades that are honorable are necessary: but the ministry is most necessary of all. President Coolidge has recently said that legislatures and congresses cannot create the spirit that will make their laws effective. The real spirit that gives the laws power and cohesion to society comes from religion. The legal profession is to-day helpless before the wave of crime, unless one wishes to read against it a sharper indictment. Babson has only recently said again and again that religion holds industry together. O u r higher education, even, somehow does not succeed in making us a nation of moral and spiritual power. Religion alone has the dynamic needed, and it was the ideal of Jesus that religion should be mediated by special "men of God", who should also be to mankind the heralds of the gospel of salvation. T H E CHALLENGE OF A GREAT T A S K . The tragedies and triumphs supreme of humanity are the tragedies and triumphs of individual humans. The minister has a chance to be a true "friend to man". He may do more for individuals than any other. Healing of the body is needed—but what is it without healing of the spirit? Enlightenment, science, education, how much they are needed, but whither shall they tend? Industry is needed so there may be a chance to earn and accumulate wealth—but what shall we do with it? Does wealth make individual or nation great? Accepting all these as needed, and honoring every true worker who does his own work for humanity well, yet it is true that all these are less than nothing unless men are spiritually right with God. In season and out of season, in public and in private, this is the minister's great work, "we beseech you therefore in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God." So he comes close to young and old, he shares their joys and sorrows, and tastes the finest joy on earth when he leads men in the way they should go. "Unskillful he to fawn, or seek f o r power By doctrines fashioned to the varrying h o u r ; F a r other aims his heart had learned to prize—• More bent to raise the wretched than to rise." "But in his duty, prompt at every call H e watched and wept, he prayed and felt for a l l ; And, as a bird each fond endearment tries T o tempt its new-fledged offspring to the skies, H e tried each art, reproved each dull delay. Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way."

Men may count themselves unworthy to enter the ministry. count themselves too great.

Page One Hundred Ninety

Never may they


^

Mb-

.

m

v1

:• -

?sV<-

' .'-IS1' /s

m

, 0 * 1 lCK«k* >-N<v' cjT

'

X H

m

)

Take A Peek m


+'

— +.

TAKE A PEEK AT

Every college sheik—take a peek! Every college p r o f — h a v e a l a f f ! Every college maid—please try awfully hard to grin ! OUR

1926 MILESTONE HUMOR " T h e bear went over the mountain to see what he could see"— The student bent over the fountain ( ? ) Yes! we have one! Honest!

REMEMBER! The trouble with most humor censors is that they haven't got a censor humor. HAPPENS OFTEN Lad writes—"Father, I am in need!" Dad writes—"Son, I am in Cincinnati!"

Dimmie (in chapel) : is still a student! Yes, we Fresh Frosh (owner next year. Sell your Reo,

NO MORE AUTOS??? " W e are all students! Every professor, every teacher are all students!" of a Ford c-a-r) : " A h - h a ! Students can't have cars Dimmie boy!"

A definite etiquette of replies to ice-breaking queries has been established as Hope tradition and is herewith appended for the use of on comers. Yeh, 'tis confusing. Hope is in Holland but Holland is— W h y ?—oh! Really a small college has lots of 'vantages— Jussa Modern language English course. You see I haven't n'thing definite in view yet. And ya get a good all round— O r a t o r y ! Yeh, I've 'tended by first class in public— Yeh, we have. W e haven't been beaten yet. \ eh, he's a good player. My sister's chum was a good friend o f — No. Don't b'lieve I do. You see I don't know all the Freshmen yet and he— You'll find him at Pat's. G'bye.

Page

One Hundred

Ninety-one


STUDENTS!

Throughout the ad. section there are five mistakes. Four "l"s are placed upside down, and one "n". The MILESTONE Staff offers a dollar to each one who finds one of the mistakes first. Notify the Business Manager when you have found one, telling in whose ad. the mistake was found.

Do you love me or do you not ? You told me once, but I forgot. Garry Vander Borg can drive his car with one hand—we know because he used the other to tip his hat. Money is good.

She married him for his own good.

H e : You know I like variety—it's the spice of life. She: Well, my name's Heinz! TID-BITS FROM T H E GAME Get 'em!—down in front—yes! T e a m ! A h ! Marge—he's the ref—Papa, when will the game—m'gosh it's cold—there's a fellow f r o m — H u r r a h ! First down !—Run you—yes, dear, that's the linesman—He—Hot dawgs !—they're off —team!—Looka Ray—Red h o t — H - O - P - E — m y son can play—are you colddarling?—Daddy I wanna—ho! Touchdown! R a h !

Page

One Hundred

Ninety-two


HART SCHAFFNER & MARX MEN'S CLOTHING They have the "snap" university men like—they iiave the quality to keep that "snap" in place. There are champions 100 yard men, milers, and champion football teams. H a r t Schaffner & M a r x are champions in the Clothing field. They're on top.

Hart Schaffncr & Marx

H O U S E M A N 8c J O N E S Grand Rapids ——4.

Page One Hundred

Ninety-three


- , 7

Y=s

\it Is Us

^wry HigKV? iu$i' TairtM\it,rii^"B<rEÂťAi Co^ew^t

Teelen.

Page

One Hundred

Ninety-four


CLOTHING FURNISHINGS FOOTWEAR

P.

S. &

BOTER CO.

TWO LEADING

STORES

Clothing - 16 W. 8th St. Shoes - 14 W. 8th St.

Ntnetee7j Years of Successful Service in Holland +

Page

One

Hundred

Ninety-five


+ —

THE ZEELAND RECORD Entertains only Best Wishes for All Hope Students A. VAN KOEVERING, Editor Zeeland, Michigan

Prins Shoe Store

Electric Shoe Repairing' Quick Service

Diekema, Kollen & Ten Gate

Attorneys at Law

1 ]

124 E . 8TII ST., HOLLAND, M I C H .

I

HOLLAND

MICHIGAN

M « flH.

T R Y US Lunches, Ice Cream, Soda Confectionery, Cigars

Welling's Restaurant

H . P. K L E I S

Dry Goods, Groceries Fruits and Vegetables

120 E. Main St. ZEELAND

MICHIGAN

154 E. 8th St.

Phone 5298

+»—

HOLLAND FURNITURE MARKET

For all kinds of used goods, stoves, etc. We buy, sell, and exchange. Phone 5259

Page One Hundred

Ninety-six

214 College Ave.


1925 Sun.

September Mon.

6 13 20 27

1925 Sun.

5 12 19 26

1925

Tues

6 13 20 27

3 10 17 24

Sat.

5 12 19 26

4 11 18 25

ivember Wed.

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

Wed.

2 9 16 23 30

7 14 21 28

2 9 16 23

cftool

Caknbar

Wed.

3 10 17 24

1925=1926

Sat.

2 9 16 23 30

7 14 21 28

1926

T h u r s . Fri.

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

Wed. Thurs. Fri.

7 14 21 28

1926

1926

June

Sun.

Mon. Tues. Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

Sat.

6 13 20 27

1 8 15 22 29

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

2 9 16 23 30

Sat.

6 13 20 27

1926

Mon. Tues. Wed.

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

May 5 12 19 26

Sat.

1926

larch 3 10 17 24 31

Apri

1926

6 13 20 27

T h u r s . Fri.

6 13 20 27

Mon. Tues. Wed.

1 8 15 22

5 12 19 26

inuary

Februa

1926

1925

Thurs. Fri.

4 11 18 25

Decern 1 8 15 22 29

4 11 18 25

Thurs. Fri.

7 14 21 28

Mon. Tues. Wed.

Sun.

2 9 16 23 30

Wed.

Sun.

Sun.

1 8 15 22 29

Octob

Mon.

4 11 18 25

7 14 21 28

Tues. Wed.

1925

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

Sat. i

i

8 15 22 29


Ye School Calendar Sept. 15—Few anxious students arrive. Fond meetings. Surprising rumors of engagements, etc. \ oorhees "all dressed up". New improvements on campus. Several good Freshies register. Sept. 16—More students arrive. Chapel in Gym. Dr. Frederick Shannon of Central Church, Chicago, gives inspiring address. Each who registers gets one of "Wich's" rulers. Melting pot of Hope begins. Freshie says "I came from Iowa." Says New \ orker, "I would too." Class meetings. First "Anchor". Everyone pursuing everyone to secure Anchor subscriptions and sell Athletic tickets. Voorhees rules on. Sept. 17—Many attempt to find classrooms. Anne Eikenhout and Mr. Raymond new faculty members. Frosh and Soph class spirit rises. Y. W . C. A. holds "get-to-gether" meeting. Some conscientious persons worry over Friday's assignment. Sept. 18—Dr. Pieters, college pastor, leads chapel. Few stragglers arrive. Literary societies meet. Football men begin training. Reception in Voorhees for "Women's League". Sept. 19—New-comers introduced to Colonial. Sept. 20—Churches of Holland welcome students. Sept. 21—Big mass meeting. Geo. Damson gives "forceful" declamation. "Fat S., Wess, Kik and Martha Van, please mass as cheer leaders. Kik and Martha elected. Sept. 22—Mr. J. M. Yohan, native Armenian, in chapel. Hand books given out. Y. M. C. A. "Stag" knock-down social. Sept. 23—Rev. M. Bruggers leads chapel. Frosh "wearing of the green" begins. Joint Y. W.-Y. M. formal reception in Gym. "Some Frosh men are born bashful and others—don't come to Hope's University." Fine program. Frosh stunt wins. Sept. 2-1—Dr. Dimnent plays in chapel. Y. W . beach party. Cold—but beautiful sunset—impressive meeting. Sept. 25—Rev. James Wayer in chapel. Plucky Freshmen make Sophs literally pull them through the river. Class parties. Sept. 26—Sophs begin to subside. Sept. 27—Special sermon for students at Rev. J. M. Martin's church. Many enjoy moonlight. Sept. 28—"Dimmy" in Chicago. "Banty" announces Faculty recital at Hope Church. Mr. Dunham introduced to Hope audience. H. K. K. organized. Sept. 2 9 — W h a t ? W e see the face of our jovial pig-skin instructor in chapel. "Banty" and salesmen being propaganda for the lecture course. "Cub", Clyde and the two Ruths serenade the campus halls in the beautiful moonlight. Sept. 30—"Cupid" Hinkamp leads chapel singing. Honor code rehashed in mass meeting. " P r e x y ' s " stunt goes over big. Oct. 1—Men working hard for football. Leaves are blushing to think how green they've been all summer. Oct. 2—Dr. Nykerk returns. Lecture course tickets! "Long Jim" Poppen returns from Oriole camp with good record. Oct. 3—Dull day! Good for studying. Rain. Oct. 4—More rain! New pastor arrives at Hope Church. Oct. 5—Honor Code approved by Student body. Oct. 6—Lecture course tickets? Many Frosh being caught for disobeying rules. Oct. 7—Prof. Raymond leads chapel. S. G. A. meeting at Dimnent's cottage. Oct. 8—Lecture course tickets? Holland High and Hope Prep girls lead Y. W . C. A.

Page One Hundred

Ninety-eight


Compliments of the

MEYER

MUSIC

HOUSE

17 W . 8th Street, H O L L A N D , M I C H . Wherever you may be, write or call for catalogs and prices of

Fine Pianos Players, Genuine Victrolas, Victor Records

Everything

Musical

"YOU

must be satisfied" +

Holland City State Bank HOLLAND, MICH. W . H . B E A C H , President A. H. L A N D W E H R , Vice-President O T T O P. K R A M E R , Cashier H E N R Y A. G E E R D S , Asst. Cashier Capital,

-

$ 100,000

Surplus and Undivided Profits, Resources,

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

145,000

-

3,250,000

MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Friendly. Helpful

Service Ahvays

Page

One

Hundred

Ninety-nine


I

|

Compliments

BAY VIEW FURNITURE COMPANY Makers of Good Furniture for Modern Homes Spinet Desks — Living Room Tables — Small Dining Suites

Holland, Michigan 4.

Phone 5001

SCOTT-LUGERS LUMBER CO. Dealers in ALL KINDS OF BUILDING MATERIAL

Quality at

Reasonable Prices Office Cor. 6th St.. & River Ave. HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Compliments

of

VAN DEN BERG BROS. Sample Furniture— 23-25 W . Eighth Street Holland

Page

Two Hundred

TWO STORES

916-924 Grandville Ave. Grand Rapids


GRUEN—the watch you'll eventually own

Someone may give it to you, or you may buy it yourself—but Watch.

eventually

you'll

own

a

Gruen

Its exquisite beauty and f a i t h f u l time-

keeping performance rank it foremost among the established timepieces of today. up.

Prices $25 and

Z

W h y not drop in and see our selection the

next time you pass our store? BSSSSIO

GEO. H. H U I Z E N G A & CO.

Jeweler and Optician Holland

Muskegon

GRUEN

VERITHIN

...—+

TO THE STUDENT BODY We shall attempt to thank the student body for their patronage thruout their college career.

Our relation with you was very pleasant, which

we hope was a reciprocal pleasure. Now that you are leaving the portals of Hope College and enter life's enterprise to sell your services, we wish you good luck, success, and Godspeed.

BRINK'S BOOK STORE 48 E. Eighth St.

Holland, Michigan

Where quality, service and courtesy prevail

Page

Two

Hundred

One


HOPE COLLEGE HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

60 years

Purposeful

1866-1926

Chn stian Education

The Product of Seventy Years Consistent Growth " P I O N E E R S C H O O L " 1851 " H O L L A N D A C A D E M Y " 1857 " H O P E C O L L E G E " 1866 Western Civilization is Destined to Rule the World. Western Colleges and Universities Produce Western Civilization. T h e Great Men of the F u t u r e will be the Product of Western Schools.

SgcccugV-

W R I T E FOR DETAILS

THE PRESIDENT ——4.

Page Two Hundred

Two


You can find all the Newest Styles in

Dykstra's Funeral Home

FOOTWEAR at the

AMBULANCE SERVICE

Enterprise Shoe Store 210 River Ave.

Phone 5267

29 E. 9th St. •>+ -+

COMPLIMENTS OF

T H E

B A Z A A R

S T O R E

"A Good Place to Trade" XOyi East 8th Street

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

.+

+

Van Putten Grocery

Robinson & Parsons

JOHN

Attorneys

OLERT,

Prop.

at Law

Holland

.

Mich.

202 River Ave.

Phone 5127

I

Best Ice Cream Parlor in Holland

I

Fancy Candy in Bulk and Boxes

A. P A T S Y F A B I A N O 26 W . 8th Street

Phone 5575

Page Two Hundred

Three


Oct. 9 Mrs. Rowe pleas for Central American Indians, in chapel. Dr. John A an Ess is on campus and off again. Girls' societies have first open meeting. Oct. 10—Early risers announce a few snow flurries. Men's societies' bids out. Oct. 11—Back to standard time. More rain. Oct. 12—Lecture course tickets? Frosh trial. Kole, O. Yntema, Fehner, \ andeW ater and \\ agenaar convicted. Lawyers show wit. Frater serenade. Oct. 13—Helen Fehner carries out sentence, fishes and catches 44 cents. New music course discussed. Oct. 14—Chicago synod in session. Many see Papa or Unk. Oct. 15—Dr. W m . Bancroft Hill addresses chapel. Rumor comes that we are to have new chapel. Oct. 16—Fight Ferris! About 400 stand in rain to see our boys win 12-0. Band shows pep. Private Peat gives lecture as first lecture course number. Oct. 17—Pep meeting for track. Oct. 18—Lily May Hawkins has her appendix removed. Oct. 19—Official announcement that we are to have a new chapel. First snow storm. Lily May says it seems as though it may have been the whole table of contents. Oct. 20—Lots of weather. Make first snow ball on way to see the "Desert Flower". Oct. 21—This is quiz week in Hope circles. Oct. 22—Dr. Barker speaks to men and boys. New bulletin board in Van Raalte. Oct. 23—Team leaves for Detroit. Oct. 24—Hope loses to Detroit 7-0. Oct. 25—Reorganized Girls' Glee Club sings at Hope Church. Oct. 26—Pi Kappa Delta prepares for debating season. Oct. 27—Prof. Winter meets Freshmen. Intelligence test reports given. Students' Guides out. Snow covers ground. Dr. Brown, medical matron from Battle Creek speaks to Y. W . and joint Y. M.—Y. W . Sophs give attic party in honor ( ?) of Freshies in Voorhees. Oct. 28—Snow covers "terra firma". Dr. T. W . Davidson's installation. Men's societies initiate. Madeline isn't the only one being paddled these days. Oct. 29—Hope seniors and Alumni banquet in G. R. Oct. 30—Teachers' conference in G, R. Slow game played with Grand Rapids Junior in snow. Ray Gowens dislocates elbow. Oct. 31—Cross country run postponed. Seniors writing orations. Nov. 1—Many alumni in town. Nov. 2—Milestone staff selling Bird's-eye-view of campus. P r o f . Kleis goes to S. S. conference. Nov. 3—Paul Van Ess gets pretty doll for birthday. Weather milder. Nov. 4—Frosh Anchor o u t : boasting lack of intelligence and gain of Hope spirit. Nov. 5—Miss Tena Holkeboer leads Y. W . Nov. 6—Hope vs. Findley. Findley scores 13 in first half. Boys tie score in end. Nov. 7—Neil Van seen with a girl! Nov. 8—Men's Glee Club makes first appearance of season. "Cubby's" solo shows evidence of his knowledge that Dr. Nykerk is taking critical notes. Nov. 9—Everyone truly enjoys comic opera "Sweethearts", though the fastidious are annoyed by some of Michael's jokes. Xov. 10—Soph Anchor. Many hear Cambridge debaters in Kazoo. Nov. 11—Home coming day. Big parade at one; society floats. Big crowd at game. By some mistake we lost. Fraters entertain at Lakeside.

Page Two Hundred

Four


/f

STEADY influence for thrift â&#x20AC;&#x201D; money saved, financial protection guaranteedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that is life insurance.

& UFF1CIENT insurance, carefully chosen, means independence and the fulfillment of whatever hopes depend upon money to fulfill them. l.\

NOWLEDGE is power. One who knows the use of life insurance commands a powerful financial ally. ASK

W. J. OLIVE R E P R E S E N T A T I V E FOR T W E N T Y - T H R E E YEARS

Holland, Michigan

Page Two Hundred

Five


B O A R D O F P U B L I C A T I O N , R. C. A.

Headquarters for Religious Books REFORMED CHURCH HOUSE, HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Phone 5614

T H E H O L L E M A N - D E W E E R D A U T O CO.

Ford

Lincoln

Fordson

Sales and Scrvice 153-163 River Ave.

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

+

+

Massage, Shave and Hair Cut EOR T H O S E W H O CARE

BOS

& BLAIR

White Cross Barber Shop RIVER AVENUE —+

Paie

'/wo

Hundred

Sir


Compliments of H O P E TEXT BOOK AGENCY

DE RUITER

DECKER

.— HOME FIRES BURN BRIGHTEST" Manufactured, Installed and Guaranteed

by the

HOME FURNACE COMPANY HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

The Corner Hardware DICK VAN T A T E N H O V E

GENERAL HARDWARE Quality and Service Since 1847 Citizens Phone 5049 Corner 8th St. and River Ave. *

Page Two

Hundred

Seven


YesTkinV;*

BORHS

W

J^ot-ksr KfAims

THe C^usen OJ Spuits 7vA lil

fiJ i i.l

'

)5K. J W VOOT

Cuv CW&fcfe DwsiwzeA, U^o?

TH< ยง<|osd

Page

Two

Hundred

Eight


THE STUDENTS' STORE

Young Mens Clothing Furnishiugs

J. J. Rutgers Co. 19 W . 8 T H S T . The house of NEW

IDEAS

+ +—

——

—f

WAITING "A general waited and a battle was lost—" A man waited until "after a while" to save and an opportunity was lost. So it goes. Don't wait until after a while to save. Start today. PEOPLES STATE Holland

BANK Mich.

Page

Two Hundred

Nine


F. BOONSTRA MERCANTILE CO. Home of

H a r t Schafifner & Marx

Everything in Mens and Boys' C lothing

ZEELAND, MICHIGAN —.———

Period Dining, Apartment and Breakfast Room Suites. Made in Mahogany, JValnut and Enamels i

BY

I

O T T A W A F U R N I T U R E CO.

1

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

+——•>—•>—>•——"»—i—"«—II«—" ii—>•—<«—..I—..—ii.—mi——in.—.I.—I..—.i.—..—n.—..—..—..——4

Page

Two

Hundred

Ten


Real Estate Bought, Sold and Exchanged LAKE MICHIGAN WATER-FRONT LOTS AND LARGE TRACTS A SPECIALTY Farms, Resort

and City Property

ISAAC KOUW 36 W e s t Eighth Street • •«„

III

Nil

UN

Phone 5166 .in

MH

un

+—

Nil

III

Holland, Mich. HI

mi

nil

••

HI

an

in

in flB—

—f " I t pays to trade at

KEEPER'S LUNCH

T H E MODEL"

ROOM

Why?

Service and Quality are our Watchwords

29 West Eighth Street

MODEL DRUG STORE

For

Northeast Cor. 8th & River

Ladies and Gentlemen • •

HI.

mi

mi

mi

nil

mi

Ml

mi

«»

HOLLAND, ml

MICH.

'Itj •

Enthusiasm "Enthusiasm is that kindling spark which m a r k s the difference between the leaders in every activity and the laggards who put in just enough to 'get by'.' Compliments of

H O L L A N D P R I N T I N G CO. 4.

+

Page

Two

Hundred

Eleven


Phone 5787

West 16th Street

HOLLAND LUMBER & SUPPLY CO. Everything to Build Anything Let us serve you

Holland

Michigan

Xov. 12—Frosh conspiracy in air. Those without "pots and ties" sent home. Mrs. Durfee leads Y. W . Milestone staff of '24-'25 enjoy party at G. R. Nov. 13—Last "new girls" program in Girls' societies. Nov. 14—Kinney and Kik get places in track meet at East Lansing. Kik lias accident or would have done much better. Nov. 15—Jim and Bevie and friends wander over to Miss Boyd's. Nov. 16—Jeannette V. faints in Drama class. Four take her out and return ( ? ) . Nov. 17—Mr. Ter Low, curator of Hope's museum at home, one to five o'clock. Debate in Y. M. on race question. Nov. 18—Football season ends with 500 average for Hope. Prospects bright for next season. All our team needs is more boosting. Let's go! Nov. 19—Dr. Pieters meets group which is to form girls' gospel teams. Nov. 20—Hope votes to enter World Court. Congress immediately enters. Election of members in girls' societies. Nov. 21—Girls tearing all over town welcoming new members. Everybody happy! Teas and receptions given in afternoon. Nov. 22—Girls' Glee Club in Third in A. M. Junior Girls' Glee Club in Hope in evening. Nov. 23—Y. W . packs Xmas boxes for missions. Muzio ill! Violinist secured. Orchestra, Glee Club, Hon. G. J. Diekema, Dr. Davidson, Rev. Martin, Ardean, John Lloyd, and Harriet H. entertain until 10:30. Artist then arrives and all who had patience to stay are well repaid. Nov. 24 I hanksgiving dinner party at \ oorhees. Brief and witty speeches by Hon. G. J. Diekema and Dr. Davidson. "Cap" night at 8. Burial of "green" at grave, cider and doughnuts in gym. Scrimmage basketball game.

Page Two Hundred

Twelve


FIRST REFORMED CHURCH COR. E A S T N I N T H

ST. AND CENTRAL AVE.

REV. J A M E S VVAYER, Pastor

M R S . D . DYKSTRA, Missionary S E R V I C E S

Evening Worship 7 :30 P. M.

Morning Worship 9:30 A. M. Bible School 11 ;05 A. M. A

Christian Endeavor 6:30 P. M.

CORDIAL W E L C O M E

TO A L L

L Page Tzvo Hundred

Thirteen


DAMSTRA BROS. Plumbing and Heating Contractors 2 0 6 COLLEGE AVE.

Holland

Michigan + â&#x20AC;˘ +

I

Quality and Speed

R O B B E R T CO.

IVe Have Both For Quality Gt'oceries and Meats

Hollanb Citj'

iSetog

PRINTERY

E S T A B L I S H E D 1872

'The Printers

168 W . 13th St. 114 W . 16th St.

Yours for Service

who know hozv" -+

Citz. Phone 5032

Established 1867

+

Dr. G. W. Van Verst

T. Keppel's Sons DENTIST Fuel and Mason's Supplies 63 E. 8th St.

Page Two Hundred

Fourteen

Telephone Citizens 5265 Holland City State Bank Building


Compliments

of

JUST IT BAKERY JVe make Mother's Bread, Puritan and Winner Also Holland Cookies, Boter Krakelingen and Almond Rolls H . T U R K S T R A , Prop.

+â&#x20AC;˘

Phone 2212

HOEKSTRA ICE CREAM CO.

Cream of Uniform Quality for all occasions

65 E. 8th Street

Holland, Michigan

GREEN MILL CAFE Holland's

distinctive

eating place

Excellent meals and just the place to go after an evening's entertainment C H R I S K O R O S E , Prop.

Page

Two

Hundred

Fifteen


*

Holland Furnaces Make Warm Friends

The Heart of the Home" T h e Holland W a r m - A i r System will keep A L L of your home filled with clean, circulating, moist, warm-air, and do it silently. You wouldn't drink water f r o m a stagnant pool; then why risk your health and the family's by breathing stagnant air ? It is the business of the Holland Furnace Company to do one thing, do A L L of that thing, and do it well. Over 180,000 users of the Holland recommend it for your home. T h e Holland Guarantee makes the World's Largest Installers of Furnaces directly responsible to you for your entire Heating Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;completely installed. Your Home deserves one.

HOLLAND FURNACE COMPANY

General Offices - Holland, Michigan i

Page

Two Hundred

Sixteen


l l

Autographs

Compliments

of

COMPLETE H O M E - B U I L D I N G SERVICE Plans—Materials—Millwork—Construction

Builders

Grand Rapids

Holland

Muskegon

Page

Trvo Hundred

Seventeen


«£.,

»

B|

WOLVERINE GARAGE DULYEA & VANDER BIE

Durant and Star Pleasure Cars One satisfied customer today brings us two tomorrow

Citizens Phone 5656 Cor. River and 9th, Holland, Mich.

.

.

+

1 Compliments

B. J. De Vries, D. D. S.

of

D U M E Z BROS.

Dentist

Dry Goods, Cloaks, Millinery

Citizens Phone 5629

"Serve-Self" Grocery 210 River Street 31-33 E. 8th St.

HOLLAND

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN —._i+ —

Holland's Up-to-Date Food Shop

—•+

A. W . Baker

A. A. Boone

Citizens Transfer & Storage Co.

Kuite's Economy Grocery and Market

Baggage Service Phone 5149

12 W . 8th St.

72 W . 8th St.

I

.4

+ Compliments

*-

Dr. M. J. Cook

of

DENTIST

Holland 5 & 10 Cent

Over 26 W. 8th St.

Store

Opp. A'an Den Berg Bros. Furn. Store

4 W . 8th St.

Page Two Hundred

Eighteen

Holland

Citz. Phone 5131 Holland, Mich.


'+

+••

+

i

i

The Bert Slagh & Son

COLLEGE INN 'Students

Decorators Wall Paper and Paints

Foremost Place"

Eating

O u r clientele is not exclusive. An increasing number of nonstudent patrons proves that. Always the best in the best way at the College Inn. C. E. P A T T E R S O N , Prop.

56 E. 8 T H S T .

COR.

HOLLAND

COLLEGE AVE.

AND T E N T H

ST.

•—* I Colonial

G. M O E K E & SONS ZEELAND, MICHIGAN

Manufacturing Co.

Lumber, Lath, Shingles Coal, Lime, Plaster Cement

Manufacturers Interior Finish, Exterior Finish of Hall Clocks

Box Shooks ZEELAND, MICH.

Phone 134 •I* -—"»

Page Two Hundred

Nineteen


FOR COLONIAL CORSAGES i i i

of Surpassing Beauty Go to

I

i T H E SHADY L A W N FLORISTS J O H N B . V A N D E R P L O E G , ' 2 2 , Mgr.

HOLLAND, MICH.

Phones 2652 - 5345

Our Business Is Growing

'A filttvv

I

Page Two MIDI died

Tiveuiy


lju ••• •• •»

Third Reformed Church C O R N E R

T W E L F T H

REV. JAMES

M.

A N D

MARTIN.

P I N E

Pastor

SERVICES E V E N I N G SERVICE 7 : 3 0 P .

M.

C H R I S T I A N ENDEAVOR 6 : 3 0 P .

M.

MORNING WORSHIP 10:00 A. M . BIBLE SCHOOL 11 ;30 A . M .

Cordial welcome the Students'

to all Hope Students

at the Church Services,

Class and the Christian Endeavor

Meetings I

•n*

Page Two Hundred

Twenty-one


•+

I

Phone 2218

Thos. H . Marsilje

J . J . Brower FIRE INSURANCE

Phone 5212

Dentist

F i r s t State Bank Bldg.

HOLLAND

-

Over French Cloak Store 30 E. 8 T H S T .

MICHIGAN

*

+

+>•

Boven & Co.

Nick Kammeraad

DRY GOODS, N O T I O N S AND GROCERIES

Fine Footwear, Dry Goods and Shoes, Electric Repairs, Dress Patterns P h o n e 1540

378 Central Ave.

P h . 5742

348 Central Ave.

Phone 1589 170 W . 13th Street

•+

• +

I

When in need of QUALITY SHOE REPAIRING call on "Dick, the shoe doctor"

Do you want to make a dollar?

ELECTRIC SHOE HOSPITAL

What is wrong with this sentence?

W e call for and deliver Phone 5328 13 E. 8th St.

Cota's D r u g Store

Diseases of the Eye, Ear Nose and Throat

Phone 5295

DR. A. L E E N H O U T S flO to 11:30 A. M. Office Hours •{ 2 to 5 P. M. [Sat., 7 to 9 P. M. 22 West 8th Street • +

Page Two Hundred

Twenty-two

+

I

i 1 i i 1 .4

— +

54 E. 8th St. HOLLAND, MICH.

i

I

1 + •

I I

I I

Citz. Phone


Are You Insured? H o w often do you hear the words

MUTUAL BENEFIT Do you know the meaning of the words?

If Not Look them up and get a

Mutual Benefit Life Policy

of Van Putten Insurance Agency 36 W .

8TH

ST.

HOLLAND, M I C H .

Endowment

Policies at Life Rates

FOURTH REFORMED CHURCH C O R N E R F I R S T A V E . A N D F I F T E E N T H ST. JOHN

F.

HEEMSTRA,

Minister

240 W . Fifteenth Street

SUNDAY

SERVICES

Morning Service . . . . 9:30 A f t e r n o o n Service . . . . 2.30 Evening Service . . . . 7:30 Sunday School Hour . . . 1 1 : 0 0 C. E. Prayer Meeting . . 6:30 Young People's Class f o r Doctrinal Instruction, Monday, 7 :30 P. M.

Everybody Welcome

Students Cordially Invited â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Page Two Hundred

Twenty-three

.4.


YOUR PHOTOGRAPH is a reminder of your loving thought fulness and binds closer the ties of friendship AT OUR STUDIO it is an easy matter to get a real photograph that you will be proud to give your friends

A PHOTOGRAPH TO BE CHERISHED

ZEELAND ART STUDIO E. J. M A C D E R M A N D For an Appointment Phone 107

The Photographer in Your Town

+

CLASS PINS FRATERNITY AND SORORITY EMBLEMS MEDALS As you scatter to the four corners of the earth a f t e r June 16 that pin, or emblem, so many of you wear, representing your Lit. Society, your Club, or. be^t of all, your school of P U R P O S E F U L C H R I S T I A N E D U C A T I O N , will become increasingly dear to you because of what it symbolizes. W e have dies for making the emblems of twenty Hope organizations and classes on short notice. For particulars and prices see our representative, Josh N. Hogenboom.

The Hardie Jewelry Company HOLLAND, M I C H . Note:â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Except in cases of serious breakage ivc repair all of our zvork free of charge during your college course.

Page Two Hundred Twenty-four


The HOLLAND MAID Co. T h e oldest and largest Washing Machine Manufacturer selling direct to the consumer exclusively. A. H . LANDWEHR G. J. DIEKEMA C. E . GSCHWIND

R. M. BOSWORTH

President Vice-President Treas.-Gen.

Mgr.

CON DE FREE, . Holland, Mich. E. G. LANDWEHR, Z)i>cc/or Holland, Mich. D . B . K . V A N RAALTE, Director

Secretary D. F. BOONSTRA, Director.Zee\and,

Holland, Mich. Mich. H O L L A N D M A I D CO.

Holland, Mich. Gentlemen: I have had a Holland Maid Washing Machine in my home for two or three years and am

very

well

pleased

with its operation. Yours very truly, R O Y B. C H A M P I O N ,

Holland

Maid

appli-

ances are built with 4 big, vital principals in mind:

m

Beauty Efficiency Safety Durability

& Thousands of enthusiastic Holland Maid ozvncrs in three states testify weekly to the _ high class of ivork produced ivith Holland Maid Washers and Ironers. "I have used a Holland Maid Electric Ironer for several months and can unhesitatingly recommend it to anyone who might be thinking of getting an electric ironer. Signed. M R S . W M . W A G E N A A R

T h e Holland Maid Co. H O l L A N D , MICH. LOCAL B R A N C H S T O R E â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 8 0 E . 8 T H S T . 4 0 B R A N C H E S I N M I C H . , I N D . , AND O H I O

Page

Two

Hundred

Twenty-fiv


+

+"•

Klomparens Coal

W. R. Stevenson

IS

J E W E L E R and OPTOMETRIST

Good Coal 24 E. Eighth St. 133 E. 8th St.

Phone 5247

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

+

-*•

i

Herman N. Dosker & Company

JACK'S Famous Malted Milks chase away the BLUES

307-8 4th Nat. Bank Bldg. INSURANCE Grand Rapids

+»•

Michigan

+..•

P.

S.

Citizens Phone 5133

Dr. U. F. Devries

WOODALL

DENTIST 217 East Eighth Street

36 East 8th Street

HOLLAND, MICH.

HOLLAND,

M I C H .

*• T

I I

Compliments

of

H . R. Doesburg

Holland Fuel Company

i i

D R U G G I S T

Phone 5122 1 COR.

HARRISON

AND

i 4.—

Page

12TH

32 E. 8TH ST

ST.

• +

Two

Hundred

Twenty-six

f f I i

f

I

i

E. 8th St.

East End D r u g Store

I

Holland, Mich.


+

CLOTHES! The clothes you get at our stores inspire confidence —confidence when you buy them, confidence when you wear them. They are right. O u r name and Adler Collegian's name are behind them. That guarantees good style, good fit, and good wear.

$25.00 to $45.00

J. N . T R O M P E N & C O . —4 S T O R E S 4— 8 2 3 - 8 2 5 DIVISION AVE.

804-806 W .

5 4 8 - 5 5 0 EASTERN AVE.

4 0 5 - 4 1 1 GRANDVILLE A V E .

LEONARD S T .

I

•4 Nov. 25—Each leaves for his or his room-mate's home. Easterners hold party. Nov. 26—Thanksgiving! Nov. 27—Many do outside reading that has been neglected. Nov. 28—Many Hopeites in G. R. Nov. 29—Hopeites begin to gather. Nov. 30—All, including G. M. DeYoung, have returned. Dr. Simon Cornelius, native from India, gives talk in chapel. Dec. 1—Again, quiz week in Hope circles. Ardean and Clyde decide to live on love alone, between meals. Dec. 2—Muzio really here. Dr. Nykerk gains the smiles lost a week ago. Dec. 3—Sorosis and Dorian initiation. Drama class play caste chosen. Dec. 4—Sorosis and Delphi mock initiation. First basketball game of season. Hope wins over Firliks 58-15. Dec. 5—Many 11th hour Erosh visit Dr. Pieters at a late hour to hand .n Bible resumes. Dec. 6—Men's Glee Club in Hope Church. Dec. 7—We'll all agree, while sharp winds blow. With the song making c h a p ; Man wants but little ear below The bottom of his cap. Dec. 8—Orchestra makes first and very successful appearance. Shows improvement under J. L. Kollen's direction. Dr. Rawei, native Samoan, tells of his country. Dec. 9 — " D i m m y " describes "Twin Pilgrim Homes". "Old Ladies H o m e " on corner and "House on the Heights". Drama class play caste see "Goose Hangs H i g h " in Grand Haven.

Page

Two

Hundred

Twenty

seven


|

THE LACEY STUDIO

F

19 EAST 8TH

I

ST.

Holland, Mich.

i

I I I 1 i 1

i

Where sitting fur your picture is a pleasure I

PRESENT

Page Tzvo Hundred

LOCATION

Twenty-eight

19

YRS.

PHONE

5338


+—

M Every Meal Eat HERMAN'S Cookie-Cakes and Crackers

3 i n the

y e a r

g i a n l f i s c u n L O . rand Rapids.Mich. i •1-

Page

Two

Hundred

Twenty-nine


CVulfk*?*'

Xee 4 M

Pag^

Ttfo

SoorJ

The- L-ymr

Hundred

Thirty


COPYING

ENLARGING

Kodak Finishing AS Y O U L I K E IT

D. J. D U S A A R

HOLLAND

PHOTO

SHOP 10 East 8th Street

Kodaks and Eastman Supplies

FRAMING

PHOTO SUPPLIES

Page

Two

Hundred

Thirty-one


••+

+

I I

Meet your friends

For good Malted Milks

I i

at

Bouman's Confectionery

i

Vaupell's Pharmacy COR. 8 T H AND C E N T R A L

Drugs, Sodas, Candies Toilet Articles

7 W . 16TH S T .

I

Try O u r Courteous Service

F I R S T STATE BANK G. J. D I E K E M A , President

'

W Y N A N D W I C K E R S , Cashier

Capital $100,000.00

Surplus $100,000.00

Undivided Profits $103,000

The Largest

and Oldest State Bank in Ottawa County

W e are friends of Hope College

+

+—""

Smith's D r u g Store Compliments

of

at CENTRAL AVE. & 16TH

ST.

Economy Shoe Store 28 W .

"The Convenient

Page Two Hundred

Drug Store'

Thirty-two

8TH

ST.,

HOLLAND


+

+

H E R K N E R ' S

STUDENTS T/ie business men of Holland are largely re-

GRAND RAPIDS

The Leading Jewelers JVestern Michigan

sponsible for the success of this book. Please give them your support.

Solicit your patronage on the quality and values of their Jewelry See O u r Display and Compare O u r Prices Before Buying Elsewhere

114 M O N R O E A V E . + +' Dec. 10—Pre-Medics visit Butterworth Hospital and hold stag at Rowe Hotel. Delphi and Sibylline initiations. Dec. 11—Association Union leads chapel. Hope wins over Grand Rapids Seating Co. by big score. Dec. 12—Which suggests to our gray m a t t e r G o l d e n opportunities are like pancakes—tackle them in the morning while they're hot. Dec. 13—Girls' Glee Club in Hope Church. Dec. 1-1—Mrs. Allen, Pres. of Domestic Board, gives talk in chapel. Dec. 15—Albertus T. Brooks, Pres. of Board of Education, leads chapel. Dec. 16—Anchor tells what "Peabody" wants for Xmas. Dec. 17—The day before the day. Dec. 18—Vacation begins. Everyone remembering ( ?) that soon after Xmas comes X-ams. Dec. 27—Dr. Nykerk in Chicago to arrange for 1926 lecture course. Dec. 28—Hope vs. Alumni in Carnegie gym. Alumni 35—Hope 34. Dec. 30—Erater annual alumni stag at W a r m Friend Tavern. Jan. 1—Hope beats Bethany, Grand Rapids, 26-22. Jan. 2—Play caste returns. Jan. 3—Few students return. Jan. 4—Several students return. | a n i 5—More students return. "Semester exams one week earlier" overwhelms all. y a n , 6—Dr. Banninga, '90, missionary of Congregational church to India, speaks in chapel and to Home and Student Volunteers. Jan. 7-—Last student returns. Frosh girls lead Y, W . Jan. 8—Hope loses to Manchester. Van \ leek has cheese party. Jan. 9—Van Vleck has another cheese party. Ian. 10—Girls' Junior Glee Club at Hope Church.

Page

Two

Hundred

Thirty-three


Established

1869

Fifty-Seven

Years

of Success

JHLING R R O S . F v e r a r d

COMPLETE PRINTING SERVICE BOOK is 'T'HIS ENTIRE a -product of our plant, where machinery and workmanship of the highest quality rule. Take up your present or contemplated Printing Problems with us. :: Write for Estimate s.

KALAMAZOO,

Page

Two

Hundred

Thirty-four

MICHIGAN

(O.


liiiliiipillliSllli

mmxi

PM

M P

J nqravinqs in t h i s b o c l ^ m a d c

by C a n t o n 'EnqravinQ ^ t l e c t r o t ^ p a Compart^ Canton • ^ • Ohio WVJJjh

my m

"vvvs

Page

Two

Hundred

Thirty-five


Jan. 11 "\ arsity Four (Cubby, Ted, Clyde, and Jack) make first public appearance. Jan. 12 ()rchestra plays at Ladies' Literary Club. Orchestra picture taken. Jan. 13—Orchestra plays in chapel. Jan. 1-1—Library filled these days. Jan. 15—Hope wins over Mt. Pleasant but game has queer turns. Yntema's entertain with sleighride ending in party at their home. Jan. 16—-Which suggests to our gray matter:—If there's nothing that will freeze, how about hot water? Jan. 17—Men's Glee Club at Hope Church. Jan. 18—Dr. and Mrs. Patterson entertain P. Chem. and San & Hy classes. Several students studying. Jan. 19—More students studying. Jan. 20—Exams-U B- passed out. Jan. 21—Everybody studying. Jan. —I Exams end. \ alue of Mark decreases. N^ot in Germany either. Jan. 23—General relaxation. Many fishing at Mac. So cold the" thermometer caught pneumonia. Men's Gospel team at Comstock Park. Jan. 24—Prayer week begins with meeting in chapel. Dr. Pieters leads. Jan. 25—New semester begins. Dr. Shannon talks on "Daniel's Strong House". Flood in Voorhees basement. Y. M. Cabinet and men's prayer group leaders meet Dr. Shannon at Dr. Pieters. Prayer group meetings in evening. Jan. 26—"Human Roadability" is Dr. Shannon's theme. Stresses motor, carburetor, and battery. Y. W . Cabinet and Girls' Group leaders at Dr. Pieters' in afternoon. \ ery practical discussions in group meetings in evening. Hope wins over Bosch Jewelry team 38-20. Jan. 27—Dr. Shannon continues, stressing brakes, shock absorbers, and speedometer. Jan. 28—Dr. Shannon talks on "Training our individual menagerie". Trample down lions of mobocracy, conventionalism and pleasure. Crush serpents of envy and jealousy. Jan. 29—Last meeting with Dr. Shannon, who has become beloved by all. Societies meet. Sorosis celebrates Mabelle Coburn's engagement. Wish our ears were on our fingers so we could put them in our pockets. Jan. 30—Cold spell broken. Jan. 31—Religious Education Day! Feb. 1—"Bill" Bonnema back. Anne Carrigan arrives. Not a few didn't have to wait till they received their sheep-skins before they found out what the cold, cold world was like. Feb. 2—Hope loses to Kazoo College in close game. Maybe because Ground Hog didn't see his shadow. Feb. 3—Margaret Anderson entertains with "Kid P a r t y " for Marian Landahl. Feb. 4—First presentation of "Goose Hangs H i g h " very successful. Jack and Ruth sure "collegiate". "Flossie" and "Jim" so devoted. While "Connie's" and Carol's anxiety seems real. The rest, especially Betty, as grandma, act well too. Feb. 5—Just as large and appreciative audience. Orchestra especially fine. V. "Danny" Ten Cate operated on for appendicitis. Feb. 6—Several students slip on icy sidewalks. Feb. 7—More students slip on ice. Girls' Jr. Glee Club—now "Hope H a r mony Club" at Hope Church. Feb. 8—Which suggests to our nervous system, a cold always settles in the weakest part of the body. Feb. 9—Anchor elections. "Here's where 1 shine" say Sorosis and Sibylline new girls as they wax floors.

Page Tzvo Hiindred

Thirty

six


ANY RESTAURANT Will Give You

Don't Spoil Your Teeth That Way!

Something to Eat. BUT

Y

OU visit your dentist r e g u l a r l y ; you choose your d e n t i f r i c e c a r e f u l l y , you b r u s h your t e e t h faithfully— And then, p e r h a p s , you spoil it all by u s i n g an old-fashioned, inefficient tooth b r u s h w i t h which you couldn't possibly b r u s h y o u r t e e t h thoroughly.

If You W a n t Cooking Like Mother's go to

D o n ' t r u n t h a t risk. L e t u s show you a scientifically correct, m o d e r n tooth brush, designed t o m a k e t h o r o u g h b r u s h i n g easy. It's the San-Tox SCIENTIFIC TOOTH BRUSH.

Laughlin's Restaurant 72 E. 8 T H S T . +

Study Lamps Edison Mazda Lamps Everything Electrical

A small brush, slightly outcurved, with p r o j e c t i n g e n d - t u f t and widely spaced, pointed bristle-rows—all t h e f e a t u r e s which d e n t a l a u t h o r i t i e s insist upon. You will be delighted with the ease with which this b r u s h cleans all t h e s u r f a c e s of all t h e t e e t h . The hardto-reach places, t h e d a n g e r spots, c a n ' t e s c a p e it.

A

(O

Aroosd the corner*

Cleans OuUide

This fine tooth b r u s h is only one of m a n y good r e a s o n s f o r visiting our store. T h e r e a r e lots of o t h e r excellent San-Tox requisites f o r toilet, health, and hygiene—sold exclusively by us.

at

De Fouw's Electric The San-Tox

Shop

Scientific Tooth Brush Price 50c

26 E. 8 T H S T . Opposite People's State Bank

Page

Two

Hundred

Thirty

seven


' R E C O M M E N D E D BY A F R I E N D " — T h a t ' s one

big

reason why our business grows so rapidly.

JAS. A. B R O U W E R CO. 2 1 2 - 2 1 4 - 2 1 6 RIVER

Oldest Furniture

Business

AVE.

in Holland

.—.+ If yon want it done right—

Steketee Tire Shop l E O N A R D S T E K E T E E . PROP.

Elenbaas and Fortney

Firestone Tires Vulcanizing

Prest-O-Lite Batteries

1 J

"THE

S T U D E N T S ' BARBER S H O P "

71 E . 8TH ST.

+

. + +.

+• To Be Well-dressed

Compliments

of

Have Your Suits Made at

Nibbelink and Notier

Nick Dykema THE

PHONE 5013-F1

TAILOR

Over Keefer's

Restaurant

Ambulance

18 W .

9TH

ST.

Service

+ — —

GEERDS ELECTRIC COMPANY 200 RIVER AVENUE

ZENITH RADIO Authorized

Page Two Hundred

Thirty-eight

Sales and Service

-

+


WARM FRIEND T A V E R N Holland, Michigan Only All Fireproof Hotel on M Eleven in Michigan Financed

Built - Furnished by Holland Citizens

(Jne Hundred and Seventy Rooms O P E N E D M A Y 1st, 1925 Home for Commercial

Man and Tourist

The " W a r m Friend T a v e r n " with its Beautiful Lobby, Private Dining Rooms and W a r m Friend Hall will be the Social Center for Holland Great care given Banquets,

Conventions,

Parties

W e solicit your valued patronage

M . L . TYSON, Mgr.

Feb. 10—Let Indianapolis " Y " beat us by few points. Feb. 11—Easily win over Mt. Pleasant 30-20. W i n debate at Detroit law school. Hope Y. W . C. A. celebrates 25th Anniversary. Feb. 12—Special Lincoln's Birthday celebration in chapel. Emersonians celebrate Seventh Annual stag. Win debate over Mt. Pleasant. Lose debate to Albion. Feb. 13—Valentines coming already. beb. 1-1—Those who heeded "Say it with Flowers", or "Candy" make many girls happy. Feb. 15—Play caste entertained by Mrs. Durfee. Caste gives her waffle iron in appreciation of her kind efforts in coaching. Soph girls in Voorhees have party in honor of M. Flipse. Feb. 16—Flope Harmony Club sing in chapel. Dr. Dimnent tells Frosh and Sophs of virtue of going to chapel. Feb. 17—First edition of Anchor under new staff. Close game with St. Mary's. Hope 31, St. Mary's 33. Many attend our good friend Rev. H . Dykhuizen's funeral in Fremont. Feb. 18—Ardean, " K e n " and George play in chapel. Orchestra gives concert in Muskegon. Dickensians observe founders day with stag. Feb. 19—Association Union leads chapel. Moeke sisters sing. "Not So F a s t " was not so fast. Feb. 20—Many tobaggoning and skeeing. Delphi "Gentlemen's Night" in Ladies' Literary Club rooms. Feb. 21—General day of rest. Feb. 22—Frats, Cosmos, Knicks and Addisons hold stags. Town filled with smoke.

Page

Two

Hundred

Thirty-nine


business

o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o G o o o o

-JhCovies

IN FIVE "REALS"

Real I

_G

M r . Prudent Buyer decides to purchase a sales folder on a Quality basisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;-from 1'oren's, of course.

o o

Real II T o r e n ' s e x p e r t craftsmen transmit M r . Buyer's ideas through paper, type and ink into a colorful sales appeal.

Real III

\

T h e printed salesman receives favorable attention from M r . Prudent Buyer's prospective customers.

Real IV Substantial orders from everywhere prove M r . Buyer's wisdom of investing in quality printing.

Real V Banking the profits, far in excess of any possible saving from cheaper printing. RECEIVING I

tail

T o r e n

P u i m i i m g

Cd

29-31 Ottawa Ave., N . W . Grand

Page Two

Hundred

Rapids, Michigan

Forty

G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G

G G G G G


Feb. 23 Group of Knicks and lady friends hold sleigh ride which ends in party at "Lil" Schmid's. Feb. 24—Seniors are winning in class B. B. tournament. Measles creepino& into Hope circles. Feb. 2 5 — W . C. A. election of officers. t e b . 26—Men's Glee Club give concert in Grand Haven. Hbpe wins debate with Kazoo Normal here. Loses in debate with Ypsilanti there. Hope basketball team loses to Manchester, Ind. there, 50-17. Mr. Geo. Collins here. Feb. 27—More measles. Mr. Collins speaks on Christian's attitude toward war. Hope loses to Concordia there 25-19. Feb. 28—Mr. Collins talks on Christian's attitude on race question. Girl's Gospel team in Kent City. Mar. 1—Mildred Ramaker delayed in Kent City with measles. ^ Mar. 2—Harriet Heneveld delivers oration "Poisoned Springs" in chapel Y. M. C. A. elections. Mar. 3—Stanley Albers gives his oration plus confession in chapel loses game to Kazoo College.

Hope

Afar.-4—John H e n r y Albers takes Stanley's place. Orators start for Ypsilanti. 1. W . gym party. Mar. 5—Men's Glee Club gives concert in Muskegon. Mass meeting in chapel. Debate, Resolved that women are root of all evil. M. O. L. returns. Harriet takes first and "Heinie" third place. Studentry exclaim fact to all bv ringing bells, and building large bon-fire. Mar. 6—Hope well represented at Student Volunteer convention at Albion. Mar. 7—Hope H a r m o n y Club in Hope Church. Mar. 8 Glory D a y ! (ireat applause of welcome and thanks given orators— and as much to Mr. Wichers who so fittingly addressed the well filled chapel. Ten highest in senior class announced. Big parade. Exercises in Holland High, b rosh elimination contest for men in afternoon. G. Severance wins first, Jacob Pelon, second place. Class parties in evening. Senior-Soph costume partv big success. Mar. 9-—Soph eliminations contest for men. Lester Bossard wins first, Geo. Uiquennoi, second place. Girls' Glee Club in Forest Grove. Carol and Hermina lead Y. M. C. A. Mar. 10—Prayer Day for Crops. Junior eliminations contest for men. " T u b b y " Damstra wins first and Neil Oostenburg second place, while "Breezy" takes third. Mar. 11—Hope Girls' negative debating team loses to Kazoo Normal. Neil and Ted get chance to talk back when they lead Y. W . C. A. Mar. 12—Hope Girls lose debates with Kazoo College. Sibylline "Family Reunion" at Moeke's. Mar. 13—Seniors win inter-class tournament with perfect score. Tuniors and Frosh tied at .400 per cent. Sophs trailing at .200 per cent. Mar. 14—Girls' Gospel team leads C. E. at North Holland. Mar. 15—Son born to both Timmer's and Van Zyl's. Mar. 16—Hope loses to Holland Furnace, 31-48. Mar. 17—Junior-Senior Banquet at W a r m Friend Tavern. Sarah Lacey and M a r j o r i e Du Mez broadcast from Rowe Hotel, Grand Rapids. Mar. 18—Men's Glee Club concert in Hope chapel. Mar. 19—Victor Saar, composer and musician, guest of Orchestra at John L. Kollen's. Affirmative debating team loses to Calvin there, negative team wins

Page

Two Hundred

Forty-one


over Calvin here. Hope Harmony Club gives successful concert in Coopersville. Mar. 20—-Welcome merry sunshine! Men's Gospel team at Lowell. Mar. 21—More sunshine! Spring has good beginning. Mar. 22—Four mile course christened "Shakespeare" because of the romance it produces. Mar. 23—Van Vleckites elect House committee for coming year. Mar. 24-—Soph class day. Royal purple and white worn by every Soph. "Jim" Ten Brink elected Editor-in-Chief and " P e t e " Du Ruiter Business Manager. Mar. 25—Raven Contest. "Tubby" Damstra wins first, Neil Van, second place. Mar. 26—Mr. Luke Rader, evangelist, and his group delight chapel audience. With a start we realize—vacation is here. Mar. 26, 27. 28—Neil, Roy and Lester Kuyper act as group leaders in Kent Co. Older Boys Hi-Y conference. April 6—Vacation and terrible snow storms have passed. Chapel interior newly decorated. April 7—Milestone work nearly completed. April 11—Girls' Gospel team leads C. E. at Central Church, Grand Rapids. April 12—Girls' Glee Club sings at North Holland. April 14—Moving pictures on life of Martin Luther in Carnegie, under auspices of Y. M. C. A. April 15—Harmony Club gives concert in Saugatuck. April 16—Girls' Glee Club gives concert in Zeeland. Harmony Club in Muskegon. April 17—Baseball game with Notre Dame. April 22—Girls' Glee Club gives concert in Grand Rapids. April 24—Baseball with G. R. Junior College. Sorosis Banquet at W a r m Friend Tavern. April 27—College Orchestra Concert. April 29—Girls' Glee Club sings in Grandville. April 30—Hope Baseball team plays Kalamazoo College. Knickerbocker Banquet at Hope Church. May 1—Delphi Banquet at W a r m Friend Tavern. May 5—Girls' Glee Club Concert in Chapel. May 7—Hope team plays Kalamazoo College in baseball. Girls' Glee Club Contest at Detroit. May 8—Baseball game with Ferris Institute. Cosmopolitan Banquet. May 12—School of Music Recital. May 13—Baseball game with Michigan State College. May 14—'Emersonian Banquet. May 15—Hope plays Ferris in baseball. Sibylline Banquet at Country Club. May 17—Recital by the School of Music. May 21—Grand Rapids Junior baseball game. Washington Bust Contest in Oratory. May 26—Dorian Banquet. May 28—Addison Banquet. May 29—St. Mary's Baseball game. Alethea Banquet. June 3-9—General Synod, R. C. A. Pageant. June 11—Public Meeting, St. Nickolas Society. June 13—Baccalaureate service. June 16—Commencement.

Page Two Hundred

Forty-two


TRINITY REFORMED CHURCH C entral Avenue and Twentieth Street HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Minister R E V . C L A R E N C E P. D A M E 495 Central Avenue

|

Citizens Phone 2153

i

MISSIONARY M I S S M A R Y E. G E E G H Madanapelle

Arcot Mission

MADRAS, SOUTH

{ j

PRES.

j

INDIA

J

Sunday Services Public Worship at 10:00 a. m. and 7 :30 p. m. Sunday School at 11 :40 a. m. Christian Endeavor Aleeting at 6:30 p. m.

Trinity Church Invites You to Its Fellowship During Your College Days |

I

?

||||

Page Two Hundred

Forty-three


i

QUALITY Gifts

is always the first consideration

T hat

HERE

Last

regardless

of the

ECONOMY in our PRICES

Visser & Bareman CLOTHIERS,

Selles Jewelry Store

HATTERS,

FURNISHERS

50 East 8th St.

V

ANAnOHMDt f y

JliFenneylp. I f

| | a

institution-

I '

DEPARTMENT STORES

where savings Let Us Furnish Y o u r

i

Home Complete

1

1

5 Floors of Furniture

De Vries - Dornbos The

Home

of

Good

I

!

Furniture

4 0 - 44 E. 8TH ST., HOLLAND, MICH.

I

1 . _ _ 4

Page Two Hundred

Forty-four

are greatest wJ

|


Compliments

of

FRIS BOOK STORE Headquarters for Students' Supplies

30 W . 8 T H S T .

PHONE 5749

Today I encountered a teacher I told him how nervous I am T h a t I know of no way to spend leisure That I'm restless as eggs without ham " I n college is where you're to study" His answer was friendly, but flat. Then straight to his face, I retorted "Gee whiz! I ne'er thought about that. Late to bed and late to rise makes a college man miss eight o'clock chapel. At Van Vleckâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; "Lessons may look in but dare not enter.' POME W e hates Debates. Says Dr. Pieters:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Man was created first to wait for woman. When thou art at college act natural; when at home, be collegiate

Page Two Hundred

Forty-five


Quality

Sanitation

Brick and Bulk

ARCTIC ICE CREAM De Luxe our Specialty Service

At All Arctic Dealers

a

'A

BOX

OF FLOWERS" Sent to a lady, is always a pretty,

Men enjoy dropping in for their favorite cigars, cigarettes and tobacco

appropriate

and

welcome g i f t .

To

" Say it with Flowers " is considered the height of refinement and culture. We

furnish Flowers for Weddings,

Birthdays, Banquets,

Ollie's

Graduation, etc.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;everything

Festivities, in

the

flower line f r o m bouquets to boutonniers.

SPORT SHOP

Ebelink's Flower Shop 2 3 8 RIVER AVE.

This space contributed

PH. 5554

by

THE B W - M WARM

SHOE STORE

FRIEND TAVERN

'Holland Shoes for Men''

Page Two Hundred

Forty-six


4..—. 1

I

Buy Your

L I F E INSURANCE —

from

tht

F isscher-Bruoks Agency

representing

the

Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. TED

P H O N E 5016

ESSEBAGGERS,

College Rep.

4 East 8th, H O L L A N D , M I C H I G A N

—4.

Page

Two

Hundred

Forty-seven


EDUCATION The habit of saving is in itself an education. It fosters every virtue, teaches self-denial, cultivates a sense of honor, trains to foresight and so broadens the mind. Educate yourself thru saving. It pays remarkable dividends.

T H E Z E E L A N D STATE BANK Zeeland, Mich.

Our highest price is $5.95 Everything in footwear from the baseball shoe to the dainty silver brocade pump.

Merit Shoe Co., Inc. 18 W . 8TH

ST.

Shoes "Fit" to Wear

HOLLAND, M I C H .

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

CO-ED DRESSES YOUTH

LOOK

COATS AND SUITS H e r e are exquisite Frocks, Smart Coats, Suits for street and afternoon parties, too. Each shows a charming aptitude for its particular occasion, and the pricings are varied uiough to meet every plan of expenditure.

ROSE C L O A K STORE T H E SHOP OF EXCLUSIVE SERVICE

Page Two Hundred

Forty-eight

HOLLAND, MICH.

*


C o : Ah ! I must go to gym. E d : Is he the latest ? If you've never seen that sort of thing before—it's collegiate. Red Slicker: Is your sister ever out of temper? Blue Slicker: I should say not. She's got it to give away. P r o f : W h a t is an idea? Stude; An idea is like a dream, only you don't wake up. Ed : I came f r o m Iowa. Ted : I would too. Says Pete— As I was going home last night, I was approached by a tramp. him, " W h a t do you w a n t ? " " W h a t have you got ?" he asked. As he reached for his gun. his foot slipped and I held him up.

I said to

S h e : I wouldn't think of marrying such an intellectual monstrosity and physical misfit as you are—you numbskull! Do you get me ? H e : Well, from the general trend of your conversation, I should judge not. Of the five senses of a Collegian—common cents is the rarest. Moonlight on Black lake And one clear cold precise May there be no crackling of lagoon When my No. 10's trod the ice. Heard around the corner :— "A woman got on the street car with a baby. I began to look at it. said, 'rubber'! I said, 'Is that so?' I thought it was real."

She

JUST AN OLD-FASHIONED GIRL Debonair Johnny Flyn had just been presented to demure Mary Anne. 1 hey sank with one accord to a modestly chummy position on the steps. Sweet and low, Johnny told of his business and his ideals. Demure Mary Anne, drinking all in, leaned closer toward him. But just as her eyes came to a sweet level with Johnny's, something snapped. " W h a t was that?" Johnny asked, startled. Mary Anne blushed. " W h a t was t h a t ? " Johnny demanded. "W-a-well, if you m-m-must know," Mary Anne stammered, "m-m-my g-g-garter broke!" "Honey," pleaded Johnny fervently sinking to his knees, "will you marry me? I've been looking for an old-fashioned girl like you."

Page

Two Hundred

Forty-nine


THE LEADER

A Christian Weekly

Published in the Interests of The Reformed Church in America

Editorial Staff E. J. BLEKKINK. D. D. J. E.

KUIZENGA, D. D .

HENRY

Page Two Hundred

Fifty

GEERLINGS


GOODRICH CHICAGO STEAMER LEAVES H O L L A N D TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS, SATURDAYS DAILY SERVICE EFFECT I V E A B O U T J U N E 15TH DeLuxe Passenger Service Large Modern Fast Steel Steamers Special Party Rates for Students

GOODRICH TRANSIT COMPANY PHONES 2778-5081

J. A.

JOHNSON,

Gen. Agent

4.

4. " I want some talcum powder." "Mennens ?" "Nein, wimmenses." "Do you like Tillie T. ?" "Well, she has a good heart." "Neither do I."

Well Sam, I'll show you how 'tis. You see I married a widow and this widow had a daughter. Then my father who was a widower married our daughter, so you see my father is my son-in-law. Then my step-daughter is my stepmother. Well then her mother is my grand-mother and I'm married to herâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so that makes me my own grandfather. A girl may not let you kiss her but the chances are she appreciates your wanting to. No, Henry, the Student Volunteer movement doesn't consist in bumming one's way to the outside games. H e r mouth is like a rosebud and like a rosebud it's bound to open. "May I kiss you?" "They say kissing tends to the propagation of microbes." "Weil, then, you kiss me. I'm not a f r a i d of them."

Page

Two

Hundred

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I

REFLECT! W h a t does our remarkable five year growth mean to you ? Simply this: Since we profit through serving others, we must serve well in order to profit well. Our success proves our worthiness better than any other argument one could offer. It came through giving perfect satisfaction to those who tried us. It is a Real Pleasure to us to turn out Perfect Printingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from a personal name card to two, three and four color work. W e have the largest and most modernly equipt printing plant in Holland. All matters for the consideration of us as your printer. F o r a Complete Printing Service, Phone 5908 and our representative will be over in jig time.

Steketee-Van Huis Printing House Successors

to Klaasen Printing

Co.

Complete Printing Service 9

EAST

IOTH

ST.

Phone 5908

HOLLAND, M I C H .

THE BUSH & LANE PIANO possesses supreme quality

Grands, Upright Grands and Reproducing Pianos in many models offer a choice for every home.

Page Two Hundred

Fifty-two


*

. —

NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Largest Insurance Company and Greatest Financial Institution in the World.

1,800,000 People hold nearly $5,400,000,000 of

Insurance with Assets of over $1,000,000,000. the Policy Holders.

All Property of

81 years of service.

Attractive and Liberal Provisions for Disability and Double Indemnity f o r all Class " A " Policies. Ask Students Already Insured. Explain Policies.

They Are Satisfied.

Glad to

Past Interest Appreciated.

1

A L B E R T E. L A M P E N , Agent

I 1 — +

Question on Frosh intelligence e x a m : — W h e r e are the bronchial tubes situated ? Killey:—They are underlying passages from N. Y. to the Bronx. One of the below 85% : W h a t you don't know won't hurt you, but it certainly doesn't help you to get out in the evening. W E WOULD BUT Apologizing for our errors reminds us of the tale about the Van Vleckite who spilled ink on the envelope which enclosed a letter to his woman. He hastily scribbled in pencil, "This blot got on in the mail." To the J r - S r . Some came in Tuxedo's and others walked. N e x t to the Chicago " L ' s " the noisiest thing in the world is hard toast for breakfast at Voorhees. The truth about these "wild college parties"—the rat took the cheese, the rat took etc.—wink em!—join hands—everyone choose—good night! Love is a game often resulting in a tie.

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1926 Milestone Index

Page Addison Alethia Alumni Alumni Song of '87 Anchor Staff Arbor Day Armistice Day Athletic Board Athletic Board of Control Athletic Debt Diggers

118 108 8 10 86 70 72 igo 159 1S8

Band Baseball Basketball

98 140 152

Chemistry Club Contents Cosmopolitan

84 5 112

Debating Dedication

g

Delphi

102

Dickensian Dorian Drama Class Play

120 162

Emersonian

ng

Faculty Football Foreword Fraternal Freshman Class

j7 ]44 4 JJQ 53

Girls' Glee Club Girls' Sweater Club Glory Day Gospel Teams

94 153 73 ori

Harmony Glee Club Home Volunteers.. Hope Kurfew Klub

Page Two

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Fifty-four

Page Junior Class

41

Knickerbocker

114

Lake Geneva

75

Men's Glee Club

96

Milestone Staff M. O. L Monogram Club

88 124 157

Orations Orators Orchestra

126 125 97

Pageant Pi Kappa Delta Pre-Medic Club Preparatory President of College

163 90 85 179 18

Scenes School of Atusic Faculty Science Club Seminary Senior Class Senior Girls' Association Sibylline Sophomore Class Sorosis Student Council Student Volunteers

H 93 83 187 25 39 104 55 100 74 81

Tennis Track T u g of W a r

139 149 62

Y. M. C. A Y. W. C. A

76 78


Index to Advertisers

Name

Page

Arctic Ice Cream C o . . . . 2 4 6 Bay View Co Bazaar Store Bolhuis Lumber Co Boonstra Co Boter, P. S Bouman, L Boven Blue, Jack B-M Shoe Store Brink, H . R Brower, J. J Brouwer, Jas. A Bush-Lane Co

200 203 217 210 195 232 222 226 246 201 222 238 252

Canton Engraving Co... .235 Citizens T r a n s f e r C o . . . . 2 1 8 Colonial M f g . Co 219 Cook, M. J 218 Corner Hdw. Co 207 Cota's Drug Store 222 Damstra Bros 214 De Free Co 237 Devries, U. F 226 De Fouw Co 237 De Vries & Dornbos Co..244 De Vries, B. J 218 Diekema, Kollen, Ten Cate 196 Doesburg, H . R 226 Dosker, H . N 226 Du Mez Bros 218 Du Saar, D. J 231 Dykema, N 238 Dykstra, J. S 203 East End Drug S t o r e . . .226 Ebelink, H 246 Economy Shoe S t o r e . . . . 2 3 2 Electric Shoe Hospital. .222 Elenbaas-Fortney 238 Enterprise Shoe S t o r e . . . 2 0 3 Fabiano, A. P Fourth Ref. Church First Ref. Church

203 223 213

Name

Page

First State Bank Fris Book Store

232 245

Geerd's Electric Co Green Mill Cafe Goodrich Transit Co

238 215 251

Hardie Co 224 Hekman Biscuit Co 229 Herkners 233 Hoekstra's Ice Cream Co 215 Holland City News 214 Holland City State Bank 199 Holland Fuel Co 226 Holland Furnace Co 216 Holland 5 & 10 218 Holland Furn. M a r k e t . . 196 Holland Lumber & Supply Co 212 Holland Maid Co 225 Holland Printing Co 211 Holleman and D e W e e r d 206 Home Furnace Co 207 207 Hope Book Agency Hope College 202 Houseman-Jones Co 193 Huizenga, Geo. H 201 Ihling Bros. Everard Co. 234 Kammeraad, N Keefer's Restaurant Keppel, T Kleis, H . P Klomparens Coal Co Kuite, Jacob Kouw, 1 Lacey, G. A Lampen, A. E Laughlin's R e s t a u r a n t . . Leader, The Leenhouts, Dr. A

222 211 214 196 226 218 211 228 253 .237 250 222

Moeke & Sons 219 Marsilje, T 222 Merit Shoe Co 248 Meyer's Music H o u s e . . . 199 Model Drug Store 211

Name

Page

Nibbelink-Notier

238

Olive, W . J 205 Ollies Inc 246 Ottawa Furniture C o . . . . 2 1 0 Patterson, Chas 219 Penney, J. C 244 People's State B a n k . . . . 2 0 9 Prins, H. P 196 Reformed Church House 206 Robbert Co 214 Robinson and P a r s o n s . . .203 Rose Cloak Store 248 Rutgers, J. J 209 Scott-Lugers Co Selles, P. J Shady Lawn F l o r i s t s . . . Slagh, Bert Smith, Geo Steketee Tire Shop Steketee-Van Huis Co.. Stevenson, W . R

200 244 .220 219 232 238 .252 226

Third Ref. Church Toren Printing Co Trinity Ref. C h u r c h . . . Trompen, J. N Turkstra Co Tyson, M. L

221 240 .243 227 215 239

Van Den Berg Bros 200 Van Putten Bros 203 Van Putten Ins. Co 223 Van Verst, G. W 214 Vaupell's Drug S t o r e . . . 2 3 2 Visscher Brooks Co 247 Visser-Bareman Co 244 Welling's R e s t a u r a n t . . . .196 White Cross Barber Shop 206 Wolverine Garage 218 Zeeland Art Studio Zeeland Record Zeeland State Bank

Page

Two

Hundred

224 196 248

Fifty-five


' ARCHIVES SHEE COL;


Milestone 1926  

Hope College yearbook.

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