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Merry Christmas LDC — 7

Hope College Anchor Official Publication of the Students of Hope College at Holland, Michigan

Ruth Probst Presents First Student Recital The first s t u d e n t recital of the season will be presented Sunday, J a n u a r y 12, by Ruth Probst, Senior o r g a n i s t , who will be g r a d u a t i n g in February.

Happy New Year

Majors in English Discuss Anderson

B. Timmer, A. Vanderlaan To Attend Speech Meeting

Maxwell Anderson, eminent playw r l g h t of the modern e r a , was the a u t h o r considered by members of I the English Majors Club at its Sonatina Bach recent meeting, December 9. This I'relude and F u g u e interesting and i n f o r m a t i v e discusin E Minor Bach The International Relations Club The r e g u l a r meeting of Pallette sion about the life and works of in their December 11 meeting cen- an J Masque was held Wednesday, II this famous author w a s held at the tered the theme of the meeting December 11, 194(5, in t h e lounge F a n t a s i e and F u g u e Boelley home of Dr. John Hallenbach. around today's question mark — jf Van R a a l t e Hall. Mr. Edward F a c t s about the life of Maxwell Russia. This topic was selected, III Avison, club advisor, discussed the Anderson were given to the group as are all of t h e club's topics for The Fountain Fletcher drama courses to be o f f e r e d secNoel D'Aquin-Watters by B a r b a r a Bilkert, a f t e r which the consideration, with the view that ond s e m e s t e r which a r e Dramatic play "Valley F o r g e " w a s reviewed .ve college s t u d e n t s should know T h e French Clock Bornschein Production and Community Drama. by J o h n Bo<>rsma. In his review of something of the countries round Frael udi um Jarnefelt Pictures of club m e m b e r s were the play Mr. Boorsma remarked about us. The club feels that a 'aken by Adrian Bos, a f t e r which IV that the supreme issue at s t a k e careful e d u c a t i o n a l p r o g r a m is information sheets were filled out. Piece Heroique F r a n c k was the queoti m " w h y do men needed and that more s t u d e n t s on These information sheets are the V a l h y Forge is a histori- Hope's c a m p u s should avail them- beginning of p e r m a n e n t records of R u t h took p r e l i m i n a r y o r g a n fight?" t r a i n i n g f r o m her mother, and has cal play vary a;; f r o m the regular selves of the privileges offered by personal information, d r a m a t i c exstudied o r g a n for four y e a r s with plays written by Mr. Anderson, the LR.C. perience in high school, on Hope's Mrs. Snow. She has been very becaus? ii dealt with American HisMiss Metta J . Ross, Club Spon- campus, and other places, experiactive in t h e Music Organizations tory and not his c u s t o m a r y theme sor. opened the p r o g r a m of the ence in acting, directing, s t a g i n g on campus, a s a member of Chapel of English and European history. evening by p r e s e n t i n g some re- and class work. Choir, Women's Glee Club, and Mu- This play contains several worth- corded Russian music. Her comThese records will facilitate in sical A r t s Club of which she also while speeches given by George n e n t s and e x t r a c t s f r o m Tschai- selection of plays and casting. They served as president her junior year. Washington, whic'i g a v e character kowsky's S y m p h o n y No. 4, and will also be the basis f o r achieveShe has presided at the organ many and meaning to an otherwise de- Szostakowcz S y m p h o n y No. (i ment of special distinction and adpress! n " p'ay. t i m e s for chapel services. made this part of the p r o g r a m i mission to membership in the NaHer p r o g r a m is as follows:

"Russia" Is Theme O f I. R. C. M e e t

An ainu;;..itf co 'dy, " H i g h T o r " was summarized "»y Glenna Gore. This play concvrns itself with the a m a z i n g p h i l o s ' p ' y of life of Von Vandoren, a i/u.o.i nan. There was considerabl • discussion regarding A f t e r g r a d u a t i o n from Hope, the depressin -, m I ng to this play, Ruth plans on doing advanced work a f t e r it had been such a comedy nearly all the v a v '.hrough. f o r her M a s t e r of Music Degree. In "Wingless \ c t o r y , " a n o t h e r depressing play o." Maxwell Anderion's we discover t h a t the author s deep'y perplexed about the question of a Christian m a r r y i n g someone of an absolutely different f a i t h Mr. Edward Avison, speech and and racial group. Betty Timmer, in d r a m a t i c s instructor on Hope's her condensation of this play, felt campus, presented "Dickens' sure that some of the p r a y e r s C h r i s t m a s Carol" in a special offered are superb and beautiful chapel service on Tuesday, Decem- beyond comparison. ber 17, 1946. Mr. Avison began his During an informal discussion at work on this r e a d i n g in J u n e , 1929, the close of the meeting in which under Dr. Delbert G. Lean, head of all the s t u d e n t s and faculty particithe Speech Department at Wooster pated several of Mr. Anderson's College. Dr. Lean had been reado t h e r p" y ; were considered. Dr. ing the story since 1908. Mr. AviHollenuac.i g a \ e a s u m m a r y of son gave his first public r e a d i n g at " W i n t e r s e t . " This play dealt with Ritman, Ohio, in 1929 and since the question of justice. Opinion was then he has read it in Ohio, f o r t h c nning concerning the type of Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, d r a m a being written during this and this y e a r he adds the s t a t e of era. Dr. Clarence De Graaf spoke Michigan. highly of a recent editorial fea"Dickens' C h r i s t m a s Carol", tured in Life m a g a z i n e written by which is now approximately one Henry R. Luce concerning modernhundred y e a r s old, is enjoyed day writers of plays. every year by young and old. It is not only read from the platf o r m , but also by p a r e n t s to children in their homes d u r i n g the Yule season. It is also heard, read, and acted on the radio by unknowns as well as by Lionel J o h n VanOeveren presented the B a r r y m o r e . Every year it is pre- topic "The Philosophy of Russia" sented many times in schools in n the Philosophy club meeting on this country and foreign countries Monday, December 9. The politiin the form of a one act play. cal, economic, and religious life of During her junior year she served as organist in the F o u r t h Ref o r m e d Church of H o l l a n d , and when at home she is a s s i s t a n t org a n i s t of the Reformed Church in Nyack, New York.

Avison Presents Christmas Carol

Permanent Records To Be Kept by P&M

t was discovered that Russian table m a n n e r s rival our own—that Russian s e n t r i e s a p p e a r alert even as the American soldier does when his photo is taken — and that the Russian is born, works, m a r r i e s and dies even as an American and quite unlike an imagined monster. In the film the Russian was m e t ! as a fellow human, and it is on this plane that Americans must meet the n a t i o n a l s of every na-, tion in every phase of life if peace on e a r t h is to be maintained.

Hope College will send two representatives to t h e State Extempore Speaking Contest, which will be held on J a n u a r y 10, 1947, at Kalamazoo State College, Kalamazoo, Michigan. Appointed as representatives for Hope College are Mr. Robert Vander Laan, who will speak on t h e general subject, The Control of Atomic E n e r g y , " and Betty Timmer, mem-

Holland Club Hears Hope Delegation

n a r r a t o r . Sonny Donohue.

College President In Radio Forum

Language Clubs Discuss Customs

Philosophy of Russia Is Club's Topic

W . A . L Sponsors All-College Party

Rev. John

To Be A t K College Jan. 10

On Tuesday, December 10, a delegation f r o m Hope College conducted the discussion at a meeting of the Social P r o g r e s s Club of Holland, at the home of f o r m e r Superintendent of Schools, Egbert Fell. Dr. Irwin Lubbers. President of Hope College, presented a paper, and in connection with the paper enjoyable to all present. Then the tional F r a t e r n i t y as soon as there a radio broadcast by the Departfilm "A Day in Soviet R u s s i a " ! are enough to qualify. ment of State was read. The topic The presentation of a radio skit was shown. Club members were was, " I s U N E S C O the Key to Inmpressed with the fact that life | entitled " C a s t e " by Robertson conternational U n d e r s t a n d i n g ? " in Russia is a f t e r all not so dif- cluded the meeting. Those who R e p r e s e n t i n g Hope were Dr. ferent f r o m life in London or New i took part in the radio skit include Lubbers and Dr. William Schrier the following: J a n J o l d e r s m a , ShirYork. Intermission between reels 3f the Speech D e p a r t m e n t . Robert ley Knoll, M a r g u e r i t e Aardema. was filled with pithy comments on the film and life as shown in Rus- John McCallum, Marvin Kragt, Vander Laan and Chester Droog sia. To the a m a z e m e n t of some Ted Locker. Clifford Haycock, and also participated.

Dr. Irwin J. Lubbers, president of Hope college, presented his n e w s on the subject, "Will the United N a t i o n s Make G o o d ? " at a round table discussion which was sponsored by Western Michigan College of Education. The forum was held Wednesday evening, DeChester Droog, d u b President,! cember 11, in Grand Rapids. This presided at the meeting. Plans a r e was a radio broadcast on W J E F . progressing f o r the forthcoming} For the past three Wednesday banquet and a r r a n g e m e n t s and the j evenings e x t e m p o r a n e o u s discusdetails of securing a nationally I sions were presented to emphasize known s p e a k e r are being com-! the h i g h l i g h t s in certain world pleted. affairs. The t a l k s were based principally on t h r e e s u b j e c t s : "German Occupation: Is It a S u c c e s s ? " ; "Will the United N a t i o n s Make G o o d ? " and " W h a t Will the Next Congress D o ? " The subjects menThe modern l a n g u a g e club met in tioned above were discussed by the chapel for the December Christ-1 various s p e a k e r s on December 4 mas p r o g r a m on December 9. At 11 and 18 respectively. Mr. J o h n C. Hoekje, r e g i s t r a r at this meeting Dorothy Davis told Western Michigan college and a the g r o u p about C h r i s t m a s customs Hope g r a d u a t e , is a m e m b e r of the in Spain where C h r i s t m a s is observed on J a n u a r y (>. Maurfce Lang p r o g r a m committee which is retalked about the G e r m a n C h r i s t m a s sponsible for the organization of or St. Nicholas Day, which is held the f o r u m s . Mr. Otto Yntema. who on December (5. The French Christ- is connected with adult education For the last eighteen y e a r s it the Russians was discussed in re- m a s was discussed by Grace Lang- at Western Michigan, participated has been an annual affair for Mr. lationship to their present philos- ley. Also included in the p r o g r a m in the December 18 discussion. Avison to read "Dickens' Christ- jphy. The problem of American was the r e a d i n g of "The Night mas Carol". He presents it from Christianity or capitalism versus Before C h r i s t m a s " in German by were the three vice-presidents — two to ten times each y e a r with Russian Communism was also con- Edna Mae Van Tatenhove and the Phyl Haskins, G e r m a n ; Rachael audiences r a n g i n g in size f r o m five lidered. The f u t u r e topic given to reading of the C h r i s t m a s story as Dykstra. Spanish; and Doris Opie, to one thousand. This year his Marian Dame, will be "How Does found in Luke in French by Dorie French. Scientific Attitude Affect Opie. audience will be equal to or larger the The J a n u a r y meeting f e a t u r e s a than any previous year. The boys Christian T h i n k i n g ? " Those in c h a r g e of the program movie " R o a d to P a r i s . " of the National Guard, previously the S t a t e Guard, of which Mr. Avison w a s formerly a member, a - o bringinr? him back to Kirksv i l K Missouri, to read it again to them. Within the last eleven years, Mr. Avison has road "Dick ens' C h r i s t m a s Carol" in Kirksville about twenty times.

The C h r i s t m a s spirit filled Carnegie Gymnasium on the night of December 15 during the All-College C h r i s t m a s party sponsored by the W. A, L. and Student Council. Blue lights and red and white t r i m m i n g s provided a m e r r y atmosphere as the p r o g r a m began with g r o u p singing lead by Mr. Clyde Geerlings. A brief t h r e e - a c t play, "The D a g g e r , " was given by Rev. A r t h u r John who is touring Bud Koranda, Don Scholten, Russ America a s a messenger of t h e DeVette, and Gene Van T a m e l e n . Group g a m e s and frolics w e r e lead Church in India will be the Chapel by Rev. E u g e n e M. Osterhaven. s p e a k e r on Tuesday, J a n u a r y 7. General chairmen were Alma H e is pastor of the C h i t t a r Church VanderHill and Phyl Dietrich. in India.

Extempore Speech Contest

/ Mr. Savarirayan Mr. J a r e d S. S a v a r i r a y a n will address Y.M.C.A. on J a n u a r y 7. Mr. S a v a r i r a y a n is principal of Voorhees College in India and is very influential in educational circles. He is t o u r i n g t h e S t a t e s a t present and speaking on h i g h e r education in India.

Mrs. Williams Mrs. A r p u t h a m Williams is the

Wives of Veterans Organize Into Club

the Ranipet Church in India and is c h a i r m a n of the " E a s t e r n Circle" of village p a r i s h e s t h e r e .

Contests Held This Week The annual Raven and Adelaide Oratorical Contests were held in the ("hapel on Tuesday and Wednesday a f t e r n o o n s , December 17 and 18. Several s p e a k e r s were heard on subjects such a s "The Morals of the Armed Services During the Past W a r . " "The Church's Responsibilities to Society," and "The Crisis and the Moral Order." The A. A. Raven Prize in Oratory dates back to the y e a r 1908 when it was established by Mr. A. A. Raven f o r men on the campus. The prize is divided into a first a w a r d of $.'{() and a second award of $20. Competing in the contest on W e d n e s d a y a f t e r n o o n were Charles Previle, Glenn Van Haitsema, Leroy Koranda, Hanilu Sc-haible. W a r r e n Heitbrink, Walter Studdiford, Robert Schuller, Donald Evers, and Vergil D y k s t r a .

Adding to the list of unprecedented activities on Hope's campus •S the newly-organized student wives group. S t a r t e d at the iniative of the women of the faculty, the wives met together several times last year, but it was not Adelaide Prize Is $25 until this November t h a t an The Adelaide O r a t o r y contest is organization meeting was held and also a yearly event on the campus. iefinite plans made for the operaThe Prize of $25 may be competed tion of the group. for by women s t u d e n t s of the colThe purpose of the monthly lege and is designed to f o s t e r the meetings is to provide o p p o r t u n i t y study of rhetoric and the practice for wives of s t u d e n t s to meet each of oratory. This y e a r ' s c o n t e s t a n t s )ther and to feel more a part of w e r e : Leona Doornbos, Marian college life. At a meeting held Korteling, Hazel Vander Woude, November 2n in Voorhees Hall, and Lorraine Van F a r o we. under the sponsorship of Miss The winners of both the Raven Elizabeth Lichty and Miss Laura and Adelaide a w a r d s will repreBoyd, with Mrs. Irwin J . Lubbers ss guest, the following officers S e , U H o p e u C o l l e g e t h i s c o m i n * s r,n w o r n loMoH • VI r u u/ii P ^ a t t h e c o n t e s t o f t h e Michiwere oelected: president, Mrs. Wilgan Intercollegiate Speech League. liam C. Bennett; vice-president. The winners of the contests last Mrs. Renze L. Hoeksema; secrey e a r were Miss Helen Goff and t a r y . Mrs. Donald W e e m h o f f ; Mr. Paul Fried who attended the t r e a s u r e r , Mrs. Edwin Ratering. contest at Wayne University, DeT h e next meeting of the group troit. Michigan. is scheduled f o r the latter part of January. It will be held in the basement lounge of Van Raalte Hall. Notices will be sent to wives whose names a r e on file in the college office. All wives a r e invited to attend. Under sponsorship of the YW

Deputation Teams Visit Local Groups

and YM several deputation teams

D e V e t t e Selected As Blue Key Rep. To National Con. L a s t week at the monthly dinnern e e t i n g of t h e Hope C h a p t e r of 31ue Key National Honor F r a t e r n ty in the Temple Lounge, it was innounced t h a t Russell De Vette vould represent the local chapter it the National Blue Key Conven:ion to be held in St. Louis on December 27. This will be the f i r s t National Convention of the Blue Key since 1940. All C h a p t e r s of colleges and universities t h r o u g h o u t the country will be represented at this meeting. \ s the official C h a p t e r delegate, Russ automatically becomes a national member of Blue Key. O t h e r business discussed at last week's meeting included various committee r e p o r t s . It was decided to have the basketball line-ups printed for distribution a t the home g a m e s . Preston S t e g e n g a presided a t this meeting, which was attended by the active m e m b e r s and f a c u l t y advisors.

Y.W.C.A. speaker on J a n u a r y 7. She is t h e w i f e of Rev. Williams of

ber of Phi Kappa Delta, speech organization, \vho will t a k e part in the discussiorr topic of t h e Women's Division. " J u v e n i l e Delinquency." T h e Contest is under the sponsorship of the Michigan Inter-collegiate Speech League. Subjects for discussion were chosen by this organization at its last meeting in Lansing, Michigan.

Many t h a n k s go to Mrs. Dena W a l t e r s , Mr. Albert T i m m e r ' s secretary, who contributed t h e C h r i s t m a s t r e e in t h e Koffee Kletz.

have conducted services in near-by churches. Last Sunday, December 15, First Reformed, Kalamazoo had a Hope College team for their y o u n g peoples meeting and Bethel Reformed, Kalamazoo, the evening church services. Pierce Maassen spoke at the young people's meeting and Chester Droog at the church services. H a r r y Miners accompanied by Betty Fuller, provided the music for both services. j D i c k Vriesman c o n d u c t e d a ] h y m n s i n g i n A 1 | e n d a l e i December 8. Marion Ter Borg played for the s e n i c e s and Phyllis Darrow sang several numbers. This hymn sing w a s sponsored to raise f u n d s for an organ for the church.

NOTICE! Have a d a t e f o r a Sorority or F r a t e r n i t y p a r t y ? Order your corsage f r o m W a r m Friend Flower Shop. (Rosalind Scholten — college representative). Call Voorhees 9142. I n f o r m a t i o n will be given you on: 1. Price lists 2. Variety of flowers available 2. Color of y o u r d a t e ' s formal.


Page Two

Hop# College Anchor

Hope College flnchor Member

ftssoe'ded Cbtefiicte Press STAFF VIVIAN DYKEMA Kenze L. Hoeksema „ , ^ Howard Koop Lois V a n Wyk Louise T e r Beek Joseph P a l m e r , J r

Editor-in-Chief ) . { Associate ^ Editors ) Business M a n a g e r Asst. Business M a n a g e r

STAFF News Editor Feature Editoi Society Editor .Circulation M a n a g e i

Harriett Hains.. B a r b a r a Bilkert Glenna Gore Mary Young Dorothy Davis Shirley Willbrandt Janet Pfeiffer

^Typists A r t Editor

Dale Aekridge

REPORTERS Lou Bixby J o a n n e Decker Rachel Dykstra Virginia Hemmes Carolyn Ingham Alida Kloosterman Laurence Masse Elaine Meeusen E r n e s t Meeusen

J e a n Meulendyke Lois Meulendyke Peggy P r i n s Ruth Q u a n t Mollie R e i m c r s Eleanor Rubingh Ruth Ruys Geraldine S h e e r a n s J e a n Sibley

W a l t e r Boerma Dick Brown Marie B u t t l a r

Marian H a n n a Carolyn I n g h a m Jan Joldersma

J e a n Thompson G e r t r u d e Vredeveld Dick V r i e s m a n Arlene Wieten Robert W i l d m a n Vernon Sennet Owen Koeppe Max F r e g o Vergil D y k s t r a

BUSINESS S T A F F

Ruth Bartholomew Marcia De Young

Roger K e m p e r s Lyn L u n d b e r g Don Vanden Berg Robert Wildman

CIRCULATION S T A F F Donna S l u g t e r Bonita Zandbergen Evelyn Van Dan

Published every two weeks d u r i n g the school year by the s t u d e n t * of Hope College. Entered as second class m a t t e r a t the post office of Holland, Michigan, a t special r a t e of postage provided f o r in section 1103 of Act of Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. PRINTED

A T OLD N E W S PRINTERY

Thoughts On Christmas The C h r i s t m a s season is cne of t h e most beautiful t i m e s of tlie year, but very often in t h e rush of the everyday t h i n g s which are so demanding and pressing, tlie t r u e spirit is missed. With all t h e advertising done by commercial concerns f o r promoting their businesses, the religious significance of such a d a y is lost, in the a t t e m p t to make Christmas j u s t another means of exploiting the public. E m p h a s i s placed on those t h i n g s is not entirely bad if the t r u e C h r i s t m a s is not subjected to a lower plane or f o r gotten altogether. The beautiful s e n t i m e n t s of this season receive their basic motive f r o m t h e coming of t h e Christchild to a lowly m a n g e r as recorded in the Bible. This s t o r y and related incidents can give all of us a new point of view on m a n y phases of life. For instance, t h e evidence of g i f t s always brings up the question of how t h e g i f t was given. Some people are so stingy t h a t they will not give a n y more t h a n t h e y think they a r e required to. Others are good-natured and will give if they are pressed to do so. Still o t h e r s receive such delight in giving t h a t t h e y do it of t h e i r own f r e e will. When we think of God's s u p r e m e g i f t of His Son, we would do well tc. emulate such an example, not only a t this time of year, but, throughout the coming months. It is not t h e price t a g of a. present t h a t should receive the attention, but r a t h e r the. spirit, of the giver. Then, too, t h e s t a r of Bethlehem reminds one of t h a t silent night so long ago. The light of this s t a r shines down through the ages undimmed by h u m a n events. It is a guiding beam that leads all to t h e eternal t r u t h s and to the Christ. This ascending s t a r with its silver s h a f t causes all to pause and to consider how each one of us can achieve something worthwhile and i m p o r t a n t in t h e coming year. Once again, t h e m a n n e r in which a person strives to a t t a i n his mark m a y well be an imitation of t h e humbleness and unobtrusiveness which characterized C h r i s t ' s life on e a r t h . It is now 2,000 years since t h e b i r t h of t h e Christ-child, but present day problems a r e so complicated t h a t t h e onlysolution seems to be in Him. T h e r e is no question t h a t social, poltical, economic, and scientific developments change with t h e passing years. However, t h e moral responsibility of each and every one of us still r e m a i n s t h e same. A sense of principles including those of t r u s t w o r t h i n e s s , integrity, and cooperation is a necessity. And C h r i s t m a s is the time t o remind us of our responsibilities. It r e a f f i r m s t h e elements of h u m a n kindness with its good impulses and s y m p a t h y , l a u g h t e r and light, love and tenderness. In Charles Dickens' A C h r i s t m a s Carol it is said t h a t Ebenezer Scrooge "knew how to keep C h r i s t m a s well, if a n y man alive possessed t h e knowledge. May t h a t t r u l y be said of all of us. And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless u s everyone!"

Letters To The Editor Dear E d i t o r : T h r o u g h o u t the c o u r s e of years, t h e p r o p e r use of w o r d s h a s been a problem of g r e a t scope. F r o m e a r l y childhood until t h e end of o u r years, we a r e daily faced with t h e problem of selecting suitable words to e x p r e s s o u r opinions on national events, a n s w e r p r o f e s s o r ' s questions, convince a f a i r damsel t o accept our c o m p a n y f o r an evening, or to exercise o u r r i g h t t o

f r e e d o m of speech in a n y field of e n d e a v o r . Each s i t u a t i o n r e q u i r e s a d i f f e r e n t set of words, y e t N O N E of t h e m requires the use of profanity. Hope College is founded on t h e principles of C h r i s t i a n i t y , including t h e c o m m a n d : " T h o u s h a l t n o t t a k e t h e n a m e of t h e Lord t h y God in v a i n . " In f o r m e r y e a r s , a t t e n d ance a t Hope w a s considered a privilege and honor. O n l y t h o s e

who a g r e e d to conduct themselves in accord w i t h the principles on which Hope w a s founded w e r e allowed t o a t t e n d . S t u d e n t s r e s p e c t ed her s t a n d a r d s and each in t h e i r own w a y a t t e m p t e d t o live u p to her g r e a t n a m e . P a s s i n g y e a r s cause c h a n g e , and c h a n g e h a s been registered on Hope's campus. App a r e n t l y a portion of the s t u d e n t s now in a t t e n d a n c e do not respect Hope and the principles upon which she is founded. I n s t e a d , they are h e r e t o t a k e a d v a n t a g e of Hope's- f a c i l i t i e s since they c a n n o t secure admission in any o t h e r school due t o the crowded conditions. However, while m a k i n g use of t h i s o p p o r t u n i t y offered t h e m , they add n o t h i n g constructive to :he school, but instead a r e slowly uining its r e p u t a t i o n and s t a n d i n g )y t h e i r actions and words. Proanity is used e v e r y w h e r e — i n the hapel, in Bible classes, in the library, in t h e dorms, in t h e Kletz •'nd on the c a m p u s ! P e r h a p s we a t t e m p t to excuse ihe condition on the c a m p u s as being b r o u g h t a b o u t by the r e t u r n »f the V e t e r a n . E e in g V e t e r a n s does not exclude us f r o m o u r responsibility to our God and our school! T h i s is r a t h e r a guise behind which we are a t t e m p t i n g to hide. It would be b e t t e r to look at the f a c t s . Some of the s t u d e n t s on the c a m p u s think it iy s m a r t to use p r o f a n i t y and to use it in excessive q u a n t i t i e s , especially on the campus of a Christian college. A .najority of these s t u d e n t s a r e too young to have served in t h e a r m e d forces. V e t e r a n s , a l t h o u g h t h e y do esort to p r o f a n i t y upon occasions, 'requently a r e so tired of h e a r i n g It t h a t they a t least make an effort o regain t h e use of p r o p e r speech.

Lamentations Of A Dorm Before Vacation Oh d e a r w h a t can t h e m a t t e r b e ? My walls a r e a c h i n g witn noise. Oh, won't t h o s e kids e v e r be quiet And gain s o m e dignity and poise? T h e v e g o t suitcases s t r e w n all over my r o o m s , And the w a y they pack is a s i g h t . Some j u s t t h r o w t h e i r t h i n g s in, And o t h e r s p u t t h e m in r i g h t . You'd t h i n k 1 had a choir inside The w a y t h e y ' r e s i n g i n g t o n i g h t ; C h r i s t m a s carols and such, t h a t I like v e r y much, It m a k e s m y a t m o s p h e r e b r i g h t . In my living room now an evergreen stands f h a t s covered with lights and with balls. They've h u n g holly you know and white mistletoe, And d e c o r a t e d all brightly my walls. But hush! All of a sudden quiet reigns Some c a r o l e r s a r e s i n g i n g outside. They t u r n out the lights, to see w h a t ' s in sight, f i l l finally t h e s i n g e r s are spied. They listen with reverence to the songs t h a t are s u n g . Of the s t o r y of the Christ child's birth. And thrill when they sing the songs of the king, And l a u g h when they sing those of m i r t h . But now t h e y ' r e all quieted down And s n u g g l e d into t h e i r beds. While visions of home, but not t h a t alone. Run a mad race in t h e i r heads. Now a n g e l s who on tip-toe come in With c a n d l e s all a g l o w . Sing carols anew, and beautifully, too. In voices s o f t , sweet and low. When m o r n i n g doth break, they all do a w a k e With a wonderful f e e l i n g inside. Vacation is nigh, and 1 heave a sigh; In their own homes f o r a while they'll abide. R. J. Quant

We pride ourselves on our high icholastic s t a n d i n g , and yet we find mrselves in the very u n c o m f o r t ible position of t u r n i n g out students who a r e unable to m a s t e r the English l a n g u a g e . T r u l y it is the mark of poor education and lack of vocabulary when one r e s o r t s to p r o f a n i t y in e x p r e s s i n g his views. Added to this is t h e fact hat Hope is recognized as a Christian college t h r o u g h o u t the count r y . We a r e according her g r e a t disrespect and slowly ruining her some c o n s t r u c t i v e t h i n k i n g and .eputation by using p r o f a n i t y . less opinionating, or is it still What can be done about the siteasier to complain t h a n to imuation? Ahelishing p r o f a n i t v on CAD Hope's c a m p u s is not a m a t t e r f o r p r o v e ? ter of " S T U D E N T ACTION", a d m i n i s t r a t i v e policy; it is a matFirst of all, each of us m u s t t a k e inventory of ourselves and m a k e sure t h a t even under p r e s s u r e we do not lapse into the use of prof a n ity . If each of us did this, profanity would cease to exist on Hope's C a m p u s . Should additional steps prove necessary, the students, who respect Hope and desire to rid her c a m p u s of p r o f a n i t y , could all speak to the individual who insists on using p r o f a n i t y , m a k i n g him feel so out of place t h a t he will e i t h e r leave school or conform to o u r way of thinking. T h e r e is no place at Hope or any Christian school for those who t a k e a d v a n t a g e of the opportunities we have to offer and then go into the world and display contempt for our principles. If some of these individuals, who r e f u s e to conform to Hope's Christian principles, slip in and they do not feel the u r g e to leave, the u r g e to leave should be applied by the administration. I s u g g e s t t h a t we a s the student body make these last few weeks of t h i s semester " B e t t e r Speech" m o n t h and once a g a i n make Hope's c a m p u s a place t h a t respects the Ten C o m m a n d m e n t s , including the c o m m a n d : " T h o u shalt not t a k e the name of the Lord thy God in vain." A student

Dear E d i t o r : When I read T H E E Y E S A N D E A R S O F H O P E in t h e December 5th issue of the A N C H O R , it seemed t h a t my eyes were deceiving me. W h e r e did you find those n a s t y c o m m e n t s on d a n c i n g ? Just

how

is

dancing

an

un-

christian f o r m of r e c r e a t i o n ? me, and HOPE

to

To

many o t h e r s on the

campus, • dancing

is

a

h e a l t h f u l , r e l a x i n g recreation t h a t is as Christian-like as singing, bowling, or any o t h e r f o r m of decent exercise. A s has a l r e a d y been b r o u g h t out, if the s t u d e n t s really w a n t to dance, they will find a place t o do so. Isn't it a much b e t t e r idea to have the C O L L E G E run o r g a n ized, chaperoned dances than to have it done in some S a u g a t u c k jin-mill ? L e t ' s get H O P E up to the rest of the n a t i o n ' s colleges ind have dances, s e m i - f o r m a l s included, a l o n g with the rest of normal school social life. RMK Dear Editor: The question of d a n c i n g on the c a m p u s s e e m s to be t h e big topic of t h e d a y . In spite of the high s t a n d a r d s and ideals which Hope College h a s m a i n t a i n e d a n d the fine quality of its g r a d u a t e s , it seems t h a t c e r t a i n s t u d e n t s find t h e m s e l v e s capable of q u e s t i o n i n g decisions of t h e adm i n i s t r a t i v e officials. T h i s is no doubt a r e s u l t of the increased enrollment which h a s b r o u g h t t o Hope m a n y s t u d e n t s not the l e a s t bit i n t e r e s t e d in the college's fine traditions.

Dear E d i t o r : In t h e p a s t f e w weeks o u r student body h a s been embroiled in a r g u m e n t s a b o u t t h e school sponsoring dances. T h e r e is little doubt t h a t the e n t i r e m a t t e r will be settled by the t r u s t e e s of our school. T h e r e a r e n a t u r a l l y m a n y rebellious-natured a m o n g us, and to t h i s W e m i g h t find d a n c i n g a m o s t group a n y decision would be t a k e n e n j o y a b l e w a y t o spend a n evening a s a dictatorial decree. b u t why not s e t t l e f o r t h e dances The issue, u n f o r t u n a t e l y , is not which a r e n o t sponsored by t h e only t h a t of dancing. I t goes school and not expect t h e school much deeper t h a n t h a t . It is t h e to break a t r a d i t i o n to s a t i s f y one question of A U T H O R I T Y . A f t e r m i n o r w h i m of a m i n o r i t y of stuall, w h y a r e we all here, to learn dents. or to rebel ? If o u r purpose is one L e t ' s n o t condemn t h e people of b r e e d i n g radicals we m a y a s well give u p all p r e t e x t of being a who made H o p e College w h a t it is church school and become a n o t h e r f o r a little n a r r o w - m i n d e d n e s s Rutgers. w h e n we a s s t u d e n t s a r e so n a r The issue is clear, t h e lines a r e r o w minded t h a t we can so t w i s t d r a w n . T h e o f t repeated excuses a n innocent a c t of a fellow s t u t h a t t h e school is old f a s h i o n e d or d e n t a n d m a k e c a l u m n y concernt h a t d a n c i n g is s i n f u l have become i n g i t u n t i l it develops i n t o a m e s s stale. W e r e t h e issue a n y p l a i n e r which can p e r m a n e n t l y i n j u r e o u r it would a s s u m e t h e s t a g e of o u t school—Hope College.

tnd out ridiculousness. Let's have

Betty Fetter

I Am So Generous Lois Meulendyke

t h e r e ' s my best g i r l f r i e n d , R u b y , over t h e r e . E u r i k a — t h a t ' s w h a t I

Clank, clank, c l a n k ! Mtti-mm-m — t h a t r e m i n d s m e of a song I used to sing, " H e a r the -pennies d r o p p i n g . " W h y do I a l w a y s g e t p e n nnes f r o m J a s p e r when I'm fishing for larger stuff—? ( J a s p e r is o t h e r w i s e known a s my p i g g y bank) I n case you h a v e n ' t guessed it y e t — I ' m robbing J a s p e r to help out my Yuletide spirit of g i v i n g . I'm one of those f e w peculiar individuals who do t h e i r ChristmaE s h o p p i n g the last minute w a y (nothing sarcastic about me). A n y w a y , here I go loaded w i t h n o n e y and a double dose of vitanin pills to w i t h s t a n d t h e r i s e in prices. You know, it a l w a y s thrills me to see all the b r i g h t lights a n d hoards of people t h a t t h r o n g the big city (of H o l l a n d ) . So now, w i t h the h a r d boiled e g g s along m y spine, I push open t h e doors of t h e Jime store. Ee-golly gee h o o s i f a t , there's S a n t a Claus. Oh well, he'll never know t h a t I had my nightF .aken a w a y for t h a t " A " in m y College A l g e b r a — a French " E " t h a t is! L e t ' s s e e — t h r e e cotton h a n k i e s for my Dad. H e ' s one of those perfiniky g u y s who needs two clean ones every day—one f o r show and one f o r blow. Guess I'll introduce him to Kleenex. The c o m p a n y )ught to give me a prize f o r t h a t idea. Now my Mom is the next expense item. Guess I'll g e t h e r a blouse—all mine a r e on the out "nd out list. And besides. Mom is so g e n e r o u s t h a t way. I s n ' t it nice to have such a cooperative f a m i l y ? Yes indeedee!! Oh, yoo-hoo—excuse me kids.

Ah, de boids is gone, de leaves is gone, de woims is h i b e r n a t i n ' , and it's cold—but where is t h e s n o w ? Now days when people s i n g " I ' m D r e a m i n g of a White C h r i s t m a s " , they mean it, and keep t h e i r fingers crossed. T h e o t h e r d a y I was s i n g i n g " J i n g l e Bells" and a robin flew by s p o r t i n g a new o r a n g e and black license plate. H e told me he'd decided to stick it o u t all w i n t e r — i t was so nice in Michigan. A couple of weeks ago the T h e s a u r i a n s had " S h i n e - o n - H a r v e s t Moon w e a t h e r " f o r their hay ride and p a r t y . They couldn't h a v e asked f o r a f u l l e r moon. Someone mistook Dr. De Graaf for a f a r m e r . T h e r e is a similarity. O n e tills f e r t i l e soil and the o t h e r t i l l s f e r t i l e ( ?) brains. I t ' s j u s t a q u e s tion of w h e t h e r you p r e f e r b u d d i n g c a b b a g e s to budding geniuses. And then of course you h a v e girls t h a t p r e f e r t o dive under t h e table t h a n beside it. Nellie M a e R i t s e m a ! "And you one of m y senior girls too. W h a t an e x a m p l e to t h e underclass y o u n g s t e r s . " Mr. and Mrs. C a v a n a u g h spent the n i g h t being " s q u a r e in a social circle". T h e y didn't " s a v e z " t h e s t e p s to the s q u a r e dance so t h e y stood in the middle of the circle and laughed a t all t h e o t h e r people who d i d n ' t " s a v e z " them e i t h e r . E v i d e n t l y everybody was l a u g h i n g , but it s u r e w a s f u n . A s l i g h t c a - t a s - t r o p h e upset t h e o c c u p a n t s of Beach C o t t a g e l a s t week. Evidently t h e flame d i d n ' t w a n t t o set t h e world on fire, b u t it w a s p r e t t y w a r m . E v e r y b o d y

Snow Fall It s w i f t l y , s o f t l y , slowly fell. I t covered covert, glenn and dell. I t t r i p p e d a n d t r a m p e d o'er all t h e fields, And still t h e sky stepped up i t ' s yield. It w r a p t all the world in v i e w In a cloak clean and g l i s t e n i n g white. I t p a i n t e d p i c t u r e s all anew. And n ' e r did stop till c o m m i n g night. W h e n m o r n i n g g l e a m e d on glisteni n g scene, A s h i m m e r i n g , shining b l a n k e t beamed. A g h o s t l y g a r b of color t r u e , W r o u g h t a n old world into new.

R. J. Quant

could g e t m y s i s t e r — s h e goes g a g a g a g a over j e w e l r y and she lf»bk#f real f a s h i o n a b l e in red. The r i n g p a r t m i g h t t u r n gold a f t e r t h e silver w e a r s off, but t h a t ' l l be good i n s u r a n c e a g a i n s t monotony. W e l l , ^ m a y b e I could s p e n d a n o t h e r d i m t - r /or s o m e fingernail polish and g i v e .t a coat or t w o b e f o r e h a n d . H u m p h , g u e s s s h e c a n ' t accuse me ihis y e a r of g i v i n g h e r s o m e t h i n g . h a t ' s too p r a c t i c a l — l i k e w h a t h a p pened last y e a r . Oh well, I a l w a y s say, " I t h a p p e n s in. t h e . best of .amilies." . • ^ And now d e a r readers—1 blush to t h i n k of i t — w h y don't you go •ead s o m e o t h e r article while I • spend my h e a r t and soul and my last q u a r t e r on a p r e s e n t f o r — o o h —my blood p r e s s u r e — I ' m so sen3itive a b o u t my boy f r i e n d . O n . second t h o u g h t , I'm too big h e a r t e d to be s t i n g y with such an e l e g a n t m o m e n t so if you promise not to look too close, you may s t a y with lie ( m y good d^ed f o r the d a y ) . Oh, I can see his d e a r f a c e b e f o r e me—it keeps me f o r e v e r t r u e . S a y . • [ could g e t him a picture f r a m e . I c a n ' t a f f o r d a s n a p right- now, but this'll say it's just like me—blank t h a t is. And now, my f r i e n d s , t h e sound waves of the nine o'clock c u r f e w .ire f o r c i n g t h e i r way a l o n g to my a u d i t o r y canal and I m u s t t u r n my back upon the" c o u n t e r s and t r u d g e back to Voorhees Hall. T h e g e n e r o s i t y of my he-irt has fillej my a r m s with p r e s e n t s f o r rny f a m i l y and my i m a g i n a t i o n fills my head with visions of s u g a r p l u m s — a n d so comes a sweet ending to a sticky s t o r y ( a n d it's not a missprint).

acted in the u s u a l textbook m a n ner. T h e psychologists would have been p r o u d — c o n f u s i o n followed by slight f r u s t r a t i o n — a touch of panic in a f e w — g e n e r a l tension— and when t h e whole t h i n g w a s over —laffs and more laffs f r o m all concerned. , , r. The seat s h o r t a g e a t t h e a r m o r y h a s n ' t a p p e a r e d too s t r e n u o u s of late. Of course to get a good one the line f o r m s to the r i g h t , a n y - , where f r o m five o'clock on. If it g e t s a little crowded and the cute girl s i t t i n g on your l e f t h a s to ait on your lap, let her sit t h e r e (you might never have a n o t h e r chance) or send her over to the f a c u l t y section. . .. *i If a n y o n e w a n t s to know how to a p p r e c i a t e a basketball g a m e and your girl a t the s a m e time, ask J a y Van Omen. Good g a m e , w a s n ' t it? W h a t with vacation so close a n d everybody doing t h e i r s h o p - l i f t i n g early, w h a t m o r e is t h e r e to s a y . -Who's listening a n y w a y ? All t h a t you have to do is r e m e m b e r — h a v e you g o t e v e r y t h i n g you n e e d ? P a j a m a s , tooth b r u s h , comb, b r u s h —hey,, m i s t e r , don't f o r g e t y o u r head s o m e d a y i j . m i g h t come in handy. , So w i sh i n g farewell

you

all

a

fond

T o t h e last chime of t h e chapel bell I t a k e t h i s o p p o r t u n i t y to cry A M e r r y C h r i s t m a s t o all and to all a goodbye. • P.S. N e w Y e a r ' s resolutions a r e in g r e a t d e m a n d . M a k e y o u r s e a r l y this y e a r — b e f o r e they r u n out. B.A.B, .

A Christmat Poem Bells of Heaven s o f t l y r i n g i n g • - y S w e e t l y r i n g i n g in the d a w n . Lowly s h e p h e r d s t r i b u t e b r i n g i n g On t h a t early C h r i s t m a s m o m . Tenderly the mother singing To h e r little b a b e — new born. A n g e l s s i n g in a d o r a t i o n S o n g s u n k n o w n t o t o n g u e or pen. Of t h e L o r d ' s h u m i l i a t i o n T o r e d e e m his people. T h e n — " J o y f u l n e w s t o every nation, Peace on e a r t h , Goodwill t o m e n . " r B u t t h e world is still u n h e e d i n g , Still we learn t h e a r t s of w a r . While we g r a p p l e , worn and bleeding, Love is Waiting a t the door. W h e n we heed i t s g e n t l e p l e a d i n g C h r i s t will r e i g n f o r e v e r more.


Page

Hope AmbaaaadntB

much combing and pinning to make it quite sleek, a mixture of mineral oil and water was combed into the unswept p a r t s to keep it in place. I didn't recognize the mineral oil until I tried to wash my hair that evening. A beautiful cluster of pale lavender flowers was shown and many apologies were made f o r them. I was delighted; they were very pretty. However, I realized why they apologized when they pinned them in my hair. They smclled strongly of garlic.

A Nurse In Manila A n n V a n Eck

Now I was ready; the chaplain could sec me and, incidently could take my picture. Everyone crowded out into the garden t h a t had once been well tended — now due to existing conditions it was a playground and place f o r the family washing to be hung. A little girl was brought out dressed in a red dress much like mine. She was to have her picture taken with me, but she knew I wasn't the native I was posing a s and I couldn't get near her.

So many memories of Manila in the Philippines seem to be of the dirt, rain, heat and general unpleasantness. But along with them come the amusing, interesting, and sometimes heart-stirring incidenta, many directly pertaining to the Filipino people. Let me tell you a bit about the Novarro family to illustrate the interesting. They were a middle class family; most of the adults were high school graduates. The home was large and had been well furnished before the war. About three families of the immediate relation had lived nearby but were forced to crowd into this one house when much of the surrounding neighborhood had been burned by the J a p anese. Rather than the one room Nipa hut of the poorer class, their home had an actual foundation and was made of wood. One of the sisters was an artist, and paintings of the family and of native scenery adorned the walls. On occasional visits with them we exchanged accounts of our countries — the people, the customs, the food. On every visit they acquainted our palate with new and sometimes queer tasting f r u i t s . So I said I liked bananas. When I learned of the many varieties and the many ways bananas could be prepared I was indeed surprised. A polite but firm refusal came when a large, f a t banana cooked in its jacket like a potato was offered.

There were more people waiting in the garden and in the surrounding yards. I began to feel like all three rings of a circus. There were large stone pillars at each comer of the yard and in the midst of my posing the chaplain quietly told me to look in the direction of one of them. There were no young men in evidence in the crowd, but behind the pillar were four of them; they disappeared behind their pillar fast when I looked in their direction.

One experience t h a t I shall always remember with mixed emotions occurred on a Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Novarro had made the chaplain that had introduced me to the family promise to bring me alon - on this particular day and had insisted that he also bring his camera. We arrived wondering what they had planned but weren't allowed to puzzle over it f o r long. I was immediately whiskeJ in o another room and told t h a t they were going to dress me in their native costume. Little did I know all t h a t was enta led! They had borro\ «•(! the dress because I was much taller than Mrs. Novarro and he • sister Nueves. Of heavy royal blue n y o n silk with enormous white birds, it was a gorgeous gown. The net overblouse that is pinned over the dress and the three cornered " s c a r f " was starched to a degree of s t i f f n e s s t h a t we Americans could not tolerate f o r long. While I was admiring the dress, about twenty of the neighbor women and girls gathered to watch the proceedings. The old grandmother who was bedridden had to fit the Jo it to her satisfaction. There were no buttons or snaps; pins were blouse with its butterfly sleeves and fold the scarf — no one else could useJ on these garments to insure the proper fit. When I started to a r r a n g e my hair, Mrs. Novarro said, "Nq, no, one of our neighbors will d» it f o r you; she is a hair-dresser.""After

The people were having a wonderful time. One or two pictures weren't enough though we were perspiring freely by that time. I sat down; then stood up again. With the help of five children, papers were spread on the ground and my skirts were arranged around me as I sat down. The poor chaplain. He took pictures from the usual angle and then, on their request, stood on a chair, kneeled and had as much trouble as I was having. Finally the afternoon ended; but that wasn't all. I spent another afternoon autographing the pictures when they had been developed. Most families had t ken a picture of an American soldier, but the Novarro's graciously pointed out t h a t it was an honor to have one of an American woman. It has been an honor to know the Novarros! ^888888888$®8888^=^88888S88888888888888888888888

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Page Four

Hope College Anchor

^nrnnttes Sib Formal Party Features Artistry Friday evening, December 13 found Sibyllines and their guests enjoying an Artist's F a n t a s y in the Tulip Room of the Warm Friend Tavern.

* The square dance which followed SOROSIS proved t h a t a strong constitution Onco again the Sigma Sigma is needed to execute the many and sisters met in the Sorosis r o o m varied steps. (I'm still dizzy!) on Friday the 13th too yet! The o meeting was in charge of Sister ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA Gore who followed the Christmas Alpha Sigma Alpha, f r e s h m e n theme by reading the Christmas girls' sorority, is now organized story. The prayer consisted of and planning a well - balanced very impressive moments of solischedule of meetings and parties; Ludc as we listened to Fred Warrendition of "SILENT an informal winter p a r t y to be ing's NIGHT". held J a n u a r y 18 and a formal in

Travel abroad produced "Aloha", sung by Alice Marie P a r r o t t and portrayed by Ruth Bartholomew. The return home would be a "Sentimental J o u r n e y " which Edna Mao Van Tatenhove reflected as she sat amidst her luggage at the station and the hands of the clock crept close to seven. Home again and a worl.l torn by war brought .he spring. a realization of the deeper things in life. With "Ave Maria" sung DELPHI by He.ty Christie for the background, Alice Marie P a r r o t t made " S a n t a ' s Holly-day" was celethe artist's masterpiece, "The brated by Delphians Friday night I l a d o n n a " come to life. at their meeting in the Delphi room. President Myra Hrouwer presided at the business meeting .-•nd election of olTicerr. Luella Pyle was elected president; Elaine Meeusen, vice-president, and Hetty "Old M a c Don a i d ' s Hani" re- Van Lente, secretary.

Paging through the past with artist Molly Reimers, those present received some of her f a m o u s portrait paintings. "A P r e t t y Girl" was portrayed by Edna Mae Van Tatenhove with background music supplied by Alice Marie I'arrott singing "A Pretty Girl is J u s t Like a Melody". "Summertime", sung by a sextette composed of Hetty Christie, Harriet Muyskens, Harriet Hains, Alice Marie I'arrott, Anne Van Kck and Phyllis Haskin, pictured Isla Vander Heuvel bask- sounded to laughter as Thesaurians ing on the sands. .'•ml their guests gathered for a DORIAN Seated before her caravan, Ruth hay-ride and s(|uar?-dance on DeThe hayride put everyTo end the year properly the Martholomew portrayed "The cember one in the mood for fun and food. Dorians last Friday had a ChristGypsy" as sung by Hetty Christie. Passing through a lovely Autumn, The program opened with group i ms program and party, with the the group found itself in mid- singing a f t e r which a trr.gedy. P.ibical story of Christ's birth, winter with Isla Vander Heuvel The Giants Are Coming," was carols. The Night Before Christpausing in her ski jump to be presented. Phyl Darrow put us all n a s read by Marian Korteling, and gift exchange according to painted while the sextette sang in a dreamy mood with " H a r v e s t "Winter Wonderland". Moon" and "White Christmas." "secret sisters."

Thesaurian Plays Hostess atHayride

Shirley Martin brought us up to | Jate on the news situation from i f a r and wide, old and new com1 mentaries, including the inside "dope" on the Beach Cottage fire— the Cosmos really didn't s t a r t the fire with their cigarette-lighters as they so claimed. Hoppy gave her humorous serious paper on the Christmas traditions in various countries. Although she finally lost her voice (must have been a term paper) she DID manage to get over the fact that in Scandinavia, people celebrate Christmas by taking their annual bath (they're probably handicapped by showers like Van Vleck's). Next on the program was a solo, " W H I T E CHRISTMAS", by Holly Holleman; however, J a n Joldersma's prelude took so long we thought Holly had lost her voice too—but she did manage to so'.'eeze in her solo amid various distractions.

j*

jtfratcrntttrs KNICKERBOCKER Formal initiation was primary interest to Knickerbockers and their pledges in their regular meet'ng Friday evening in Walsh Music Hall. In the business meeting which followed Anno Vander Kolk was elected president to t a k e over the chair vacated by Don Van Farrow. (Have a nice time in Mexico, Don!) Randall Dekker was appointed to the executive board to fill the office of vice-president for the remainder of the t?rm.

meeting was adjourned in f a v o r of officers t r e a t .

FRATERNAL The Formal Initiation of Hope's oldest F r a t e r n a l organization was held last Friday, December Fraternal

is truly

choice of

men

l.'Uh.

of

the

it has mad** and

wishes them all the best of luck and

happiness in the

F r a t e r n ty

Mid Campus life.

COSMOPOLITAN

EMERSONIAN Newly initiated members of the Emersonian Fraternity were in c h a r g e of the December <! literary meeting. Immediately following the litera r y meeting, election of olTicers for the new term was held. Clarence Wagner, president; Alfy Vander Was, vice-president; Leon Sparl : ng, secretary; and Dick Brown, sergeant at a r m s were the men :hosen to direct the F r a t e r n i t y •.hrough the winter term. Impressive installation ceremonies were held December 18, a f t e r which the

proud

The

Cosmopolitan

Fraternity

held its formal initiation During

the

business

r.icotin;;

which followed, these new officers were elected to serve d u r i n g the second t e r m : Merle Vanden Berg, President; Charles Knooihuizen, Vice-president; Wyba Nienhuis, S e c r e t a r y ; Leroy Sandee, Treasu r e r ; Bob Becksfort, Keeper of the Archives; Bill ( " K l a g h o r n " ) Leverette. Chorister; Pierce Maasen, S e r g e a n t - a t - a r m s ; (lord Timmerman, Corporal-at-arms; a n d Don Lee, Pfc.-at-arms.

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Hope College Anchor

Page Five

Pucka Patter

chapel service the last morning before vacation.

The latest word on everyone's hali- t h e " D u m b w a i t e / s Union" ol tosis-stained lips is the strike situ- Temple under "P.iillip Murray' ation and its in^plications. Few at ngiiam, deal a crushing blow to Hope realize t h a t we, too, have oui he vitamin content of Hope Coldomestic and economic labor prob lege. "John L." is the unfond lems. Peace, fortunately, was at >bject of campus comment and the tained on the campus labor fron student council finally gets him before rigor mortis set in at th( sornered on a "contempt ol dining halls and literally "hun- : a m p u s " charge because he was dreds of college students slowly )nce caught walking on the grass, Htarved." The issue at hand war le is fined §10.00 (a shattering the employment of kitchen help )low to the Hillegonds budget) (waiters, etc., commonly called nd each rebel ious waiter assessed ' • H a s h e r s " . ) for sub-sub-uhion or one chapel cut, per day. wages. lis wrath is unexcelled; his crew"John L." H i l l e g o n d s , chief 'ut stands a full quarter-inch organizer, r a b b l e rouser, and \igher in his vermilion scalp; he pride of the plate-pushers, led the lemands revenge! The case is reevil onslaught in an attempt, which t i r e d to the highest court in the proved f r u i t i u l , to gain the pro and . . . "The Lichty Tribunal," verbial higher wages and bettei here to get final and democratic living conditions (soconJs on des- . ? ) judgment. In the meantime, sert) for his "men in the pits." Wc he p?ople are not quiet. Dr. Hay"innocent bystanders"; we, the lond contracts to have daily sh!p people who are in no way impli lents of Mr.<. Snyder's Ilomad? cated with the manner in which Mes sent from Grand Papids for labor is being treated; we would .he stan-ing student body. Dr. Rubbers, just returned from a fishhave been the m a r t y r s in this gas ng tr p on Black lake in his presitronomical cause. The effects, fel low Hopites, had they not been ol iential yacht, "The Skow", is prean appeasatory nature, would mosl oaring a Sunday night address to certainly have spelled "Famine' the collcgiate intion. . . . Comes for the students of this institution that historical and eventful SaturPicture the 2()-odd Has^erH of day, and "Jo' *1 f , " Hillegonds, in a Zwemer walking out en-masse press co->f"—i'-c, abruptly calls-off leaving the men (men without sub- the S-d.-y old strike and the waitsistence checks, mind you!) tf ers go back to the "pits". He struggle fruitlessly (and vege- -ealizes that "The Lichty Tribunal" tablelessly) for days, m a y b e cannot render an unbiased decision weeks! Picture this—this dictator under the p r e s e n t educational this unscrupulous rebel, this "John emergency. Th'nk. H l o w students, L." Hillegonds daring to expose . . . . it might have happened here! each and every one of us to masf (Editors note: / ny similarities to pyloric panic! The I'.P.P. (United national events j ist proves that Pot Polishers) and the C.I.O. some students arf up on current (Characters that Indulge Occasionally) strongly c o m p o u n d e d problems.) under Hillegonds hadership, plus

(But, chile-wren. Jingle Bolls is not Waterloo!! Drip! Drip! Drip! a carol!) There was so much rain last week, Now that Christmas is coming the Mens Glee Club decided to take another theme song and this is it! — the season of peace — let's bury Speaking of rain reminds me of old differences, and be friendly, hey worms, which reminds me of Vries- fellows? We think your Glee Club man running around with a pocket- is wonderful. In fact, it sounds full of angleworms, telling every- better every time we hear it. Especially that Russian number. It one he's gone wormy. sends us downstairs! Seems as if Mrs. Snow is having

/

an awful time sticking to her a f t e r noon lesson schedule. So if you hear loud shrieks and much laughter, don't become alarmed, it's only her senior organ students driving her crazy.

Glad to see so many out to the Vesper. Wasn't it a nice one? The whole first row in choir was turning up present. Prof, still hasn't recovered from running up and off the stage. He thought someone The Christmas season is one of might be absent. But we fooled him. ihe most inspirat.onal and exciting „ I Now that the coal strike is over times on Hope's Campus. Handel's I we can all go home. Have a nice Messiah," though g i v e n e v e r y Christmas. And to the fellows in year, never becomes commonplace. the Glee Club I say, "No! 1 won't The choir presents an unforgettable get lost." Don't you!

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Page Six

Hope College Anchor

HOPE MEETS YPSILANTI TONITE Ypsilanti Team is Judged Largest Obstacle To Date

Who's Who On The Team

F r e d Brieve ( F r e s h m a n ) : Fred the same year t h a t he was named was named on the State P r e p Hal captain of the all s t a t e team picke( of F a m e while attending Hollanc by the Detroit F r e e Press. He was Hope's cagers will be g u n n i n g f o r Christian High School, where he also elected to the ALL MIAA their fourteenth straight victory Hopemen Take Over played basketball f o r t h r e e years squad. While in the service he was when t h e y meet Michigan Norma Top M I A A Position He is a center t h a t has a lot of forced to f o r g e t basketball, but won of Ypsilanti in the Holland Armory ability and should be watched in the air medal as a pilot of a fighter tonight. This will doubtless be the Three weeks of the 1946-47 the coming seasons. air c r a f t . He is a g u a r d and has toughest opposition Hope has facet basketball season have gone by Harold Buter (Sophomore): Herk scored 323 points in 28 games. so f a r this year. She has ha( with all six MIAA fives having Charles Ploesgma ( F r e s h m a n ) is playing his second year of varthings her own way in her first seen action a t least once. Most of sity ball f o r Hope a f t e r being dis- Chuck g r a d u a t e d f r o m H o l l a n four g a m e s but will probably have the games have been played with charged f r o m the Army Air Corps High School, where he played has to work for this one. teams from outside the conference on J a n u a r y 20, 1946. While he was ketball f o r three years. When he Y p s i l a n t i i s b a c k under the although f o u r conference g a m e s a second lieutenant navigator, he finished high school, he entered the coaching of Ray Stites this year have been played. He was gone for several years dur played basketball for the JSan Mar- Army medical corps. He was dis Kalamazoo won their opening cos, Texas Army Air Force team. charged last year in time to play ing the war. Normal usually uses a slow set jonference g a m e with a decisive He is a center and scored 47 points part of the season with Hope's B team. His experience last year has up style of offense. They have prac 51-23 win over Adrian and thereby in 9 games last season. The Dutch c a g e r s have four g a m e s stowed away, and an expected tically the same team they had last 3stablishing themselves as a forHarvey Buter ( J u n i o r ) : Harv is helped him develop into a goo( f i f t h this evening. Tonight's contest will give the lads their f i r s t taste year. Their attack is built aroum midable challenger f o r the confer- Herk's older brother and was cap- center f o r this year's team. their big center, Sampier, who is ence crown. However in two out- tain of H o l l a n d Christian High Donald Scholten (Sophomore) of competition, but nothing like w h a t will happen later in the season. side games the Hornets have not De Vette will probably end up as top scorer in the state this year. six f e e t five inches and weighs School basketball team when he Don is a n o t h e r Holland High Schoo fared as well, dropping a 67-61 enover two hundred pounds. A man was a senior there. He has played boy who made the all conference He played a lot of ball during t h e war years and this plus his natural :ounter to DePaul and losing to that size is always hard to g u a n two years of varsity ball for the team back in 1943. He saw a lot of ability in the g a m e will give him a better than 20 points per game Howard Mesinger is a high scorer Bowling Green of Ohio, 57-47. college and has had experience action d u r i n g the war with the average. Mulder is playing as good a g a m e as ever, setting up lots who will bear watching this even Hillsdale and Albion each made I with the Camp Butner t e a m ' i n ' t h e 106th I n f a n t r y Division where he ing. He was very effective against a s t a r t on an undefeated season by service. He saw action in the Eu- received three purple hearts. He of scoring, handling t h e ball beautifully, passing with flawlessness. Hope last year. Eddie Gilday may defeating hapless Alma in turn, j r o p ^ n ^ e a t r e as a forward observ- was also a prisoner of war in Ger Van Dis a/.d Dalman a r e still, in my opinion, m a s t e r s par excellence also be in there causing trouble. Fhe Dales edged Alma, 39-31, and e r i n i n f a n t r y . Harv was dis- many f o r some time. He was dis of the fake. These f o u r men a r e all back f r o m the 1942-43 "Blitz The Hope-Ypsilanti s e r i e s has Albion took the Scots, 58-52, with charged on Feb. 3, 1946. He is a charged f r o m the Army on Nov Boys" squad, which averaged 58 points per g a m e and set a new MIAA been characterized by many close Moon and Isaacs providing the guard and has scored 18 points in 28, 1945, and played a lot of basketscoring record by d e f e a t i n g Hillsdale with a total of 95 points. T h a t games. In 1941-42 for instance scoring punch. Albion, however, [g games. ball f o r Hope last season, besides year they chalked up a total of 986 points, to 685 for their opponents. Ypsilanti won 29-28 and Hope won dropped an out-of-conference game George Dalman ( S e n i o r ) : Form- playing one year with the 2nd regi44-43. Hope holds by f a r the wid .o Cansius, 56-36, while Alma Five " w a r m - u p " g a m e s then the big one on the second of next er s t a r basketball player and all ment team at Fort Ord, Calif. He est margin of victory with a 49-24 bounced back into winning ways conference team member f r o m Hol- is a g u a r d and scored 59 points in year with the powerful Western Michigan o u t f i t . They dumped Manwin in 1938. Hope has won eleven with a 58-44 decision over Ferris land High. George made the ALL 13 games. hattan in Madison Square Garden, and a t this writing are expected of the last sixteen contests includ- Institute and a 71-53 whalloping Robert Van Dis ( S e n i o r ) : "GabMIAA team in 1942. He left f o r to lick the University of Michigan. If Coach H i n g a ' s boys can defeat ing both games last year. the boys from Percy Jones Hosthe navy in 1943, where he played by" Van Dis comes from Kalama- the Bronco's this year, it will certainly put Hope on top of the MichiHope's s t a r t i n g lineup is not set pital. for the Iowa Seahawks during the zoo, Michigan, where he played for gan basketball heap. So how did I get around to that Western Michibut it will very likely be Mulder Hope takes the top spot of the 1943-1944 s e a s o n . He was dis- C e n t r a l H i g h S c h o o l and was gan g a m e ? Let's talk a bit about it. and Scholten at guards, DeVette six team league with its three I charged on J a n . 5, 1946. He is a elected captain of his team and and Van Dis at forwards, and Herk Hope College has a lot of alumni, scattered all over the s t a t e and straight wins and no defeats. The j forward and has scored 170 points chosen f o r the all conference squad. Buter at center. This is Hope's last standings of the MIAA counting j in 27 games. He is playing his f o u r t h year of out of state. These f o r m e r students are anxious to see a Hope congame before the big one with West?ames played up to Friday, De-1 Russell DeVette (Senior): Rusty varsity ball for Hope, having made test, but because of the number of people now in school and the limited ern Michigan on J a n u a r y 2. .•ember 13 are as follows: hails f r o m Muskegon, Michigan, the ALL MIAA selection in 1946. seating capacity in the Armory they will see none. This is definitely o Home Opp. I where he was captain of his team Gabby is the s p a r k plug of the not f ai r . Take the University of Michigan — they are allowing their W L Score Score I and an all conference winner. In team and a r e g u l a r forward. He students to see only two g a m e s ; Western Michigan followers on Hope .1 0 68 43 11943 he was a member of the ALL was in the European theatre with campus will see every other game. Hope's athletic officials, trying Kalamazoo .1 0 61 23 MIAA team and in 1944 he was the i n f a n t r y during the war. He to keep the interests of the alumni, students and city followers of the .1 0 39 31 named to the ALL OHIO team, received his discharge on J a n . 11, team in mind, decided on the plan presented in the last issue of the Hope openea its home basket- Hillsdale .. .1 0 58 52 I while playing at Denison Univer- 1946, and finished out the season ANCHOR. By this plan, full season tickets, a limited number, were ball schedule by rolling over Grand Albion 0 2 66 129 sity. He has played two years here at Hope. He has scored 176 sold to the public. But this could not begin to stem the tide, so the Rapids Junior College 62-34 two Adrian Western Michigan contest was thrown open to the public, and no stu0 2 83 971 with Hope College and one with points in 18 games. weeks ago. Russ De Vette was Alma dent activity tickets will be honored. Paul Van Dort ( S e n i o r ) : Paul Denison while in the Marine Corps the big gun for Hope, dropping in He also played basketball with the comes f r o m H o l l a n d w h e r e h e a total of 27 points. This included General admission f o r this g a m e will be $1.00 f o r everyone, 20 cents Pacific Fleet Marine Force in 1945 played t h r e e years of basketball for of which goes to the government. 15 points during the f i r s t eight 1946. Russ was discharged from the high school team, and has been minutes of the second half. Over half of Hopes' students will be home f o r the holidays and the Marines on July 27, 1946. He on the varsity f o r two seasons at The J. C. Raiders, coached by Hope. He saw action in the Euunable to see the contest, which will n a t u r a l l y make t h a t much more is a center and forward and has Russ Waters, were completely unropean t h e a t r e as a radio operator room f o r the alumni. This was t h e big f a c t o r in causing the Athletic ored 155 points in 15 games. able to cope with the f a s t breakH O P E 74 FG FT TI Paul Hendrickson ( F r e s h m a n ) in the A r m y air corps. While in the Board to give the Western Michigan contest the "open" date nod. ing Dutchmen. Hope jumped off De Vette, f < 0 14 Paul comes f r o m Grand Rapids service he gained f u r t h e r basketball to an 8-0 lead and was not headed Zuverink, f 1 0 2 I personally believe that the college did the best and only thing experience playing on the Gunther during the entire contest. During Van Dis, f 4 2 10 Michigan, where he played basket Field and Scott Field Army Air possible under the circumstances. As students we will see eight ball for Central High School f o r the l a t t e r part of the half, Coach •> Dalman, f 5 12 games, which is enough for anyone to digest. Those of us who will three years. Although he is in his Corps teams. He was discharged Hinga substituted freely, t h a n k s to Herk Buter, c 4 1 9 be around for t h a t game, and desire to see it, can fork over the buck on April 1, 1946. He plays either first year, he has looked good a t a commanding lead built up by the Brieve, c 1 0 2 and in years to come say it w a s worth it, f o r undoubtedly the Dutch center or f o r w a r d . s t a r t i n g five. Hope led 30-14 at center in the pre-season scrim Mulder, g 4 1 9 Nick Yonker ( F r e s h m a n ) : Nick will give the Bronco's a game t o be talked about. the half. mages. Holwerda, g 2 0 4 Hope's s t a r t e r s l o o k e d very Earl Holkeboer ( J u n i o r ) : Earl is comes f r o m Muskegon, Michigan, .. E ; * 7 ° n e Z i U ** h a p p y ' t h e c i t y followers, the alumni, the students, Korver, g 0 1 1 sharp during the first few minanother local boy who has playec where he was all conference with the Athletic Board. Remember, the Dutch have a good following in Scholten, g 1 1 3 utes of the second half. Led by two years of high school basket two y e a r s basketball experience. the s t a t e , and to keep that good will, built up through a number of H a n ' Buter, g 2 0 4 De Vette, they quickly dumped in ball and one year of f r e s h m a n ball He was elected to the ALL MIAA years, the public must be pleased. Yonker, g 2 0 4 20 points and retired from the at Hope. While he was an ensign football team this season in the The basketball season is t h r e e weeks old. and it looks as if my game in favor of some able subs. in tfie Navy, he gained f u r t h e r ex quarterback spot. He is a guard Totals 33 8 74 pre-season guess is fairly accurate. Kalamazoo has shown lots of who may see a lot of action this The g a m e ended in a see-saw batperience playing on a basketball power, as has Albion, with Hillsdale the dark horse. Len Colby snorts tle of long shots. Dalman hit one PERCY J O N E S 41 FG FT T P team on Okinawa. He plays f o r year. Ken Zuverink (Sophomore): Ken announcer f o r station WKZO s a y s t h a t the MIAA will end up with of his " h o t " streaks and put in 8 Whitehouse, f 3 0 6 ward, Kazoo on top, Albion second, Hope t h i r d . ' I say he's wrong, t h a t Hope points in the closing minutes. West, f 2 0 4 William Holwerda ( F r e s h m a n ) played with Holland High School wiH end up f i r s t . Kazoo second, and Albion or Hillsdale third. But f o r Van Dis took second honors in Wachstetten, f 1 0 2 Bill is a n o t h e r Grand Rapids, Mich for two y e a r s and was one of the the Dutch to t a k e it, they will have to improve their f o r m , which has scoring and looked his usual s h a r p Stone, f 0 0 0 igan boy. He played basketball f o r regular f o r w a r d s a t Hope College been lacking^ Let s a t t n b u t e the weakness to bad competition, and self. Although Mulder scored only Myers, c 3 1 7 South High School and was their last year. He is big and f a s t and 4 points, his ball handling was Trampus, c 0 0 0 captain d u r i n g his senior year. Bil should see a lot of action on the superb, and he set up many basDugan, g. 0 1 1 is one of the biggest members o; ball club this year. Last year he v r w v v f p T a l l a V E R Y M E R R Y C H R I S T M A S A N D H A P P Y kets. " L i t t l e " Buter continued to Stein, g 3 0 6 the team this year standing 6' 2 scored 157 points in 15 games. N E W YEAR, be seeing you at the big Kazoo g a m e on the 10th. look good under the boards. He Colbert, g 3 0 6 tall and w e i g h i n g a g o o d 190 held the opposing center scoreless Miller, g 4 1 9 pounds. He is a guard and is catch during the entire game. Probably Hendrickson, g ing on to Hope's style of playing 0 0 0 the most decisive factor in Hope's Totals 19 3 41 very well. Harv Buter, g 2 2 6 victory was her complete control of Free throws: Hope—8 out of 12 Ronald Korver ( J u n i o r ) : Ron is Scholten, g 0 2 both backboards. Percy Jones—3 out of 91 f r o m O r a n g e City, Iowa, and a first Yonker, g 1 J i m Horn, Grand Rapids' negro 1 year man at Hope. He spent his Korver, g star, played a fine game for the fir8t t w o ear8 at 0 0 n + o r Pr.a+^rni+\/ I y Northwestern Hope College opened its defense this year . losers. His shooting, though not unior College in 0 r a n g e C i t y 1 1 of the M.I.A.A. basketball chamconsistent, was excellent at times. Russ De Vette scored 25 points Holwerda. g herehel layedbMketban andwon 0 0 pionship with an easy 68-43 romp H O P E 62 FG FT TP J the athletic medal. He is a guard. over Adrian last Thursday n i g h t and w a s the t e a m ' s high scorer f o r Van Dis. f 2 2 10 Basketball t e a m s chosen to rep-1 Donald Mulder ( J u n i o r ) : Don Although the outcome was never the third s t r a i g h t time. He boosted 14 68 Zuverink, f his season total to 66 points. Don 1 0 2 resent the f r a t e r n i t i e s and various w a 8 capUdn and all c o n f e r e n c e n doubt, Hope's play was nothing FG FT T P De Vette, f Mulder's 2 points do not begin to A D R I A N 43 12 3 27 independent g r o u p s o n campus m e i n ^ > € r 0 ' h i s Blissfield, Michigan exceptional. Dalman, f 0 10 do him justice. His speed and 4 0 8 were made this week. These t e a m s high school team. He w a s calle< De Vette, Van Dis, Buter, Schol- tricky passing c a u g h t t h e fancie of Wilson, f Herk Buter, c 0 0 3 0 6 will be divided into two leagues, | ' n t o the A r m y Air Corps in 1943, ten, and Mulder were again Coach Hendrickson, c the crowd and set up many shots Moore, f 3 1 6 0 2 each f r a t e r n i t y entering a t e a m in i i n g a ' s s t a r t e r s . The game began Mulder, g f o r his teammates. Van Dis, Herk Powers, f 0 6 1 2 4 5ach league, while the i n d e p e n d e n t t h a t the f i n t g a m e will be played with plenty of speed. The spectaYonker, g Buter, and Zuverink tied for second S t a r k , c ?. 4 1 1 3 will be represented in one league immediately a f t e r the C h r i . l m a a tors got a good t a s t e of the ultraScholten, g scoring honors with 9 points each. Gustafson, c 0 0 0 0 0 by the " T " barracks contingent | vacation. ast passing of which Hope is capHarv. Buter, g Fox, Adrian f o r w a r d , played a Champion, g 1 9 0 0 0 and in the other by a g r o u p outAnother important decision made able. T h e first s t r i n g went out a f t e r fine g a m e and scored 10 points Ploegsma, g 0 ? 0 0 0 side the " T " barracks. |by the WJia t h e g t n r t | 0 I | i I | g ten minutes with a 23-9 lead. De Holwerda. g which w a s high f o r the losers. F o x Dsenko, g 3 7 0 0 0 Mr. Jack S c h o u t e n , director, of a play off between t h e winning Vette a n d Van Dis had 18 of these is an old high school rival of Don stated t h a t he hoped to obtain an team in each league to decide upon points. T h e rest of the half was Mulder. Totals 9 43 27 8 62 impartial outsider as an official an ultimate and indisputable champlayed a t a much slower tempo. J U N I O R COL. 34 FG FT T P to referee and also an official pion who would be suitably recogDuring the second half Coach F r e e t h r o w s : Hope—14 o u t of 26 Neither t e a m accomplished much, Adrian—9 out of 20 Horn, f 0 12 scorekeeper. Among the groups nited and honored. and the half ended with Hope ahead Hinga experimented with the f o r Montgomery, f 1 2 4 were included the Arcadians, Cosward combination t h a t clicked so The B league games a r e sched- 30-16. Grey, c 0 0 0 mopolitans, Emersonians, P r a t e r - | u l e d for Monday nighta, and t h e The Dutchmen c l i c k e d f o r 18 well in '42-'43. George Dalman Haan, c .. 1 1 8 nals, Knickerbockers, Independent A league f o r Wednesdays. went in a t f o r w a r d and De V e t t e points in the first seven minutes of Lee, g .. 2 0 4 ( " T " ) , and Independent (OutsidThe n u m b e r of players allowed the second half. Adrian then w a r m - switched to t h e center slot in place Greenhoe, g 1 1 of Herk Buter. 3 ers). From the representatives each t e a m h a s been s e t by t h e ed up considerably and started hitRaymond, g 1 0 2 present, Roy Davis was chosen t o council a t no less t h a n ten while ting shots f r o m all over the floor, H O P E 68 FG F T T P Burgering, g . 1 0 2 head the council as President and no more t h a n f i f t e e n a r e allowed. liey d r e w to within 14 points of De Vette, f 11 3 26 Martin, g .. 1 1 3 Don Schriemer was given t h e T h e g a m e s s t a r t a t seven and t h e r e Hope b u t then it w a s the Dutch 2 0 4 P. Montgomery, g. .. 0 1 1 honor of doing the secretarial work should be on t h e a v e r a g e of t h r e e reserves' t u r n to g e t h o t They 4 1 9 of the organization. They plan g a m e s a n i g h t Anyone desiring tossed in 12 points d u r i n g t h e last Zuverink, f 4 i 1 9 Totals 14 6 34 to finish t h e scheduling of the more information should see M r . 'our m i n u t e s of plmy. Hope's 68 Herk Buter, c. 3 3 9 F r e e throws: Hope—8 out of 20 g a m e s the l a t t e r p a r t of this week S c h o u t o n , Roy Davis or Don point t o t a l w a s exactly equal to h e r Brieve, c 0 0 0 J . C.—6 out of 11 and s t a r t t h e machinery rolling so Schriemer. average f o r h e r first three g a m e s Mulder, g 0 2 2

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Dutch Win Opener From G. R. J. C.

Hope Wins Opening Game

Adrian Bows To Hope's

Cagers in Easy 68-43 Win

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To Begin SchGduler

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12-19-1946