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ANCHORS

£ i^'V a v• i

N O .

FEATURES

Getting to know you

Sufjan Stevens

National exposure

Independent music sensation has Hope roots.

Soccer and track members compete on national stage.

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SPORTS

A R T S

Stories of a Hope comedian, actor, writer and designer.

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H O P E COLLEGE • H O L L A N D , M I C H I G A N

SPERA IN DEO'

NOVEMBER 23. 2011 • SINCE 1887

V O L .

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Relay for Life raises $50,663 to fight cancer Jessica Snitko CAMPUS CO-EDITOR

H o p e College s p o n s o r e d its n i n t h a n n u a l Relay for Life f u n d r a i s e r f r o m 7p.m. Friday, Nov. 11 until 7 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 12. "Overall, Relay w a s a h u g e success," said Activities a n d Entertainment Committee m e m b e r Elizabeth Clark ('13). T h e event raised $50,663 for t h e A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society. This c o n t r i b u t e s to t h e total $297,882 that H o p e has d o n a t e d since it began in 2003. Relay for Life was started by t h e A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society to raise m o n e y to fight t h e disease. It provides v o l u n t e e r s with t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to h o n o r those w h o have battled cancer and r e m e m b e r loved o n e s w h o lost their lives t o t h e illness. Each participant is e n c o u r a g e d t o raise $100 for t h e event. These d o n a t i o n s help

people stay well, recover, find cures a n d fight cancer. This year's Relay for Life was extremely successful, with 608 participants a m o n g s t 36 t e a m s . "I decided to get involved b e c a u s e I have been i m p a c t e d by cancer so m u c h . A large n u m b e r of m y family m e m b e r s have b e e n affected, and 1 have also had cancer," said Ceremonies Committee m e m b e r Sara G a l l e m o r e ('13) "This w a s m y first Relay t h a t I have d o n e after my diagnosis, so it was a very i m p o r t a n t event for me." Prior t o t h e event, all volunteers were e n c o u r a g e d t o participate in t h e $48 in 48 Challenge. For this challenge, relayers a t t e m p t t o raise at least $48 within t h e t i m e f r a m e .

STUDENTS UNITE FOR A C A U S E - For a full 12 hours last Friday night, Hope students from 3 6 campus organizations gathered In the Dow to support a common cause. Walking In support of cancer research, Hope's Relay for Life event participants this year raised $ 5 0 , 6 6 3 .

Everyone w h o s u c c e e d e d had the c h a n c e t o win a Relay Survival Kit including iPod speakers, a coffee mug, a w a t e r bottle and various snacks. Relay for Life participants also had t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to c o m p l e t e the Fight Back Challenge. This challenge included three simple steps: take an A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society quiz, m a k e a

pledge to fight back against c a n c e r and b e c o m e a m e m b e r of t h e A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society C a n c e r Action N e t w o r k . The volunteers who c o m p l e t e d this challenge were a w a r d e d a special T - s h i r t a n d participated in a special Fight Back lap d u r i n g Relay. The event itself included a variety of c e r e m o n i e s a n d f u n

activities. "During Relay for Life, we have different c e r e m o n i e s honoring and remembering those with cancer or w h o have survived cancer," said Clark. G u e s t s were invited t o speak d u r i n g these c e r e m o n i e s and share their experiences with the disease. "My favorite p a r t was listening to t h e speakers," said Gallemore. SEE RELAY, PAGE 2

Gap Year Fair offers options Stand Up continues with open mic night Claire Call

school. M a n y have religious CAMPUS CO-EDITOR affiliations, but s o m e , such as t h e Peace C o r p s and Teach for America, do not. Anyone who had been W h e t h e r you are interested w o n d e r i n g what to d o w i t h a in e d u c a t i o n . Christian service, year off before g r a d u a t e school c o m m u n i t y d e v e l o p m e n t h e r e or was m o s t likely at t h e gap year abroad, e c o n o m i c d e v e l o p m e n t , fair in M a a s a u d i t o r i u m last disaster relief, w o r k i n g with Thursday. The fair was h o s t e d children or m a n y o t h e r possible by H o p e College, b u t w e l c o m e d fields t h e r e a r e a variety of s t u d e n t s f r o m any school. p r o g r a m s to c h o o s e f r o m and The gap year fair was h o s t within those programs an to representatives f r o m m a n y a b u n d a n c e of locations to c h o o se different volunteer o r g a n i z a t i o n s to provide these services. including Christian R e f o r m e d "I never k n e w t h a t t h e r e w e r e W o r l d Missions, Jesuit Volunteer so m a n y mission trips possible t o Corps, Lutheran Volunteer participate in. It m a d e m e really Corps, Mennonite Mission want to m a k e a difference in t h e N e t w o r k , M e n n o n i t e Central world," said C a r m i n a O'Sullivan C o m m i t t e e , Mission Year, Peace S c i m e m i ('14). Corps, Nicaragua Christian Programs such as Academy, R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i C o r p s and Peace C o r p s America, Teach for America, provide o p p o r t u n i t i e s to work in The Dale H o u s e Project, Youth any area of interest. Those w h o for Christ U S A / W o r l d O u t r e a c h , would like t o travel to c o u n t r i e s a n d Wycliffe Bible Translators. abroad would d o better off in The majority of these t h e Peace Corps, while those o r g a n i z a t i o n s provide o n e - t o w h o would like to stay in t h e two-yearvolunteeropportunities United States would do well in for s t u d e n t s to participate in b e f o r e a t t e n d i n g graduate SEE FAIR, PAGE 1 0

Caltlin Klask C O - E D I T O R IN C H I E F

If you've b e e n c u r i o u s a b o u t t h e Stand U p shirts and stickers a r o u n d c a m p u s , their O p e n Mic Night o n Nov. 30 in the Kletz at 9 p.m. should clear a few things up a b o u t the group's direction and f u n c t i o n this year. Student Congress Vice President Ashley Fraley ('14), w h o is also c o o r d i n a t i n g Stand Up this year, is e n t h u s e d a b o u t Stand Up's p r o s p e c t s , including t h e Nov. 30 event w h i c h will i n c o r p o r a t e FYS classes to initiate f r e s h m e n with the organization. "We're taking things in a different direction this year," Fraley said. In O c t o b e r 2010, Stand U p was f o u n d e d by Katie Sawyer ('11) as a c a m p u s - w i d e initiative for action a m o n g t h e s t u d e n t b o d y a n d administration. In late January and early February, Stand U p exploded as t h e c a m p u s n e e d e d an outlet t o discuss their o p i n i o n s o n large scale events.

T h o u g h n o t affiliated with t h e cumulative shocking a n d u p s e t t i n g incidents o n c a m p u s d u r i n g t h a t t i m e . Stand Up's events and messages eased s t u d e n t s ' pain and c o n f u s i o n in t h e m o n t h s to follow. Stand Up's p u r p o s e , according to pamphlets distributed t h r o u g h o u t c a m p u s , was to "visibly s h o w s t u d e n t solidarity in s u p p o r t i n g o u r n e i g h b o r s and t o not tolerate i g n o r a n t , racist, hateful and discriminatory actions and a t t i t u d e s o n our campus." Eight-hundred Stand U p shirts plus posters, w i n d o w clings and b u t t o n s were d i s t r i b u t e d t o reiterate t h e message. "As a senior, I'll be here until May," Sawyer said in an interview with The A n c h o r for t h e Feb. 2 Stand U p special issue, "but this will not end o n Feb. 2 or w h e n 1 leave H o p e . I'm not t h e only p r o p o n e n t of it." "This n e e d s t o continue, a n d hopefully it will spark a fire in o t h e r p e o p l e a r o u n d campus," she said.

Fraley is proof of t h e sparks that Sawyer left o n c a m p u s . The Stand U p c o m m i t t e e , Fraley said, is a diverse g r o u p with resident assistants, t h e basketball t e a m captain, theater actors and plenty of o t h e r eager H o p e s t u d e n t s . The g r o u p m e e t s weekly t o discuss and plan for events. The t h e m e a n d focus for Stand Up is "I A m Blank, We A r e H o p e College." According to Fraley, it's a b o u t being a puzzle piece to t h e greater good. W i t h t h e help of the committee and the student body. Stand Up "took o n a life of its own," Fraley said. Several events are p l a n n e d for next semester, including speakers and a musical guest, which will be announced b e f o r e t h e e n d of this semester. In January, Stand Up will be holding an RA t r a i n i n g session for discussing discrimination. Stand U p is a b o u t aggressively p u r s u i n g goals and change. "It s h o w s t h e reality of what you can do," said Fraley. "It's not just a o n e - t i m e event, b u t a cultural movement."


2

CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E

NOVEMBER 2 3 . 2 0 1 1

STAND U P Hope s t u d e n t s m o d e l S t a n d Up s h i r t s . S t a n d Up c o n t i n u e s t o p r o m o t e a c c e p t a n c e and u n d e r s t a n d i n g on Hope's campus w i t h an o p e n m l c n i g h t in t h e K i e t z on Nov. 3 0 a t 9 p.m.

Thursday Nov. 2 4 Thanksgiving Recess begins 8 a.m.

Monday Nov. 2 8 Thanksgiving Recess ends 8 a.m.

Tuesday Nov. 2 9 Red Cross Information Table

See f u l l story on page 1 . •

M a a s Lobby 1 1 a . m . - 2 p . m .

P H O T O BY A N N M A R I E P A P A R E L U

I N BRIEF

PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE SELECTION UPDATE

None in Four event comes to campus Scott M a r t i n

H O P E PR - Two final c a n d i d a t e s GUEST WRITER for t h e pos i t i o n of President at H o p e College have been identified by t h e O n e in f o u r college w o m e n Presidential Search C o m m i t t e e following a series of interviews with fi- r e p o r t surviving a sexual assault since her 14th birthday. In nalists o n Nov. 18-19. The final c a n d i d a t e s will be in- addition, 3 p e r c e n t of college vited t o c a m p u s t h e week of Dec. 5-9 m e n r e p o r t surviving a sexual for o n - c a m p u s interviews, including assault as a child or adult. Sexual assault is an offense sessions with faculty, s t u d e n t s a n d staff. The schedule will be d e - t h a t affects everyone, and no t e r m i n e d based o n t h e availability o n e deserves to b e sexually asof t h e c a n d i d a t e s and will be p o s t e d saulted. W i t h t h e a i m of i m p a c t i n g o n K n o w H o p e and c o m m u n i c a t e d c h a n g e o n c a m p u s , t h e STEP t h r o u g h c a m p u s emails. (Students TeachThe c o m m i t t e e ' s intent is t o r e c o m - p r o g r a m m e n d a single c a n d i d a t e to t h e Board ing and E m p o w e r i n g Peers) is of T r u s t e e s at their late January m e e t - h o s t i n g an event called N o n e in ing, in a c c o r d a n c e with t h e Board's Four o n Tuesday, Dec. 6 f r o m 7 to 9 p.m. in M a a s A u d i t o r i u m . charge to the committee.

Sarah Strong, m a n a g i n g dir e c t o r of N o t This Girl (www. not thisgirl.com) will give a k e y n o t e speech at t h e event. A discussion panel will follow to engage s t u d e n t s t o openly discuss this issue, m o d erated by Hope's Director of Residential Life and Housing, Dee C a m p a n e l l a . N o n e in Four will pave t h e way for c h a n g e o n c a m p u s , starting with changing our att i t u d e s and p r e c o n c e i v e d n o tions, d e b u n k i n g m y t h s and providing a place for s t u d e n t s t o b e heard. Be a part of t h e c h a n g e t h a t is h a p p e n i n g all over c a m p u s , until o n e in four is N o n e in Four.

GET CRAFTY! MHunanon

Campanella helps students as sexual assault policy educator Monica Hanna GUEST WRITER

"My goal is to just help o n e p e r s o n ; 1 just hold o n to t h e h o p e that this c a n m a k e a difference for just o n e p e r s o n and t h a t keeps m e going," said D e e C a m p a n e l l a , the n e w sexual harassment and assault policy e d u c a t o r at H o p e College. Born in D e t r o i t but raised in Texas, C a m p a n e l l a brings u n i q u e n e s s to H o p e . She holds a d e g r e e in j o u r n a l i s m f r o m the University of Texas a n d a master's d e g r e e in e d u c a t i o n with a focus o n college s t u d e n t p e r s o n n e l f r o m t h e University of Maryland. A f t e r g r a d u a t i o n she w o r k e d w i t h A m e r i C o r p s , focusing o n public and c o m m u n i t y health. Her w o r k with t h e National AIDS F u n d triggered her passion for health, and she w e n t o n t o e a r n a m a s t e r ' s in public health and c o m m u n i t y h e a l t h f r o m t h e

for violence and could take place in any t y p e of relationship. Her aim is to bring a w a r e n e s s t o p o w e r - b a s e d personal violence n o t just for those w h o are involved directly but those w h o a r e b y - s t a n d e r s as well. "Bystander intervention" encourages those who are p r e s e n t at an incident t o intervene. She teaches s t u d e n t s t h e "3 Ds" of intervening: •Distract t h e p e r s o n h a r m i n g t h e o t h e r o r t h e p e r s o n w h o is being h a r m e d . •Direct t h e v i c t i m s or t h e offender's a t t e n t i o n elsewhere. •Delegate t h e v i c t i m s or offender's f r i e n d s to get t h e m o u t of t h e situation. C a m p a n e l l a sees H o p e as a caring c o m m u n i t y and says teaching s t u d e n t s a b o u t these issues will give t h e m t h e skills t o m a k e a difference. She plans t o t o u c h b a s e with all of c a m p u s by informing major organizations

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B U I L D I N G A S A F E C O M M U N I T Y - Dee C a m p a n e l l a Is w o r k i n g w i t h S t u d e n t s T e a c h i n g and E m p o w e r i n g Peers to keep c a m p u s safe. University of M a r y l a n d . Using her experience and e d u c a t i o n , Campanella worked for Washington University in St. Louis w h e r e s h e w a s involved with sexual assault e d u c a t i o n and response. In July 2010, C a m p a n e l l a was hired as associate director of residential life and h o u s i n g at H o p e . Last spring s h e gained an additional title: sexual h a r a s s m e n t / a s s a u l t policy educator. W i t h her b a c k g r o u n d in advocacy against sexual violence and work in t h e city-wide sexual assault r e s p o n s e t e a m in M a r y l a n d and Rape Crisis line in St. Louis, C a m p a n e l l a said, "This position is ideal." She is currently speaking t o health d y n a m i c s classes a b o u t "power-based p e r s o n a l violence" w h i c h is a m o r e inclusive t e r m

first, such as athletic t e a m s and Greek Life. She is w o r k i n g o n t h e S t u d e n t s Teaching and E m p o w e r i n g Peers p r o g r a m w h i c h is a n e w s t u d e n t peereducationprogramdesigned to increase u n d e r s t a n d i n g a b o u t p o w e r - b a s e d personal violence. W i t h STEP, s h e w a n t s t o bring this "taboo" topic at H o p e out in t h e o p e n to p r e v e n t those "suffering in silence," C a m p a n e l l a said. Danielle Mikhail ('13) said, "The p r o g r a m and m o v e m e n t toward sexual harassment e d u c a t i o n will hopefully m a k e H o p e a better c a m p u s all Ground." C a m p a n e l l a said, "If a s t u d e n t finds themselves in p o w e r - b a s e d personal violence, they should never feel alone."


NOVEMBER 2 3 , 2 0 1 1

WORLD

THE ANCHOR

3

Burma taking steps toward democracy Annellese Goetz W O R L D CO-EDITOR

President Barack Obama will b e s e n d i n g Hillary Clinton to B u r m a in D e c e m b e r in o r d e r to encourage "flickers of progress" there. The p a r t i c u lar flicker that s e e m s t o have sparked this decision was t h e r e a p p e a r a n c e of p r o - d e m o c r a c y politician A u n g San Suu Kyi. A u n g San Suu Kyi h a s been absent f r o m t h e political s c e n e in B u r m a , following t h e 1990 elections. H e r party, t h e N a t i o n a l League for Democracy, boycotted t h e 2010 election. These were t h e first polls to be held in 20 years. The 1990 elections had b a n n e d A u n g San S u u Kyi f r o m r u n n i n g . H e r party w o n but she was never allowed t o take power. Instead she was a political priso n e r u n d e r h o u s e arrest until t h e n e w g o v e r n m e n t allowed for her release just last year. The 2010 b o y c o t t w a s in r e s p o n s e to this. The National League for Dem o c r a c y have d e c i d e d t o r e t u r n to t h e r u n n i n g this year partially d u e t o a state n e w s p a p e r article.

A c c o r d i n g to t h e BBC, in t h e article, p a r l i a m e n t a r y s p e a k e r Shwe M a n n "recognized" that t h e National League for D e m o c racy should have w o n t h e 1990 election. The ban against A u n g San Suu Kyi has b e e n d r o p p e d . The National League for Dem o c r a c y has a n n o u n c e d that it will "register according t o party registration laws, and w e will t a k e p a r t in t h e c o m i n g by-elections." Understandably, o n e of t h e t o p priorities o n A u n g San Suu Kyis agenda is t h e f r e e in g of o t h e r political p r i s o n e r s . T h e r e is s o m e evidence of h o p e for this. President Thein Sein has p r o m i s e d t h a t "all political priso n e r s will be released soon." T h e r e is s o m e c o n t r o v e r s y over A u n g San Suu Kyi's ret u r n t o politics. She told t h e AFP n e w s agency, "If I t h i n k I should t a k e p a r t in t h e election, I will. S o m e p e o p l e are w o r r i e d t h a t taking p a r t could h a r m m y dignity. Frankly, if you d o politics, you should n o t be t h i n k i n g a b o u t your dignity." According t h e BBC, "the US m a i n t a i n s e c o n o m i c sanctions a n d travel b a n s against m e m b e r s

of t h e f o r m e r j u n t a [militarized g o v e r n m e n t , replaced in 2011 by a civilian government]." It has also suffered political slights bec a u s e of its h u m a n rights record. O b a m a is sending Clinton to B u r m a t o "explore w h e t h e r t h e U n i t e d States can e m p o w e r a positive transition in Burma." This involves t h e B u r m e s e gove r n m e n t m a k i n g s o m e significant a n d c o n c r e t e c h a n g e s toward reform. Obama spoke with A u n g San Suu Kyi. He decided t o send C l i n t o n t o B u r m a as a gesture of s u p p o r t for t h e c h a n g e s p e o p l e like A u n g San Suu Kyi a r e trying t o make. According to the BBC, O b a m a said, "Last night, I s p o k e to A u n g San Suu Kyi directly and c o n f i r m e d she s u p ports American engagement to m o v e this process f o r w a r d " H e is not t h e only world leader t o express h o p e . W h i l e there is still a great deal of u n e a s e and great strides to be taken, I n d o nesian Foreign M i n i s t e r M a r t y Natalegawa reportedly said that Burma has demonstrated a s t r o n g effort t o t r a n s f o r m itself into a d e m o c r a t i c nation.

P H O T O COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATED P R E S S

O U T O F T H E H O U S E — Pro-democracy p o l i t i c i a n A u n g San Suu Kyi is free a f t e r s p e n d i n g years under house arrest. She was has s p e n t 1 5 of t h e past 2 2 years in s o m e f o r m of detent i o n . She w i i l run for one of t h e 4 8 availabie Senate seats.

PERSPECTIVES

Myth or Reality: Internet censorship in U.S.? w o u l d be accomplished by W O R L D CO-EDITOR s h u t t i n g d o w n websites w h e r e p e o p l e d o w n l o a d music, m o v Alright, it's confession time: I ies and television shows. Since have w a t c h e d copyrighted telem a n y such sites a r e based outvision shows o n t h e I n t e r n e t . side U.S. b o r d e r s , this would I have listened to copyrighted also involve cracking d o w n m u s i c o n t h e I n t e r n e t . I have o n U.S. websites that provide m o s t certainly s e e n images f r o m links to sucji foreign sites. copyrighted w o r k s such as m o v Americancensorship.org ies and b o o k s o n t h e I n t e r n e t . m a i n t a i n s t h a t these provisions Here's a n o t h e r thing: I'm p r e t t y would n o t s t o p I n t e r n e t pirates s u r e that you've d o n e all these f r o m accessing foreign sites. things, too. I k n o w - shocker. It also claims that a m b i g u o u s Anyhow, you don't n e e d clauses in t h e bills would alm e to tell you t h a t t h e activlow c o r p o r a t i o n s t o sue webity o f t e n k n o w n by t h e d e sites for a variety of r e a s o n s , ceptively romantic-sounding crippling legitimate U S . webn a m e " I n t e r n e t piracy" is very sites such as n e w search e n common, especially among gines and social media sites. m e m b e r s of o u r g e n e r a t i o n . The people behind ameriI'm not w r i t i n g to try to c o n c a n c e n s o r s h i p . o r g are w o r r i e d vince you t h a t piracy is w r o n g a b o u t t h e bills chiefly b e c a u s e or right, t h o u g h I d o h o p e t o get websites that foster creativp e o p l e talking a b o u t that. I'm ity and provide a p l a t f o r m for writing b e c a u s e there are bills protest (Tublr, Twitter, Youo n this subject currently m a k i n g Tube, various social n e t w o r k their way t h r o u g h b o t h h o u s e s ing sites) are also places w h e r e of C o n g r e s s t h a t are r u b b i n g users o f t e n p o s t w h o l e slews of a lot of p e o p l e t h e w r o n g way. pictures, s o u n d clips, and footM u c h h a s b e e n said a b o u t age f r o m copyrighted w o r k s . China's Internet censorship They're also c o n c e r n e d t h a t policies, s o m e t i m e s k n o w n colt h e g o v e r n m e n t would block or lectively as t h e Great Firewall take legal action against sites (see what they did there?). I'm like Facebook for t h e s a m e reafairly certain that n o b o d y serisons. S o m e even fear that indiously w a n t s that sort of thing viduals could b e slapped with t o h a p p e n in t h e United States. fines and jail time for s o m e However, there a r e a n u m thing as simple as singing a ber of panic-stricken Internet p o p s o n g in a YouTube video. users w h o think that C o n O p p o n e n t s of t h e bill don't gress h a s started walking d o w n necessarily think it's an overt att h a t p a t h with t h e P r o t e c t t e m p t at censorship, but they d o IP Act (Senate) and t h e Stop s e e m t o agree that c o r p o r a t i o n s O n l i n e Piracy Act (House). will a l m o s t certainly a b u s e their T h e activist website Amerip o w e r s in ways t h a t will m a k e t h e cancensorship.org claims that distinction b e t w e e n regulation these bills would give the enand censorship a m o o t point. t e r t a i n m e n t i n d u s t r y t h e power Under the Digital M i l l e n n i u m to censor t h e Internet. This Copyright Act, websites such Cory Lakatos

as YouTube t a k e d o w n videos w h e n c o m p a n i e s ask t h e m to. The c u r r e n t H o u s e bill would allow c o m p a n i e s t o t a k e legal action against websites t h a t even allow copyrighted material to b e posted, possibly m e a n i n g t h a t YouTube and its kin would have t o vet videos b e f o r e allowing t h e m to b e p u t up, unless of course they w a n t e d t o risk being sued. Furthermore, opponents of t h e bills assert (using technobabble that I cannot under-

66 The current House bill would allow companies to take legal action against websites that even allow copyrighted material to be posted. 59 stand) that t h e t i n k e r i n g of t h e U.S. g o v e r n m e n t would m a k e t h e I n t e r n e t less secure and less stable. In short, m a n y p e o p l e see t h e bills as ineffectual prot e c t i o n for intellectual p r o p e r t y rights a n d a slippery slope to blatant I n t e r n e t c e n s o r s h i p o n t h e China model. They see curr e n t tools t h a t c o r p o r a t i o n s have for fighting piracy as either sufficient or excessive even witho u t giving t h e m m o r e p o w e r s . I'll admit that all this kind of m a d e m e w a n t to grab a c r u d e l y - m a d e protest sign, r u n to t h e nearest a i r p o r t , and catch t h e next p l a n e to W a s h i n g t o n with t h e rest of my generation. The U.S. g o v e r n m e n t is t u r n i n g into a c o r r u p t Orwellian m o n s t e r capable of depriving m e of my f u n -

d a m e n t a l h u m a n right to w a t c h T V online for free? Let t h e r e be riots in t h e streets! A n d yet... doesn't it all s o u n d just a bit t o o awful t o be true — just a bit alarmist? A r e a t t e m p t s t o p r o t e c t copyrights, however misguided, t h e s a m e as c r a c k d o w n s o n o u r f r e e d o m of s p e e c h ? T h e website for t h e H o u s e of Representatives states that "the bill m o d e r n i z e s o u r crimir nal a n d civil s t a t u t e s t o m e e t n e w IP e n f o r c e m e n t challenges a n d p r o t e c t A m e r i c a n jobs." It describes t h e H o u s e bill as a bipartisan m e a s u r e for fighting c r i m e and p r o t e c t i n g U.S. c o m p a n i e s f r o m foreign t h r e a t s . A c c o r d i n g to t h e site, t h e bill "allows t h e A t t o r n e y General to seek i n j u n c t i o n s against foreign websites t h a t steal and sell A m e r i c a n innovations a n d p r o d ucts." It also "increases criminal penalties for individuals w h o traffic in c o u n t e r f e i t m e d i c i n e and military goods, w h i c h put i n n o c e n t civilians and A m e r i c a n soldiers at risk." T h e s u m m a r y of t h e bill focuses a l m o s t entirely o n c o m b a t i n g foreign websites t h a t provide pirated materials. A defense of t h e Senate version a p p e a r i n g o n t h e blog of C h r i s t o p h e r C o o n s , a Delaw a r e senator, calls t h e claims of a m e r i c a n c e n s o r s h i p . o r g and its like "a slew of misinformation." According to C o o n s ' c o m m u n i cation team, t h e n e w bill would not criminalize any activities that are not already illegal. "This bill would provide that those w h o engage in piracy willfully and for profit will b e held tp t h e s a m e s t a n d a r d s — in' eluding potential felony charges — regardless of w h e t h e r they engage in that piracy by selling

bootlegs o n the street c o r n e r or providing access t o t h e streaming of copyrighted material over t h e Internet," t h e y write. Coons himself stated t h a t t h e bill will only target websites that exist primarily t o infringe copyright laws. D o e s this m e a n that o p p o n e n t s are overreacting? JLm still conflicted, t o b e h o n e s t . I have an uneasy conscience a b o u t Internet piracy, so even t h o u g h I don't like t h e s o u n d of these bills, can I reasonably object? "No, government," I'd say, " S h a m e o n you for p r o s e c u t i n g m e w h e n I d o illegal and i m m o r a l things. Stealing is totes legit — it says so in t h e Constitution, right?" (Lest a n y o n e think otherwise, I d o n o t actually talk like this.) W o u l d that make any s e n s e at all? Is there even a way to d e f e n d intellectual p r o p e r t y rights that couldn't be abused as a tool for censorship? T h e n again, it might b e w o r t h it t o o p p o s e these bills simply b e c a u s e there's t h e potential that t h e y will b e abused t o t h e d e t r i m e n t of o u r right to free expression. If you've already m a d e u p your m i n d a n d d o n n e d your G u y Fawkes m a s k , a m e r i c a n censorship.org can hook you up with ways to fight t h e bill. If you're o n t h e fence like me, I guess I can only advise you to think a b o u t it m o r e . There are m a n y perspectives o n this issue. If you actually like t h e s o u n d of t h e P r o t e c t IP and Stop O n line Piracy Acts, I'm n o t s u r e what to say to you. I s u p p o s e you could write an encouraging letter t o your congressperson, or you could calmly m a k e your way to the nearest a i r p o r t and board a plane for C h i n a .


4-

WORLD

THE ANCHOR

NOVEMBER 2 3 , 2 0 1 1

Neo-Nazi violence shocks Germany Shubham S a p k o t a STAFF W R I T E R

It h a s been d e c a d e s since t h e end of W o r l d W a r II, a n d it is quite s u r p r i s i n g and tragic to see the ideologies of t h e National Socialist (Nazi) party still influencing p e o p l e in G e r m a n y . These people, w h o are seen as being neo-Nazis, have b e e n s u s p e c t e d of being terrorists w h o a r e t h e cause of a series of c r i m e s arid m u r d e r s t h a t h a s t a k e n place in G e r m a n y over the past ten years. Even t h o u g h four m e m b e r s of this g r o u p have b e e n exposed, o n e of w h i c h s u r r e n d e r e d , t w o killed themselves, a n d t h e f o u r t h h a s b e e n detained, their actions have already triggered w o r r i e s a m o n g G e r m a n s that this g r o u p could lead t h e rise of n e o - N a z i extremist g r o u p s in general. N o n e of t h e G e r m a n s want this n i g h t m a r e f r o m their past t o h a u n t t h e m all over again.

It h a s been suggested t h a t this n e o - N a z i g r o u p is responsible for murders of immigrant workers, bank robberies, and a 2004 b o m b i n g of an i m m i g r a n t neighborhood in Cologne. After police d e t a i n e d o n e of t h e suspects, they began t o s p e c u l a t e that this group, w h i c h calls itself t h e National Socialist Underground, is responsible for over 14 bank robberies in t h e past 10 years. It is also t h e p r i m a r y s u s p e c t in the Cologne bombing which injured 24 people. Furthermore, the guns that w e r e retrieved f r o m t h e two d e a d m e m b e r s of t h e g r o u p f o r m e r l y belonged to t h e t w o officers w h o w e r e shot in H e i l b r o n n in 2007. Angela Merkel, t h e G e r m a n chancellor, h a s said t h a t what t h e m e m b e r s of this g r o u p have d o n e is simply "shameful." A f t e r so m a n y years of seeking to diminish the nation's association with t h e

Nazi atrocities that took place d u r i n g W o r l d W a r II, t h e chancellor could not believe t h a t t h e a t t e m p t s of neo-Nazi g r o u p s to stir chaos are actually taking place in G e r m a n y . On a similar note. Dr. HansPeter Friedrich, t h e German interior minister, stated that P H O T O COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATED P R E S S these uncovered P R E V I O U S L Y A R R E S T E D â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pictured in this 1998 German newspaper are actions of the National Socialist Beatrice Z, Uwe W, and Uwe M, all three are suspected of neo-Nazi related U n d e r g r o u n d terrorist activity. were signs pages of G e r m a n newspapers. and voice their angry o p i n i o n s . of "a n e w f o r m of rightThe government is still However, n o o n e t h o u g h t wing-extremist terrorism." trying to dig d e e p e r in order they were capable of action Videos of Nazi p r o p a g a n d a to expose this suspicious on such a large scale. w e r e discovered a n d linked g r o u p . The activities of t h e The n e w s of t h e c r i m e s t o this group, and r e s i d e n t s National Socialist U n d e r g r o u n d of this s u p p o s e d n e o - N a z i w h o live near t h e area of have shocked Germany. g r o u p in G e r m a n y was o n e of Friihlingsstrasse, where the m e m b e r s stayed, m e n t i o n e d t h a t they used to get together

t h e only stories that t o o k t h e e u r o z o n e crisis off of t h e f r o n t

Russian shuttle carries three astronauts to International Space Station Cory Lakatos W O R L D CO-EDITOR

In August, a Russian Soyuz space shuttle c r a s h e d shortly after taking off f r o m t h e Baikonur c o s m o d r o m e in Kazakhstan. It is believed t h a t t h e c r a s h w a s caused by a fluke fuel p i p e blockage. Fortunately, t h e c r a f t was u n m a n n e d and carried n o t h ing m o r e t h a n cargo b o u n d for the I n t e r n a t i o n a l Space Station. A c c o r d i n g t o t h e BBC, Soyuz shuttles have p r o v e n t o be a comparatively safe way t o get

into space in t h e past. Despite this, t h e crash led all m a n n e d Russian space flights t o be cancelled for a full t h r e e m o n t h s . However, Soyuz s p a c e shuttle travel r e s u m e d o n Nov. 14. This time, t h r e e a s t r o n a u t s , t w o Russians and o n e American, m a d e t h e flight. T h e r e w e r e n o c o m p l i c a t i o n s or m i s h a p s and t h e t h r e e gave t h e t h u m b s - u p to observers on the ground outside of M o s c o w via v i d e o link o n c e they h a d achieved orbit. Their ultimate d e s t i n a t i o n is t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l Space Station.

T h e t h r e e a s t r o n a u t s involved w e r e A n t o n Shkaplerov, 39, Anatoly Ivanishin, 42, of Russia, a n d Dan B u r b a n k , 50, of t h e U n i t e d States. The two Russian a s t r o n a u t s w e r e m a k i n g their first voyage into space while B u r b a n k , a N A S A veteran, w a s riding in a Soyuz s p a c e c r a f t for t h e first t i m e . Despite t h e August crash, t h e t h r e e m e n s t a t e d t h a t they w e r e c o n f i d e n t that t h e flight w o u l d go f o r w a r d successfully. " W e don't have any black t h o u g h t s . W e have faith in o u r

equipment," said Shkaplerov. A f t e r t w o days in space, t h e t h r e e a s t r o n a u t s d o c k e d at t h e International Space Station, w h e r e they are s c h e d u l e d to stay until M a r c h of 2012. They will replace t h e c u r r e n t t w o m a n crew, w h i c h will r e t u r n t o e a r t h shortly after t h e i r replacem e n t s ' arrival. If t h e r e had b e e n p r o b l e m s with t h e launch that b r o u g h t Shkaplerov, Ivanishin, a n d Burbank t o t h e ISS, t h e r e was a very real risk t h a t t h e space station would be left u n m a n n e d for t h e first t i m e in over a d e c a d e .

The August crash was n o t t h e only setback t h a t t h e Russian space p r o g r a m h a s experienced in r e c e n t m o n t h s . Two w e e k s ago, a p r o b e w h i c h was i n t e n d e d t o e x a m i n e Phobos, o n e of t h e m o o n s of M a r s , bec a m e stuck in t h e Earth's orbit. W h e n NASA shut down its 30-year s h u t t l e p r o g r a m in July, it u s h e r e d in a period of several years in which Russia's shuttle program will t r a n s p o r t

all ISS crews.

PERSPECTIVES

Doubt cast on death penalty: Davis executed despite witnesses recanting L a ^ h a w n Donelson GUEST WRITER

The e x e c u t i o n of T r o y A n t h o n y Davis by lethal injection in S e p t e m b e r for a c r i m e that h e long claimed he did n o t c o m m i t has p u t additional scrutiny o n t h e effectiveness of t h e d e a t h penalty. Davis was convicted of m u r d e r i n g police officer M a r k M a c P h a i l in Savannah, Ga., in 1989. His case c a p t u r e d w o r l d wide a t t e n t i o n b e c a u s e of t h e d o u b t his s u p p o r t e r s raised over w h e t h e r he killed MacPhail. Since his 1991 trial, several of t h e witnesses w h o h e l p e d convict h i m r e c a n t e d their testimony. T h r o u g h o u t his trial and imprisonment, Davis maint a i n e d his innocence. His s u p p o r t e r s included t h e NAACP, A m n e s t y International USA, t h e I n n o c e n c e Project and o t h e r h u m a n rights g r o u p s . P r o m i n e n t individual s u p p o r t e r s included Pope Benedict XVI, A r c h b i s h o p D e s m o n d Tutu, f o r m e r president Jimmy Carter, Rev. Al S h a r p t o n , form e r FBI director a n d j u d g e Williams Sessions, a n d f o r m e r U.S. C o n g r e s s m a n f r o m Georgia and presidential c a n d i d a t e Bob Barr,

according t o N e w York T i m e s . Blair Riddle, p r e s i d e n t of H o p e for United Justice, said, "The Troy Davis c a s e s h o w s that our legal system is n o t always p r o t e c t e d f r o m injustice. It is a sad reality t h a t p e o ple m a y be p u t to d e a t h in America, even if their guilt is q u e s t i o n e d . Seven of t h e n i n e witnesses against Davis have since r e c a n t e d their statem e n t s yet Davis was still put t o death; this is not justice served." H o p e political science p r o fessor David Ryden said capital p u n i s h m e n t is "too p r o b lematic o n t o o m a n y levels." "My biggest o b j e c t i o n is that there simply are t o o m a n y imp e r f e c t i o n s in o u r criminal justice system t o allow for w i d e s p r e a d application of t h e d e a t h penalty. In particular, t h e classbased a n d racial inequities largely u n d e r c u t t h e d e a t h penalty as a tool of justice," Ryden said. "The quality of legal repr e s e n t a t i o n varies widely depending on the resources one has to d e f e n d oneself in court," Ryden said. "Likewise, evidence strongly suggests that w h i t e juries are inclined to devalue p o o r m i n o r i t y d e f e n d a n t s in c o n -

t e m p l a t i n g capital p u n i s h m e n t . Given t h a t capital p u n i s h m e n t is t h e ultimate penalty, these factors w a r r a n t against its use." The I n n o c e n c e Project assisted Davis in an e f f o r t t o clear his n a m e . T h e y asked that t h e execution w a r r a n t against Davis be r e m o v e d b e c a u s e t h e r e was no D N A evidence that c o n n e c t ed h i m t o t h e c r i m e . The I n n o cence Project has helped m o r e t h a n 17 i n m a t e s get off death row t h r o u g h t h e usage of D N A , a c c o r d i n g to N e w York Times. The U.S. S u p r e m e C o u r t even g r a n t e d Davis a h e a r i n g to prove his innocence, t h e first t i m e it had d o n e so for a death r o w inm a t e in 50 years, according to t h e Associated Press. H o w e v e r Davis' a t t o r n e y s could n o t pers u a d e a federal j u d g e to g r a n t h i m a n e w trial and t h e S u p r e m e C o u r t did not review t h e case. O n e million s u p p o r t e r s petitioned to have t h e Georgia Board of P a r d o n and Paroles to g r a n t clemency. The b o a r d rejected clemency and declined t o review their decision. Federal appeals c o u r t s a n d t h e G e o r gia S u p r e m e C o u r t h a d upheld his conviction, leaving t h e parole b o a r d as Davis' last c h a n c e .

Penalty I n f o r m a t i o n Center. A c c o r d i n g t o A m n e s t y InterGeorgia has 103 d e a t h row national USA, m o r e t h a n 130 i n m a t e s including 52 blacks, p e o p l e have been released f r o m 48 w h i t e s and t h r e e Latinos. death row throughout the country d u e to evidence of th e ir w r o n g f u l c o n victions since 1973. S o m e Davis s u p p o r t e r s say t h e case demonstrates how the justice system w o r k s against o t h e r races. Recent statistics by t h e Death Penalty Inf o r m a t i o n C e n t e r say t h e n u m b e r of individuals executed for interracial murders with a white d e f e n d a n t and black victim is 16. For a black d e f e n d a n t with a white victim t h e n u m b e r is 253. Thirty-four states allow for capital punishment while 16 states, including Michigan, d o not have the death penalty. P H O T O COURTESY OF THE A S S O C I A T E D P R E S S Georgia, where TROY ANTHONY DAVIS IN 1 9 9 1 Davis was executed, The controversy s u r r o u n d i n g Davis* had t h e sixth highest a p p e a l and e x e c u t i o n has led t o Inn u m b e r of executions c r e a s e d d e b a t e r e g arding the death (51) since 1976, according t o t h e Death penalty.


ARTS Living larger, laughing harder with Williams

NOVEMBER 2 3 ,

THE

ANCHOR

5

2011

Annelise Belmonte ARTS CO-EDITOR

It's rare to see Kara Williams ('12) w i t h o u t a smile building o n her face. She h a s a lot to smile about. She's been cast in main stage theater shows every semester, worked with H o p e S u m m e r Repertory Theatre and is president of Vanderprov, Hope's improvisational comedy group. So h o w did t h e reign of laughter begin? "I wasn't planning on auditioning for Vanderprov," Williams said. A fellow cast m e m b e r w a n t e d a friend t o a u d i t i o n with for t h e comedy troupe. "I went, and I literally think there was one thing that p e o p l e laughed at, a n d it was a s o u n d I m a d e like, 'Blehblehmehhehr'shesays, her expression c o n t o r t i n g into uncharacteristic disgust. T h e next day Williams received a formal email t h a n k i n g h e r for auditioning. Scrolling through the pages of d o w n arrows, at t h e end of t h e email w a s all-caps c o n g r a t u l a t i o n for m a k i n g the team. As t h e year progressed, Williams w a s t h e only freshman on the team. N e r v o u s b e c a u s e of t h e c h a r i s m a of t h e o t h e r m e m b e r s . Williams said she felt "bottled up" for actual p e r f o r m a n c e s . T e a m m a t e and f u t u r e Vanderprov President Cassie N i e s p o d z i e w a n s k i reassured her. " O n e of your s t r e n g t h s is that you're consistent. You don't pull focus, you listen, and you c o n t i n u e a scene... funnily... hopefully

Back at h e r Dykstra cluster, however, Williams w a s k n o w n for her s e n s e of h u m o r a n d outgoing nature. For April Fool's Day,

Kara W i l l i a m s

s h e and t w o o t h e r cluster m a t e s w e n t all-out, p u t t i n g Vaseline o n d o o r h a n d l e s , toilet seats, flushers, sink handles, basically a n y t h i n g likely t o be grabbed or t o u c h e d . Kool-Aid tinted t h e toilets a n d showers, spraying p u r p l e p o w d e r everywhere. "Thegirlstheredefinitely t a u g h t me t o t h i n k o u t s i d e of t h e box and get in t o u c h with my inner child...! don't think any of us w e n t to bed b e f o r e 2:30 a.m., not b e c a u s e of h o m e w o r k b u t b e c a u s e of t h e s h e n a n i g a n s we w e r e having," Williams said. Vanderprov Vice President Jesse SwatlingHolcomb said, "Kara always says, 'yes' t o o t h e r people's suggestions, a rule of improv, b u t s h e also always says yes in a big way. If you tell her you're o n fire, s h e w o n ' t t h r o w a b u c k e t of w a t e r o n you, she'll t h r o w you in t h e ocean." As W i l l i a m s was cast in m o r e p r o d u c t i o n s and did m o r e improvisational w o r k , she gained m o r e c o n f i d e n c e onstage. ' T h e r e was this m o m e n t

Theater turned movie tar: Telfer acts out

w h e r e I just kind 'got it,"' Chrlstoff Vlsscher Williams said. " M y whole G U E S T W R I T E R t h o u g h t process c h a n g e d . Theater m a j o r s at H n p f 1 can lose myself in (performing) as o p p o s e d are k n o w n to p r o d u c e to analyzing myself high- quality p r o d u c t i o n s for b o t h the student now." Daina Robins, b o d y a n d t h e Holland one of Williams' c o m m u n i t y . O f t e n s o m e d i r e c t o r s at H o p e , of these s t u d e n t s a r e said her gymnastics recognized by their p e e r s a r o u n d c a m p u s after they b a c k g r o u n d has helped h e r have b e e n seen o n stage. physicality for b o t h For o n e senior though, his h u m o r a n d d r a m a . recognition by s t u d e n t s "She is aware of h e r m a y gradually b e c o m e body, she makes- recognition by t h e general good choices, and public with t h e u p c o m i n g she can m a k e good release of his t w o feature films.John Telfer choices...big, bold length has b e e n active in the choices." H o p e College Theater S w a t 1i n g since his Holcomb said D e p a r t m e n t f r e s h m a n year. W i l l i a m s ' "I've b e e n in six m a i n movements remind h i m of, "a ninja o n stage p r o d u c t i o n s , along with several student m u s c l e relaxants." Theater-goers and directed p r o j e c t s including self-directed/written Vanderprovians might a recognize her as a sweet S h a k e s p e a r e - b a s e d and crazy old w o m a n m o v e m e n t piece called 'If whose husbands were W e Shadows,"' Telfer says. Coming from Western afraid to sleep with her in Springs, 111., Telfer k n e w " U n d e r t h e Milkwood," that h e w a n t e d to act ever a m a t t e r - o f - f a c t lesbian since s o p h o m o r e year of f r o m "Second Class," a h a r d - w o r k i n g n u n trying high school. "After reading for a to pull her family together in " M a r i o n Bridge," or character in 'Cyrano de Nancy, t h e w e l l - m e a n i n g Bergerac' for English class, but sports-illiterate wife of s o m e o n e told m e t h a t I should try out for t h e a cocky racecar driver. Katie Garret ('12), auditions that day," Telfer close friend and cluster says. "It was 'Pride and m a t e f r o m f r e s h m a n year Prejudice' and I got cast! said, "She is goofy, s h e is I c o n t i n u e d to d o theater ridiculous, s h e loves t o for t h e next t h r e e years of laugh a n d have a good time, high school." In t h e s u m m e r of 2010, b u t s h e is honestly o n e of t h e m o s t loving p e o p l e t h a t Telfer auditioned for a role as an extra in t h e I have ever m e t . "She brings a w o n d e r f u l i n d e p e n d e n t film "Return the Hiding Place" w o r k ethic t h a t m a k e s t o e v e r y o n e in t h e g r o u p have w h i c h was being filmed in a higher expectation of Holland. However, after what they are going to do," seeing his a u d i t i o n and G a r r e t said. "She w a n t s t h e realizing there were s o m e g r o u p t o really live into t h e historical inaccuracies in fullest potential it can, and t h e film a b o u t the D u t c h I can definitely see that in resistance effort in W o r l d II, t h e d i r e c t o r s t h e way that V a n d e r p r o v W a r c r e a t e d t h e role of a f o u r t h h a s c h a n g e d over t h e p a s t brother named Hank, to f o u r years."

which Telfer was cast. "My work in that movie led me to make some connections which would eventually lead m e to w o r k i n g in my next film, 'Alone Yet Not Alone,"' Telfer said. Focusing o n an early c o l o n i a l missionary Skye Edwards and John Telfer group being "Big Love" d e s c r i b e d t h e captured by experience of w o r k i n g Native A m e r i c a n s , t h e with Telfer. film was t o be filmed in "Because John has a Roanoke, Va., and being strong background in cast as a leading role m e a n t stage m o v e m e n t and is Telfer would have to t a k e pretty fearless, it .was a s e m e s t e r off of school. a w e s o m e to just figure Fortunately, his a c a d e m i c c h o r e o g r a p h y out. T h e r e credits allowed h i m space t o t a k e t h e s e m e s t e r off w a s so m u c h f r e e d o m and I r e m e m b e r trying so and enjoy t h e experience. m a n y things successfully. "It w a s great! W e He's t h e type t h a t won't filmed in t h e Blue Ridge just say 'let's try that', but Mountains for three m o n t h s . It was fantastic he'll immediately start figuring it out physically," w o r k i n g almost every shot Stock said. o u t s i d e b e c a u s e we got His acting resume to s w i m t h r o u g h rivers, c o n t i n u e s to expand, as h e climb m o u n t a i n s and even played several p r o m i n e n t play lacrosse with Native roles in this past s u m m e r ' s A m e r i c a n children. It was H o p e S u m m e r Repertory like w a k i n g u p and playing Theatre lineup and was t h e c h i l d h o o d game of t h e lead in t h e m o s t recent soldiers and Indians," H o p e p r o d u c t i o n "Two Telfer said. G e n t l e m e n of Verona." "The most i m p o r t a n t The c o - d i r e c t o r of t h e t h i n g as an actor, besides show, Elizabeth D w y e r being a h a r d - w o r k e r a n d ('12) says that Telfer will talented, is t h a t you really have to f o c u s o n being a go far in his acting. "In 10 years, John will relatable p e r s o n b o t h o n be w h e r e v e r he w a n t s to and off t h e stage," Telfer be. He's so multitalented says. "People will do their and charismatic t h a t he best work with you if you can get w h a t he wants, and are a giving a c t o r and he'll be h a p p y with that." don't put yourself first. Telfer's views of t h e M o r e will b e revealed if f u t u r e s e e m to align with you focus o n m o r e t h a n Dwyer's prediction. "I just what's going o n in feel like I would be h a p p y your o w n head." anywhere, as long as I Brittany Stock (10), a k n e w t h a t t h e work I w a s H o p e alumni, and o p p o s i t e doing represented my cast m e m b e r to Telfer in abilities." t h e 2009 p r o d u c t i o n of

I

'Community' benched by NBC, a fan's plea for good TV Elena Rivera SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

N B C just recently released its midseason schedule, and in the midst of the Chelsea Handler comedies and the "Glee" knockoffs there was a glaring omission to the list: the critically loved but little-seen "Community." "Community," created by Dan Harmon ("The Sarah Silverman Program"), is the story of a study group of friends who attend a weird and wonderful community college called Greendale. Although its first season started off rough, by the middle of the

r nommrm n nunn ii tt vy "" had season "" C had created created a unique comedy niche of selfaware pop culture parodies combined with deeply complex character development. "Community" may have gained recognition initially because of some of the famous names attached, like Joel McHale ("The Soup") and Chevy Chase ("Saturday Night Live"), but it now is known as the program that launched some lesser-known actors to fame, like Alison Brie (doing double duty on "Mad Men" and "Community") and Donald Glover (who just released a rap album under the moniker

Childish Gambino). From the daring campus-wide paintball saga of the first season to the alternate timeline, Doctor Who-esque episode of the current third season, "Community" constantly reinvents typical comedy tropes and turns them into something completely revolutionary. Although "Community" is innovative and creative, the reasoning behind N B C ' s decision to take it off the midseason schedule makes sense. " C o m m u n i t y " is consistently on the low end of the ratings scale in general, and is the lowest-

rated comedy in the current N B C Thursday night line-up. Removing a struggling show, or "benching it," in favor of a new show that might gamer more viewers is a c o m m o n network practice, albeit a worrisome one. Benching a struggling show is usually a sign from the network that a show is in trouble and possibly on the verge of cancellation. N B C is currently in last place in viewers in comparison to ABC, CBS, etc. and has not been shy about canceling previous shows that have not faired well in the ratings. This fall season has been

especially especially brutal, brutal, with N B C cutting shows after two or three episodes, barely letting the shows develop a fan base to watch and re-watch the episodes. This quick-and-dirty business practice is why " C o m m u n i t y " fans find the news disheartening, possiblysignaling"Community , s" cancellation in a year's time, or even less. The honest truth is that " C o m m u n i t y " desperately needs to be on the air. Perhaps it's not the most viewed comedy on television, or even on NBC, but in today's world of DVR numbers and online viewings, big S E E COMMUNITY, PAGE 10


6

THE

ARTS

ANCHOR

NOVEMBER

23,

2011

Guest designer Joseph Flauto brings talent and hippies to Hope Amanda Vander Byl GUEST WRITER

A band of hippies d r e s s e d in tie-dye, floral skirts and b e a d e d necklaces g r e e t e d t h e audience at Hope's p r o d u c t i o n of Shakespeare's "Two G e n t l e m e n of Verona." The n e u t r a l colors, quirky accessories and giant a f r o w o r n by t h e actors w e r e all a p a r t of guest c o s t u m e d e s i g n e r Joe Flauto's vision. Flauto, a s e a s o n e d designer, joined Hope's theater d e p a r t m e n t for t h e p r o d u c t i o n w h i c h ran f r o m Nov. 17 t o Nov. 22. Before s h a r i n g his talents with H o p e , Flauto established a successful career in t h e t h e a t e r world. Flauto discovered his love for theater design as an u n d e r g r a d u a t e at Y o u n g s t o w n State University in O h i o . A l t h o u g h he was an art major, h e was involved in t h e university's small theater program. "First I s t a r t e d acting so t h e y paid attention to m e so I could design t h e set," Flauto said. He k n e w design was his place in t h e theater b e c a u s e h e was m o r e c o n c e r n e d with t h e details of his c o s t u m e s t h a n t h e c h a r a c t e r s he played as an actor. After receiving a bachelor's d e g r e e in art f r o m Youngstown, Flauto w e n t o n to earn m a s t e r ' s degrees in theater f r o m Bowling G r e e n University and t h e University of N e w O r l e a n s . Flauto joined t h e University of Evans-

ville faculty in 1978 and t a u g h t t h e r e for 30 years as a set, lighting a n d c o s t u m e designer. W h e n he had t i m e off, h e s p e n t it designing for o t h e r schools and professional theaters. For 27 s u m m e r s , he designed for t h e H o p e S u m m e r R e p e r t o r y Theater. Having d e s i g n e d for c o u n t less p r o d u c t i o n s at b o t h t h e college and professional level, Flauto a p p r e c i a t e s t h e differe n t e x p e r i e n c e s of w o r k i n g with professional and college actors." "Professional actors fascinate me," Flauto said. "They d o this for a living and they're so insecure." O n c e h e w o r k e d with a

professional actor w h o was in a panic b e c a u s e she was i n s e c u r e a b o u t t h e way she looked in her c o s t u m e . Flauto s t e p p e d in and

* Joe Flauto

e a s e d her anxieties so she could perform. "I just talked to her a b o u t h o w lovely she was," Flauto said. His calming w o r d s w e r e e n o u g h to allow t h e s h o w t o go o n . W o r k i n g with college stud e n t s is a different story, h e said. W h i l e they a r e n o t as reliable or e x p e r i e n c e d as professional actors, they a r e willing to s t e p up to t h e plate. "They don't k n o w e n o u g h to have melt downs," Flauto said. "College s t u d e n t s will d o anything, they'll wear anything." Flauto's first e x p e r i e n c e with Hope's t h e a t e r d e p a r t m e n t was in 2009 as guest set designer for "Skin of o u r Teeth." " H o p e s t u d e n t s a r e so re-

P H O T O S COURTESY OF H O P E T H E A T R E

H I P P I E - I N S P I R E D C O S T U M E S O N D I S P L A Y â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The outlaws In Hope's recent production of "Two Gentlemen of Verona" showcased Flauto's talent.

spectful and so responsive that I w a s h a p p y t o c o m e back," Flauto said. Theater professor John Tarnmi directed b o t h p r o d u c t i o n s Flauto has b e e n involved with at Hope. "Joe Flauto is a director's designer," T a m m i said. "He k n o w s h o w t o help tell t h e story of t h e play." Hope's p r o d u c t i o n of "Two G e n t l e m e n of Verona" placed . t h e story in t h e late 1960s and early 1970s. Flauto's designs helped s h a p e t h e concept. The c o s t u m e s w e r e inspired by high fashion designers of the '60s and 7 0 s such as Yves St. Lauren, Calvin Klein and Halston. The t i m e period had a wide variety of styles because people were e x p e r i m e n t i n g with clothing f r o m earlier p e r i o d s while adding styles of t h e i r o w n . The c o s t u m e s reflected t h e styles of The Beatles, Elvis, Jackie K e n n e d y a n d more, while still hinting at t h e clothing of Shakes p e a r e a n times. Flauto's creative designs w e r e a hit. "The c o n t r a s t b e t w e e n t h e outlaws r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e '60s feminist m o v e m e n t worked brilliantly against t h e m o r e reserved c o s t u m i n g of t h e m a i n characters," Lexi Egedy ('12) said after Friday's p r o d u c t i o n . H o p e f u l l y Flauto will r e t u r n t o share h i s talents with t h e H o p e t h e a t e r again.

Sellers' quirkiness, enthusiasm endear her to students, readers Lindsay Wolf ARTS CO-EDITOR

In t h e m i d d l e of class, H o p e English professor Heather Sellers is lying o n t h e floor of L u b b e r s 220. Sellers has just c o m p l i m e n t e d Alison L e c h n e r ( 1 2 ) o n o n e of h e r p o e m s and t o her great surprise discovered this is Lechner's first English class at H o p e . "Knock m e d o w n and call m e speechless, sister," H e a t h e r said b e f o r e p r o c e e d i n g to lie d o w n o n t h e c l a s s r o o m floor to m a k e her point. Sellers' quirkiness and e n t h u s i a s m are just two of^the r e a s o n s w h y s t u d e n t s enjoy her classes. Jacqueline C a n o n a c o ('12) says s h e always leaves class happy. "She is so full of c o m p l i m e n t s and e n c o u r a g e m e n t w h e n you d o s o m e t h i n g well. She m a k e s you want to k e e p doing better," C a n o n a c o said. "She h a s a beautiful a p p r e c i a t i o n for words, people a n d experience. A n y o n e could benefit f r o m her classes, n o t just writers. Sellers is also a r e n o w n e d a u t h o r best k n o w n for her recent m e m o i r "You Don't Look Like A n y o n e I Know." Sellers is o p e n and h o n e s t in her book - sharing i n t i m a t e m e m o r i e s of her c h i l d h o o d , her family and h e r discovery of her rare neurological disorder, prosopagnosia. "In using m y o w n life, I'm

always trying t o c o n n e c t with t h e r e a d e r and h e r or his o w n experience," Sellers said. The m e m o i r ' s title hints at Sellers' d i s o r d e r m o r e c o m m o n l y k n o w n as face blindness. She doesn't recognize her family, h e r f r i e n d s or her s t u d e n t s . She doesn't even recognize herself in t h e mirror. But Sellers doesn't let face blindness negatively affect h e r life. O n t h e contrary. Sellers says her disorder is a gift. "Face blindness is h o w I can n o w c o n n e c t with o t h e r p e o p l e in a d e e p and m e a n i n g f u l way. I have t o o p e n with it, and it m a k e s my interactions m o r e authentic, personal and o p e n right o u t of t h e gate. 1 love that," Sellers said. "And, e v e r y o n e h a s s t e p p e d in. T h e disorder has r e n e w e d m y faith in h u m a n kind. Everyone w a n t s to help." Since the 2010 release of her m e m o i r . Sellers h a s received a lot of media attention. Sellers has traveled to Chicago, N e w York and all a r o u n d Michigan for book readings. "I guest blogged, did television a p p e a r a n c e s , lots of radio and Skype," Sellers said. "I think t h e m o s t r e w a r d i n g p a r t of t h e publication process for me is t h e t e a c h i n g a s p e c t - w h e n I d o a talk for a c o m m u n i t y g r o u p and people ask q u e s t i o n s a b o u t t h e writing process. 1 feel I'm able to c o n n e c t p e o p l e with t h e p o w e r of telling o u r stories. That's incredibly meaningful." D u r i n g t h e school year. Sellers m a n a g e s to balance t e a c h i n g

unique. It is p a r t a n d writing. Sellers is currently of w h o I am," Bull w o r k i n g o n a collection of p o e m s ' said. "My classes a b o u t Tarzan and g r o w i n g u p in with H e a t h e r are Florida, essays a b o u t a r t and a easily m y favorite. y o u n g adult novel. She h a s a way of "I find teaching and w r i t i n g connecting with t o be a p e r f e c t balance. You can't write all day - you just can't concentrate for t h a t long," Sellers said."HopeCollege is an incredibly s u p p o r t i v e , positive place to work. During the s u m m e r I a m lost a n d crabby without my s t u d e n t s . I yearn for t h e school year t o start." In a similar manner. Sellers' students look f o r w a r d to each Sellers' m e m o i r class with her. She challenges students every kind of s t u d e n t to find their o w n voice in and really listens t o what we their writing: " E m b r a c e your have t o say. She also assigns a lot oddness." W h e n Lauren Bull ('12), of work, and I like that. H e a t h e r has helped m e realize my full creative writing and w o m e n ' s potential." studies major, first v e n t u r e d into Sellers helped Bull discover Sellers' office t h r e e years ago, her a c a d e m i c calling. she "instantly clicked" with her " W i t h o u t her, I don't k n o w professor as they b o n d e d over if I would have f o u n d a n d "being misplaced S o u t h e r n e r s in legitimized my passion for the Midwest." Bull is f r o m Texas. creative writing this early," Bull Sellers was b o r n a n d raised in said. Florida. Bull is also a teaching assistant "She has e n c o u r a g e d m e to for Sellers. She d e s c r i b e s t h e use my S o u t h e r n b a c k g r o u n d as fuel for my writing. It is experience as "a dream."

Heather Sellers

"It's inspiring t o learn h o w to teach f r o m s o m e o n e w h o loves teaching so much," Bull said. Sellers' passionate work with her s t u d e n t s is also recognized by t h e college. In M a y she received t h e H o p e O u t s t a n d i n g Professor E d u c a t o r Award, p r e s e n t e d by t h e class of 2011. "That teaching award at H o p e , w h e r e there are so m a n y s t u n n i n g teachers? That was so u n e x p e c t e d . I still do not really believe it," Sellers said. "That day was o n e of the high points of my life."


NOVEMBER 2 3 . 2 0 1 1

FEATURES

THE ANCHOR

7

J Independent music sensation anchored in Hope Chris Russ E D I T O R IN C H I E F

Detroit native Sufjan Stevens ('98) has b e e n profiled in num e r o u s international publications and his a l b u m "Illinois" h a s sold over 300,000 copies t o date. He is arguably t h e most fam o u s m e m b e r of H o p e College's alumni. He has not, however, played a c o n c e r t at H o p e since his graduation, instead having played multiple t i m e s o n t h e riv a l - c a m p u s of Calvin College. His latest a l b u m "The Age of Adz" was s t r e a m e d o n NPR's website leading u p t o its release, a n d Paste, The N e w York Times, and M T V all placed t h e record in their "Top Ten of 2010" lists. H e is o n e of t h e m o s t influential indie musicians in t h e world, and his work has d o n e a lot to popularize a n d spread t h e indie-folk s o u n d n o w h e a r d o n t h e radio in t h e f o r m of M u m f o r d and Sons, as well as The Decemberists. A prolific artist, Stevens has released nine studio a l b u m s since 2000, and n i n e m o r e C h r i s t m a s themed albums during the same

1994

elitist because I was o n O p u s . I pitted Moxie against O p u s and exploited that m o r e t h a n I should have," Stevens said. In 1996-1997, what would have been his senior year, Stevens left H o p e a n d perf o r m e d in N e w York with t h e band Marzuki. He r e t u r n e d for t h e 1997-98 school year, and started "Moxie" u p again. This time, h e collaborated with his English D e p a r t m e n t advisor Dr. Stephen H e m e n way (who is still a professor at Hope) and Moxie b e c a m e an i n d e p e n d e n t study project.. Stevens g r a d u a t e d m a g n a c u m laude f r o m H o p e that year. A letter f r o m the editor in an edition of Moxie published that year reads, "Welcome to t h e latest flop in print-media technology. Moxie is your very o w n m o n t h l y arts publication exhibiting freely s u b m i t t e d u n G R E E T I N G S F R O M H O P E C O L L E G E — Critically a c c l a i m e d I n d e p e n d e n t m u s i c i a n , S u f j a n c e n s o r e d arts and writing c o n Stevens, g r a d u a t e d f r o m Hope College In 1 9 9 8 w i t h a degree In English. tributions f r o m t h e H o p e ColStevens, 36, began at H o p e w o r k i n g with The A n c h o r and design and composition, and 1 lege community." Later in that as a f r e s h m a n in t h e fall of 1993. O p u s to begin his o w n magazine really indulged myself. It was a s a m e c o l u m n Sufjan states that, "I a m indebted t o Dr. H e m e n He served for a t i m e as t h e arts entitled "Moxie". He d e s c r i b e d blunder, very i m m a t u r e . I was way for his tolerance and advice." a n d e n t e r t a i n m e n t editor for this decision in t h e 1998 edition working off a stigma of O p u s as

period of time. As a s t u d e n t at H o p e College, this prolific work ethic resulted in a n u m b e r of poe m s , articles, c o l u m n s and magazines published in his n a m e .

1995

H o p e s s t u d e n t n e w s p a p e r The A n c h o r and s u b m i t t e d work for publication t o H o p e s literary publication. O p u s . D u r i n g his junior year, Stevens stopped

of Hope's Milestone yearbook. "I w a n t e d a venue for stud e n t s t o submit, o p e n f o r u m , with n o g e n r e or style limits. (Moxie) let m e e x p e r i m e n t o n

1996

S A Y C H E E S E 1 — S u f j a n Stevens as he appeared In t h e 1 9 9 4 , 1 9 9 5 and 1 9 9 6 M i l e s t o n e yearbooks.

R E A D A L L A B O U T IT— While s t u d y i n g at Hope, Stevens served as an a r t s and enter t a l n m e n t for Hope College's s t u d e n t newspaper. HEADING

BY L A U R E N A P R I L L

LAYOUT BY A L E E S A R I B B E N S


8

VOICES

THE ANCHOR

Going the distance Christopher Russ C o Editor-in-Chief

m

I'm almost halfway d o n e with m y last year of school. W h e n I w a s really young, 1 r e m e m b e r thinking t h a t going to school f r o m t h e age of 5 to 21 s e e m e d like an a b s u r d c o m m i t m e n t . Basically, for t h e first two d e c a d e s of your life you are a s t u d e n t . A n d n o w s o m e h o w , I'm a l m o s t finished. All of this reflecting b r o u g h t m e back to t h e blur that was f r e s h m a n o r i e n t a t i o n at H o p e College. O n e thing t h a t still sticks a b o u t t h o s e first two days w a s t h e " O r a n g e and Blue for You" play that was put o n by m e m b e r s of t h e o r i e n t a t i o n staff. The play consisted of skits t h a t were m e a n t to give s t u d e n t s advice a b o u t their n e w life as a college-student: don't p u t off studying, you might have a.difficult r o o m mate, you m i g h t get h o m e s i c k , and so o n . O n e "lesson" that a p p e a r e d in at least t h r e e of these skits, was t h a t if you are d a t i n g your significant o t h e r f r o m high-school, you are delusional. It's just a fact of life that it will not w o r k o u t , especially since there are so m a n y cool girls o n Hope's c a m p u s . In t h e end, t h e c h a r a c t e r in t h e play m a k e s t h e decision t o break up with his girlfriend over t h e phone, a n d h e is m u c h h a p p i e r n o w that h e can flirt with all of t h e c u t e college girls. A s a guy w h o w a s dating a girl w h o

Respect turkey day "It's Beginning to Copy Editor Look a lot like Christmas never fails to inspire me with that nostalgic, S a n t a - i s - c o m i n g holiday feel. However, this s o n g has a t i m e a n d place, a n d t h a t t i m e is n o t until after T h a n k s giving h a s had its rightful t u r n . It s e e m s t h a t t h e C h r i s t m a s s e a s o n b e g i n s earlier a n d earlier each year. This year, M e i j e r and Target got d e c k e d o u t for C h r i s t m a s as s o o n as t h e last piece of Halloween c a n d y was trick-or-treated. At this rate, we'll

Melody Hughes

NOVEMBER 2 3 , 2 0 1 1

went t o college o n t h e o t h e r side of t h e state, I felt fairly targeted by this message. N o w s o m e of this was just t h e result of a misguided a t t e m p t t o m a n u f a c t u r e a few m o r e H o p e College s w e e t h e a r t s , but this play still very clearly stated that d a t i n g s o m e o n e w h o lives outside of your area c o d e just a disaster waiting t o h a p p e n . Sitcoms a n d movies also b u y into this message for t h e m o s t part. In an episode of " H o w I M e t Your Mother," Marshall is c o n s u l t i n g Ted a b o u t a relationship and says that "Even t h o u g h Lily is my s o u l m a t e , long-distance almost killed us." At t h e end of t h e episode, Ted d e c i d e s t o give a long-distance r o m a n c e a s h o t anyways, b u t t h e story e n d s with t h e "moral" that these relationships hardly ever work a n d should not b e a t t e m p t e d . Even w h e n d i s t a n c e doesn't kill a relationship entirely, i t s usually at least d e p i c t e d as being s o m e kind of a living hell, like in t h e recent comedy, "Going The Distance." After you get a r o u n d t h e s p e c t r e of c a u t i o n a r y Hollywood tales, you also t e n d to find yourself defending your alternative lifestyle in conversations. S o m e p e o p l e like to s o u n d as w o r l d - w e a r y a n d exper i e n c e d as possible, a n d an easy way to d o this is b y c o m p l a i n i n g a b o u t past relationships. So w h e n a p e r s o n finds o u t that you're t r y i n g t o d a t e s o m e o n e w h o lives h o u r s away, they t e n d t o j u m p at t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o tell you h o w it is. I rem e m b e r o n e c o - w o r k e r w h o just looked at m e , shook her h e a d and said, "all guys cheat." S o m e t i m e s p e o p l e won't criticize you b u t will just say "Oh," a n d halfsmile sympathetically. You c a n almost h e a r t h e m mentally m a k i n g a n o t e to k e e p an eye o n your rela-

t i o n s h i p status on facebook. I should p a u s e for t w o quick disclaimers b e f o r e I keep going. First of all, I don't w a n t to give t h e impression t h a t I live t h r o u g h p e r s e c u t i o n day-in and d a y - o u t or anything. A l m o s t e v e r y o n e will be very supportive, and even if people give you a warning, they will usually still genuinely wish you luck. Second, t h e point of this c o l u m n is n o t to criticize p e o p l e w h o had a long-distance relationship that didn't work out. I don't think that you're evil or t h a t you don't believe in t r u e love, I just w a n t to let p e o p l e k n o w that these relationships aren't inherently cursed. In o n e particularly m o v i n g episode of "Scrubs," Dr. Kelso gives t w o o t h e r c h a r a c t e r s a warning, "Life is scary, get used to i t . . . n o t h i n g in this world that's w o r t h having c o m e s easy." If you really love s o m e o n e , a n d o n e or b o t h of you need t o move, I would r e c o m m e n d taking Dr. Kelso's uncharacteristically positive advice. A n d dating s o m e o n e w h o lives h o u r s away should theoretically easier than ever today. W i t h Skype, texting, voicemail, cars, cell p h o n e s , and facebook chat, staying c o n n e c t e d should be a breeze. U n f o r t u n a t e l y m o d e r n technology h a s pretty m u c h erased the rom a n t i c a d v e n t u r e r w h o writes letters h o m e t o t h e girl of his d r e a m s by candlelight, but if h e could d o it, you can too. Next s u m m e r I'll b e m a r r y i n g my h i g h - s c h o o l s w e e t h e a r t . A f t e r a l m o s t f o u r years of going to college o n o p p o s i t e sides of t h e state, I've n o t regretted c o m m i t t i n g to a long-distance relationship for o n e second.

soon be e a t i n g r e i n d e e r - s h a p e d popsicles and buying e l f - t h e m e d school supplies. This p r e m a t u r e C h r i s t m a s c o m m e r c i a l i s m enc r o a c h e s o n an a u t u m n holiday that deserves m o r e t i m e in t h e spotlight. Thanksgiving should have t h e m o n t h of N o v e m b e r t o itself w i t h o u t t h e distractions of a holiday t h a t already receives m o r e t h a n e n o u g h hype. H e r e are my t o p r e a s o n s why w e s h o u l d give Turkey Day m o r e respect; 1. Everything in m o d e r a t i o n C h r i s t m a s m a k e s t h e s n o w m o r e beautiful, t h e cookies m o r e b o u n t i f u l a n d t h e p e o p l e m o r e c o m p a s s i o n a t e . So why a m I arguing that there should b e less of it? I believe that C h r i s t m a s is s o special b e c a u s e it h a p p e n s o n c e a year. It's a holiday with its o w n designated season; t h e c h u r c h celebrates advent b e g i n n i n g in D e c e m ber t o r e m e m b e r t h e C h r i s t m a s story.

Instituting an artificially long C h r i s t m a s season detracts f r o m its singularity and significance. By t h e t i m e Dec. 2 5 rolls a r o u n d , p e o p l e have b e c o m e n u m b to t h e b e a u t y and true m e a n i n g of C h r i s t m a s . If it's always C h r i s t m a s t h e n it's never really C h r i s t m a s . By properly r e s p e c t i n g Thanksgiving, we avoid desensitizing ourselves to t h e traditions that b r e a t h e life into t h e C h r i s t m a s season. 2. G o d Bless America Thanksgiving deserves m o r e respect b e c a u s e it is an A m e r i c a n holiday. O n that f o u r t h Thursday of N o vember, w e g a t h e r together for a feast that is wholly a u t h e n t i c t o A m e r i c a . R e m e m b e r in k i n d e r g a r t e n w h e n your class p u t o n a p a g e a n t a b o u t t h e pilgrims and Indians? A little poking a r o u n d o n Wikipedia i n f o r m e d m e that t h e feast h a s ^ L i s t , p a g e 9 been celebrated since 1621, and

Puffy popcorn combating the Instant gratification syndrome' Marc Tori

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Stomach happiness. C o n fe s sion; I have an addiction to snacks. S o m e of my favorites include: fruit snacks, trail mix. Goldfish, c h i p s and salsa. Really I'd eat a b o u t a n y t h i n g you'd find in aisles 6 - 8 of Meijer. I b o u g h t a bag of p o p c o r n kernels last Sunday. I'm a big fan of p o p c o r n and I t h o u g h t it would be m o r e c o n venient (and cheaper) t o have a b a g of kernels I could m a k e h o w e v e r I pleased w h e n e v e r I w a n t e d t h e m . Popc o r n by itself ( w i t h o u t t h e butter and salt m i n d you) is a pretty healthy snack. I would not be o p p o s e d to substit u t i n g it for dinner. A n d that's probably not a good idea. P o p c o r n is fluff. It would fill my s t o m a c h b u t n o t provide a lot of nutritional value. O n e serving is 4.5 c u p s a n d h a s 120 calories. P o p c o r n is almost all c a r b o hydrate with a small p e r c e n t a g e of fat a n d protein. I'd eat e n o u g h to feel full but I'd be left h u n g r y quickly. But this is an easy d i n n e r o p t i o n and easy is attrac-

tive to a 22 year old c o o k i n g for himself. I imagine you're starting t o see my point. T h e lesson I'm learning f r o m p o p c o r n goes so m u c h f a r t h e r than eating habits. I'm all t o o willing t o take t h e easy r o u t e to get a quick fill. Living only o n s n a c k s could m a k e o n e u n h e a l t h y quickly. So can h a n g i n g o u t with t h e w r o n g friends, staying in an abusive relationship, d o i n g t h e b a r e m i n i m u m in a class, or neglecting your spiritual nature. Living a b a l a n c e d life is not easy. Avoiding cookies a n d waiting for d i n n e r isn't either. W e delay m a k i n g tough decisions b e c a u s e m a i n t a i n i n g t h e status q u o spares us s o m e pain. So o f t e n we just d o w h a t w e see as best for o u r self in t h e m o m e n t . Sure it's OK to splurge n o w and then. W e should be living life in t h e p r e s e n t too. Living a balanced life is not easy. Avoiding cookies a n d waiting for isn't either. My life isn't in p e r f e c t balance; I don't have it all figured out. The only t i m e I go t o t h e Dow is t o give a t o u r for admissions. I probably wouldn't r u n even if 1 w e r e chased. I could probably s p e n d less t i m e w a t c h i n g H B O ' s "True Blood" a n d s p e n d m o r e intentional t i m e with my h o u s e m a t e s .

ANCHOR C h r i s R u s s EonoK-iK-CHiif Caitlin Klask Jessica S n i t k o

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to b e better. W h a t if we all set a higher s t a n d a r d for ourselves? C a n we neglect o u r i m m e d i a t e desire to satisfy a m o r e i m p o r t a n t n e e d d o w n t h e road with s o m e t h i n g m o r e beneficial? Let's live life, and live it t o t h e fullest! We'd b e silly to think we can d o it all o n o u r own. Ask a friend t o help. Seek out t h e p o w e r of Christ. As Craig Barnes, t h e speaker at t h e G a t h e r i n g t w o Sundays ago said, " W e don't m a k e c h a n g e s to b e beloved, we make c h a n g e s b e c a u s e we a r e beloved." If o u r identities have b e e n placed in Christ, there is f r e e d o m t o be w h o h e created us t o be. If this m e a n s forsaking to indulge in what I t h i n k I n e e d n o w in o r d e r to b e c o m e his masterpiece, so be it. Let's not raise t h e bar just so we can be fantastic p e o p l e b u t so that we can glorify o u r creator. Marc spends time folding his clothes when he takes them out of the dryer so he won't be mad pulling wrinkled clothes from the hamper for the rest of the week.

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N o t all of us are going to b e p e r f e c t s t u d e n t s . O u r relationships probably won't b e perfectly h a r m o n i o u s . At s o m e point, we'll end u p h u r t i n g s o m e o n e else or ourselves. This doesn't m e a n , though, t h a t we can't strive

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What we sing

THE ANCHOR

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to "riches I heed not nor man's empty praise" I always get the chills myself because I think of all of the times that I have said things or do things just for the resume or just to get that next internship. It's only when we get to that point we may sing "thou in me dwelling and thy in me won" that may the victory "high King of Heaven's." I know I'm not there. Are you? But what about my favorite song? Seriously what does it really mean when we sing "I Surrender All?" The song writer, Judson W. Van Deventer, gave up his teaching career, his successful music career, sold his home and became a full time evangelist. He went on to disciple some of the well-known Christian leaders of our time, including Billy Graham. Are we really laying anything and everything at his feet? This doesn't just mean our riches or our accomplishments. It means our futures, our aspirations from what we eat for breakfast in the morning, to classes that we take next semester to the career that we may spend the rest of our lives doing. I recently had the neat opportunity of hearing Gil Odendaal speak. It's interesting because in many -ways "I Surrender All" is surrendering much more than what most of the church does today. Most all probably should be saying "I surrender 10 percent". More so even let's take this to one last level. So we've screwed up. We haven't followed him entirely. But that should never stop us from singing. In Fee's "Glory to God Forever," we declare the mightiness of the creator and is "great matchless name", "we declare that our life maybe a blazing offering." "Take my life and let it be for your glory, take my life and let it be yours." It's time we started taking it one step at a time. Every thought. Every action. Every Word we say. This Thanksgiving may we sing: Glory to God. Glory to God. Glory to God. Glory to God forever.

to "break our heart" and "take everything we have"? It's

hard to swallow. Before I go further I do need to make two qualificaSamuel Tzou tions on this topic. Columnist First of all when I describe general worship music, I am not talking about certain bands that while profess to be Christian don't necessarily produce music that directly praising the Lord. I'm not saying what they're doing is wrong. But it's kind of hard to go into a song like Relient I came across the thanksgiving psalm the other day; K's "Sadie Hawkins Dance," which may not be considlittle did 1 know that it is one of the most quoted Psalms ered worship music, and try to extract meaningful, Christian lyrics. of all. Second, I don't claim to be somebody that has some Psalms 100-1 declares "make a joyful noise onto the Lord." It goes on to describe serving him "and (coming) divine blessing to be living out what I sing and do. Heck, I have a hard enough time carrying out what I say I'm into his presence with singing"(v.2). going to do in the first place, and it's only by God's grace While 1 haven't always associated Thanksgiving nor do I think the Aramaic word for thanksgiving referred to that I get there. However, when I think about the songs that we sing, the Thanksgiving of the Pilgrims, it only seems fitting to I'm often convicted as these are declarations and promwrite about the Thanksgiving Psalm right around Thanksises that I'm making to God. We're telling him that evgiving. erything I have really is His when we barely give him the Like many students at Hope, I love singing in chapel and in church. No matter how well we sing, tone deaf, oft' thought of day. Being able to watch fellow brothers and sisters filled pitch and all, we are still able to glorify God through it. The lyrics sung in chapel, in our dorm halls at Tuesday with the spirit during worship is absolutely incredible as night worship and/or many other events are pretty incred- we raise our arms high, singing our hearts out. The music is always beautiful, but what I would like to suggest what ible to say the least. is more beautiful if we truly strive to live out the things Take "Hosanna" by Hillsong for example: "We see his that we say and do when we sing these songs. love and mercy" Or take "Hosanna in the highest." What When you look at David's songs, worship declaraa mighty declaration (an Aramaic expression declaring, tions in Psalms, and Mary's Song in Matthew, these were "Save, I pray")! people that truly lived out their lives and sang about it as But when we go further and look at some of these they went. lyrics, these songs of praise suddenly become very chalPsalm 145 describes David's loyalty to the Lord as he lenging: to live with "selfless faith" and working towards proclaims Him across the land. David was a man after a ' ^ e a r revival, staring as we pray and seek, we're on God's own heart and he dedicated his life to God. our knees" as we declare hosanna. The demands and the Fast forward quite a few millenniums. promises that we sing during this song are hard to grasp When we sing "Be Thou My Vision", is he truly the in themselves. How many times a day do we really get on our knees to pray for a revival? How often do we ask vision that we have before our eyes? When we harmonize

Professor reflects on historic Christian faith: abolishing sin Dr. Kim Hawtrey

Tips on turkey day

it is easy to disregard the purpose of Thanksgiving. There's m o r e to it than consuming a food coma-inducing amount of food and cheering loudly for the football team that some of your relatives despise. This day should be a time for us to pause (beyond the one minute, pre-feast prayer) and r e m e m b e r what we have to be thankful for. I'm guilty of feasting on autopilot, and neglecting to recognize all the blessings

• JUMP, from page 1 Lincoln wanted to fix an official date to promote unity between the N o r t h and South. The history of this holiday and the spirit that it represents make me proud (and thankful!) to be a part of this country. Yeah it's corny, but take a m o m e n t to think about it and you might just agree! 3. Giving thanks Even though it's right in the title of the holiday,

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tion. Disclaimer. The Anchor

within ourselves. The Bible says that Jesus came to save us from the reality of this sin. not by redefining it, but by defeating it on the cross. - • ' This was necessary because we could not save ourselves. Like a beetle on its back that cannot turn itself upright, we are helpless to put right our mistakes. For this reason, the salvation that Jesus came for is an offense to our world. It is a hard pill for us to swallow, because it says we are hopelessly unlike God and incapable of saving ourselves. This is the "offense of the cross": that we are failures who cannot redeem our own

mans 1:18). Even his name—"Jesus"-—encapsulates his saving mission. Fittingly, the announcing angel at the start of Matthew's gospel declares that Mary would give birth to a son and "you are to give him the name Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins" (Matthew 1:21). All the gospels then go on to reiterate the same message: "the Son of M a n came to seek and save what was lost" records Luke (19:10). John the Baptist understood it this way: when he saw Jesus coming toward him he said, "Look, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world" (John 1:29). And Paul agrees: "here is a trustworthy saying that deserves full acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners" (1 Timothy 1:15). Christianity tells us that life, properly understood, is necessarily "forensic" in nature. This means it involves matters of penal law such as guilt, judgment, and acquittal. That there is a courtroom, God's courtroom and inevitably we human beings must traffic in the language of jurisprudence. The salvation that the Bible speaks of is from some-

leisure, he would have sent an entertainer. If what we needed most was money, the Lord would have sent a banker. And if it was better health we needed, he would have supplied a doctor. But none of these popular wishes is why )esus came. Instead, he came for a purpose altogether different: to save sinners. Its a message that is not exactly considered to be the most relevant in this day and age. The problem is that our society has taken the amazing step of abolishing sin. The post-Christian West now alleges that salvation has become irrelevant, that notions such as "hell" and "divine judgment" and "eternal life" have become marginal for modern people. In keeping with this, some have reduced Jesus to a mere personal life coach, a kind of religious version of Oprah. Others see him predominantly as an ethics campaigner, or he is misconstrued as a means to achieving success and prosperity. The mistake involved in all of this is to blur the nature of salvation — or even deny the need for it at all. But

Our Mission: The Anchor

thing objective, a judicial reality — an "unfelt need" — rather than a subjective, felt need that we generate

attempting to abolish sin by defining it away is nothing but a breathtaking display of arrogance by our world. In the end, it will fail. We need another way of abolishing sin. G o d s way. And that is why Jesus and his saving mission had to be. The Bible leaves us with no other possible interpretation of Jesus' mission. The point of the gospel, we are told, is "for the salvation of everyone who believes" (Ro-

It has been said that if our greatest need were technology, God would have sent a scientist. O r if our greatest need had been

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lives. This is halo-shattering in the extreme. It cuts deep into our secret pride in self. Yet that is precisely the moment when salvation becomes effective, when we cast ourselves upon God and his mercy and coming to him by faith: "Nothing in my hands I bring; naked to thy cross I cling" At that moment God declares us righteous. We don't have to try to become good in order to gain acquittal; rather, we are declared righteous by God. The truth is, there is only one way to really abolish sin: through Christ. Classical salvation from old-fashioned sin therefore remains acutely relevant in today's world. It is still the main game.

end of s o m e days, choosing thankfulness instead of bitterness is a daunting challenge. Yet, if we spend less energy complaining, 1 believe that we will become m o r e aware and grateful for the good in our lives. This Thanksgiving, I challenge myself and you to embrace a sincere spirit of thankfulness. Melody encourages you and your friends to get psyched for Thanksgiving by tracing a hand turkey and decorating it with feathers and glitter. at-

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a n d t y p o g r a p h i c a l e r r o r s . However, if s u c h m i s t a k e s occur, this n e w s p a p e r may c a n c e l its c h a r g e s for t h e p o r t i o n of t h e a d if. in t h e p u b l i s h e r ' s reasona b l e j u d g m e n t . t h e a d h a s b e e n r e n d e r e d v a l u e l e s s by t h e m i s t a k e .

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NOVEMBER 2 3 . 2 0 1 1

Project Discussion: What's your discussion?

IN BRIEF G R E E K L I F E COAT D R I V E

Ashley Fraley STAFF W R I T E R

A n e w online a d d i c t i o n h a s hit H o p e . It is different t h a n last year's "Like A Little" obsession. It will get you to s t o p looking at Facebook and Twitter a n d instead check your Project Discussion questions. Project Discussion, develo p e d by H o p e s o p h o m o r e s Hayden Davis a n d Taylor Brushwyler, is a m i x of t h e best parts of Twitter a n d Facebook. It takes t h e quick p o s t s of Twitter and mixes it with t h e interaction of Facebook. It c h a n g e s things u p by having everything in q u e s t i o n format. Users can ask a q u e s t i o n a n d provide o t h e r users a n s w e r s t o c h o s e f r o m . For example, a user would ask, " D o p e o p l e r e s p e c t H o p e College degrees?" and t h e n gave two answers, "yes," and "no." U s e r s click o n w h a t e v er answer t h e y feel is right. T h e user can go back a n d see h o w e v e r y o n e voted. User Taylor Rabbai (15') said, "I use Project Discussion a lot. I used it for class t o ask q u e s t i o n s for projects." W h a t sets Project Discussion a p a r t f r o m o t h e r social m e d i a sites is its interaction with H o p e College. H o p e is a n e t w o r k o n t h e site, b u t t h e site was also created by two H o p e s t u d e n t s . Hope College

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In a d d i t i o n to being w e b developers, Davis and Brushwyler a r e clearly best friends. They are t h e best kind of best friends; they finish each other's s e n t e n c e s and work t o g e t h e r closely o n l a u n c h i n g the site. "Taylor is very smart. Hayden has t h e creative side," said user Barry DeGraaf, or better k n o w n o n Project Discussion as BigBear. "The idea just c a m e t o m e " Davis, an e c o nomics and managem e n t d o u b l e major, said. "I was driving back to Hope from C R E A T I N G T H E N E X T B I G T H I N G - Sophomores Taylor Brushmy h o u s e and I wyler ( l e f t ) and Hayden Davis ( r i g h t ) m i x e d Twitter and Facebook t o w a s o n Twitter c r e a t e P r o j e c t Discussion. The f o r m a t c o n s i s t s e n t i r e l y of q u e s t i o n s with my p h o n e and a n s w e r s s e p a r a t e d by user groups. and t h o u g h t 'I their n e t w o r k . N o w it is used Brushwyler said. They w e n t into bet w e can m a k e s o m e t h i n g like as like a c o m p e t i t i o n a m o n g full swing t o get t h e site u p and this.'" Back o n c a m p u s h e shared friends," Rabbai said. r u n n i n g . They l a u n c h e d t h e site his idea with Brushwyler. The site is n o w o u t of beta and and c o n t i n u e to m a k e it better. " H e c a m e in and said ' D u d e is g r o w i n g every day. Brushwyler " W e d r e w a lot of this stuff u p I got the best idea,'" Brushwyler and Davis t h i n k t h a t is probably o n a w h i t e b o a r d . W e looked at said. F r o m t h e r e Brushwyler, t h e coolest thing. what stuff we liked and t h e n just w h o is a c o m p u t e r science ma"Seeing o t h e r p e o p l e use kept a d d i n g o n stuff," Davis said. jor, s t a r t e d w o r k i n g o n t h e site s o m e t h i n g you c r e a t e d is t h e Since launching th e ir beta with Davis. Davis f o c u s e s o n t h e greatest feeling," Davis said. a b o u t t w o weeks into t h e school business a s p e c t while B r u s h Join t h e discussion at projectyear t h e y have d o n e a lot of imwyler d o e s t h e site p r o proving. T h e y have a d d e d "calldiscussion.com. gramming. ing o u t " a n d even "ranking" for "I had to learn a lot their n e t w o r k . of this stuff o n m y own. "I actually c a m e up with t h e W e don't have a class that just teaches this," idea of r a n k i n g p e o p l e a m o n g

m

MZZZMBZZy

PROJECT

DISCUSSIONS

RISING

FAME

— Hope C o l l e g e ' s user group c o n s i s t s of 1 4 0 m e m bers. The t o t a l a m o u n t of m e m b e r s using P r o j e c t Discussion has risen t o 2 9 4 w i t h 1 2 3 9 q u e s t i o n s .

• COMMUNITY, from page 5 ratings don't always signify good quality, r a t h e r s o m e t i m e s q u i t e the opposite. "Community," a l t h o u g h small in viewers, is large in h e a r t a n d in ambition. The s c o p e of creator D a n H a r m o n ' s vision for his s h o w is staggering: t h e r e are m o r e t h a n e n o u g h e x a m p l e s of e p i s o d e s t h a t should have failed o n p a p e r b u t have t u r n e d into e p i s o d e s w o r t h analyzing and criticizing for years t o come. O n e such e x a m p l e is f o u n d at t h e e n d of season two of "Community." A classic T V episode is t h e "clip show," an episode at t h e e n d of a season w h e r e p r o d u c t i o n is b e h i n d s c h e d u l e a n d to cut costs t h e s h o w will film a small a m o u n t of n e w material a n d intersperse t h e n e w material with highlights, o r "clips" f r o m t h e past season. In a clever reinvention of this classicTVepisode,"Community" had a clip s h o w with entirely n e w material that was a s s u m e d t o have o c c u r r e d over t h e course of a year, a d v e n t u r e s t h a t t h e g r o u p had but that we, t h e viewers, had never seen. It not only had brilliant "clips" of comedy, but it highlighted t h e relationships that had evolved over the c o u r s e of a season in

t h e s a m e way that a typical clip s h o w would. But " C o m m u n i t y ' s " clip s h o w is only o n e e x a m p l e of t h e kind of g e n r e - b e n d i n g that t h e s h o w d o e s so effortlessly, and only o n e of t h e h u n d r e d s of r e a s o n s t h e s h o w n e e d s to r e m a i n o n t h e air. •Dan Harmon and "Community" are fighting against c o m e d y cliches to create an entirely n e w show, a s h o w t h a t pays h o m a g e t o "Cheers," "Cougar Town" a n d "Arrested Development" while still retaining its o w n essence. It's t h e rare c o m e d y that allows its c h a r a c t e r s to evolve past their first season a r c h e t y p e s , a s h o w t h a t isn't afraid t o get serious, or m e a n , or u n c o m f o r t a b l e , just like real life. So, NBC, as a fan and as a lover of quality television, I urge you t o rethink your decision. " C o m m u n i t y " is t h e rare c o m e d y t h a t s h o w c a s e s an e m o t i o n a l , d y n a m i c g r o u p of f r i e n d s trying to figure out their place in t h e world. Its i m p o r t a n c e in t h e c o m e d y world is unparalleled. Save a struggling s h o w for quality's sake, n o t for m o n e y a n d greed. The H u m a n Beings of G r e e n d a l e will t h a n k you for it.

During the week of Nov. 27 to Dec. 4, Greek Life will be collecting coats for the Holland Community Action House. Donations can be new or gently used, so make sure to bring back old coats from Thanksgiving Break. There will be donation boxes located in the Dewitt Center outside the Greek Life office and in every residence hall. HOPE STUDENTS WIN H O N O R S IN S I N G I N G AUDITION

On Nov. 5, three Hope College students earned honors in the National Association of Teachers of Singing Michigan State Chapter Auditions. The auditions were held at Eastern Michigan University. Participants included students from colleges, universities, and high schools throughout Michigan. Sam Horsch (MS) w o n first place in the FirstYear College Men category. Skye Edwards, ('13), earned second place in the Musical Theatre category. Finally, Brent Smith ( ' 1 2 ) won third place in the ThirdYear College M e n category

VOLUNTEER SERVICES SPONSOR FOOD DRIVE

Volunteer Services will b e h o s t i n g a food drive for t h e Holland c o m m u n i t y d u r i n g t h e w e e k of Dec, 5-9, P a r t n e r i n g with St. Francis de Sales C h u r c h , they will be accepting p e a n u t butter, p a s t a of any kind, cereal, and pinto b e a n s . The goal of t h e food drive is to give back in a practical and h e l p f u l m a n n e r this holiday season. The collection will take place after chapel o n Monday, Dec. 5, W e d n e s d a y , Dec. 7, and Friday, Dec. 9. T h e r e will also be a d o n a t i o n c e n t e r o u t s i d e t h e Volunteer Services office all week.

Relay fights cancer with fun • RELAY, from page 1 "It w a s very inspirational t o hear their stories and k n o w t h a t pretty m u c h everyone, in s o m e way, h a s been affected by cancer." The v o l u n t e e r s were provided with f o o d t h r o u g h o u t t h e event. There were also a variety of activities including root b e e r pong, 4-square, b e a n bag toss, a n d hill-billy golf.

"Overall, Relay was a h u g e success," said Clark. T h e event raised $50,663 for t h e A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society. This c o n t r i b u t e s t o t h e total $297,882 t h a t H o p e h a s d o n a t e d since it began in 2003. Even m o r e i m p o r t a n t t h a n t h e m o n e y e a r n e d was the n u m b e r of lives t o u c h e d by t h e event. "I learned so m u c h m o r e about

t h e disease a n d a b o u t certain people. It w a s a great way t o get m o r e involved and a great way t o give back and s h o w gratitude t o w a r d s e v e r y o n e w h o h a s ever b e e n affected," G a l l e m o r e said, "Almost e v e r y o n e you talk t o h a s been t o u c h e d by c a n c e r somehow," said Clark. "Relay is a great t i m e to share these stories a n d to s u p p o r t o n e another."

Gap year opportunities • FAIR, from page 1 AmeriCorps. There a r e also m a n y p r o g r a m s which are focused a r o u n d C h r i s t i a n missionary work either h e r e or abroad. For t h o s e with this interest, t h e r e are volunteer organizations for just a b o u t every Christian d e n o m i n a t i o n . Among the options are o r g a n i z a t i o n s like Mission Year, Youth for Christ, The Dale H o u s e Project, Christian R e f o r m e d

World Missions, Nicaragua Christian Academy, Wycliffe Bible Translators, t h e Jesuit or t h e L u t h e r a n Volunteer C o r p s and t h e M e n n o n i t e Mission Network. Students who attended the fair had very positive reactions a b o u t their f u t u r e p r o sp e c t s, s o m e w h o had never b e f o r e considered a mission trip d u r i n g their gap year c h a n g e d

their m i n d s b e c a u s e of t h e fair. "It really o p e n e d m y m i n d to different opportunities," said O'Sullivan Scimemi. If you did not have a c h a n c e to a t t e n d t h e gap year fair but are interested in s o m e sort of volunteer corps, all of these organizations have websites w h e r e you can get i n f o r m a t i o n and apply to become a volunteer.


THE ANCHOR

Hope teams compete on national stage

T H I S W E E K I N SPORTS

Wednesday Nov. Women's basketball

Bethany Stripp SPORTS EDITOR

Saturday Hockey

1 3 S h o t s by t h e men's occer t e a m in t h e s e c o n d half sectional final game. T h e lad f o u r half. ' N a t e Love's mile :e B in t h e N C A A c h a m p i o n -

Dec. 3

vs. Calvin at Edge Ice A r e n a at 7 p.m.

I N BRIEF MEN'S BASKETBALL REMAINS UNBEATEN

P H O T O COURTESY OF H O P E C O L L E G E P U B L I C R E L A T I O N S

U N D E R C O N T R O L â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tarwo Konbloa ('15) t a k e s t h e ball t h r o u g h t h r e e Luther players in Hope's Nov. 1 8 v i c t o r y In t h e NCAA s e c t i o n a l s e m i f i n a l . Hope w o n t h e g a m e w i t h a 6 - 5 edge In the shootout after two overtimes. A f t e r a thrilling second r o u n d w i n over D o m i n i c a n College o n Nov. 12, t h e men's soccer t e a m advanced t o t h e sectional r o u n d of N C A A play for t h e third t i m e in school history. The Nov. 18 t h i r d r o u n d g a m e pitted H o p e against Luther, w h o received an at-large bid into t h e t o u r n a m e n t a f t e r falling in t h e Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic

By the numbers

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A p p e a r a n c e s by H o p e ' soccer t e a m in t h e sec-j tional finals prior t o Nov. 19

0 : 1 9 Seconds separating Hope's t o p five w o m e n ' s c r o s s c o u n t r y finishers o n Saturday.

C o n f e r e n c e finals. Luther took t h e lead in t h e 35th m i n u t e of Friday's g a m e off a c o r n e r kick, b u t S h a u n Groetsema (12) evened the score in t h e 76th m i n u t e o n a penalty kick. The D u t c h m e n and the N o r s e f r o m Luther r e m a i n e d tied,, t h r o u g h two o v e r t i m e s , after w h i c h t h e g a m e w e n t into penalty kicks. Jason Muller (13), T a r w o Konbloa ( 1 5 ) , Justin R e a m o n (15), a n d M a x DeBoef ( 1 4 ) all scored in t h e s h o o t o u t , b u t f o u r L u t h e r penalty kicks also m a d e it past goalie Logan Neil ( 1 2 ) . In a c c o r d a n c e with N C A A standards, the game then went into a s u d d e n d e a t h s h o o t o u t . Ben L e m m e n ' s ( 1 4 ) shot hit t h e goal post, b u t Neil m a d e t h e save o n Luther's s h o t t o k e e p t h e D u t c h m e n alive. A goal by Luke

D i s h n o w ( 1 3 ) was c o u n t e r e d by a n o t h e r L u t h e r goal. Neil t h e n c a m e o u t of t h e goalie box t o t a k e t h e n i n t h H o p e penalty kick of t h e s h o o t o u t . He got t h e ball past Luther goalie Steve O ' M e a r a a n d successfully blocked t h e next Luther shot to secure Hope's w i n and send t h e D u t c h m e n to t h e N C A A quarterfinals for t h e first t i m e in school history. O n Saturday, t h e D u t c h m e n m e t h o s t O h i o Wesleyan in t h e sectional final game. The Bishops took an early lead, scoring t h r e e m i n u t e s into t h e game. O h i o Wesleyan e x t e n d e d its lead to 2-0 in t h e 53rd m i n u t e . Nicholas H e y b o e r ( 1 4 ) scored o n a h e a d e r in t h e 87th m i n u t e to cut O h i o Wesleyan's lead t o one, b u t t h e D u t c h m e n didn't score in t h e r e m a i n i n g t h r e e m i n u t e s . H o p e finishes its season 17-5-4.

Sailing ends season with Emma Biagioni Memorial Regatta R o b e r t M o r r i s University and a second MSU squad. GUEST WRITER T h e club c o m p e t e s as p a r t M i d w e s t Collegiate The H o p e College Sailing of t h e Sailing A s s o c i a tio n and had Club e n d e d its fall season by four s c h e d u l e d regattas this fall. hosting college sailing t e a m s f r o m a r o u n d t h e M i d w e s t for a The club traveled t o A n n Arbor, final regatta n a m e d in h o n o r of a W e s t e r n Michigan University and Madison, Wis. for earlier past member. races. The E m m a Biagioni M e m o r i a l M We finished in a b o u t t h e Regatta, held O c t . 29 at Holland's middle of t h e fleet in the first M a c a t a w a Bay Yacht Club, was three," Scott Brandonisio ( 1 3 ) n a m e d for E m m a Biagioni (11), said. an avid sailing club m e m b e r . The club has b o t h a fall and She died in a plane crash at spring season a n d is o p e n t o Holland's Tulip City A i r p o r t o n a n y o n e w h o would like to try Jan. 17, 2010, along with David their h a n d at sailing. Otai (12). " W e will t a k e a n y o n e n o m a t t e r In addition t o h o n o r i n g a what their previous experience. fellow sailor, t h e m e m o r i a l race If you c o m e out, we'll teach you m a r k e d a successful end to t h e h o w t o sail," Brandonisio said. "I club's season. had never sailed in m y life. T h e n Hope's first t e a m finished I saw t h e club at t h e activity fair fifth in t h e regatta while Hope's my f r e s h m a n year, gave it a try, second squad took sixth. and I have g o n e to every practice Michigan State's first t e a m w o n since." t h e regatta, followed by W e s t e r n The core of t h e sailing club Michigan, Purdue, M i a m i of is m a d e up of a b o u t 10 to Ohio, t h e t w o H o p e squads. Alex Porter

30

vs. K a l a m a z o o at 7 : 3 0 p . m .

Thirty-six Hope College student athletes had the o p p o r t u n i t y t o c o m p e t e at s o m e of t h e highest levels of college s p o r t s last w e e k e n d as t h e men's soccer t e a m c o m p e t e d in N C A A sections and w o m e n ' s cross c o u n t r y and men's r u n n e r N a t e Love ( 1 2 ) headed t o Wisconsin t o race in t h e N C A A National Championship meet. Eight of Hope's cross c o u n t r y r u n n e r s c o m p e t e d in O s h k o s h , Wis. Saturday at t h e N C A A Division III C h a m p i o n s h i p m e e t . Love qualified after finishing in 13th at t h e regional m e e t o n Nov. 12. The women's s q u a d b r o u g h t seven r u n n e r s after t h e t e a m qualified with a third place finish at regionals. Sheri M c C o r m a c k (' 14) led t h e Flying D u t c h at nationals with a 79th place finish, c o m p l e t i n g t h e 6K race in 22:24.63. Kelly Lufkin (12), M e r e d i t h B u s m a n (14), Camille Borst (14), Kate Nelson (12), Salome E m m a n u e l ( 1 2 ) , a n d Taylor Mattarella ( 1 3 ) also finished for H o p e . The D u t c h finished 21st overall o u t of a field of 32 t e a m s . Love e n d e d his H o p e College cross c o u n t r y c a r e e r with an 81st place finish o u t of 279 r u n n e r s . Love ran a 25:09 8K, 15 s e c o n d s faster t h a n his t i m e at regionals.

meet

11

15 m e m b e r s ( b o t h m e n and women) who consistently practice and participate in t h e races. However, o n any given day, normally d e p e n d e n t o n h o w nice t h e w e a t h e r is, u p t o 30 p e o p l e attend practice. "Right n o w in t h e club we have people all over t h e s p e c t r u m , f r o m leisurely m e m b e r s to p e o p l e w h o w a n t to race and are a bit m o r e serious," M a t t h e w Rybar ( 1 3 ) said. Senior Jeff H a r r i s o n (12), w a s o n e of m a n y casual m e m b e r s w h o only m a d e it o u t to a f e w practices, but he still t h o r o u g h l y e n j o y e d his t i m e s p e n t with t h e club. "The sailing club was m a d e up of s o m e cool kids; we didn't have a super w i n d y fall b u t going out and sailing o n Lake M a c a t a w a w a s still a lot of fun. W e ' r e blessed to have t h a t resource so close to us at Hope," H a r r i s o n said. In season, t h e club generally practices for t h r e e h o u r s o n

Lake M a c a t a w a f r o m M o n d a y to Thursday, taking Fridays off and t h e n having regattas o n Saturdays. M e m b e r s can c h o o s e w h e n they w a n t to go t o practice, as it is not m a n d a t o r y t o go every day. The t e a m is mainly led by s t u d e n t s , and t h e m o r e experienced sailors teach n e w c o m e r s w h o are trying to learn the basics of sailing. This year t h e club w e l c o m e d physics professor Paul DeYoung as its first coach. "It was great to have C o a c h DeYoung this year; h e w a s an experienced presence o u t t h e r e o n t h e water," Brandonisio said. W i t h t h e fall season complete, s t u d e n t s interested in sailing should consider joining t h e club spring semester. The spring season is s h o r t e r and is mostly for f u n as t h e r e are n o regattas. "It's a good way to s p e n d s o m e t i m e o u t o n t h e w a t e r and get away f r o m school and classes for a while," Rybar said.

The men's basketball t e a m c o n t i n u e d t o build o n its seas o n - o p e n i n g success o n Saturday, t r i u m p h i n g over Spring A r b o r 78-56 in a n o n c o n f e r e n c e m a t c h u p . T h e D u t c h m e n started strong with a basket by N a t e S n u g g e r u d ( 1 3 ) 31 s e c o n d s into t h e g a m e and m a i n t a i n e d its lead t h r o u g h o u t t h e game. Snuggerud led H o p e in scoring for t h e second g a m e in a row, adding 18 p o i n t s to t h e team's total. Peter Bunn ('12)-and Billy Seiler ( 1 3 ) also s c o r e d in t h e d o u b l e digits, p u t t i n g up 13 a n d 11 points, respectively. Snuggerud pulled d o w n nine b o a r d s d u r i n g t h e g a m e to lead t h e D u t c h m e n in r e b o u n d s . B u n n had eight reb o u n d s and Josh Holwerda ( 1 3 ) grabbed seven t o c o n t r i b u t e to Hope's overall 40 r e b o u n d s c o m . pared to Spring Arbor's 33. The D u t c h m e n will be b^ck in action at C o r n e r s t o n e U n i ^ r s i t y in t h e Hall of Fame Classic t h e weekend after Thanksgiving. H O P E L E A D S IN C O M M I S S I O N E R ' S CUP

Hope College currently holds the lead in the annual competition for the M1AA commissoner's cup. After the fall season, Hope has earned 103 points. Calvin is in second with 81 points. M I A A schools earn points based on where teams finish in the conference. Hope finished in first or second in seven of the eight fall sports. W O M E N ' S BASKETBALL SPLITS T O U R N A M E N T

The w o m e n ' s basketball t e a m suffered its first loss of t h e season o n Nov. 18, falling 53-62 to Capital, Ohio, in t h e M o u n t St. Joseph tipoff t o u r n a m e n t . M a d die B u r n e t t ( 1 2 ) p u t up an impressive offensive effort in t h e loss, scoring 22 points for t h e Flying D u t c h . Liz Ellis ( 1 3 ) followed in scoring with 12. Burnett and M e r e d i t h Kussmaul ( 1 3 ) both had five r e b o u n d s in t h e game. T h e D u t c h r e t u r n e d to its w i n n i n g ways in t h e t o u r n a ment's consolation g a m e against h o s t M o u n t St. Joseph, t r i u m p h ing 81-66. Allie C e r o n e ( 1 2 ) t o o k t e a m high scoring h o n o r s with 17 points. Ashley B a u m a n ( 1 3 ) led t h e t e a m in r e b o u n d s with 7. The D u t c h take o n Aquin a s o n Nov. 26.


12

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

NOVEMBER 2 3 , 2 0 1 1

Basketball set to excite, starts seasons strong James Rogers ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Basketball returned to H o p e College o n Nov. 15 with t h e men's and w o m e n ' s t e a m s o p e n i n g their seasons against Rochester. C o m i n g off a 23-7 (12-2 M I A A ) record f r o m a year ago, t h e men's t e a m r e t u r n s 10 players f r o m last season's roster. Last year t h e D u t c h m e n were M I A A c h a m p i o n s and clinched a b e r t h in t h e N C A A t o u r n a m e n t in head coach M a t t Neil's first year at t h e h e l m . This year's s q u a d is c o - c a p t a i n e d by N a t e King ('12), David K r o m b e e n ('12), and Logan Neil ('12). K r o m b e e n was selected to t h e All-MIAA s e c o n d t e a m last

year after leading t h e c o n f e r e n c e in steals per g a m e (3.29) and finishing second in assists (5.36 pg)H o p e also has senior Peter B u n n back for t h e 2011-2012 c a m p a i g n . Bunn w a s sidelined all of last s e a s o n with illness after he led t h e t e a m in scoring his j u n i o r year ('09-'10) at 16.1 per g a m e and was selected as an All-MIAA first teamer. A h u g e a d d i t i o n to t h e t e a m will b e N a t e V a n A r e n d o n k ('14). He t r a n s f e r r e d f r o m Division I C e n t r a l Michigan to play ball for t h e D u t c h m e n . Listed at 6 foot 10 inches a n d 255 p o u n d s , V a n A r e n d o n k is e x p e c t e d t o m a k e an i m m e d i a t e i m p a c t o n t h e t e a m at t h e c e n t e r / f o r w a r d position. T h r e e s o p h o m o r e s have m a d e

P H O T O BY A N N

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the t e a m after playing JV ball last year. C o d y Campbell, Craig Toren and G r a n t Neil will join VanArendonk.to round out the varsity representatives f r o m t h e class of 2014. S t e p h e n W i t t e n b a c h ('15) will b e t h e only Flying D u t c h m a n fresh o u t of high school to play o n the team. Wittenbach graduated f r o m Forest Hills Central and s t a n d s 6 foot 4 inches. Hope's returning l e t t e r w i n n e r s include C h a s e D e M a a g d ('13), Josh Holwerda ('13), C o l t o n O v e r w a y ('13), C h r i s Ray ('13), Billy Seiler ('13), and N a t e Snuggerud ('13). O n Nov. 30, t h e D u t c h m e n will face an N C A A Division I o p p o n e n t for t h e first t i m e since 1991. T h e y will travel to K a l a m a z o o to t a k e o n W e s t e r n Michigan University. The D u t c h m e n opened up this season with a 63-45 h o m e win against Rochester. Snuggerud p o s t e d a double-double, totaling 26 p o i n t s and 13 r e b o u n d s o n 12-15 shooting. Bunn was just shy of a d o u b l e - d o u b l e with eight points M A R I E PAPARELLI and 11 boards.

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P H O T O BY A U S T I N T I M Y A N

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O n t h e w o m e n ' s side, t h e Flying D u t c h lost four starters f r o m last season, including AllA m e r i c a n Carrie Snikkers. The w o m e n carried a 2 7 - 3 record (15-1 M I A A ) last season and lost in an N C A A t o u r n a m e n t Regional final. H e a d coach Brian M o r e h o u s e is n o w in his 16th season at H o p e a n d is leading a t e a m with just t w o seniors o n t h e 14-player roster. Those two seniors, Allie C e r o n e and M a d d i e B u r n e t t , are joined by Liz Ellis ('13) and M e r e d i t h Kussmaul ('13) to m a k e up t h e c a p t a i n s for t h e 2011r2012 season. Ellis w a s n a m e d the -MIAA Defensive Player of t h e Year and m a d e t h e A l l - M I A A s e c o n d t e a m last season.

Other returning letterwinners are Ashley Bauman ('13), C o u r t n e y Kust (13), and Katie O v e r w a y ('14). Three sophomores who played JV a n d t h r e e incoming f r e s h m e n are the n e w faces to the team. Anna Kaufmann ('14), M e g a n Kelley ('14), and Kristen Slotman ('14) are t h e s o p h o m o r e s and H a n n a h Doell ( 1 5 ) , Rebekah Llorens (15), and Liz Siepker ( 1 5 ) make up t h e freshmen. The w o m e n a r e 2 - 1 o n t h e season, beating Rochester (8436) a n d M o u n t St. Joseph (8166) and losing to Capital, O h i o (62-53). The t h r e e - p o i n t e r s are d r o p p i n g for Hope, totaling 2 5 in t h e first t h r e e g a m e s of t h e season.

Hope goaltender has no problem putting team on his back saves, I find a g r o o v e and ride

Chris Ray GUEST WRITER

it."

W h e n Dave Nowicki ( 1 2 ) is in t h e crease in f r o n t of t h e net, his f o c u s never w a n d e r s . He sees t h e puck, locates o p p o s i n g players w h o could be t h r e a t s to score a n d deflects or traps any shot that c o m e s his way. After all, t h e All-American goaltender for the Flying D u t c h m e n hockey t e a m a n c h o r s a squad t h a t h a s reached t h e national c h a m p i o n s h i p t h e past t w o seasons. Nowicki k n o w s t h a t o n e m e n t a l lapse could h u r t his entire t e a m . "The only thing I f o c u s o n is t h e game," Nowicki said. "As soon as I think a b o u t s o m e t h i n g o t h e r t h a n t h e g a m e , I lose f o c u s and m a k i n g saves b e c o m e s m o r e difficult. But as I play and m a k e

So far this season, Nowicki has b e e n in quite t h e groove for t h e u n d e f e a t e d hockey t e a m . W i t h his individual target t o m a i n t a i n a goals against average of below 2.00 and have a save p e r c e n t a g e of 9 3 p e r c e n t or better, he h a s his h o p e s set high for not only himself, but for t h e t e a m as well. A f t e r c o m i n g within a g a m e of w i n n i n g a national c h a m p i o n s h i p t h e past t w o seasons, Nowicki w a n t s to get over t h e h u m p this season. . " C o m i n g so close t o w i n n i n g gives m e m o t i v a t i o n to i m p r o v e a n d give t h e t e a m t h e best c h a n c e at w i n n i n g every game," Nowicki said. "I c o n t i n u e d to work o u t off t h e ice this s u m m e r and tried to t o u c h t h e ice at least o n c e a week."

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K n o w n as "Wicki" by his t e a m m a t e s , Nowicki is respected and liked o n and off t h e ice. His consistency in g a m e s a n d his f o c u s e d d e m e a n o r has c a u g h t t h e attention of alternate c a p t a i n A n d r e w Haggerty (12). "Nowicki is t h e best goalie I've ever played for," Haggerty said. "It's just incredible t o b e c o n f i d e n t that, regardless of t h e situation, we've always got solid g o a l t e n d i n g that's going to keep t h e puck out of t h e net." G r o w i n g u p in Littleton, Colo., Nowicki did n o t always play goaltender. H e started his hockey career as a d e f e n s e m a n b e f o r e m a k i n g t h e switch t o goalie, t h e position he has played for t h e past 14 years. W h e n it c a m e t o college, Nowicki w a n t e d to travel away f r o m h o m e and try s o m e t h i n g new, a n d H o p e c a u g h t his a t t e n t i o n early for various reasons. "I c h o s e H o p e b e c a u s e it was an academically challenging school, and it w a s different f r o m t h e large universities," Nowicki said. "I f o u n d out that H o p e had a hockey t e a m and it solidified my choice." Since Nowicki arrived o n Hope's c a m p u s , h e has b e e n o n e of the best goalies in t h e program's histroy. His overall r e c o r d d u r i n g his t i m e is 46-122-3, with a total of nine s h u t o u t s , only two b e h i n d t h e all-time leader. His r e p u t a t i o n o n t h e ice gives his t e a m and coach confidence, even w h e n t i m e s a r e

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D E F E N S I V E — N o w i c k i has been c r u c i a l t o Hope's success so far t h i s season and has a career record of 4 6 - 1 1 - 2 .

tough. "Having great goaltenders m a k e s all t h e difference," coach C h r i s V a n T i m m e r m a n said. "A t e a m is going t o m a k e mistakes a n d to have our g o a l t e n d e r s back there a d d s confidence. Nowicki is cool, c a l m and collected in all situations a n d guys read that and feed off that." The t e a m m o t t o for t h e season is, "Burn t h e boats," taken f r o m t h e story of H e r n a n Cortes and the Spanish c o n q u e r i n g t h e A z t e c empire, signifying t h e C o n q u i s t a d o r s intent o n not leaving t h e battle until t h e Aztecs had fallen. The t e a m w a n t s to use this story as a way t o tell each o t h e r they

will not q u i t until they finish t h e j o b of w i n n i n g a national c h a m p i o n s h i p . C o m i n g so close t o a national c h a m p i o n s h i p two years in a row h a s m o t i v a t e d Nowicki and t h e rest of t h e team. "Everything we d o f r o m h e r e o n out is a reflection t o w a r d s nationals in Atlantic City, NJ.," Nowicki said. "We have a solid t e a m this year and expect to do well." W i t h Nowicki leading the way for t h e hockey team, c o m e M a r c h 17, t h e Flying D u t c h m e n may b e b u r n i n g s o m e b o a t s of their o w n and winning a national championship.

11-23-2011