11-19-1965

Page 1

anc or OPE COLLEGE

$ C c c i ^ :

OLLAND, MICHiOAN

Special Edition — November 19, 1965

Viet Conference: Saturday Importance SINCE:

Vietnam m a y lead to l a r g e - s c a l e conflict. Any s t u d e n t m a y c o m e involved.

suddenly

be-

A citizen h a s the r i g h t to know m o r e t h a n w h a t n e s w p a p e r s relate. A citizen questions.

may

desire

to

ask

A citizen m a y f r a n k l y d e s i r e to challenge U.S. i n v o l v e m e n t . THEREFORE: The S e n a t e r e c o g n i z e s the stud e n t ' s i n t e r e s t s a n d will p r o v i d e a c o n f e r e n c e to p r o v i d e for t h e m

State Department Sends Speaker R e p r e s e n t i n g the United S t a t e s ' S t a t e D e p a r t m e n t , M r . Dolf Droge will speak at H o p e ' s c o n f e r e n c e on Vietnam. Mr. Droge h a s h a d firsth a n d e x p e r i e n e in V i e t n a m as a c o r r e s p o n d e n t to t h a t country with the Voice of A m e r i c a . T h e VOA, as s u b o r d i n a t e of the United S t a t e s I n f o r m a t i o n A g e n c y , is the radio voice of our nation to people around the world. With an a u d i e n c e of 17 to 26 million a d a y , it is considered an influential f a c t or in foreign r e l a t i o n s . " M r . Droge can be e x p e c t e d to p r e s e n t and s u p p o r t the governm e n t position," c o m m e n t e d Dick Shiels, co-ordinator of the conference. " T h e q u e s t i o n - a n s w e r period should be i n v a l u a b l e to those who wish to question o r challenge o u r involvement."

The V i e t n a m C o n f e r e n c e a t Hope on N o v e m b e r 20, will f e a t u r e a visit b y D r . Wesley F i s h e l of Michigan S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y . MSU w a s selected to advise t h e Diem r e g i m e on the building of a gove r n m e n t a l o r g a n i z a t i o n . M u c h of the c r e d i t f o r M S U ' s selection w a s given to D r . F i s h e l , r e f e r r e d to by a V i e t n a m e s e n e w s p a p e r as the m o s t " i n " m a n in South V i e t n a m d u r i n g the m i d 1950's. Dr. Fishel a t t a i n e d a liason with t h e chief-ofs t a t e and is said to h a v e had a closer link with the V i e t n a m e s e g o v e r n m e n t t h a n m a n y of the U.S.'s official r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s while the p r e s e n t situation w a s taking shape. The Michigan S t a t e operation in V i e t n a m which involved 54 prof e s s o r s a t t e m p t e d to g e a r the gove r n m e n t to a solution of t h e serious social p r o b l e m s confronting it. A b l u e p r i n t for g o v e r n m e n t a l p r o g r e s s w a s laid out, b u t n e v e r b e c a m e r e a l i t y . T h e f a i l u r e for this is said to be one of t h e m a i n f a c t o r s r e s p o n s i b l e for the eventual toppling of t h e Diem r e g i m e and the r e s u l t i n g period of political flux and g e n e r a l instability leading to p r e s e n t U.S. involvement. A m a j o r a r e a which t h e Michigan State o p e r a t i o n c o n c e r n e d itself with was a police s y s t e m which eventually evolved into a political e n f o r c e m e n t a g e n c y . Involved in this a r e a of i n t e r n a l and e x t e r n a l diplomatic force and intrigue, the MSU g r o u p is p u r p o r t e d to h ave b e c o m e involved with organizations s i m i l a r to the C.I.A. Through the M S U group, t h e U.S. is said to h a v e built up its influence in V i e t n a m in a m i l i t a r y s e n s e u n d e r the cover of a simple advisory o r g a n i z a t i o n . E x p e r i e n c e d in V i e t n a m e s e aff a i r s by such i n v o l v e m e n t . Dr. Fishel will s p e a k on the question, "Why a r e w e in V i e t n a m ? "

N

$

SOUTH VIETNAM — The Viet Cong is kifluencial throughout the entire country. The shaded area indicates a VC stronghold.

CONFERENCE AGENDA 0:30

12:00 12:15

M o r n i n g Session College C h a p e l Opening Remarks B a c k g r o u n d to V i e t n a m Speaker: Dolf D r o g e Voice ol A m e r i c a C o r r e s p o n d e n t Q u es i i o n - A n s wer Peri od Lunch Break P r e p a r a t i o n for A f t e r n o o n Session Van R a a k e S t u d e n t - l e d Discussions F o r m a t i o n of Q u e s t i o n s for O f f i c i a l s

1:15

A f t e r n o o n Session College C h a p e l Speaker: Dr. Wesley Fishel Past Advisor to P r e m i e r D i e m P r o f . Political Science, MSU Question-Answer Period

3:00

Adjournment


r

anc or OPE COLLEGE

Conference on Vietnam Tomorrow Sponsored by NSA

OLLAND, MICHIGAN

£ c c c i ^

Hope College anchor

78th ANNIVERSARY — 10

November 19, 1965

Vietnam Conference Opens Here Tomorrow Fishel and Droge, Vietnam Authorities, Will Headline Saturday's NSA Conference T o m o r r o w a student conference on Vietnam will occur on c a m p u s , featuring two s p e a k e r s who h a v e first-hand knowledge of the Vietn a m crisis. T h e c o n f e r e n c e agenda also includes question-and-answer sessions and discussions of American policy toward the highlighted Southeast Asian country.

T H E HURTER'—Female agent 007 (Dave Baas) Is pleased with the results of the 'hurter's' machine as shown by the results in the cage (Joe! Monsma).

Praters Will Romp With Frolics Tonight The F r a t e r n a l Society will present the first of two p e r f o r m a n c e s of the " F r a t e r F r o l i c s " tonight at 8 p.m. at the Women's Literary Club. This y e a r ' s presentation, "Television." is under the direction of Rueben Archilla and D a v e B a a s and will provide an inside look at some favoriteT.V. p r o g r a m s . The p r o g r a m s will include "The H u r l e r , " directed by P a t E a m a n ; " S h i n d i g . " d i r e c t r d by Rueben Archilla and Dave Baas, and featuring the original A-GO-GO <-!iis: " D a y in C o u r t , " directed t)> Bill Hill; "Yogi B e a r , " directed by Chris Buy<s, and s t a r r i n g Regin-

Romney

ald the Regional R a n g e r ; "FridayNight at the 'Movies: The Adventures of D r a c u l a , " directed by Gene P e a r s o n ; and " T h e N e w s , " directed by Phil R a u w e r d i n k and Ken Walz. Assistant d i r e c t o r s a r e Chris Buys and Bill Hill; s t a g e director is Ade vSlikkers; Dennis F a r m e r is business m a n a g e r ; Bill Mills is in c h a r g e of tickets; F r a n k Lundell is in c h a r g e of p r o g r a m s ; and publicity is under the m a n a g e m e n t of Dennis Oehm. Tickets can he purchased at the door lor $.75. All proceeds will go to a charity organization.

The conference is being sponsored by the National Student Assn. Commenting on the significance of t o m o r r o w ' s p r o g r a m , Student Senate P r e s i d e n t Wes Michaelson said, " I t is most important that we get a l a r g e p e r c e n t a g e of the student body out Saturday. This could be one of the biggest things on c a m p u s for s e v e r a l years." The conference will consist of two s e p a r a t e sessions, each centered around one of the two m a i n speakers. The morning session, scheduled for 10:30 in the Chapel, will center around Dolfin Droge, a r e p r e s e n t a tive of the United States Department of State. Mr. Droge is a correspondent for the Voice of America. a subordinate agency of the U.S. Intelligence Agency. The express purpose of the VOA is to present U.S. policy to people of other nations. Mr. Droge's work has recently taken him to Vietnam. The VOA correspondent is expected to defend the official policies of our government. Droge will a d d r e s s attending students and answer any questions on issues the students might wish to raise. The morning session will also

Tour a Success

R o m n e y B a c k s V i e t n a m Policy Michigan Governor George M. •Romney gave his s t a m p of approval to the U.S. g o v e r n m e n t policy toward Vietnam in a Detroit speech last Tuesday. The Republican governor, who h a s just returned f r o m a tour of the F a r E a s t and Vietnam, spoke for the Student L e a d e r ' s S u m m i t Conference, which was attended by nine Hope students. The conf e r e n c e , held at the Univ. of Detroit, was televised live by Michigan television stations and attended by delegates f r o m thirty colleges and universities in Michigan and Ontario. In his thirty-minute speech. Gov. Romney elaborated on his conviction t h a t the U.S. involvement in the V i e t n a m e s e conflict is a m o r a l one. "I h a v e no question that what w e ' r e doing in South Vietnam is morally right, and essential to the f r e e d o m and prog r e s s of the w o r l d , " he said. Romney- sought f u r t h e r to conv i n c e his audience that the struggle in V i e t n a m is not civil and t h a t the Viet Cong a r e not r e p r e s e n t a tive of a popular uprising. He called the w a r " a n e f f o r t on the part of North V i e t n a m to terrorize the people of South Vietnam, who w a n t to be f r e e . " He classified the Viet Cong activities as " p a r t of an international conspiracy to impose terror."

Romney illustrated Vietnamese a c c e p t a n c e of A m e r i c a ' s role in the w a r by telling of native friendliness toward A m e r i c a n s , of the failure of the South Vietnamese to obey the Viet Cong call for a general strike and of the fact that Viet Cong desertions a r e increasing. "Without the help of North Vietnam, the Viet Cong would be a bandit g r o u p , " he said. The Michigan Governor applauded the troop m o r a l e which he observed in V i e t n a m , calling it " t e r r i f i c . " "They c a n ' t understand the demonstrations h e r e , " he said. Romney w a r n e d that the outcome of the w a r depends on the attitude of A m e r i c a n s both here and in Vi e t n a m . "Any lack of m o r a l e will prolong the conflict," he said. Romney said t h a t the aim of the U.S. g o v e r n m e n t is " t o assist the g o v e r n m e n t of South V i e t n a m in achieving a w o r k a b l e settlement and to seek to end the aggression without t h r e a t e n i n g the existence of North Vietnam or spreading the w a r . " He added that the w a r should be mainly confined within South Vietnamese b o r d e r s and that the m i l i t a r y effort should be defensive in c h a r a c t e r . Following his a d d r e s s ,Romney a n s w e r e d questions submitted to him by the delegates. During this t i m e he called for cancelling foreign aid to nations aiding North

include a review of .American involvement in V i e t n a m by J a c k Schrier, regional c h a i r m a n of NSA. Dr. Wesley Fishel will be the focal point of the afternoon session, which begins at 1:45 p . m . Dr. Fishel, a professor of ipolitical science at Michigan State University, has s e r v e d in varied official capacities related to Vietn a m since 1954. He f o r m e r l y served as special adviser to President Ngo Dinh Diem and has visited Vietnam as c h a i r m a n of the American F r i e n d s of Vietnam as recently as last August. The author of a n u m b e r of books on Vietnam, he is presently the advisory editor for Southeast Asia for the Encyclopedia International. Dr. Fishel will speak f r o m his e x p e r i e n c e s on the topic: "Why a r e we in V i e t n a m ? " He also will take t i m e for questions. The conference will conclude with an opportunity to re-question either or both of the two s p e a k e r s . To insure intelligent questioning f r o m the student body*, conference p a r t i c i p a n t s will spend forty-five m i n u t e s between sessions in meetings with student discussion leaders, to raise and develop questions to be submitted. The two s p e a k e r s will attend a banquet with several m e m b e r s of the faculty at noon. F i n a n c e s for bringing both speakers, to raise and develop quesby the Michigan region of NSA. T h e r e f o r e delegates f r o m each of the seven other NSA - affiliated schools in the region have been invited to the conference. The Voice of America, primarily a broadcasting a r m of the governm e n t , intends to cover the entire conference p r o g r a m and h a s requested the facilities of WTAS to tape speeches, discussions and ext e m p o r a n e o u s c o m m e n t s by the faculty. Mr. Ray K a r b a c k e r , a

DR. WESLEY FISHEL second r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of VOA, will b e present on c a m p u s for that purpose. "Both Droge and Fishel can be expected to present and defend g o v e r n m e n t policy," stated Dick Shiels, coordinator of the conference. " T h e r e f o r e , there will be opportunity both for s t u d e n t s to be informed on our latest official policies and actions and for those students who wish to challenge the g o v e r n m e n t policy to do so." M r . Droge received his bachelor's degree f r o m Wittenberg College as a political science m a j o r in 1950 and his m a s t e r ' s degree f r o m Western Reserve University in 1951. He h a s served in the F a r E a s t with the USAF, h a s been with the USIA in Thailand and Laos, and in E a s t e r n E u r o p e as a state d e p a r t m e n t official. Presently, he is assigned to the Voice of America Vietnam Desk as Chief of Vietn a m e s e Service.

Welmers of Aerospace To Lecture Here Nov. 30 Dr. E v e r e t t T. W e l m e r s of t h e A e r o s p a c e Corp. will a d d r e s s Hope College in the T u e s d a y assembly of Nov. 30 at 10:30 a . m . in Dimnent Chapel. Dr. W e l m e r s holds an A.B. degree f r o m Hope in m a t h e m a t i c s and the classics, and A.M. and P h . D d e g r e e s in m a t h e m a t i c s and a s t r o n o m y f r o m the University of Michigan. He has been assistant p r o f e s s o r of m a t h e m a t i c s at Michigan State U n i v e r s i t y and a professional l e c t u r e r at the University of Buffalo.

ROMNEY

ON

VIETNAM

Gov. Romney put approval on policies

in

Vietnam

in

his

speech in Detroit Tuesday. Vietnam. He called B a r r y Goldw a t e r ' s advocation for a complete economic blocade of t h e North "too s i m p l e . " Representing Hope College as delegates w e r e Cathy Vander Linde, Barbara Timmer, Wes Michaelson, Dick Shiels, Neal Sobania, Menno K r a a i , J a c k Shrier, Glen P o n t i e r and P a u l Verduin.

operations, the rently holds.

position

he

cur-

He h a s spoken before m a n y education, industrial and civic groups and to m a n y technical societies on subj ect s r e l a t e d to dyn a m i c s , c o m p u t e r s , applied mathe m a t i c s , flight testing, operations analysis, reliability and aerospace systems.

Since late 1960 h e h a s been at Aerospace Corp. He has participated in a n u m b e r of special study groups for the D e a r t m e n t of Defense, including P r o j e c t Lincoln and P r o j e c t Starlight. E a r l y in 1964. the results of e a r l i e r study e f f o r t s on m a n n e d satellite s y s t e m s w e r e sufficiently significant t h a t a cornorate reorganization established the Manned S v s t e m s Division, with responsibilities for space boosters used for m a n n e d missions, m a n n e d orbiting l a b o r a t o r i e s and m a n n e d m i l i t a r y missions. Dr. Welmers b e c a m e a s s i s t a n t to the vice president a n d g e n e r a l m a n a g e r of t h e division, responsible for technical

DR. EVERETT T. WELMERS


Page 2

November 19. 19C5

Hope CeUege anchor

Programmed

Christ in Temporal Fact Is Vander Lugt's Talk

Method Studied

D e H a a n E n d s 2-yr. Project By George Arwady

DR. WILLIAM VANDER LUGT "Hhgh Points of the H u m a n S p i r i t " is the title of a lecture which Dr. William VanderLugt, Dean of the College, will present next Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in G r a v e s auditorium. The a d d r e s s is the second in the Centennial Series on Eduation. In previewing his lecture. Dr. V a n d e r Lugt said, " I n the l e c t u r e I hope to indicate that there is a doctrine of objective value in class-

ical education before the Christian e r a , and that the Christian e r a accepted this objectivity and illuminated it by attaching e t e r n a l significance to concrete t e m p o r a l events." "Christianity h a s e n a b l e d u s , " he continued, " t o r e a d superior expressions of m e a n i n g into common m a t t e r s . Knowledge of m a n and of the universe take on d e e p e r m e a n i n g when considered in the light of Christian faith. In t h e incarnation God unveiled in J e s u s Christ the truth which f r e e s us f r o m meaningless existence. A liberal education does not r e a c h its goal unless something of e t e r n a l g r e a t n e s s is seen in the p a s s a g e of t e m p o r a l fact. T h e response to the incarnation cannot be m a d e in t e r m s of discursive t r u t h only — it calls for worship and a life of devotion — high points of the human spirit." Dr. Vander Lugt w a s b o r n in the Netherlands, received his A.B. d e g r e e f r o m Calvin College and his M.A. and 'Ph.D. f r o m the University of Michigan. The dean will meet informally with interested faculty and students in the P r e s i d e n t ' s R o o m of G r a v e s Hall a f t e r the lecture.

A f t e r two y e a r s of r e s e a r c h into the p r o g r a m m e d method of teaching, Dr. Robert De Haan, head of the education d e p a r t m e n t , is concluding his c o m p r e h e n s i v e study and formulating s o m e interesting conclusions. The basic concept of the prog r a m is that of an educational sequence p r e p a r e d in a p a r t i c u l a r subject with an e x a c t objective in m i n d . It brings the scientific method into the classroom for the s a k e of efficiency. For e x a m p l e , the p r e p a r a t i o n and f o r m a t of a p r o g r a m in math would b e similar to this: F i r s t the author of the p r o g r a m decides on the e x a c t objective of the course—let us s a y he w a n t s to

teach the technique of rounding-ofr n u m b e r s . The author cites e x a m ples of correct technique for each s t a g e of the rounding-off process. Then, a f t e r each e x a m p l e , the p r o g r a m explains the concept behind the e x a m p l e and quizzes the student on the concept. The prog r a m methodically spins a web of c a r e f u l l y explained e x a m p l e s and concepts until the o b j e c t i v e ^ h a s been reached. Dr. De H a a n ' s r e s e a r c h into this field has involved the e x p e r i m e n t a l implementation of p r o g r a m m e d m a t e r i a l s in the various schools of the Great Lakes Colleges Assn. A c a r e f u l study is m a d e of e a c h p r o g r a m as it is being developed and its d e g r e e of success is estimated.

One of the interesting features peculiar to Dr. De Haan's study in this area is the work being done in programming both the arts and the sciences. Traditionally, programs tend to be written in areas such as math and science where specific objectives can be more easily isolated. However, Dr. De Haan believes that there is no limit on such programs. The area that a program can cover is limited only by the genius of its author. Among the programs currently being studied are those involving such aesthetic areas as poetry. Various Conclusions Tentative conclusions of the research project are in several veins. Research indicates that programming is a form of teaching which is highly successful in explaining a technical point of detail to a student. Its efficiency in specific detailed areas surpasses that of a normal course which gives a broader, less-confined picture of a course. However, there are drawbacks to the program as well. Preparing the program is often a slow painstaking task for the author. If entire courses were programmed, indications are that over a long period of time the set routine and restrained range of classroom freedom would eventually tend to bore both instructor and pupil.

Fris'

Thus classes based solely on programs would not s e e m to be feasible, for although an objective could be reached, too high a price would be paid in classroom apathy.

EVERYTHING FOR SCHOOL

Future Programs Plus CO-ED DONATES BLOOD—Jan Boersma donates blood to the fourth

Western Michigan's Largest Greeting Card Department

APO-sponsored project. Each participating student contributed one pint, giving Hope a total of 297 pints. The Red Cross will present a

Yes, we carry the complete line of

trophy to the w'nner of the Albion-Hope challenge—the probable victor being Albion. The fraternity contest is very close with approxi-

Swingline Staplers

mately 33% cf the Arkies and Cosmos membership contributiing.

"Downtown

HOLLAND EX 4 - 8 5 9 7

— Next

to Penney's"

The winner will be presented a trophy by Dean Carey when the official results are obtained from Lansing .

ZEELAND

Y/\CA

y

9 EAST 1 0 t h St.

CORDIALLY INVITES HOPE STUDENTS TO JOIN IN HAVING FUN THE Y's WAY

HURRY!

SENIOR PORTRAITS

Life Saving

What, then, is the future of the program in education? According to Dr. De Haan the future possibilities and applications of the programming technique are of great a large-scale basis but of great value when used selectively. Their great worth can come in explaining a specific point on which a class or individual is bogged down. A "nodular programming" system is envisioned, in which there would be a program covering specific areas in every subject. A teacher could utilize a program to clarify a specific point of difficulty met in the normal classroom procedure. Over a brief period with a very clear objective in mind the value of the program is unchallenged. Dr. De Haan predicts increased use of the program through such techniques as this in many schools, including at Hope.

RecreaVional Swimming Senior Leaders Club Preient fhii ad and receive a 50% discount on our

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banquet and party accommodations

OPEN YEAR (14-16 West Eighth Street)

USE YOUR COLLEGE CREDIT CARD

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Just a Quick 15-Minute Hop Down 1-196


»

Hope College anchor

Students, Faculty

Pafe S

Discuss Common Problems /4 .

m m m

S t u d e n t s A i r Criticisms

During the T u e s d a y a s s e m b l y period, t h e opportunity was given to the student body to voice criticism, pro or con, it h a d concerning c a m p u s life. The c o n f e r e n c e , an innovation at Hope, w a s attended by some 85 students and a p a n e l of a d m i n i s t r a t i o n l e a d e r s who wished to get a b e t t e r notion of the s t u d e n t s ' problems and how to deal with t h e m .

^

The m a j o r i t y of the one-hour c o n f e r e n c e w a s spent a n s w e r i n g questions previously s u b m i t t e d to Wes Michaelson, president of the Student S e n a t e , who served as m o d e r a t o r for the session. At t i m e s s t u d e n t s rose f r o m the aud i e n c e to r a i s e new points of discussion or to c o m m e n t on the discussion in progress. Chapel WILL IT HAPPEN AT HOPE?—Will Slater ever serve breakfast in bed to students at Hope? This is exactly what happened recently to Slater food subscribers at Albion College.

Albion Students Are Served Breakfast in Bed by Slater L a s t week, Albion College students e n j o y e d w h a t most of us would consider the ultimate in easy living—the Slater Food Service t h e r e provided a b r e a k f a s t in bed, consisting of orange drink.

The Basement Upstairs Offers Relaxation A new dimension in college ent e r t a i n m e n t and a t m o s p h e r e will result when the B a s e m e n t U p s t a i r s opens tonight at 9:15 p.m. The dimly lit, m u s i c filled, atm o s p h e r e will a p p e a r in the unrecognizable Little T h e a t e r on t h e fourth floor of the Science Building. Rick Rietveld, president of P a l e t t e and Masque which is sponsoring the B a s e m e n t U p s t a i r s , said, " S t u d e n t s can play c a r d s , sit and talk or enjoy the available ree s h m e n t s . The highlight of the evening will be a variety show composed of c a m p u s t a l e n t . " Glen Gouwens will be m a s t e r of ceremonies for the show which will be given at 9:30 and 10:30 p . m .

milk, coffee, doughnut, c e r e a l and a n e w s p a p e r for its a p p r o x i m a t e l y 500 s u b s c r i b e r s to c e l e b r a t e t h e end of the m i d - t e r m week. In this e x p e r i m e n t which t h e s t u d e n t s enthusiastically t e r m e d " a g r e a t succ e s s " t h e r e s i d e n t advisors picked up utility c a r t s loaded with food at 6:45 a . m . and r e t u r n e d to their r e s p e c t i v e d o r m corridors to waken and feed their sleepy but cheerfull constituents. Someone jokingly suggested that it m a y h a v e been an e v e n g r e a t e r success had the serving been done on an e x c h a n g e basis, the m a l e R.A.'s waiting on the women and vice v e r s a . In answer to t h e possibility of a Hope b r e a k f a s t in bed, Mr. Raymond of our own Slater Food Service consented to the idea, provided t h a t a resoonsible organization t a k e s the initiative and absorbs the additional work involved in such p r e p a r a t i o n s .

Is

Educational

Speaking on t h e question of compulsory c h a p e l . Chaplain Hillegonds noted t h a t m a n y s t u d e n t s h a v e never b e e n exposed to r e a l worship. F o r u n d e r c l a s s m e n especially, he felt, chaoel c a n h a v e a r e a l educational value. He proposed that a new system be adopted under which f r e s h m e n m u s t a t t e n d chapel t h r e e days a week, sophomores twice a week, juniors once, and seniors at their own m a t u r e discretion. On t h e s u b j e c t of m a n d a t o r y classes and class cuts. Dean Vand e r Lugt noted that the college policy left t h e m a t t e r of attenda n c e in the h a n d s of the individual instructors. He c o m m e n t e d , " W h e n you cut class you're just cutting yourself out of an e d u c a t i o n . " Seve r a l students noted that o f t e n t i m e s the classes which the s t u d e n t did not wish to a t t e n d w e r e those in which a t t e n d a n c e was carefully kept. The Dean replied t h a t a college had a resnonsibilitv to k e e p t r a c k of its students. Hope, he said, feels t h i s obligation m o r e keenly than m a n y l a r g e r schools.

s e e m e d e x t r e m e . She cited the editorial in last week's anchor as an e x a m p l e of this. She noted that while the m e n s e e m e d greatly c o n c e r n e d about the women's rights, the w o m e n t h e m s e l v e s did not r e g a r d the regulations as so g r e a t a b u r d e n . T h e D e a n of Wom e n r e m i n d e d the students of provisions such as l a t e permission and w o n d e r e d if t h e regulations w e r e as s t r i c t as m a n y students s e e m e d to feel they w e r e . She noted that Hope " i s concerned with the whole person, not just the m i n d . " Rev. Hillegonds suggested that perhaps it might be b e t t e r , in at least the s m o k i n g controversy, to allow the w o m e n to m a k e t h e i r own decision, and t r u s t to their m a t u r i t y .

the students t h a t Hope did not wish to h a v e a n y student drop out bec a u s e of f i n a n c i a l p r e s s u r e a n d advised s t u d e n t s i n t e r e s t e d in schola r s h i p s to s e e him in his office in Van R a a l t e .

Housing Shortage D e a n Van E e n e n a a m mentioned the s h o r t a g e of housing. Business m a n a g e r William Wilson told of t h e ten-year plan for college expansion which is in the p l a n n i n g s t a g e but said t h a t f i n a n c i a l pressure pr ecl udes the construction of new housing in t h e next y e a r or t two. On t h e student-teacher ratio and relationship, Dean V a n d e r Lugt said t h a t the p r e s e n t eighteen-to-one ratio will be maintained. Chaplain Hillegonds a n d Dean Carey c o m m e n t e d on s e v e r a l prog r a m s being planned to give opportunity for closer student-teacher relations, including such plans as e n c o u r a g i n g faculty m e m b e r s to eat in the c a f e t e r i a and providing for faculty visitations to dormitories on an informal basis.

Aid to Students S e v e r a l other topics w e r e discussed. Roger Rietberg of the admissions d e p a r t m e n t r e p o r t e d that the n u m b e r of applications were still i n c r e a s i n g and that m a n y of t h e new applications w e r e from s t u d e n t s outside the R e f o r m e d Church. William Hilmert advised

Frats Accept Members; IFC to Rule on Hell Week Two weeks of h a y r i d e s , house p a r t i e s and s m o k e r s c a m e to a c l i m a x last W e d n e s d a y as f r a t e r n ity fall r u s h e n d e d . Bids w e r e accepted or r e j e c t e d by r u s h e e s last F r i d a y , and now each f r a t e r n i t y is waiting for t h e I n t e r - F r a t e r n i t y Council's decisions concerning hell week.

Rich Smith, Don Van D yke and L a r r y W a l t e r s to their m e m b e r ship. Ken B r u g g e r s , Tim Dykstra, Mark J o h n s o n , Dave L u b b e r s , Pat Price, Ken S t r e m l e r and Bob Vogel a r e E m m i e pledges. T h e F r a t e r s took in Cal Boer, J i m G u n t h e r , Randy N y k a m p and Steve P i e r s m a . Among the new Knick pledges a r e Dan B e r g e r , P a u l Bleau, Dave Duitsma, Jim Hankamo, Cal K e m p k e r , Ron Ovens, Mike Paliatsos. Chris P l a s m a n , Steve Reynen, Mel Smith. J i m Tillema and Lew V a n d e r N a a l d .

Arkie pledges included J o h n Arnone. Clay Howe, Don K r o o d s m a , Rich Miller, Tim T r u m a n , Bill Vand e r L u g t and P a u l Vant Hof. T h e Cosmos h a v e added Rick Appleton, J. C. Carlson, J i m De Witt, D a n K r e u g e r . J i m Schoon,

Women's Rules A m a j o r a r e a of discussion concerned the regulations applying to Hope coeds. D e a n of Women V a n E e n e n a a m noted that m a n y of the r e q u e s t s f r o m t h e student body

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November 19, 1965

Hope College anchor

Page 4

anchjor editorial

Get Out and Stay Away W

E, L I K E M A N Y of o u r f r i e n d s , l i k e a t t e n d i n g M o p e C o l l e g e in H o l l a n d , M i c h . , b e c a u s e it is a p l e a s a n t i s o l a t i o n f r o m s o m e of t h e m o r e d i s q u i e t i n g a n d dist u r b i n g t h i n g s t h a t g o o n in o u r w o r l d . S e l d o m , if e v e r , a r e w e c o n f r o n t e d b y p r o b l e m s s u c h as m o r e b o m b s , m o r e b a b i e s , r a c i a l h a t r e d o r w a r . I t ' s v e r y p l e a s a n t l i v i n g in this d e a r old t o w n g o i n g to college, s t u d y i n g w h e n we can or o f t e n w h e n we feel like it, o n l y t o b e s u r p r i s e d w h e n we r e t u r n h o m e t h a t s o m e o n e w e k n e w w a s d e a d , k i l l e d in Vietnam. A h , yes, t h e c o m f o r t of it all. A n d t h e n a g r o u p of s t u d e n t s w h o a l w a y s h a v e t o f i n d s o m e t h i n g t o yell a b o u t o r s o m e t h i n g t o d o start p u t t i n g u p posters a b o u t a conference o n V i e t n a m a n d s a y i n g t h a t it's v e r y i m p o r t a n t b e c a u s e V i e t n a m i n v o l v e s us. All this is v e r y c o n f u s i n g b e c a u s e in t h e f i r s t p l a c e we have a h a r d t i m e r e m e m b e r i n g w h e r e V i e t n a m is ( " I t ' s k i n d of n e a r I n d i a i s n ' t i t ? " ) a n d in t h e s e c o n d p l a c e w e c o u l d n ' t c a r e less w h e t h e r it w a s t h e r e o r n o t . It's far e n o u g h away from H o l l a n d and even from the Netherlands. Even our n o m and dad are worried a b o u t our draft status a n d we're not sure why, b u t it d o e s n ' t m a k e a n y d i f f e r e n c e b e c a u s e w e ' r e 2-S. A n d w h y b u r n y o u r c a r d ? Isn't that against the law?

/ V

A

N D T H E N T H E R E WAS something about students demonstrating against t h e U.S. b e i n g i n V i e t n a m . W e h e a r d t h a t the s t u d e n t s said t h a t we d i d n ' t b e l o n g

Readers

Speak

there; that the South Vietnamese p t o p l e didn't w a n t us there b u t t h a t the S o u t h V i e t n a m g o v e r n m e n t w a n t e d us t h e r e to p r o t e c t t h e i r g o v e r n m e n t ; t h a t it w a s n o r m a l l y w r o n g t o stand for f r e e d o m a n d self-determination a n d then subject a people to a g o v e r n m e n t which t h e y d i d n o t w a n t ; t h a t it w a s m o r a l l y w r o n g to b o m b m e n , w o m e n , c h i l d r e n , h o m e s a n a f a r m s t h a t w e r e n ' t e v e n i n v o l v e d in t h e w a r ; t h a t it w a s w r o n g t o k i l l . W e don't u n d e r s t a n d those students, and f r o m t h e p i c t u r e s of t h e m it l o o k s as if t h e y are beatniks a n d radicals anyway. T h e enemy, w e ' r e t o l d , is C o m m u n i s t a n d a e t h e i s t a n d r a d ical a n d s u r e l y n o t D u t c h . I t ' s r e a l l y n o w o n der they are the e n e m y or that they are w r o n g a n d w e a r e r i g h t . A f t e r a l l , if it w e r e n ' t f o r t h e U . S . a n d o u r w a y of f r e e d o m a n d t r u t h a n d r i g h t e o u s n e s s , w h e r e w o u l d this w o r l d be?

B

UT W E G E T U P S E T j u s t t a l k i n g a b o u t this. Those p e o p l e o u t there are just too mixed up. T h e r e must be a simple answer somewhere. W e d o n ' t like people d y i n g , least of all t h e b l o n d - h a i r e d s o n s of A m e r i c a n m o t h e r s , b u t we really c a n ' t get a l l t h a t u p s e t a b o u t it. A n d w e d o n ' t w a n t t o k n o w a n y t h i n g m o r e a b o u t it. I g n o r a n c e is b l i s s f o r u s , b e c a u s e t h e less w e k n o w t h e less w e get u p s e t . T o m o r r o w is t h e c o n f e r e n c e b u t for u s it's a n o t h e r S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g t o s l e e p in, a n d in t h e a f t e r n o o n w e t h i n k we'll take a w a l k d o w n to the w i n d m i l l and w a t c h t h e s l u d g e f l o w p a s t o u r eyes.

Out

Dear Editor . . All letters within the fairly broad limHs of good taste will be considered for publication. Length should be restricted to 200-300 words, and the editors reserve the right to edit for space. All letters must be submitted before 6 p.m. on the Wednesday before the Friday of publication. Letters must be signed, but names will be withheld upon request.

\ 1 1

N T H E W A Y T O J E R U S A L E M he was passing along between Samaria and Galilee. A n d as h e e n t e r e d a v i l l a g e , h e w a s m e t by t e n l e p e r s , w h o s t o o d at a d i s t a n c e a n d litted u p t h e i r voices a n d said, "Jesus Master, have mercy on us." W h e n he saw t h e m h e said to t h e m , " G o a n d s h o w yourselves t o t h e p r i e s t s . " A n d as t h e y w e n t t h e y w e r e c l e a n s e d . T h e n o n e of t h e m , w h e n h e s a w t h a t h e w a s h e a l e d , t u r n e d b a c k p r a i s i n g G o d w i t h a l o u d v o i c e ; a n d h e iell o n h i s f a c e at J e s u s ' f e e t g i v i n g h i m t h a n k s . N o w he was a Samaritan. T h e n said Jesus, " W e r e not ten cleansed? W h e r e are the nine? W a s n o one f o u n d to r e t u r n a n d give praise to G o d except this f o r e i g n e r ? " A n d he said to h i m , " R i s e a n d g o y o u r way; y o u r f a i t h has m a d e you w e l l . " —Luke

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We a p p r e c i a t e the lofty concern of the editor for the plight of t h e women on the c a m p u s under the double s t a n d a r d . T h e r e a r e s o m e p r a c t i c e s under the double standard that we as w o m e n would hate to give up—such as the d e f e r e n c e and consideration shown us as m e m b e r s of the " w e a k e r " sex. However, we don't necessarily feel t h a t doing away with all rules and regulations or s t a n d a r d s f o r wom e n n e g a t e s the double s t a n d a r d . We a d m i t that in the business world, recognition of w o m e n ' s talents and abilities is often sadly lacking, and if you really w a n t to do us a favor, we would a p p r e c i a t e the m e n ' s concern in this a r e a . But. getting back to the " e q u a l i t y " so m u c h desired on c a m p u s — what is to stop the m e n ' s rules f r o m being c h a n g e d to comply with ours? We too feel t h a t w o m e n want to s m o k e in anything but a " s t y , " as you so aptly described the lounge in t h e b a s e m e n t of G r a v e s , and think that additional lounges for smoking should be m a d e available. This would be our proposal for a solution, r a t h e r than c r e a t e inn u m e r a b l e sties within e a c h dormitory, out of each individual r o o m . We certainly don't look down on women who smoke (in fact, threefourths of this c o m m i t t e e smoke), and feel that they shouldn't be penalized for it. However, why should a m e m b e r of the m a j o r i t y of the women on c a m p u s h a v e to exist in a cloud of s m o k e coming f r o m a c i g a r e t t e s e v e r a l doors down the hall? You, living in d o r m s , all know how odor perm e a t e s the air, and if the m a j o r ity of the girls find s m o k e obnoxious, t h e y should not be forced to live with it. Yes, it is important for women "to be responsible to themselves

and s o m e very real m o r a l standa r d s . " Is it any less a responsibility for a person to respect and comply with the wishes of the m a j o r i t y ? We doubt it. AWS S t a n d a r d s Committee Ruth Sytsma Evelyn Albers Arlene Anderson Joan Medema Dear Calvin Vander F r i s b e e and The P h a n t o m - C h a m p i o n of the Underdog, We a r e committed to a cause! We a r e alined under a b a n n e r ! We a r e crusading t o w a r d s victory! We a r e the Champions of Women's Freedom!!! Our p r o g r a m is an irrational one, in the tradition of all great causes. F i r s t , let us e x p a n d the opportunities for women to visit foreign countries on weeknights. Certainly special late permission should be given. Second, let us m a k e available f e m a l e involvement in international espionage. Surely there m u s t be at least some interest in the FrenchCanadian terrorist activities. Or if not, w h a t about blowing up Cana d i a n ships c a r r y i n g w h e a t to Red China? Thirdly, let us f r e e w o m e n f r o m the shackles of time and stop arbitrarily imposing a 24-hour, sevenday week upon them, as well as a 12-month c a l e n d a r . Surely they a r e old enough to k e e p t r a c k of time for themselves. Finally, let us once and for all .give women complete f r e e d o m in smoking. Surley w o m e n ' s Scandinavian c i g a r s can be imported and distributed f r o m the Health Clinic. We c a n ' t be enslaved by m e r e cultural m or es. So, Viva La F r a n c e ! The Maole Leaf f o r e v e r ! The Student Ad Hoc Committee For More Ad Hoc Committees One of our philosophy essays, though originally speaking in a different context, struck m e as expressing clearly, s o m e thoughts whioh have real significance, especially for the freshman and sophomore classes in the light of

Nykerk: " I t s e e m s equally m i s t a k e n to say, on the one hand, t h a t all classconsciousness is b a d , or, on the other, t h a t we ought above all things to gird ourselves for the class-struggle. T h e just view apparently is that we should h a v e in this m a t t e r , as e l s e w h e r e , diff e r e n c e on a basis of unity. Class alty in t h e p u r s u i t of right ends is good; but like all such s e n t i m e n t s it should be subordinate to a broad justice and kindness. If there is no class-consciousness m e n become isolated, d e g r a d e d and ineffective: if t h e r e is too m u c h , or the w r o n g kind, t h e group becomes s e p a r a t e and f o r g e t s the whole. Let t h e r e be ' d i v e r s i t i e s of gifts but t h e s a m s p i r i t . ' " Priscilla Inkpen, '69 As a r e c e n t g r a d u a t e of Hope College, I had m y first limited opportunity to view the c a m p u s activities as an " o u t s i d e r . " While I w a s i m p r e s s e d and p l e a s e d with the p e r f o r m a n c e s at N y k e r k last S a t u r d a y , Nov. 13, I w o n d e r if it w a s n e c e s s a r y , at the conclusion, to add insult to d e f e a t . I ' m sure the a u d i e n c e w a s not e n t e r t a i n e d in those last few minutes—not to mention the F r e s h m e n girls. A '65 g r a d u a t e F o r one p a r t i c u l a r s t a t e m e n t I m a d e at N y k e r k , I wish to apologize. I w a s not reflecting m y own feelings nor those of m y classm a t e s at the t i m e . I would like to r e - e m p h a s i z e m y wish t h a t the m e m b e r s of our c l a s s e s m a y not only feel close to and work with with those in their own class, but t h a t we all, as s t u d e n t s of Hope, will work together to f o r m a m o r e acive, m o r e i n t e r e s t e d student body. I hope the competition between rival classes in the Pull and at Nykerk will always b e friendly, constructive competition making stronger classes and therefore a stronger student body. Jerry Poortinga We want to thank our men for the wonderful support and encouragement you g a v e us before and during the Nykerk Competition. We especially appreciate all those of you who c a m e to practices and


November 19, 1965

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Why Stay in Vietnam? By Dick Shiels Dr. Wesley F i s h e l and Dolfin Droge will be on c a m p u s S a t u r d a y to discuss A m e r i c a n policy in Vietnam and to a n s w e r specifically the q u e s t i o n , " W h y stay in Vietnam?" What it t a k e s to a n s w e r t h a t question is a knowledge of t h e geography, the politics and t h e significance of S o u t h e a s t Asia. B a c k g r o u n d i n f o r m a t i o n for such a visit is n e c e s s a r y for a basic u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the situation. V i e t n a m is seen a s a stepping stone for R e d China. It is t h t key to taking o v e r all of Southeast Asia and all 325 million of the Southeast Asian people. The significance of the w a r is not limited to t h e b o u n d a r i e s of V i e t n a m . T h e second point t h a t proves that t h e r e is an indefinite significance in the w a r is t h a t South Vietnam is the r i c e bowl of all Asia. Both Red China and North Vietnam h a v e populations crying for food, and the most fertile soil in Asia lies in pro-Western South Vietnam. To lose V i e t n a m to these n o r t h e r n f o r c e s would be to strengthen t h e economy of t h e s e two nations as well as to b r o a d e n their b o u n d a r i e s . But the m a i n concern lies in the stepping-stone notion. An understanding of the shinking behind it, then, is crucial to seeing the significance of V i e t n a m .

Straits of Malacco The most f e a r e d step beyond taking South V i e t n a m would be taking the S t r a i t s of Malacco, proven to be the safest route f r o m the Indian to the P a c i f i c Ocean. At the p r e s e n t t i m e 98 per cent of the O r i e n t ' s t r a d e p a s s e s through this 600 mile strip of w a t e r . More t h a n 12,000 ships a y e a r p a s s t h r o u g h h e r e to t h e British port of S i n g a p o r e ; over 10,000 a y e a r to Indonesia. The loss of the S t r a i t s of Malacco t h e n would put China in position if not to take, at least to g r e a t l y w e a k e n these two pro-Western basts. Australia, Japan But w h a t would be the progression of the o t h e r " s t e p " ? The hypothetical a n s w e r is that f r o m South Vietnam Red China would take T h a i l a n d . Laos, and Cambodia and find herself in position to look to t h e Philippines, to J a p a n and to Australia. At this point any f u r t h e r s t e p p i n g would certainly be significant. Australia is a nation geographically t h e size of t h e United States. Her resources as well as h e r location and size would be of intense interest to the Chinese. And h e r population is no m o r e than 11.000.000. Taking Australia f r o m this hypothetical v a n t a g e point would be a breeze. And w h a t of J a p a n ? J a p a n h a s s,

.

Review of the News U.S. troops fought a threeday battle this week against 1 r e g u l a r North V i e t n a m e s e a r m y | forces. The battle took place in 1 the valley between the CamJ bodian border and Plei Me. I They were supported 'by 350 | tons of 750-lb. bormbs dropped 1 by giant B-52 b o m b e r s . The I battle w a s hotly contested but a p p a r e n t l y t h e North VietnamM ese lost as a U.S. division comm a n d e r observed, " T h e i r b a c k & is b r o k e n . " T h e North Vietnamese had at least 869 known dead and e s t i m a t e s suggested that up to 1300 p e r i s h e d . U.S. casualties w e r e officially described as m o d e r a t e but non-government o b s e r v e r s told of heavy losses. This w a s the first m a j o r confrontation between U.S. and North V i e t n a m e s e troops. Almost no Viet Cong or South V i e t n a m e s e units w e r e involved. In Indonesia c o m m u n i s t s w e r e also being fought. F i f t y communist rebels were reported killed and 580 c a p t u r e d by Indonesian a r m y units in E a s t J a v a . P r e s i d e n t Sukarno drifted f a r t h e r f r o m the c o m m u n i s t block by ordering g o v e r n m e n t m a g e n c i e s to purge t h e m s e l v e s of anyone connected with the att e m p t e d coup of Oct. 1. His p a r liament d e m a n d e d t h a t the c o m m u n i s t o a r t v be b a n n e d . Prime Minister Ian Smith took the big step t o w a r d s inde1 pendence f r o m Britian and dem a n d e d t h a t the British - ap•• pointed governor g e n e r a l resign. T h e g o v e r n o r , Sir H u m p h r e y Bibbs, r e f u s e d . In E n g l a n d . Queen Elizabeth signed seven 1 o r d e r s giving the British govern-

ment wide powers to cope with the situation. Although P r i m e Minister Wilson opposes military force he t h r e a t e n e d that Britian m a y h a v e to intervene militarilly if " l a w and order break down. Red Chinese and Nationalists ships tangled for over two hours in the F o r m o s a Straits. A Nationalist m i n e s w e e p e r w a s sunk with its 100 c r e w m a n p r e s u m e d lost. However, four of eight attacking Red gunboats w e r e also sunk and a fifth d a m a g e d . Red China claimed t h a t the Nationalists invaded their w a t e r s . A luxury c r u i s e r , t h e Yarmouth Castle, b u r s t into f l a m e s and sank with 89 of its 376 passengers and 174 c r e w m e n given up as lost. Governor Romney spoke to students of Michigan on Tuesday night about Vietnam. Although the governor g a v e excellent a n s w e r s to questions asked him by s t u d e n t s and p r e s s m e m b e r s , and i m p a r t e d some interesting observations, his " f a c t u a l " presentation l e f t much to be d e s i r e d and sometimes contradicted known f a c t s concerning Vi e t n a m . A l a r g e group of d e m o n s t r a t o r s chanted "Support V i e t n a m , " before the governor's speech. In other news headlines we find: Castro b l a m e s the CIA for two boats firing on the National A q u a r i u m in H a v a n a : the Congo P a r l i a m e n t ousted P r e m i e r K i m b a ' s four week reg i m e : India p r o t e s t s against Red China's firing across the border between Tibet and Sikk i m : and a plan for s e c r e t p e a c e

Page S

built herself up to b e c o m e the fifth largest i n d u s t r i a l complex of the Wund. China's biggest need is for industrial a d v a n c e m e n t and the position s h e could t a k e in world atfairs given t h a t a d v a n c e m e n t would be f r i g h t e n i n g . The U.S. is in Vietnam to protect the rights of t h e freedom-loving V i e t n a m e s e . Of course, Gov. Romney said so in Detroit Tuesday night. But the U.S. is staying in Vietnam and putting forth her best, if also her most cautious effort, b e c a u s e the outcome of that war could shape world a f f a i r s on both sides of t h e globe for y e a r s to come.

Christian Action Was Discussed At 'Village HalV Last Tuesday evening, Hall" meeting was held Hall to discuss c a m p u s and d e t e r m i n e how we tions might take action

a "Village in G r a v e s problems as Chrison them.

Among those things discussed were the purpose of sororities and f r a t e r n i t i e s in c a m p u s life, the lack of communication among students, and the Tuesday morning assemblies. R a t h e r than having relatively unknown s p e a k e r s e a c h week students suggested that the assemblies might be better attended if they were held monthly and if they presented someone whose m e s s a g e would be of interest to ah the students. Also s t r e s s e d were the d o r m discussions with Reverend Hillegonds which occur informally in the various dormitories.

By Joyce PolllU Dr. E d w a r d Daniel Dimnent, a m a n of diverse abilities, continued to enrich Hope College over a fifty y e a r period. During his y e a r s as President from 1918 to he was responsible for the design and construction of the chapel which now bears his n a m e . He had received his f o r m a l education at Hope, where he was g r a d u a t e d in the year 189^ at the Western Theological S e m i n a r y and the University of Chicago. T h r e e honorary degrees were a w a r d e d to him in recognition of his accomplishments as an outstanding educator: the Litt.D. from R u t g e r s College, L.H.D. f r o m Hope College and LL.D. f r o m C e n t r a l College. Born in Chicago, he spent most of his life in Holland. He joined the faculty as a professor of Greek then entered the field of economics. A well-known figure in literary circles, he cultivated literary interest at the college and the community. He headed the Michigan Author's Assn. in 1938. simultaneously holding the office of president of the State Historical Society. F o r e m o s t among his writings were his poetic interpretation of " T h e Book of J o b " and " T h e P i l g r i m , " a pageant written for the seventy-fifty a n n i v e r s a r y of the college. Authorship of "The P i l g r i m " reveals s o m e characteristic qualities of Dr. Dimnent. He w a s not content to u n d e r t a k e the writing of the dialogue, but also spent additional months studying the history in order that the c o s t u m e s would give an a c c u r a t e picture of the old world scenes. He worked with precision and completeness. When it was presented. Dr. Dimnent, in all humility, r e f u s e d to take his due credit for his toil.

DR. EDWARD D. DIMNENT The most impressive edifice on the c a m p u s , the Chapel was erected under the w o r k m a n s h i p of P r e s ident Dimnent. He raised the $400,000 tor the building, whose m a j e s t i c a r c h i t e c t u r e would cost well over $Ufe million to replace it today. It b e c a m e a tradition for Dr. Dimnent to relate the stories behind the stained glass windows of the chapel e a c h y e a r for the benefit of new s t u d e n t s and visitors. Conversations with " D i m m y , " as .he was fondly called, w e r e often m e m o r a b l e experiences in themselves. He was noted for his " s a g e bits of a d v i c e " and commonly repeated p h r a s e s , such as " t h a t ' s life." Students and professors alike cherished Dr. D i m n e n t ' s friendship. h i s i m m e n s e popularity speaking well for his personal worth. Dr. L u b b e r s concluded that "the s e c r e t of his g r e a t n e s s was tiiat h e grew to be the m a n whom the Creator intended him to b e . "

Dear Editor . . .

More Letters to the Editor provided r e f r e s h m e n t s , s e r e n a d e d , worked on the Nykerk B r e a k f a s t skit and the " g r i n again, win a g a i n " sign, and w e ' r e proud of the spirit and confidence you showed us last S a t u r d a y night. It really helped us m a k e it " F o u r Straight for '68!" The Women of '68 | . ;

1 &

1 |

As a f r e s h m a n , I was very disappointed in the informality of the Nykerk Cup Contest S a t u r d a y evening. P e r h a p s I was misinformed, but I w a s under the impression that Nykerk was of a formal, dignified order. We, as a choral group, were instructed as to the i m p o r t a n c e of a m a t u r e app e a r a n c e and that we would be judged accordingly. Also, in conversing with u p p e r c l a s s m e n m y impression of formality was strengthened. However, I w a s really shocked when we filed into a noisy, rallying auditorium. I felt like I w a s at a basketball g a m e and the two t e a m s had just com e bounding onto the floor. Is this the atmosphere Nykerk is to have? I certainly hope not. I undestand a

The Best of Peanuts

n u m b e r of upper classmen did not or would not attend N y k e r k because of its loss of dignity. 1 was also disappointed in the sophomores' s p o r t s m a n s h i p . Isn't it traditional that both choirs meet in the middle of the floor? However, we F r e s h m e n had to walk over to the Sophomore side because they were so involved with their victory that they could not meet us. 1, for one, would like to have the traditions of Nykerk restored. Congratulations Soohomores. A F r e s h m a n woman

The recent inter-fraternity football g a m e between the Knicks and the F r a t e r s presented to the students in attendence an i m a g e of the f r a t e r n i t y m a n that is f a r removed f r o m that of the Hope College student. The exhibition, and it m a y rightly be t e r m e d that, brings to mind the question of the value of the f r a t e r n i t y system as a whole to Hope College. If this is an indication of the values being instilled in their m e m b e r s by t h e f r a t e r nities, it is, in m y opinion, t i m e

Rep)inled

to seriously consider the value of continuing the s y s t e m . Never in inter-fraternity athletics h a v e I witnessed such a vulgar, obscene and completely unsportsm a n l i k e p e r f o r m a n c e by the m e m bers of both t e a m s . Had the lang u a g e been of the c o m m o n four letter variety, it would h a v e been out of place at an e v e n t attended by the college c o m m u n i t y . However, the level of the l a n g u a g e used was absolutely obscene and left no question in the h e a r e r ' s mind as to its object or m e a n i n g . Accompanying this display of " C h r i s t i a n ? " spirit was w h a t appeared to be a total disrespect for all rules of s p o r t m a n s h i p . The obviously intentional b r e a k i n g of the rules did much to f u r t h e r the image of the f r a t e r n i t i e s — f r a t e r nities which claim to help in the molding of a m a t u r e , responsible Christian adult. If this is their concept of m a t u r i t y and adult responsibility and even m o r e important, of a Christian, than I feel t h a t the t i m e h a s come to reconsider the f u t u r e of f r a t e r n i t i e s at Hope College.

hy permission

Jon Wiegand

of the Chicago

Tribune

PEANUTS fi

it

il Uh-i/t?-

11-20

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Wo-.


November 19, 1965

Hope College anchor

P*M(e 6

rarultv

Focus

The Great Individual i f . J# > Editoi 's note: Dr. Eugene Scholten is the school psychologist for the Holland Public Schools and has been a part time instructor In psychology at Hope for several versity. He is active at the state level in professional psychological dent - elect of the Grand Rapids activities and is currently presiArea Psychological Assn. A Hope College graduate, Dr. Scholten earned his M.A. from Southern California University and his Ph.D. from Michigan State University. He is active at the state level in professional psychological activities and is currently president - elect of the Grand Rapids Area Psychological Assn. By

Dr. Eugene Scholtens

One of the functions of the acad e m i c community is the assessm e n t of the c u r r e n t ideological scene. This m a y 'be difficult in t h a t the m a r k of the educated m a n includes both specific goals with respect to vocational pursuits as well as general goals r e g a r d i n g the well-informed and well-integrated man. My concern is with the l a t t e r a r e a of the ideological scene. Who is responsible for the assimulation do we know about d o g m a s and belief systems which o p e r a t e so ominously in our lives? How m a n y of us attain goals with respect to the " t r u t h that m a k e s m e n f r e e ? " How m a n y of us h a v e turned to science for models through which our ideas could be tested, only to fj r r? f^ov Hon't fit—or that in a r e s e a r c h f r a m e of r e f e r e n c e the

The

v a r i a b l e s prohibit either-or answers. Let's look at a few e x a m ples regarding the assimulation of ideological differences. One of the unsolved dichotomies of our time involves the rights of the individual versus the rights of the collective whole. Standing on the brink of the Great Society, it a p p e a r s that the individual sees his existence exclusively in the group. Identity and c o m m u n i c a tion a r e with those who think " r i g h t , " i.e., as we do. Our purpose, worth and destiny often s e e m to be seen in the collective whole. But we fail to ask, who h a s decided w h a t ' s right for the G r e a t Society. It a p p e a r s that we die r a t h e r r e a d ily for ideas and ideals t h a t we find it impossible to live for. The problems of alienation and isolation are frightening to the college student. The power of the collective whole h a s never s e e m e d g r e a t e r . In e v e r y a c t and behavior, however trivial, the individual m u s t by some ritual associate and c o n f o r m with some group. The universal cry, "you don't underst?n^ m e " nrecnnnoces under standing only through similarity of beliefs. We h a v e also used e x a g g e r a t i o n with Christian m a n d a t e s such as loving " o u r neighbor as o u r s e l f . " The p a r a d o x is that we s o m e t i m e s put God and our neighbors—individual and collective—above or better than ourselves. Loving oneself a p p e a r s to be difficult for m a n y individuals and the misin-

t e r p r e t a t i o n of this Christian dogm a m i g h t well contribute to the self-effacing, defensive individual who considers himself as running a "poor t h i r d " to God and his fellow m a n . The m a r k of the e d u c a t e d m a n is the integrated m a n who is not blinded and misled by undue allegiance to belief s y s t e m s and d o g m a s but r a t h e r assimilates and e v a l u a t e s . This is no m u n d a n e task. and. a f t e r all, the difference between open-mindedness and having holes in one's head, depends on the viewer.

" T h e elevator stopped in pitch d a r k n e s s . No one else in the c a r did anything except one old m a n who put up his u m b r e l l a . In case it was The Bomb, he explained this would k e e p off the fallout. Two junior executives i m m e d i a t e ly jostled for space 'beneath it.

TRINITY REFORMED CHURCH Welcomes

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I

RENAISSANCE RECAPTURED—The baroque music of the court of James I and Elizabeth I, played on instruments of that period, c a m e to Hope last Thursday with the world reknowned New York Pro Musica. Approximately 700 Hope students and Holland heard the two-hour program.

LUJBLJANA, Y u g o s l a v i a - W o r l d War II w a s bad e v e r y w h e r e ; m a n y individuals and m a n y countries suffered dearly during that conflict. It is perhaps unfair to say that one country suffered m o r e than others, but this at least can be said of Yugoslavia; the m e m ory of suffering is very vivid and is still a m a j o r factor in almost e v e r y o n e ' s thinking. T h e r e are s o m e good reasons for this. F i r s t , not only w a s there intense fighting between G e r m a n s and Yugoslavs, but there were

"While I waited to b e rescued, your Uncle Bert w a s t r a p p e d in the subway along with 800,001 ether people. (The " 1 " is for a boy who was born on the BMT subway during this time which was especially unusual as his m o t h e r was on the IRT line. It b e c a m e unbearablely hot and moist; it is certainly a good thing I got Bert to use 'Ban.* He didn't h a v e the least w o r r y about being close. He could c o n c e n t r a t e upon worrying about h i s wallet and his life. " T h e only other really new thing h a p p e n i n g in the city is the m a y o r . It was a big election but I just coudn't bring myself to vote. I m e a n who am I to say one m a n is better t h a n another? "Ah well I h a v e to stop now; t h e color T.V. dinners a r e beginning to fade. Have a nice Thanksgiving. Don't go to your Aunt M a u d ' s . She'll probably m a k e you do something traditional like stealing turkeys for the T h u r s d a y m e a l . As ever . . . Aunt (Lydia."

large-scale conflicts between different factions within Yugoslavia, including groups of collaborators. Many of the dead and wounded suff e r e d not because of the G e r m a n s alone, but because of their fellowc o u n t r y m e n as well. Secondly, out of the intense, prolonged agony of the war w a s born a truly new Yugoslavia, different in its concept and rationale as well as its leadership, f r o m the a t t e m p t e d unity of the inter-war period. The b i r t h d a t e of t h e State r e a c h e s back only to the War, and it has a m e m o r y which in some w a y s is analogous to our idealization of the Revolutionary War which saw the birth of o u r Republic. Finally, the actual suffering w i s enormous. National capitulation b f the g o v e r n m e n t w a s quick; the r e s i s t a n c e m o v e m e n t w a s soon v e r y strong—at one point during the w a r , the P a r t i s a n s h a v e b e e n credited with tying up 19 G e r m a n divisions. Tito himself was wounded, as w e r e m a n y of his chief lieutenants, and h e w a s nearly c a p t u r e d . But the daring Resistance m o v e m e n t also s t i m u l a t e d f u r t h e r persecution and suffering. A visit to the " M u s e u m of the P e o p l e ' s Revolution" shows vividly m a n y of the atrocities c o m m i t ted by the G e r m a n s against the local population, although it is short on information about anti G e r m a n atrocities or actions by one group of Yugoslavs against another. On display, for instance, a r e dozens of posters put u p in G e r m a n and Slovene by the occupying authorities. These listed up to 100 n a m e s of people, g a v e their occupation and d a t e of b i r t h , who w e r e killed in retaliation f o r P a r tisan anti-German activity. These s o m e t i m e s included w o m e n and t e e n a g e r s ; t h e y w e r e lined up a g a i n s t a wall in m a s s e s and executed by m a c h i n e gun f i r e , or in other cases b y f i r i n g squads. O n e a c q u a i n t a n c e of this w r i t e r , living the Northern Slovenia, was

Morning Service at 9 : 3 0 A.M. Evening Service at 7 : 0 0 P.M.

ATTENTION SENIORS Don't wait until the last day. Make your

College-age Sunday School class conducted by Rev. Van Oostenburg immediately following morning service.

forcibly d r a f t e d into the G e r m a n W e h r m a c h t : wounded three times, including four machine-gun bullets in t h e now-useless left a r m and he s u f f e r e d the loss of one b r o t h e r , killed by G e r m a n s in retaliation for Partisan activity. Another brother, 17 at the time, fought with P a r t i s a n s . His family w a s forced to flee their h o m e to avoid f u r t h e r Nazi retaliation. A now^middle aged w o m a n described vividly her t r a n s f e r to Serbia and the d e s t r u c t i o n of all h e r p r o p e r t y ; her h a z a r d o u s activity for t h e P a r t i s a n s , a s s i s t e d by one of the m a n y G e r m a n soldiers who w a s " a l l r i g h t . " H h e n it w a s over, she and her h u s b a n d went back a n d rebuilt everything by hand. A m i l d - m a n n e r e d scientist described his participation in the L j u b l j a n a u n d e r g r o u n d , which " a s sassinated" enemy o f f i c e r s in broad daylight, and h a d extensive connections with the P a r t i s a n s outside the town. This despite t h e fact t h a t L j u b l j a n a was completely surrounded by b a r b e d wire, supposedly to end communication with the outside—another result of Germ a n s who were "all r i g h t , " or at least could be p e r s u a d e d to be so for a price. Yugoslavia fought hard for the opportunity to live in p e a c e and independence, to build a new life. T h e r e is h a r d l y a Yugoslav without genuinely personal and bitter m e m o r i e s of the fight.

Holleman, Groesbeck Out-debote

MSU

Hope beat Michigan State last S a t u r d a y , not in football b u t in d e b a t e at the Universiy of Michigan. C r a i g Holleman and Wayne Groesbeok of -Hope g a v e Michigan S t a t e University, the t o u r n e y winner, its only loss. Holleman and G r o e s b e c k won two out of three d e b a t e s , losing only to the University of Michigan. The d e b a t e r s a r g u e d the national d e b a t e question, " R e s o l v e d : T h a t law e n f o r c e m e n t a g e n c i e s should be given g r e a t e r f r e e d o m in the investigation and prosecution of crime."

appointment now for your senior portrait. STOPI Compare prices and samples.

PIZZA

College Youth Fellowship Following 7 P.M. service

residents of

By Bob Donia

By Rob Werge

" S p e a k i n g of electricity, the city h a s just had a black-out. Literarfor doin' nothin.' 1 w a s going up to the 63rd floor w a s h r o o m at the office (it's so much m o r e exclusive than the 62nd floor w a s h r o o m ) when it struck.

Yugoslavs Recall the War

So We Get Letters that Hope is going to let the girls smoke. It's certainly- a bold move. At this rate, the college m a y think of installing electricity soon.

\

ilt

Our Man in Europe

Chan^elin^

I shouldn't d r a g my relatives into this space. But Aunt Lydia, -who r e f e r s affectionately to Auntie Maud as "the old cow," has dem a n d e d equal time. As she sent 524 green iM & M's ' m y favorite kind) with her letter, I h a d to comply. She begins: "So how are you? We a r e all fine e x c e p t for Marvin, the neighbor boy. He's been d r a f t e d . It's r a t h e r sad as he is only six. The board insisted he w a s n ' t m a k i n g sufficient progress to stay in kind e r g a r t e n . His parents ( t h e y ' r e so un-American) a r e appealing the decision. " I had actually forgotten how progressive your school w a s until I r e a d in the iNew Y o r k T i m e s

.

Evening Appointments

Available (Good Pizza)

Rev. Gordon Van Oostenburg, Pastor

ESSENBURG STUDIO

Rev. Wilbur Daniels, Associate Pastor "PORTRAITS .. 20th and Central

by Von ins

WITH PERSONALITY"

2 0 8 River Ave. (between 8th & 9th)

o

DELIVERY

396-3674

1 0 2 River

396-5632


November 19, 1965

Hope College anchor

Page 7

Backstage Crews Are an Integral Part of Theater B a c k s t a g e a t e v e r y successful t h e a t r i c a l p r o d u c t i o n t h e r e is a good t e c h n i c a l c r e w . This crew, b r o k e n down into the specialized c a t e g o r i e s of lights, s o u n d , cost u m i n g , set c o n s t r u c t i o n , properlies, b u s i n e s s a n d m a k e - u p ordinarily f u n c t i o n s so well t h a t the a u d i e n c e , the public which m a k e s or b r e a k s a show f i n a n c i a l l y , is s e l d o m a w a r e of just w h a t all t h e t e c h n i c a l people did to h a v e their n a m e s listed in the p r o g r a m besides t h e n a m e s of t h e a c t o r s .

BACKSTAGE—Work on costumes for coming Palette productions

is heing done

by

(left to

right)

and

Sharon

Masque

Wilterdink,

Grork (itid Medieval

Second Phase of Student Teaching Opens Soon Bunker School and Cynthia Headier and J u d y Lee teaching at Angell School. P a t E l z e r m a n and Diane R e i f s n e i d e r will live in Grand Haven and teach at C e n t r a l Elementary School and White

" H i p p o l y t u s " and " T h e F a r c e of the Worthy M a s t e r P i e r r e Pathelin." two one-act plays, will be p r e s e n t e d by P a l e t t e and M a s q u e on Dec. 1. 2. 3 and 4 in Snow Auditoritim at 8:15 p.m.

School r e s p e c t i v e l y . Carol Thomp-

Euripides' tragedy "Hippolytus" deals with one a s p e c t of the unfolding of a divine oracle. Hip-

son is also assigned to the While School in Grand Haven.

f

p

Dirkse Comments Mr. L a m o n t Dirkse of t h e e d u c a tion d e p a r t m e n t c o m m e n t e d , " T h e new p r o g r a m will give t h e s e student t e a c h e r s a m o r e r e a l i s t i c picture of what full-time t e a c h i n g is really like. All their t i m e will be focused on their s t u d e n t t e a c h ing e x p e r i e n c e . Not only will they be in the c l a s s r o o m for full day sessions, but t h e y will also be involved in pupil g u i d a n c e a n d counseling, p a r e n t - t e a c h e r c o n f e r e n c e s , professional m e e t i n g s a n d community a c t i v i t i e s . "

Assignments

polytus is f a t e d to be the o b j e c t of the love of his s t e p m o t h e r P h a e d r a : his a t t e m p t to avoid the situation by worshipping the goddess A r t e m i s is futile.

the plays and is a s s i s t e d by J o h n E l f r i n g . T h e technical staff is directed by J a m e s M a l c o l m and Robert Wegter and c h o r e o g r a p h y is by Mrs. Robert De B r u y n .

The c a s t for the play includes A! Wildschut as Hippolytus. Mike Vogas as Theseus, Kathy Lenel as P h a e d r a . Alice F r e n c h as A r t e m i s , C h a r l e s Van Ark as the m e s s e n g e r . Linda Patterson as Aphrodite. Irene M a a t m a n as t h e nurse, J e d Green as the old s e r v a n t , Hal Huggins, M a r t i n Van Houzen. T o m Hendrickson. and Bob Schwegler as h u n t s m e n , and Ann S l a u g h t e r and M a r y Ann Bicking as h a n d m a i d e n s . The Chorus, consisting of nine people will be led by J e f f MacGilvray.

The various stagecrews are headed by T o m C o l e m a n , S c e n e r y ; Mel A n d r i n g a . M a k e - u p ; Sue Stoeckly. Costumes; Lee Van Dyke. Lights; Leslie B r u g g e m y e r , P r o p s ; Bob S c h r o e d e r , Sound; and Rich Reitveld. Business and P u b licity. Technical a s s i s t a n t s include Anne de Velder as C o s t u m e Mistress and Mike Vogas, Lighting and Scenery.

" T h e F a r c e of the Worthy M a s ter P i e r r e P a t h e l i n " by an anonym o u s a u t h o r is a m e d i e v a l e x a m ple of " c o m m e d i a d e r a r t e . " This style consists of little interaction of p l a y e r s , allowing the c h a r a c t e r s to s p e a k directly to the audience instead. P i e r r e Pathelin is a c r a f t y l a w y e r who a t t e m p t s to c h e a t and unwittingly e n d s up being c h e a t e d .

Service

Dr. E d w a r d S a v a g e is d i r e c t i n g

nt VICTORY SMILES—Sophomores Priscilla Kempker (left) and Mary smile

proudly

over

W h a t e v e r the i n t e n d e d goal of crew m e m b e r s , m o s t s t u d e n t s bec o m e involved in the r o m a n c e of the t h e a t e r and c o m e to find t h a t s o m e of the w a r m e s t a n d most subtle m o m e n t s of h u m a n relationships a r e u n c o v e r e d d u r i n g t h e p r o c e s s of putting on a show. T h e t h e a t e r is light, sound and color— t h e s e idealistically. Realistically t h e a t e r d r a w s and holds w o r k e r s and a c t o r s alike b e c a u s e it is expressive, hard work, exciting, c r a z y hours, black coffee and a few s t r a n g e smells like g r e a s e paint and c i g a r e t s m o k e . It r e p r e sents c o m r a d e s h i p in the g r e a t e s t sense, a s y n t h e s i s of the t a l e n t s and goals of e v e r y single person involved.

Works to Play

Pierre P a t h e l i n is p l a y e d by Dennis J o n e s , G u i l l e m e t t e by Susan A r m s t r o n g , the d r a p e r by J a n H u b e r t , the s h e p h e r d by T o m C o l e m a n and the j u d g e by Keith Taylor.

Damstra

For s o m e technical w o r k e r s , c r e w s s e e m m e r e l y a n introduction to t h e t h e a t e r f r o m which they m a y join the r a n k s of p e r formers.

P&M P r e s e n t s T w o Plays

For the rest of the s e m e s t e r these 14 girls will s t u d e n t t e a c h in full-day sessions at v a r i o u s ele m e n t a r y schools. (In the r e g u l a r p r o g r a m , s t u d e n t s teach h a l f - d a y sessions in schools as well as attend c l a s s e s at Hope all s e o n e s t e r ) .

Mr. D i r k s e also r e m a r k e d t h a t the girls would be exposed to new teaching s y s t e m s in their schools. The professional s e m e s t e r is an e x p e r i m e n t a l p r o g r a m ; if s u c c e s s ful, it m a y be e x t e n d e d to include student t e a c h i n g at the s e c o n d a r y level.

s y s t e m . F o r girls t h e r e is a l w a y s the lure of new m a k e u p t e c h n i q u e s and w o r k i n g with clothes.

In i n t e r v i e w i n g a n u m b e r of Hope s t u d e n t s c o n c e r n i n g the m e r its of s e r v i n g r e l a t i v e l y anonymously behind the scenes, m o s t c l a i m e d t h a t they e n j o y e d working for t h e t h e a t e r b e c a u s e it g i v e s t h e m the o p p o r t u n i t y to meet people on an i n f o r m a l basis. For s o m e , t h e t h e a t e r lots t h e m w o r k off the t e n s i o n s f r o m schoolwork— to get their cut-offs covered with paint a n d to really drive a few nails—a sort of group t h e r a p y operation, with m a n y possibilites for expression. Men m a y find positions involving use of e l e c t r i c a l knowledge, c a r p e n t r y skills, business or a proficiency with sound

As a p a r t of the c r e a t i v e adv e n t u r e of " T h e a t e r , " c r e w m e m bers m a y find their p a r t i c u l a r m o d e of self-expression a useful and n e c e s s a r y contribution to the a r t i s t i c c h a l l e n g e involved in producing a play. T h e a t e r , defined as a s y n t h e s i s of the a r t s , obviously r e q u i r e s all skillful t e c h n i c i a n s a v a i l a b l e to i m p l e m e n t the illusion of r e a l i t y p r o d u c e d by t h e actor. To p r o v e how obvious this m a y be. s u b t r a c t either lights or publicity, or both, from t h e t h e a t r i c a l endeavor.

Bernice Va-n Engen, Sue Stoeckly and Mary Damstra.

Last Monday the e d u c a t i o n dep a r t m e n t began the second p h a s e of its e x p e r i m e n t a l p r o g r a m for student t e a c h i n g at the e l e m e n t a r y level. F o r the past nine w e e k s of the s e m e s t e r , the 14 p a r t i c i p a n t s in the " p r o f e s s i o n a l s e m e s t e r prog i a m " w e r e enrolled in e d u c a t i o n courses. Classes met in special double sessions in o r d e r to complete a s e m e s t e r ' s work.

In educational theater, like H o p e ' s Little T h e a t e r , the d e p e n d ence upon technical aid f r o m volu n t e e r s is especially i m p o r t a n t to each p r o d u c t i o n ' s s u c c e s s . Students, unlike professional c r e w m e n , h a v e o t h e r obligations. O n c e listed on t h e crew and counted a s a necessary contribution, they m a y , to use the v e r n a c u l a r , " f i n k o u t . " T h e y r a r e l y do, h o w e v e r .

their class's

Nykerk

triumph

last

Thanksgiving Will Be

Held Tuesday On T u e s d a y , Nov. 23, a T h a n k s giving s e r v i c e will be held in Mulder Chapel of Western Theological S e m i n a r y f r o m 9 to 9:45 p . m . Rev. J e n t z of Religion and Bible d e p a r t m e n t at Hope will b e the s p e a k e r and he will be a s s i s t e d by Chaplain Hillegonds of the college. The Motet Choir will sing in the chapel, which holds approxim a t e l y 250 persons. T h e service will be open to all interested s t u d e n t s who would like to worship, said Rev. Hillegonds.

K X X X

X •%

Saturday. This was the fourth straight victory for the class of 1968 as they retired the Nykerk cup.

Seven of the 14 girls a r e s t a y i n g on c a m p u s and t e a c h i n g in local schools: C a r o l Borst and A n n e Sutton at J e f f e r s o n School; J u d y T h o m a s and Phyllis A n d e r s o n at Longfellow School; Carol H o w e s and M a r y Cousineau at G l e r u m School, West O t t a w a ; a n d M a r c i a D o z e m a n at the Roosevelt School in Zeeland. F o u r girls will live in Muskegon for the rest of the s e m ester, Judy VanderNaald and Elizabeth King t e a c h i n g t h e r e at

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Page 8

November 19, 1%5

Hope College anchor

Have 4-5 Season

Soccermen Awarded Letters By J a m e s Mace Having c o m p l e t e d its f i r s t season of v a r s i t y competition, H o p e ' s s o c c e r t e a m looks to the f u t u r e with a g r e a t deal of hope a n d s o m e cautious o p t i m i s m . Coach Philip Van Eyl a w a r d e d 11 m e m b e r s of the t e a m v a r s i t y l e t t e r s for their o u t s t a n d i n g cont r i b u t i o n s to the t e a m and of the 11 l e t t e r m e n only seven will r e t u r n f o r the 1966 soccer season. Finishing the s e a s o n with a 4-5 m a r k and a 2-4 r e c o r d in the Midw e s t Collegiate Soccer Assn., the Flying Dutch fell s o m e w h a t short of the 6-1-1 record they compiled in their initial soccer c a m p a i g n in 1964.

REBOUND!—Chr'-s Buys s n a g s the ball in practice drill under supervision of Coach DeVette. The varsity will open its season Dec. 4 against Concordia College. From left to right are Jim Klein, Carl Halters, Bill Potter, Claire Van Wieren and Buys.

However, facing v a r s i t y s q u a d s f o r the f i r s t t i m e Hope t u r n e d in a very good season and showed t h e y could play s o c c e r with such t e a m s as Wheaton College and the University of Illinois. Although def e a t e d by Wheaton, 3-2 and Illinois 5-3, the Dutch p l a y e d two outs t a n d i n g g a m e s and g a v e their opponents a real run for their money.

Fall Sports Are Honored By Banquet; Ainmnus Speaks T h e a n n u a l fall sports b a n q u e t w a s held y e s t e r d a y e v e n i n g in D u r f e e Hall to honor the m e m b e r s of the Hope football, s o c c e r and cross c o u n t r y s q u a d s . Athletic d i r e c t o r Gordon B r e w e r invited m a n y c o a c h e s f r o m K e n t a n d Ottawa Counties who h a d att e n d e d Hope to c o m e to the d i n n e r . They w e r e also r e q u e s t e d to bring along any of t h e i r v a r s i t y p l a y e r s w h o might be interested in att e n d i n g Hope. T h e Rev. J o h n A d a m s of Ypsilanti w a s the f e a t u r e d s p e a k e r .

Dutchmen Set 1965-66 Schedule For Baskethall D e c e m b e r 4 Concordia D e c e m b e r 7 Valpariso D e c e m b e r 10 Wheaton D e c e m b e r 15 Adrian D e c e m b e r 28 . 29 . 30

Home Away Away Away Union

College T o u r n e y S c h e n e c t a d y , New York January January January January January January January

February February February February February February February. February

5 8 12 15 19 22 28

Olivet Home Alma Away Albion Home Calvin Home Kalamazoo Away Wooster Home Spring Arbor

2 5 9 12 16 19 23 26

Home Home Home Away Home Away Home Away Away

Wheaton Kalamazoo Aquinas Adrian Olivet Alma Albion Calvin

Senior Portraits Next W e d n e s d a y is the d e a d line for h a v i n g senior Milestone p o r t r a i t s taken. Seniors m u s t m a k e a r r a n g e m e n t s with one of the five p a r t i c i p a t i n g p h o t o g r a p h e r s to h a v e their p i c t u r e s t a k e n on or before this d a t e , a c c o r d i n g to Milestone editor J o n Wiegand. E a c h p h o t o g r a p h e r h a s a disp l a y in the Van R a a l t e lobby. P r o o f s m u s t be r e t u r n e d by Dec. 9.

Rev. A d a m s was an All-MIAA h a l f - b a c k with th(A 1953 M1AA Hope c h a m p i o n s . The m a i n p u r p o s e of the d i n n e r w a s to honor the t h r e e Hope varsities t h a t c o m p e t e this fall: the football t e a m t h a t finished second in t h e MIAA behind Albion, the s o c c e r t e a m t h a t played its initial v a r s i t y s e a s o n in t h e Midwest Collegiate S o c c e r Association and t h e c r o s s c o u n t r y s q u a d t h a t took fourth in t h e MIAA. C a p t a i n s w e r e also chosen f o r each of the r e s p e c t i v e t e a m s f o r next season.

The 11 p l a y e r s who w e r e a w a r d ed letters include Walt B r u i n s m a , Gibson Dallah, Dave Yntema, J a i m e Zeas, A1 Griswold, Cornelius Agori-Iwe, B r i a n Bailey, Tony Mock. Doug Nichols, P i e r r e S e n d e and F r e d S c h u t m a a t . Of the 11, B r u i n s m a , Y n t e m a , Zeas and Dallah will g r a d u t a e this J u n e . Zeas, w h o w a s the c a p t a i n of this y e a r ' s t e a m and the l e a d i n g

Keun Kroodsma Named For All-MIAA Squad Bill K e u r and C a p t a i n R o g e r K r o o d s m a of H o p e ' s football t e a m w e r e n a m e d this week to the allM1AA football t e a m of 23 m e m bers. K e u r , a s e n i o r f r o m Muskegon. w a s selected as a b a c k on t h e o f f e n s i v e t e a m while K r o o d s m a w a s n a m e d to a l i n e b a c k e r position on t h e d e f e n s i v e t e a m . A m o n g the p l a y e r s who r e c e i v e d h o n o r a b l e mention w e r e five of H o p e ' s D u t c h m e n . T h e y a r e def e n s i v e bac k T o m D e K u i p e r , senior; q u a r t e r b a c k H a r l a n Hyink, s e n i o r ; d e f e n s i v e end a n d offensive t a c k l e J o e K u s a k , senior; fullback C h a r l i e L a n g e l a n d , j u n i o r ; a n d d e f e n s i v e end P a u l Wassenaar, sophomore.

Kroodsma Selected MVP By Grid Teammates R o g e r K r o o d s m a , c a p t a i n of the 1965 Flying D u t c h m e n football t e a m , w a s n a m e d Hope's m o s t valuable p l a y e r for this p a s t season by a vote of the t e a m (members. K r o o d s m a played four y e a r s und e r head coach Russ DeVette on both the offensive and d e f e n s i v e platoons and h a s a l w a y s been one of the s t a l w a r t s on the Hope s q u a d . This season he played m i d d l e lineb a c k e r in e v e r y g a m e and filled in at left and right o f f e n s i v e end on occassion. T h e 21-year-old, Zeeland n a t i v e took the place of ends Bill Hultgren and Bruce Menning when t h e y w e r e struck with i n j u r i e s . Howe v e r , K r o o d s m a w a s at his best on d e f e n s e and he helped to m a k e the Hope d e f e n s i v e eleven the powe r f u l unit it w a s d u r i n g the l a s t football c a m p a i g n . K r o o d s m a also lent a talented toe to the Dutch a t t a c k . H e kicked six e x t r a points this s e a s o n a n d also s n a g g e d t h r e e p a s s e s t h a t w e r e good for two-point conversions. He hauled in f o u r p a s s e s good for 77 y e a r d s in r e g u l a r season p l a y to t a k e the 10th spot f o r MIAA p a s s r e c e i v e r s . All in all, his efforts helped the D u t c h m e n b r e a k even f o r the 1965 s e a s o n and finish second in t h e MIAA with a 3-2 record. E v e n l a s t y e a r , when Hope fell to a 2-6 m a r k

K r o o d s m a w a s at his b e s t as a l i n e b a c k e r a n d offensive e n d . F o r his 1964 e f f o r t s he r e c e i v e d honorable m e n t i o n for the All-MIAA team. By virtue of his selection as the Hope MVP. K r o o d s m a b e c a m e eligible for the Randall C. Bosch T r o p h y a w a r d e d every y e a r to the m o s t v a l u a b l e player in t h e MIAA. T h e w i n n e r is p r e s e n t e d with a d i a m o n d - s t u d d e d , gold football in recognition of his a c h i e v e m e n t .

ROG KROODSMA All-MIAA and Hope's Most

C

F

Valuable

U

COLLEGE GROUP

Player

S

BILL KEUR ALL-MIAA

SENIORS GRADUATION PORTRAITS by

HERFST

Such p l a y e r s a s Griswold, Sende, K w a l a S i m w a n z a and Nichols will

O

Albion, c o n f e r e n c e c h a m p i o n s , led all t h e MIAA selections with eight m e m b e r s , while K a l a m a z o o h a d f o u r . A d r i a n had t h r e e a n d A l m a , H o p e a n d Olivet e a c h placed two.

be e x p e c t e d t o t a k e up t h e offens i v e b u r d e n next y e a r w h i l e D a v e P i e t , D a v e DeVelder, S c h u t m a a t , Mock and Agori-Iwe will s p e a r h e a d the d e f e n s e . Also r e t u r n i n g n e x t y e a r will be M a r k Oudersluys, T o m Cook, Neal Sobania and T o m H i l d e b r a n t . 'Goalie B r i a n Bailey who w a s inj u r e d for the b e t t e r p a r t of this p a s t season will r e t u r n n e x t y e a r a s will J i m Knott who p l a y e d m o s t of this y e a r in Bailey's a b s e n c e .

s c o r e r in the two-year h i s t o r y of the t e a m , will be sorely m i s s e d as will e v e r y one of the fellows who h a d c o m p e t i t i v e e x p e r i e n c e . .Zeas finished second in t e a m scoring last season to Bennett A m e t e f e and c a p t u r e d the t e a m scoring h o n o r s this y e a r , including o n e four-goal g a m e a g a i n s t O a k l a n d University.

STUDIO

7 W . 8th St.

CREATIVE SPEAKERS

REFRESHMENTS

Last week a college g r o u p called Focus h a d its first m e e t i n g at H o p e C h u r c h . T h e m e e t i n g was well a t t e n d e d a n d the p r e s e n t a t i o n by Prof. Jean J a v a g e was excellent. H e r e is h o p i n g t h a t m a n y m o r e s t u d t n t s will t u r n o u t for t h e c o m i n g events. Meetings are h e l d in t h e J u n i o r H i g h R o o m , on the second f l o o r at H o p e C h u r c h ,

EX 2 - 2 6 6 4 SUNDAY,

NOVEMBER

DR.

AGAIN, THIS YEAR

21,

7:00

P.M.

LARS GRANBERG -

on —

CHRISTIAN FAITH: NEUROTIC A N D MATURE APPROACHES

The Number One Ski Shop In Western Michigan.

TONIGHT

STEERING COMMITTEE: Tom Bast

and

Come A n d See Joyce Nelson

TOMORROW

ADVISORS:

See

#A(/S

THE FRATER FROLICS AT

Pat Z o e t Bill ftiills Carl Ten Pas

Dr. Arthur Jentz, Rev. Jack Walchenbach

December 5th December 12th

D e a n T h o m a s Carey Rev. J o h n A l l a n

W o m a n ' s Literary Club i Adm. 75c

8 p.m.

River Ave. At 11th Street

YOU

ARE

WELCOME

TO ATTEND


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