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I'm melting! Melting! November I 995

Hope College • Holland, Michigan • A n independent nonprofit publication • Serving the H o p e College C o m m u n i t y for I 09 years

check it out.

Assault victims question College van policy. InFocus, page 9.

College shrinks n e w hall capacity JENN DORM staff r e p o r t e r

T h e College planned to house 2 7 2 students in the Cook Residence Hall currently under construction, but rising: costs forced planners to downsize the hall's capacity by 8 0 students. T h e C o o k Residence Hall that will ajoin the Haworth C o n f e r e n c e and Learning Center will n o w house 183 students. A b o o m i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n m a r k e t in West Michigan has been held responsible for the sudden increase in construction prices, thus the need to reduce the size of the residence hall, said Bill Anderson, vice-president of finance for the College. "This is not a g o o d , t i m e to do construction projects," Anderson said. ' T h e construction business climate is b o o m i n g and contractors have more bids than they can handle, so they are able to increase their prices." T h e building is costing the College 20 to 25 percent more than w a s originally budgeted. The building is a $15 million project, with $4 million provided by a gift to the College, and

the remainder being borrowed, Anderson said. " W e would have had to borrow more money to complete the building as originally planned," he said. R a t h e r than this, the College decided to d o w n s i z e the project. Overall structurewill be the same, and rooms will remain the s a m e size. S o m e storage space w a s eliminated and the w i n g s of t h e b u i l d i n g w e r e modified and shortened. " T h e project is just a little smaller now," Anderson said. Anderson adds that the decrease in capacity is not a major setback, because the original 1993 proposal for the building included space for only 150 students. "We extended our original plan to house 150 students to the capacity of 270 students if w e could meet the budget. Now w e are cutting back to 183, which is still an increase from the num-

ber that we had originally proposed," Anderson said. T h e College has pulled in record n u m b e r s of students for several years running, but is not worried that the lower housing capacity will c a u s e a crunch. ' T o combat the demand f o r housing, Hope is planning on stabilizing the enr o l l m e n t so it w i l l not continue to increase," Anderson said. The b o o m i n g enrollment this year forced the College to purchase more housing, including new cottages and new apartments. T h i s also helped to alleviate the space that would be provided by a larger residence hall. T h e Haworth Center, a 200-person capacity cafeteria and conference center, should be c o m pleted on schedule in 1996. T h e a d j o i n i n g residence hall will be completed and functional for living in the fall of 1997.

We would have to borrow more money to complete the building as originally planned. —Bill Anderson, Vi'cePresident o f Finance

Officer crashes snowball fight SANDRA FUNK staff r e p o r t e r

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Guest speaker discusses societal gender norms, pressures. Intermission, page 6.

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I Anchor staffers take on Capitol Hill at media conference. Opinion, page 4.

A public safety officer drove his vehicle into a tree while attempting to disperse a c r o w d of s n o w - f r o l i c k i n g s t u d e n t s at Kollen Hall last Wednesday night. T h e officer crashed at 12:55 a.m. while responding to a complaint that a mob of students w e r e throwing snowballs at cars and windows. T h e officer drove o n t o the grass at the rear of the hall and lost control of his vehicle in the snow. T h e accident caused $2,000 damage to the p u b l i c s a f e t y v e h i c l e and 12 s t i t c h e s to the o f f i c e r ' s forehead. T h e officer w a s responding the fourth c o m plaint iin two hours about rowdiness outside the hall when the accident occurred. T h e o f f i c e r had arrived to find Lot A blocked by an illegally parked a u t o m o b i l e , and then drove over the curb and onto the grass to the rear entrance of Kollen to assess the situation. T h e vehicle fish-tailed, striking a tree. T h e officer estimated his speed upon impact w a s five to ten miles per hour. "The officer does not feel that anyone present w a s in danger of his driving on the grass," said Director of Public Relations Tom Renner. The officer estimated that students were 9 0 to 100 feet from his vehicle. S t u d e n t s q u i c k l y d i s p e r s e d f o l l o w i n g the crash, and no disciplinary action was taken.

Greeks grounded f r o m College-owned buses JIM RIEKSE infocus e d i t o r

Little Red and the Into t h e Woods cast enchant in theater. Section, page 6.

PR p h o t o

W E A R E F / V M I L Y : Even year Song Girls embrace when judges announce the news that the Nykerk Cup was captured by the sophomores. The annual freshmen vs. sophomore women competition featuring song, oration and play was held Nov. 4 at the Holland Civic Center. Song girls from left to right: Renee Saar ('98), Lori Parent ('98) and Shannon Werner ('98). Seephotostory, page 5.

H o p e ' s fraternities and sororities requested a policy r e v i e w by the A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A f f a i r s Board last week after discovering Greek access to College-provided transportation was at least temporarily suspended. T h e request for the review, signed by the presidents of all twelve Greek organizations, was inspired by a letter from Chris Collins ('97), president of the Cosmopolitan fraternity. Previously, Greek organizations payed to reserve College-owned transportation and a driver for their o f f - c a m p u s events, thus lowering the number of students that drove under the influence to or from the event. Collins wrote an open letter to Greeks relating how he placed a busing request for a Cosmopolitan Nov. 3 activity, only to discover that the transportation policy w a s "at that very moment being reviewed" and that "transportation priviledges had been indefinitely suspended for all Greeks," Collins said. His letter questioned if proper procedures were followed in c o m i n g to the decision to suspend

Greek transportation. " O n e day things are as they used to be and half an hour later it is suspended without the Greeks having any warning," Collins said. Dean Frost refutes the idea that the College used "improper procedures" in the suspension. "We make decisions every day how to use our resources," Frost said. "I don't think w e have the resources to sit with students every day to say T h i s is what we are going to do.' We are not set up to have consultations on every decision." Frost said that the issue does not focus on what the College ' o w e s ' Greeks. "The issue revolves around limited resources," Frost said. "We have a limited number of vans and need to decide w h o gets the priority in their usage. Obviously, education is number one." T h e revision request given to the Administrative Affairs Board named the concern that the transportation suspension could lead to a rise in the number of students driving to Greek events drunk. The Greek revision request freely admits that alcohol is served at many of the o f f - c a m p u s func m o r e BUSES on 2

Knicks, Praters regain status JESSICA

OWENS

staff r e p o r t e r

T h e Fraternal Society and Knickerbocker Fraternity are back on track with renewed status following the Nov. 7 C a m p u s Life Board meeting. Over a month has passed since the recognized status of the t w o fraternities w a s temporarily suspended pending submission of the names of the g r o u p s ' advisors' for approval f r o m the Board. T h e Fraters submitted a proposal Nov. 7 to have Stuart Post and William Japinga serve as co-advisors to the fraternity. T h e proposal w a s accepted by the Board, thereby reinstating the fraternity's status. The Knicks e n j o y e d the s a m e s u c c e s s soon after, but not after facing daunting results in their advisor search. At the meeting the Knicks presented the B o a r d with a list of 16 m e m b e r s of the College's faculty w h o m they had approached to serve as advisor. All 16 had declined to serve the position. "Charlie Hoats w a s approved at the last m o r e F R A T E R N I T I E S on 9


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campus briefs Students pitch in t o plant 700 trees Seventeen Hope students pitched in to plant 7 0 0 trees at Van Raalte Farm in two and a half hours Nov. 4 as part of a service project led by the Environmental Issues G r o u p . "It was nice to be able to work with people and do something that's

good for the world,' said Rob Andretz ('97), a member of the both the Centurian and Alpha Phi Omega fraternities. M e m b e r s o f t h e A l p h a Phi O m e g a Service Fraternity and the Centurian Fraternity pitched in to give pine seedlings a new home.

Power outage strikes campus, city A p o w e r outage struck c a m p u s and much of H o l l a n d ' s core city Saturday morning, but aside from some inconveniences, no real harm w a s done, according to College o f -

ter. "Fortunately it w a s n ' t too terribly cold, but it certainly w a s an inconvenience/' said Jerry R a d e m a k e r , assoc i a t e director of

ficials. While p o w e r w a s cut to the c o m puter labs, none of the Vaxes went down and no data w a s lost, according to Carl Heideman. Director of

physical plant. T h e power w a s cut to the College w h e n the c i t y ' s Board of Public Works cut power in the core city. "It w a s not an internal outage," R a d e m a k e r s a i d . " T h e Board of Public Works was not f e e d i n g our power loop." Power w a s restored to the College by noon.

CIT. Students in residence halls, apartments and cottages lost power for about two hours, leaving students with no heat, lights or even hot w a -

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photo by Karen McKeown

C O O K I N G W I T H C U LTTLJ RE: Japanese international students display their wares at International Night Saturday in the Maas. The cultural food fair featured native cuisine prepared by students, who appeared in native dress. From left: Gwendolyn Yao ('96), Mami Takasawa, Ayumi Suzuki, Mari Oshima, Kuniaki Nagano, Sachie Sumi, Wakanako Fugawara and Mayumi Veda.

C L E P t e s t i n g o n t h e d e c l i n e Father Dowling creator learn it in college. But the number of students taking this w a y out is

JENN D O R N staff r e p o r t e r

W h i l e s o m e s t u d e n t s get f r e a k e d out by the registration rush, those in the know will be f r p ^ d of i a k i n g s o m e b a s i c classes. They have C L E P e d out. T h e College Level E x a m i n a tion Program ( C L E P ) test allows students with a firm g r a s p on a subject to get credit by testing out of the class. "The C L E P test is an exam that is administered here on c a m p u s that students can take to earn college c r e d i t , " said S h a r o n H o o g e n d o o r n , data analyst and entry specialist, w h o administers all the C L E P tests to H o p e students. S u b j e c t s ranging f r o m Intro to M i c r o e c o n o m i c s to Analysis and Interpretation of Literature are available for credit, as well as the oft-used foreign language tests. T h e idea is a pretty sound one. Take a proficiency test in a subject and score out of having to re-

BUSING f r o m

dropping. T h e n u m b e r of students w h o opt to take the C L E P test has declined q u i t e a bit o v e r the past several years. Just two years ago, about 150 students took a C L E P test throughout the year. S o far this year, only 2 0 students have taken it. A m a j o r reason f o r this is the c h a n g e in the credit g r a n t e d f o r placement in language courses. "The language C L E P exams have always been the most popular tests b e c a u s e students would take lang u a g e s in high school and then be able to test out of them in college through the CLEP. T h e r e has been a decline and fewer students are taking the e x a m s because credit is now given for the language placement tests," Hoogendoorn said. " T h e d i f f e r e n t d e p a r t m e n t s on c a m p u s set the score that is needed to earn credit, so it varies from subject to subject," Hoogendoorn said. Normally, the exam is a typical

pencil and paper exam, but special case students can now take the C L E P test on computer. By taking the e x a m on c o m puter, the student is able to receive their results instantan e o u s l y , r a t h e r than wait the standard 4-6 weeks to find out the results. " F o r the most part, students w h o a r e g r a d u a t i n g and find t h e m s e l v e s short on credit or having yet to fulfill a core requirement are the ones w h o use the c o m p u t e r C L E P test," she said. "This w a y they have the possibility of taking the test here and immediately knowing their results," Hoogendoorn said. "We only want to use the c o m p u t e r s for such emergency situations. It is also useful for handicap students and students with learning disabilities." C L E P tests are offered each month on a set date. T h e exams take about t w o h o u r s to c o m plete and there is a $55 fee.

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tions. " T h e reality is: college students parly," the proposal reads. In regard to this reality, the proposal lists several "simple truths." " F r a ternities and sororities will continue to throw parties. Students will find m e a n s n e c e s s a r y to a t t e n d these events even if that puts them at risk, for example, walking alone at night and driving under the influence." T h e proposal also recognizes the College's motives for the change, but believes that such c o n c e r n s are secondary. " T h e t h r e a t of d a m a g e to the College's reputation for providing transportation is minimal compared to the threat of s o m e o n e being hurt or killed in an accident or assault," said one student. All presidents of Greek organizations agree that suspending transportation might e n d a n g e r students. " T h e college isn't taking safety into a c c o u n t , " said D e b b i e C a m p b e l l ( ' 9 6 ) , president of the

Dorian Sorority. " T h e C o l l e g e is really d i s c r i m i n a t i n g against the Greeks." But r e p u t a t i o n is n o t t h e C o l l e g e ' s only concern. Abuse of Hope transportation by Greeks is a sore spot for Frost. " W e ' v e b e e n c o n f r o n t e d with situations where an organization has damaged a bus, left it filthy, left alcohol containers, smoked on the bus and been o b n o x i o u s to the driver," he said. The suspension is across the board for all Greek organizations, with no exceptions based on past behavior. "Previously, w e could use the van as much as w e wanted based on our behavior," Collins said. "We (Cosmos) used the vans for H o m e c o m ing and returned them in the s a m e condition w e found them, with no problems. We should have access to transportation again. This suspension is across the board, regardless of record."

Liability is also a College c o n cern. "If a student that we transported were to die of alcohol poisoning, I could see a court case w h e r e they c o u l d r e a l l y lay t h e b l a m e on Hope," Frost said. "Imagine it, the prosecutor asking the Dean of Students whether or not he knows what g o e s o n at f o r m a t s . O b v i o u s l y drinking. So w e would have knowingly contributed to this student's death." Frost doesn't believe that the responsibility for the students is the College's alone. "If they decide these are the kind of events they are going to have, they have to take some kind of responsibility," Frost said. "Two years ago, an organization provided designated drivers and it worked well." Frost stresses that no permanent decision has been reached. "We are reviewing all kinds of questions and weighing possible risks," he said.

solves fiction mysteries in spare time at ND KIM P O W E L L staff r e p o r t e r

Ralph Mclnerny, author of the celebrated Father Dowling series, has solved ^he mystery of mystery writing, and shared his insight with about 100 students and faculty last T h u r s d a y in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel. " W r i t i n g is like p a i n t i n g , s h e said." You rough out a canvas and then begin to work on it until it is finished. I always start out with just o n e idea and let it grow from there." T h e popular mystery writer c a m e to c a m p u s as part of the Presidential lecture series. Mclnerny compared scholarly works to popular fiction. "The difference between the two is that popular fiction is read by more people," he said. O n e of the main draws to fiction writing is that it is something that can be read and enjoyed by everyone. "What every writer wants is to be read," Mclnerny said. B e i n g r e a d is s o m e t h i n g Mclnerny is plenty familiar with. His Father Dowling mystery series bridged the fiction/Hollywood g a p when it appeared as a television series starring Tom Bosley. Fiction writing isn't M c l n e r n y ' s only passion. He is also author of several scholarly works, a faculty member at the University of Notre D a m e and has received n u m e r o u s fellowships.

His fascination with writing began at a very y o u n g age. "At the age of thirteen I poured over a big green book of 20th c e n tury a u t h o r s , " said M c l n e r n y . It w a s n ' t until y.cars later as he prepared to join the priesthood that he realized that writing w a s his calling. " L i f e is a book," he said. "We set out to write o n e story and w e end u p writing another." Mclnerny proved to be a source of e n c o u r a g e m e n t f o r b e g i n n i n g writers at the lecture. "I w a s very impressed, he is an a m a z i n g man," said P a t i e n c e G r a y b i l l ( ' 9 7 ) . H e gave y o u n g writers a lot of tips on how to approach writing, I r e m e m ber he said ' d o n ' t think about it, just do i t / " "There are three kinds of writers," he said. ' T h o s e w h o know how to write but have nothing to say, those w h o don't know how to write but have s o m e t h i n g to say, and everyone else that talks about the pains of writing. Every writer needs to start with the basics and learn the rules. On ly after learning the rules can you break them," he said. Mclnerny is continuing to work at mastering his art, and if his popularity says anything, it's that he has figured out the mystery of mystery writing. His greatest hope is that his books remain popular with his readers. M c l n e r n y said: " W h e n I am gone, may it be said that ' h i s sins w e r e scarlet, but his b o o k s w e r e read.'"

Have you been missing someone special in your life lately? HOPE

GHUKeH

you to worship with IAS mm invites 11:00 a.m., Sundays Jrom Hope's campus, walk west, through Centennial park, to 7? West 11th Street.


November

I 5, I 995

DeHaan ( ' 9 6 ) c o u l d n ' t get a ride f r o m H o p e ' s shuttle v a n s e r v i c e , so instead she got a ride to the hospital. D e H a a n w a s a t t a c k e d returning f r o m an o f f - c a m p u s party, a location u n a c c e s s i b l e to the s h u t t l e v a n s d u e to c o l l e g e p o l i c y . Her assault is raising questions around campus as to the s o u n d n e s s of the College policy concerning o f f - c a m p u s transportation. DeHaan was headed home from Moon Tower on fourteenth street w h e n s h e d e c i d e d t o cut through the parking lot behind College East apartments. Two men, one while and one black, yelled for her to t 4 come t a l k , " an o f f e r w h i c h D e H a a n i g n o r e d and c o n t i n u e d walking. Apparently angered by the snubbing, the men followed her. "I wasn't going to run because I knew they could out run me," D e H a a n said. " T h e next thing I knew, a guy grabbed my arms and the other guy started whaling on me." DeHaan was hit in the stomach between five and eight times, her assailant asking, " Y o u ' r e too good to talk to us?" When she be-

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Shuttle Rebuttal Students question safety of College transportation policy

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by Jim Riekse infocus editor gan to yell, her attackers ran off. DeHaan ran home and called her friend Monica Zwart ('96) to take her to the hospital. They spent three hours in Holland Community Hospital's emergency room, where DeHaan was administered a CAT scan to check for a possible ruptured spleen. T h e test w a s n e g a t i v e and DeHaan was released after being treated for bruises and abrasions. After the attack, Tom Renner, director of public relations, issued a statement encouraging students to " w a l k in g r o u p s and use t h e shuttle vans." Dehaan had no such access to the shuttle van and could not convince anyone to walk home with her. Zwart contends that even walking in groups doesn't guarantee o n e ' s safety. She was accompanied by a male last year when she was assaulted, after which she had to have her j a w realigned. Both women view extended

I think I would rather have people puking in the back of the vans than being assaulted. —Kelli DeHaan shuttle van service as a possible solution to avoid future violence. "It is something that needs to be looked into," DeHaan said. "If transportation had been available, I would have taken it. I think I'd rather have people puking in the back of vans than being assaulted." "If they really want to stop violence, they need to do more than discouraging us to go to parties," Zwart said. "People are going to get to parties, and it is on the way home that we are really in danger."

Two years ago, the vans were allowed to shuttle s t u d e n t s o f f campus, but that practice was cut due to skyrocketing demand. "We simply couldn't take everyone everywhere they wanted to go," G r e g Maybury, director of operations and technology, said. "The most obvious solution was to reduce the demand by changing the availability from one college owned facility to another." R i c h a r d F r o s t , d e a n of dtudents, disagrees that students are entitled to get rides to off-campus parties. "They want to move off-campus, be able to drink and yet still get rides b a c k ? " Frost questioned. "This isn't a one way street." Frost sees other potential problems with offering the shuttle service.

"If we are to provide transportation to a party, why not to Meijer's or the mall?" Frost said. "It would seem like a reasonable request." Concern for the van drivers is also an issue. "Drunk students could be obscene with the drivers, cussing them out," Frost said. "If the driver says to get off the van, a fight could result." Shuttle van drivers agree that drunks can be unruly on the vans, but are concerned about the safety of those who have to walk off-campus. "I have been abused by drunk riders, especially when I don't know them, " A m e r Madi ('97), a shuttle driver, said. "They hop in the van and are loud and obnoxious. But I did drive a girl o f f - c a m p u s for a study group, simply because if my m o r e V A M on 9

Campus Pulse A^^V\~^-vAv^yvl^^AwV^WVv^AAnAn/Uv, When asked whether or not the College should allow the Public Safety van to transport students off-campus, Hope students said

"In light of the recent assault, I feel that it is essential that campus vans transport all students in the vicinity of the College." —Travis Long ( ' 9 6 )

"It is c o l d o u t s i d e . You d o n ' t want a bunch of drunk girls walking home alone." — C h r i s Ryden ( ' 9 9 )

"I think the van should be allowed to go off-campus. The use overall would be more good than bad." —Chi Le ('95)

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"The current policy is not fair. A lot of people live o f f campus. It doesn't mean you're going to a party." — M i k e Weiss ('95)

" T h e shuttle van would be a great sevice. Some houses are several blocks from campus and people would feel more comfortable knowing that they could get a ride home." — M a t t Williams ('98)

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Call X 7 5 8 4 Hope College Health Clinic (All services and records are confidential) The Health Clinic is open mornings 8:30-12:00 and 1:00-4:30. Please call for an appointment.

Jive toJazz Faculty Jazz Concert Wednesday, N o v e n b e r 15, 1995 7 p.m. i n Wichers A u d i t o r i u m


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Opinion

our voice. Shuttling responsibility O n t h e issue of p e r s o n a l safety, H o p e C o l l e g e advocates a policy of better s a f e than sorry...well...some of the time. W h i l e a late night shuttle van service is available to transport students f r o m c a m p u s b u i l d i n g to c a m p u s building, the C o l l e g e ' s p o l i c y l e a v e s t h e 4 8 5 H o p e s t u d e n t s l i v i n g in o f f - c a m p u s residences in the lurch. M a n y are f o r c e d to w a l k h o m e in the dark b y t h e m s e l v e s t o areas proven d a n g e r o u s t i m e and t i m e again. T h e safety policy for these students c o m e s in the f o r m of advice. " W a l k in g r o u p s " the C o l l e g e tells t h e m . A n d to q u o t e several s a f e t y w a r n i n g s after v a r i o u s assaults, " C a r r y a whistle and d o n ' t be afraid to b l o w it!" T h e policy h a s n ' t a l w a y s w o r k e d this way. T w o y e a r s a g o the shuttle s t o p p e d at an o f f - c a m p u s r e s i d e n c e s if within the b o u n d a r i e s of the designated van route. A c c o r d i n g to G r e g M a y b u r y , d i r e c t o r of o p e r a t i o n s and technology, the policy w a s halted b e c a u s e the service c o u l d not k e e p up with the high d e m a n d , a red f l a g the s e r v i c e w a s indeed utilized and needed. Despite the continued student d e m a n d , the administration looks as though it will not turn o v e r its p r e v i o u s decision. T h i s y e a r ' s e x c u s e is liability. A c c o r d i n g to D e a n of S t u d e n t s Richard Frost, the College fears taking responsibility f o r s t u d e n t s w h o are transported to o f f c a m p u s parties w h e r e d r i n k i n g m a y b e taking place. Vans may be trashed, drivers h a r a s s e d or, w o r s e yet, if a student g e t s into medical trouble, the school could be held responsible as an enabler of the b e h a v i o r that led to the e m e r g e n c y . Frankly, they d o n ' t want to be a taxi service. Tell that to Kelli D e H a a n and M o n i c a Zwart and the others like t h e m that h a v e been a c c o s t e d w a l k i n g h o m e late at night. T h o u g h the D e H a a n and Z w a r t a b u s e s o c c u r r e d w h i l e w a l k i n g h o m e f r o m parties, o t h e r s h a v e o c c u r r e d w h i l e s t u d e n t s w e r e c o m i n g h o m e f r o m class. T h e C o l l e g e o w e s their o f f - c a m p u s s t u d e n t s m o r e than just advice. H o p e C o l l e g e , as an institution a t t e m p t i n g to w o r k with the City of Holland to prevent and deal with the r a m i f i c a t i o n s of area v i o l e n c e , m u s t t a k e a c t i o n to e n s u r e t h e s a f e t y of their students, those w h o reside both o n and o f f - c a m p u s . T h e College, w h i l e it d o e s not need to e n d o r s e o f f - c a m p u s drinking, d o e s have a responsibility to c h a m p i o n of the s a f e t y of their students. T h e only t h i n g c h a m p i o n i n g students like D e H a a n and Z w a r t are their r u n n i n g shoes.

meet the press editor-in-chief Julie Blair operation manager Arin Neucks cam pus heat; editorJodi McFarland spotlight editor Amy-Lynn Halverson infocus editor Jim Riekse intermission editor Sufjan Stevens sports editor Greg Paplawsky graphics editor Jacob Roesch photo editors Jill Fischer Karen McKeown photographer Anne Horton copy editor Matt Sterenberg business mgr./ad repJulie Harris page designers Nina Bieliauskas Dave Schrier Kate Folkert Sufjan Stevens ad creator Russ Nelson distribution manager Dan Oderkirk faculty advisor Dennis Rentier Tad Doezema • Glyn Williams • Becky Halle nbeck • Ally son Pickens • Melissa Henvaldt • Tom Akland • Sandra Funk • Nicole McClain • Peter Emery • Michelle Piel • Laura Mi hail o f f • Den Swets • J enn Dorn •Justin Wainwright • Amy Vivio • Jess Owens The Anchor is a p r o d u c t o f s t u d e n t e f f o r t and is f u n d e d t h r o u g h t h e H o p e C o l l e g e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e . L e t t e r s t o t h e e d i t o r are e n c o u r a g e d , t h o u g h d u e t o s p a c e l i m i t a t i o n s the Anchor r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o e d i t . T h e o p i n i o n s addressed in t h e e d i t o r i a l are solely t h o s e o f t h e e d i t o r - i n chief. Stories f r o m t h e H o p e C o l l e g e N e w s Service are a p r o d u c t o f t h e Public R e l a t i o n s O f f i c e . O n e - y e a r s u b s c r i p t i o n s t o the Anchor a r e a v a i l a b l e f o r $ 1 I. W e r e s e r v e t h e r i g h t t o a c c e p t o r r e j e c t any a d v e r t i s i n g .

the

November

15, 1995

A WORD FROM THE EDITOR... There's nothing like quite like a pre-dawn phone call to rattle the nerves of a newspaper editor. And, because I have told The Anchor staff to never, ever, call me before 10 a.m. the morning after we go to press unless the office is burning down, I was especially unnerved to hear the voice of one of the editors a mere thirteen hours after the staff had set out on their journey to the Associated Press Convention in Washington D.C. Horrific thoughts flashed through my mind...what if the staff needed bail or bond, maybe a wire for large amounts of cash... As Murph's Law would have it, the College van the staff had been driving ran out of gas a half hour outside of the city on the Washington Parkway—during rush hour. Worse yet, the gas card the school had given the driver was not applicable to any of the gas stations on the east coast. Stranded and sleep deprived, the staff hung out on the curb of the highway watching all the type-A g o v e r n m e n t a l o f f i c i a l s w h i z to work while waiting for a tow truck. Luckily someone had a A A A card and the van got towed. It was then the staff realized they had only an

hour to sleep before the convention began. Alas. There's nothing quite like a long road trip to bring out the conflict resolution skills in people you work with. Julie Blair T h e rest of weekend, f r o m what the staff tells me, went well. Here's ted each and every issue. Few other papers at the convention, they said, an update. T h e competition for garnering a ' had been crafted by such perfectionranking as All-American was stiff. ists. . T h e best part of the weekend, the The weeklies in our category were full-color, twenty-page tabloid edi- staff said, was frolicking with the tions with huge budgets and double other journalists and e x c h a n g i n g the amount of computer equipment newspapers. we have at The Anchor. Therefore, In fact, the staff c a m e home with despite the enormously creative en- enough energy and ideas to make Mexican j u m p i n g beans look apaergies and time invested in our newspaper, we couldn't compete with the thetic. More than one editor sugtechnological b u c k s of other col- gested we run 20 pages this week with an additional special photo inleges. T h e staff did collect c o m m e n t s sert. While the production editor from various college newspaper ad- and I are not quite ready to make that leap, w e are more than happy visors, professional reporters and other students with hot tips to make to harness the new found vigor. With only two issues now ahead the most of what w e ' v e got. What the professionals read they of us before Christmas break, the liked. We got credit for writing to our staff is glad to be back in the game, audience and kudos for covering sen- refreshed and hungry to churn out sitive campus issues thoroughly. In another packed 12-pager, albeit a fact, two critiquers c o m m e n t e d that hefty loan from the A A A Club. Keep reading and let us know the newspaper actually looked overedited in that the information what you think. placed in The Anchor is perfectly fit-

your voice. Student disenchanted Dear Editor, I had the honor of participating in the Nykerk Competition as a Song Girl both my freshman and sophomore years. I discovered it to be an event rich in tradition, joy and dignity. This year I attended Nykerk as a spectator rather than a participant. I was disgusted by the random dis-

with Even Year Nykerk play

play of vulgarity exhibited by the sophomore play. I personally don't find jokes about boogers humorous. It was a distasteful section of an otherwise good play that did not belong in the Nykerk Competition. The bad connotations associated with it contradicted everything that Nykerk is all about. Nykerk is supposed to be showcase of talents presented in a mature.

Student expresses appreciation Dear Editor, ! would like to express some appreciation and a suggestion concerning the maintenance and uptake of this school's grounds. My appreciation is for the time, effort, and money that is put into making sure that it is never fall here at Hope. No sooner do those annoying and way-too-colorful leaves hit the g r o u n d than the e v e r - r e a d y g r o u n d s k e e p i n g p e o p l e are out with their leafblowers and that extravagantly huge leaf "sucker" that shows our well spent tuition dollars in action. Then, in the blink of an eye, the dying grass is once again revealed tor our optical pleasure. And these maintenance people's endurance is amazing! How terribly inconvenient of God to make it so all the leaves come off the trees in a gradual process rather than all at once. Still, they are out there after every gust of w i n d to c l e a n u p t h e n e w

yet entertaining way. I hope that this presentation of juvenile and revolting h u m o r e n d s a f t e r this y e a r ' s competition and doesn't raise its ugly head in the following years as an even year tradition. Sincerely, J o d i J a m e s ('97)

for leaf "suckers

"mess." Ah yes, the melodious sound of leafblowers drifting through my dorm window almost before the buzz of the lawn mowers of s u m m e r dies away. Herein lies the crux of my problem and the motive for my suggestion. I don't ever want to be able to open my window without the soothing buzz of machinery of some kind or another. So, I would like to make the following suggestion: Hope College should raise the tuition another thousand dollars and invest in dozens of blow d r y e r s . T h e n , w h e n the wretched snow begins to accumulate, the maintenance crew can come to the rescue ready to melt the snow. When the snow is particularly deep or heavy, the leaf sucker could be taken out, the suction power could be reversed, and we have instantly obtained a giant blower to melt the snow. What better c o m p a n i o n for studying for finals than the constant mechanized whine of countless blow dryers p e r s e v e r i n g to destroy the

9*

snow? Not only would the lullaby of H o p e n o w i n t o n e d u r i n g all months of the school year, but we could have the allusion of it always being summer! No longer would the ground be littered with annoying signs of the season like leaves and snow; the grass would be visible year-round. Possibly, it could also be arranged for that lovely, naturallooking blue-green grass substitute to be used w h e n the s n o w is removed, considering the dead grass of winter would then be visible. I thank you for this opportunity to express my long pent-up opinion. I encourage that this proposition be taken seriously. I'm sure many readers have aspired for the same high goals for this school, and I revel in the chance to bring some of them to light. Sincerely, C a r r i e D e V r i e s ('98)

Got something to say? Write a Letter to the Editor.


November

/^Anchor

15, I 9 9 5

Nykerlc

Even Year sips sweet success from silver Cup

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MOT-SO-SWEET" R E U N I O N : The seven dorks of'98 Play hook up the Wicked Witch of the West with wabbit hunter Elmer Fud. N A B HER!: The cast of y99 Play attempt to catch themselves a cranky queen in Wonderland. JULIE BLAIR editors-in-chief

In choosing the musical number "One...Singular Sensation" for the musical portion of the Nykerk Cup C o m p e t i t i o n , E v e n Year S o n g coaches Lisa Schrock and A n g i e Strey might have created a self-fulfilling prophecy. With the flash of S o n g G i r l s ' w h i l e g l o v e s , w o r d s of w i s d o m from orator Jess Grevenstuk and whimsical folly of Play, Even Year rocked the 60th annual competition to hold tight to the coveted Cup for a third year running. S h o w c a s i n g the talents of 3 5 0 women, the Nov. 4 extravaganza p a c k e d in p a r e n t s , f r i e n d s and Dutch alum for the three hour long competition, a tradition creatively modified this year by both ' 9 8 and '99. T h e Cup kicked off with , 9 9 , s foot-tapping doo-wah rendition of "We Go Together" from the musical Grease. Dressed in classic navy sweaters, skirts and white turtlenecks, S o n g Girls executed synchronized movements in a stellar display of dashing chor e o g r a p h y . For t h e first t i m e in t h r e e years, the group and

traditional piano player were c o m p l i m e n t e d b y an e n s e m b l e made up of two trumpets and an alto saxophone. Song Girls who opted to utilize their instrumental talents instead of sing in the chorus. Halfway through the piece, five Song Girls stepped off the bleachers to grease-it up 'SO's style, doing the shag and hand jive. T h e y w e r e m o v e s f a m i l i a r to Coach Kiersten Krause, an actress in high school who played the role of Frenchy, the beauty school dropout. Krause returned to her Rydell High role Nykerk night, conducting the chorus in a shiny Pepto-colored Pink Ladies jacket. "We picked a s o n g that everyb o d y knew so that people could spend time getting to know one another," Krause said While the audience seemed to take to the song, Krause admitted not everyone liked the addition of the band and dancers. "We wanted to keep the tradition but add our own creativity," Krause said. "We tested the tradition and got some flak for it, but overall it was a real crowd-pleaser." Grevenstuk followed Song with her presentation, "Learning to Wear Mouse Ears," a commentary on the importance of stopping to smell the

roses. Citing both the insights of Frank Capra from "It's a Wonderful Life," and Calvin of comic strip fame, Grevenstuk challenged the audience to "...be insatiably curious." Continuing on with the theme of wonder, '99 Play took the stage to perform the "Wizard of Wonderland," the wacky tale of a young boy from Holland, Michigan, (Ann Byland,) who dreams of a fairy tale world the night before his book report is due in hdpes of brainstorming a hot topic for the next day's class. The s p o o f ' s plot revolved around the woes of Alice in Wonderland (Michelle Chambers), Dorothy from Kansas (Debbie Paterik) and their respective entourages as they attempt to return home and escape the wrath of long lost pen pals, the Red Queen (Beth Quimby) and the Wicked Witch (Megan Masta). After a curtain call and a short break for the judges, the spotlight turned to Odd Year and Even Year Song Girls as they sang Michael W. Smith's rendition of "Friends," another fresh new highlight added to this year's Nykerk Cup Competition. Next up, ' 9 8 came to life, tipping sparkling gold top hats in chorus

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line fashion amongst the flicker of white and blue hand motions. Despite relatively fewer numbers of sophomore Song participants— 105 versus ' 9 9 ' s 130—Schrock said the enthusiasm the night of competition was overwhelming. "We knew it would probably be quite close," Schrock said. " T h e girls knew they were doing this for the last time. It was so exciting." But competing for the first time had its thrills, too, said '99 orator Kelly Martin. Martin challenged the audience to "dare to wonder." "Open your heart to possibilities and be amazed at the surprises you will encounter," Martin a d v i s e d . " H a v e the determination to wish opportunities where there are none, the courage to see them, and the curiosity to take them." Dopey (Tracy Rynsburger) seemed to take Martin's advice to heart as he prepared to compete in the final round of Jeopardy in the ' 9 8 Play. Led by an Irkel-esque Doc (Kara McGillicuddy), Dopey and his pose of b u d d i e d d u b b e d t h e " s e v e n dorks" trooped into the enchanted forest, some garbed in ankle-baring plaid pants, others in more traditional dwarf wear. Entitled "Snow White and the Seven Dorks," the

parody sketched the frustrations of the nerd herd as they attempted to aid Dopey, short of mental genius, in the memorization of answers. H e a t h e r M a a s got the most moans as Booger, the green-haired, nose-picking dork. T h r o u g h o u t the play, Maas sniffed and snorted, tossing a clump of g o o e y neon g r e e n " S m u d " around stage. The Smud is one artifact that will remain forever a part of ^ S ' s t h e m e — a n d part of the Civic Center's decor. " D u r i n g dress rehearsal Dopey threw it up into the air and it stuck onto the ceiling," Maas said. T h e j u d g e s , apparently, d i d n ' t dock Even Year points for it. The C u p still r e m a i n s in the gloved hands of sophomores. T h e girls say they couldn't have done it without the help of some 2 5 M o r a l e G u y s , b o o s t e r s for each class, w h o performed Saturday Night Live-type skits, danced in their boxer shorts, and made inspirational signs for the girls in attempt to keep them laughing during the intense four weeks of rehearsals. "The night of Nykerk the (morale guys) were all in tuxes looking very fine," said '98 Assistant Song Coach Kara Vander Lugt. "They helped us into our lines and kept us smiling."

m

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H O L D O N "TO Y O U R H A T S : Even Year performs Anchor photo courJ^eyAnnQ Horton

"One" from "A Chorus Line."

S T O P P I N G T O S M E L L R O S E S : '98 Orator Jess Grevenstuk

lakes times lo wonder.


^Anchor

Intermission

Movember

Glen o r G e n d a ?

A r t i s t defies sexual norms, speaks out against abuses of gay and lesbian youth SUFJ/VN S T E V E N S Intermission editor

Daphne Scholinski, a 29-year old lesbian a n d artist d o e s not c o n f o r m to t r a d i t i o n a l g e n d e r r o l e s . S h e w e a r s m e n ' s j e a n s , w o r k boots, cuts her hair short and lets her fa-

barrassing, S c h o l i n s k i said.

night I w a s m i s t a k e n for a boy in a

"I w a s put o n heavy m e d i c a tion and w a s physically constrained

restaurant," Scholinski told a packed crowd in W i c h e r s last w e e k .

said, recounting multiple incidences w h e r e she w a s a b u s e d . "I w a s put into solitary c o n c l u s i o n in a 9 foot

W h o gets to d e c i d e ? "

O t h e r hospitals set up daily therapy

in

hospitals,

s c h e d u l e s , including g r o u p therapy,

S c h o l i n s k i l e c t u r e s at c a m p u s e s

m u s i c therapy, dress therapy and art

a c r o s s the c o u n t r y to s p e a k o u t

therapy.

a g a i n s t the p s y c h i a t r i c a b u s e s of

" M o s t of my t r e a t m e n t c o n -

gay and lesbian y o u t h , a b u s e s she e x p e r i e n c e d first h a n d . "I w a s alienated in e l e m e n t a r y

sisted of p r e s s u r e s to c o n f o r m to femininity, to learn how to dress like

said. A f t e r f a i l i n g to live u p to social c o n d i t i o n s and " l a c k i n g s i g n s of b e i n g a s e x u a l f e m a l e , " Scholinski fell into d e p r e s s i o n . S h e was c o m m i t t e d to a p s y c h i a t r i c w a r d at age 14.

(b) r e j e c t i o n of urinating in a sitting position

I

(c) a s s e r t i o n t h a t s h e d o e s n o t w a n t t o g r o w breasts o r menstruate C . T h e girl has n o t yet r e a c h e d p u b e r t y

S h e w a s released f r o m the first hospital w h e n her p a r e n t s b e c a m e a w a r e of her abusive t r e a t m e n t .

school and j u n i o r high b e c a u s e I d i d n ' t look like a girl," S c h o l i n s k i

(a) an a s s e r t i o n t h a t s h e has o r will g r o w a penis

dant w h i l e restrained in my b e d . "

years of p s y c h i a t r i c incarceration different

s t r u c t u r e s , as e v i d e n c e d by a t least o n e of t h e following:

s q u a r e r o o m with no w i n d o w s . I w a s s e x u a l l y molested by an atten-

The mental ward S t r u g g l i n g to survive after four three

1. p e r s i s t e n t m a r k e d aversion t o n o r m a t i v e f e m i n i n e clothing and insistence o n w e a r i n g

and abused if 1 d i d n ' t c o m p l y , " s h e

sociology, social work, w o m a n ' s

drew over 100 s t u d e n t s and faculty to u n d e r s t a n d " W h a t is a w o m a n ?

B. Either ( I ) o r (2):

s t e r e o t y p i c a l m a s c u l i n e clothing, e.g.. boys' u n d e r w e a r and o t h e r a c c e s s o r i e s . 2. p e r s i s t e n t r e p u d i a t i o n of f e m a l e a n a t o m i c

w e r e t o r t u r o u s and s o m e t i m e s e m -

S p o n s o r e d by the p s y c h o l o g y , studies and art d e p a r t m e n t s , the lecture and c o r r e s p o n d i n g slide s h o w

k

mosexuality. T r e a t m e n t o r abuse? S c h o l i n s k i had f e w privileges

m i s t a k e n for a boy, a n d just last

for females, a c c o r d i n g t o T H E D I A G N O S T I C CRITERIA OF MENTAL DISORDERS

girl, and a s t a t e d d e s i r e t o b e a boy ( n o t m e r e l y a d e s i r e f o r any perceived cultural advant ages f r o m being a boy), o r insistence t h a t s h e is a boy.

Diagnostic Criteria manual in 1980. Until that lime, p e r s o n s could be inc a r c e r a t e d for s h o w i n g s i g n s of ho-

while in the hospital. T h e conditions

Gender Idendity Disorder of Childhood ,

A. P e r s i s t e n t and i n t e n s e d i s t r e s s a b o u t being a

Disorder, a c o n d i t i o n replacing hom o s e x u a l i t y and lesbianism in the

cial hair grow. " M o s t of my c h i l d h o o d , I w a s

15, 1995

Daphne Scholinski

a girl, and curl and style my hair," S c h o l i n s k i s a i d . " B u t 1 w a s never g o i n g to b e a n o r m a l f e m a l e , s o 1 w a s a failure." T h e r e w a s no hierarchy of s a n ity in the hospital; e v e r y o n e w a s

m y s e l f S c h o l i n s k i said. A r t and her mission today S h e w a s finally released after

of e n c o u r a g i n g o t h e r gay and lesbian youth f a c i n g o p p r e s s i o n . " E l e v e n y e a r s later I r e a l i z e

S c h o l i n s k i b e g a n to e x p e r i m e n t with d r a w i n g and p a i n i n g , first using pencil and c h a l k in p h o t o - r e a l -

her 18th birthday, w h e n the hospi-

that I w a s n ' t s u p p o s e d to survive," S c h o l i n s k i s a i d . "I w a s given t w o

ist d e p i c t i o n s of c r i m e scenes, etching s w i f t v e h i c l e s a n d stark f i g u r e s .

o p t i o n s : c h a n g e or not exist. At the

Her later w o r k s fill w a l l - s i z e c a n -

t i m e I c h o s e neither. A n d that has changed everything."

v a s e s with vibrant colors, depicting withdrawn, skeleton figures under

T o d a y S c h o l i n s k i is in therapy to recover f r o m the a b u s i v e therapy

oppression.

t r e a t e d the s a m e , no m a t t e r h o w s a n e a patient w a s , s h e said.

tal could no longer legally hold her. O v e r one million dollars w e r e

"I w a s accused of b e i n g uncon-

spent o n S c h o l i n s k i ' s therapy, treat-

trollable and an attendant would hit

ment and h o s p i t a l i z a t i o n — m o n e y

" M y peers, my parents and

m e and put his foot on my head to

not

doctors eventually convinced me

constrain me, yelling, ' S h u t u p you

that I w a s n ' t n o r m a l , " S c h o l i n s k i

crazy ass f — k i n g queer!' They

Scholinski. " S e v e n t y - f i v e percent of j u v e -

said.

well

spent,

according

to

of her f o u r - y e a r i n c a r c e r a t i o n .

H e r art o f t e n i n c o r p o r a t e s her e x p e r i e n c e s o f isolation, loneliness

killed m y spirit," s h e s a i d . It w a s n ' t until a c o l l e g e intern

nile i n c a r c e r a t i o n s a r e c l i n i c a l l y

"I t a k e s a lot b e f o r e I learn to

and a b u s e s h e f a c e d w h i l e incarcer-

Within f o u r years, S c h o l i n s k i w a s m o v e d to t h r e e d i f f e r e n t hos-

u n j u s t i f i e d , " s h e s a i d . "I w a s de-

d i s c o v e r e d D a p h n e did she finally

ated. Today, over 3 , 5 0 0 paintings are

pitals a c r o s s the c o u n t r y . S h e w a s

find h o p e . " ' W h a t are you d o i n g

serted by my family and isolated w h i l e four y e a r s of my youth w e r e

trust d o c t o r s , " s h e s a i d . " B u t I a m now trying to deal with these things. I d o n ' t b l a m e my p a r e n t s a n y m o r e .

i n c l u d e d in her p o r t f o l i o , a collec-

diagnosed with Gender Identity

h e r e ? ' the intern asked m e . 'You arc s o s a n e . ' U p until that point 1 never

slowly taken f r o m m e , " she said. S c h o l i n s k i ' s mission is to give

They were victims as well." An even g r e a t e r f o r m of

tion that s u r p a s s e s that R e m b r a n d t a n d van G o g h .

c o n s i d e r e d that I w a s n o r m a l . T h i s w o m a n helped m e finally believe in

her testimony and affirm her sexual

therapy has c h a n g e d her life: art.

and g e n d e r identity openly in h o p e s

" M y art h a s b e c o m e my most e f f e c t i v e therapy today," she said.

I m m e d i a t e l y a f t e r her release.

of

Beans, bears and fecal remains NURTURE

Pulizter poet shows she's just a farm girl at heart etry giant, having broken ground by w e a v i n g w o m e n ' s issues and poetry

into a n o t h e r b e a r p o e m , " E n c o u n ter in A u g u s t , " which illustrated for

S k u n k . " T h i s s t r a n g e p a c k a g e of n a t u r e and m a n c o n t a i n e d the

together.

the listener an A u g u s t day w h e n

Despite M a x i n e K u m i n ' s status a s Pulitzer Prize w i n n e r , the poet r e m a i n s a very u n a s s u m i n g

A l o n g with her b e s t f r i e n d , f a m e d poet A n n e S e x t o n . K u m i n dealt with t h e m e s of f e m a l e sexu-

Kumin w a t c h e d her garden b e a n s being eaten by a bear.

h a u n t i n g lines, " t h e s k u n k is the m o t h e r b e d , the ripe taste of carrion,

w o m a n w h o hates to give poetry

ality, the earth, rape, and abuse is-

" B e a n s and m o r e b e a n s for an hour of bear," c o n c l u d e d the sur-

readings. T h i s fact did not hinder the en-

s u e s in poetry for the first time. H e r writing dared to suggest

prisingly tender p o e m . Kumin also read o n e o f 17 po-

j o y m e n l of the a u d i e n c e w h o

that not all valid poetry s p o k e uni-

e m s t h a t s h e had w r i t t e n a b o u t

packed the seats of the K n i c k e r b o c k e r on W e d n e s d a y ,

versally.

"swimming dreams."

M. M E R W A L D X staff" r e p o r t e r

p o e m s by M A X I N E

K U M I N

P h o t o g r a p h , U.S. A r m y Flying School, College Park, Maryland.

1909

Wilbur Wright is racing the l o c o m o t i v e on t h e Baltimore and Ohio c o m m u t e r line. The great iron horse hisses and h u m s o r its rails b u t t h e frail d r a g o n f l y ov erh e a d appears t o be winning. Soon w e will have d o g f i g h t s and the Red Baron. The f i r e b o m b m g of Dresden is still t o come. And the first t w o A - b o m b s ,

all that there are. The a f t e r b u r n e r s of t h e j e t s lie far in t h e f u t u r e and the seeds of our last d e s c e n d a n t s , w h o knows, are t h e y n o t y e t s t o r e d in t h e i r p o u c h e s

the g r e e n kiss." An odd and w o n d e r f u l m o m e n t w a s c a p t u r e d w h e n K u m i n read her most exquisitely titled, " T h e Excrement P o e m . " In typical K u m i n wit, she read the p o e m that s o m e h o w m a d e one of the m o r e b a s e , natural parts of

Nov. 1 to attend her r e a d i n g .

Kumin, w h o runs her own f a r m in N e w H a m p s h i r e , related her love

Kumin stepped to the p o d i u m , lithe and slim in casual pants, and

for a n i m a l s i m m e d i a t e l y by o p e n ing with a s e r i e s of p o e m s a b o u t

o u s as she s p o k e of s w i m m i n g o n e

S h e s p o k e of "risen, brown b u n s baked in the h o r s e ' s oven," and

smiled a smile that displayed all her w h i t e t e e t h . "I f e e l i c o n i z e d , "

bears. "You A r e in Bear C o u n t r y " w a s

m o r n i n g , "oily and nude." " M y b o n e s drank the water...I

e n d e d with a poetic s m a s h , saying, " H o w e v e r m u c h w e stain the w o r l d .

K u m i n s a i d in r e s p o n s e t o her

taken directly f r o m a pamphlet that

w a s the well that f e d the sea," read

. . I h o n o r sh-t for s a y i n g , w e go

h e i g h t e n e d introduction, d r a w i n g rolling laughter f r o m the c r o w d .

provided a s e r i e s of directions on

the spiritually erotic p o e m . Kumin displayed a b o t t o m l e s s , a m b i g u o u s side w h e n she read the poem, " T h e Hermit Meets the

on."

A n d indeed, K u m i n is seen by many in the literary world a s a po-

how to react if attacked by a bear. Before the c h u c k l i n g of the audience had ceased, Kumin launched

S h e had at one t i m e s e r i o u s l y planned to be an O l y m p i c s w i m m e r , and her love for the sport w a s o b v i -

existence seem beautiful.

K u j n i n ' s w o r k s are available at the H o p e - G e n e v a b o o k s t o r e and at other area b o o k s e l l e r s .


November

15,

Anchor

1995

Intermission

nto the Woods Theatre production mixes fairy tales and moral codes in fantastic musical frenzy Anchor

p h o t o by Karen M c K e o w n

S U F J A N

S T E V E N S

Intermission editor

Ever wonder what would happen if you took all of G r i m m ' s fairy tales and mixed them u p with Hans Christian A n d e r s o n ' s greatest hits? Well, surprise surprise, it's been done. Sondheim and L a p i n e ' s spirited "Into the W o o d s " w a s the theatre departments latest and perhaps most d e m a n d i n g production, closing a two-week s h o w i n g last Saturday with an exciting finale. Mixing Jack and the Beanstalk with C i n d e r e l l a , Little Red R i d i n g H o o d w i t h Repunzel, the production is possibly the most refreshing and original depiction of fabled idealism mixed with hard-nosed morality. T h e lengthy first act succeeds in meshing our fondest and most endearing m e m o r i e s of childhood. We are introduced to an isolated land of make believe, where all fairy tales co-exist in strange Utopia. Little Red Riding Hood is accosted by the baker, his w i f e is enchanted by Cinderella's prince, while J a c k ' s giant stirs fear in every character. The complicated plot structure creates a webbing of clever confusion and cunning banter in a bizarre world of brawling, entertaining action. You can only imagine the outcome. T h e d e m a n d s of the production were increasingly more obvious as the musical developed, exposing the challenging mixture of superb acting, festive singing and sometimes complex staging. The sets were s i m p l e , but subtly e l a b o r a t e , with e l o n gated tree stalks, angular r o o m s and a f e w pervasive p r o p s . T h e action w a s well-paced, offering each character a chance to spin and dance and analyze his or her condition. T h i s constant juxtaposition of group images and single characters allowed the audience to adopt empathy, distaste or fear for the magnificent, assorted

...The musical pricks the tidy closure of happily ever after. —director, Daina Robins

cast.

LITTLE RED: Brooke Sherrod ('97) displays her charm in cap and cape costume.

Brooke Sherrod ( ' 9 7 ) was perfectly suited for Little Red Riding Hood. Her nimble dance and charm brought a delicate presence on the stage, while her impulsive spurts of candid disposition were laughable and ironic. Renae Geerlings ( ' 9 6 ) played a gentle and graceful, yet s o m e t i m e s awkward Cinderella, while Nathanael Buckley's ( ' 9 7 ) boyish blunders were well suited for Jack. James Gary Hamilton ( ' 9 9 ) squeezed the most erotic and hypnotic m by Su')*r SJevens

elements out of the wolf character, w h i l e his p a t r i a r c h a l c h a r m exploded even more as Cinderella's prince. Tess S u m m e r s ( ' 9 6 ) surmounted in ecstatic vocal potency in her role of the witch. Her clever spurts of unnatural evil were only subdued by intermittent episodes of maternal introversion, where a more elegant witch was exposed by rapt u r o u s vocal lines and a brilliant stage presence. R u s s e l l L u n d b e r g ( ' 9 6 ) and Kelly Jo G o u l d ( ' 9 6 ) played the pleasantly cute roles of Baker and W i f e , thrusting the action of the play with short interludes of marital disputes and reconciliation. Other secondary characters were no less stunning. Rob Abbot ( ' 9 7 ) was convincingly pontifical and self-assertive as the opportunistic Steward, and twins A m y Jo and Julie Ann Mickey ( ' 9 8 ) replicated fitting roles of Cinderella's evil step sisters. By the end of the first act, each fable is reconciled and resolved, and each character seemingly ends "happily ever after." Yet the second act takes us o n e step further, into the lives of the w e d d e d Cinderella, the rich Jack and the child-bearing Baker's wife, e x p o s i n g their s u d d e n discontent with fabled bliss. " T h i s is w h e r e the m u s i c a l pricks the tidy closure of 'happily ever after,"' a c c o r d i n g to director Daina Robins. "It asks us to question our definitions of happiness, the means by w h i c h w e seek to achieve and sustain that happiness, and the potential conflicts and c o m p r o m i s e s that individual versus c o m m u n a l happiness can exact," Robins says in her director's notes. Indeed, "Into the Woods" undermines our childish expectations of fabled bliss. T h e second act transforms its

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November

//.Anchor

I 5, I 995

Economics prof. testifies on Hill JESSICA

OWEMS

staff r e p o r t e r

Economics professor John E. Lunn left the comforts of Hope and headed lo the Hill, where he testified before a House of Representatives subcommittee regarding federal racial preference programs on Oct. 25. Lunn is an expert on the s u b j e c t of state-mandated affirmative action prog r a m s . He researched labor market discrimination in the construction industry extensively while a professor at the University of Louisiana, f o c u s i n g specifically on whether the slate was discrimin a t i n g a g a i n s t m i n o r i t y - and women-owned firms seeking highway construction projects. This research suggested that c o m p e t i t i v e market f o r c e s a r e more effective than affirmative action p r o g r a m s in leading to equal opportunity. The subcommittee on Social and Economic Impacts of Racial Preference Programs addressed whether current ' p r e f e r e n c e ' action p r o g r a m s are e f f e c t i v e in their goals. Congress is currently c o n s i d e r i n g legislation that would reduce federal Affirmative Action programs. While the overall experience

Husband/wife speaking t e a m visits c a m p u s , leads t a l k s

was "interesting," Lunn said, he felt as if the panels were simply pawns of the various politicians rather than sources of information. T h e p r o c e e d i n g s lasted only two hours, and Lunn said he felt that s o m e p o l i t i c i a n s made an appearance at the hearing s i m p l y to get their questions 'on the r e c o r d . '

Still, m a n y attended the proceedings, he said. L

u

C a m p u s B eat

n

n

served with two other economists, John Lunn e v a l u a t i n g the economic impacts of affirmative action. In testifying to the subcommittee, Lunn explained, "I w a s f o c u s i n g on minorityo w n e d f i r m s . T h e two other economists represented the perspectives that the programs were beneficial, while the other felt the evidence showed the least educated and poorest minorities were actually harmed by the programs." "Whether any change in the specific legislation will occur or not, I have no idea," Lunn said. His purpose was not to review legislation that is currently in place and decide whether or not it is effective, but rather to comment on the bigger picture of the p r o g r a m s in general, he said. " I ' m an economist, not a lawyer," he said.

B. M O L L E M B E C K staff r e p o r t e r

Malcolm and Goldie Rivkin, experts in planning and development related issues, visited several classes last w e e k as part of the Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows program of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. T h e Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows program brings a c c o m plished professional individuals to liberal arts colleges across the country for a week of scheduled classroom presentations, career counseling and informal consultations with students and faculty. The Rivkins spent Nov. 6 — 1 0 on campus participating in classes for various departments, including communication, sociology and political science. They were given a temporary office in the business administration w i n g of VanZoeren Hall so that they would be more accessible to Hope students and faculty.

"Malcolm Rivkin's presentation was a kickoff to what we will be studying next in our course," said Sociology Professor Roger Nemeth, who teaches Urban Sociology. " H e has broad knowledge in a number of topics that relate well to this class." Robin Klay, associate professor of economics and business administration, coordinated the Rivkins' visit. "The Rivkins are experts on some of the technical issues surrounding land use, but they have become exp e r t s in c o n f l i c t r e s o l u t i o n f o r which both technical expertise and a p p r e c i a t i o n of social c o n c e r n s should play a role," Klay said. Malcolm and Goldie Rivkin are both principals of Rivkin Associates inc., a Bethesda, Maryland based firm that w o r k s with those concerned with planning and developm e n t . P r e v i o u s c l i e n t s have included builders and developers, federal, state, and local governments, attorneys, architects, non-profit in-

stitutions and citizen groups. M a l c o l m s e r v e s a s C E O and Through the Fellowship program, the Rivkins have had the opportunity to visit a dozen liberal arts schools across the country. The two were first enlisted by the program in the early eighties. • "I w a s recruited b e c a u s e they were interested in finding professional women that could speak to young college women about career related issues," said Goldie Rivkin. The program strives to bring tog e t h e r i n d i v i d u a l s f r o m diverse backgrounds in an atmosphere in which they can learn about each other. It has been in existence since 1945 and nearly 200 colleges have participated in the program since 1973. "The program is looking for those in a professional field that is not normally represented by a professor on c a m p u s , " said M a l c o l m Rivkin. "This way the students can benefit from the experience they bring into the classroom."

VAN from 3 sister had to walk home, I would hope someone would make sure she got there safely, especially in light of recent attacks." Liability is also a stumbling block for the College. "If we transport a student to a party, where they are injured, the opportunity to litigate is quite high," Frost said. "We would have played an active role in the student's injury." Frost believes that it is the stu-

dents' responsibility to take care of one another. "Students need to do things together," Frost said. "How many stud e n t s c o u l d h a v e d r i v e n Kelli home? Offer to walk other students home. It is a c o m m o n courtesy that one should extend. Work with the community police, reporting people who don't seem to belong in the neighborhood. Work with landlords to get a d e q u a t e lighting a r o u n d houses."

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W O O D S from 7 tone from heightened gaiety to morbid rumination. T h e characters are faced with the unappealing and often demanding repercussions of their dreams-come-true. Previously good-natured characters b e c o m e vile and accusatory, and half the cast is murdered by the production's end. While the gruesome elements of

Shakespearian tragedy are not always complimentary to fairy tale nostalgia, the sudden mix seemed oddly successful. Although sometimes melo-dramatic and sluggish, the second act began to rise in the spirit of stoic realism, offering an innovative perspective to the all-too familiar passivity and sentiment of fabled story

FRATERNITIES f r o m Campus Life meeting," said Eric Almli, ('95). member of the Knicks. "So we're back, we're official now." The Board went into closed session to discuss the fate of the fraternities, and stated that three members of the Board would interview Hoats lo decide if he would be an appropriate advisor to the Knicks when the meeting reconvened in open session. In accordance with

telling. All in all, we find that not all is well that ends well, and our deepest expectations of fairy tale madness are mildly undermined. The strange mix of the gentle fabled myth and the awful reality of self-absorbed, fantastical desires of "Into the Woods" was brilliantly raw and entertaining.

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I C o l l e g e policy, G r e e k a d v i s o r s should be full-time members of the faculty. Hoats is a part-time member of the faculty, teaching guitar in the music department. "We very much appreciate all of your e f f o r t s to find an advisor," Board C h a i r Jim Allis told the Knickerbockers. Allis promised to get back to the fraternity in a week with the results, which were posi-

tive. Given the fact that major issues such as the reviewing of pledging procedures and Greek use of transportation are now under consideration, this is a crucial time for Greek organizations to be involved in campus decisions. Neither fraternity had input in these ongoing discussions while their status was suspended.

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Anchor

Sports

November

I 5, I 9 9 5

Flying Dutchmen ready to defend M I A A title GLYN WILLIAMS staff" r e p o r t e r

From lip lo buzzer, start to finish, the m e m b e r s of the Flying D u t c h m e n b a s k e t b a l l t e a m play with hopes lo be the best team there is, and some people are inclined to believe that they are. Dill News ranked Hope first a m o n g all of t h e D i v i s i o n III schools. However, the King of C o l : lege Basketball Dick Vitale claims Hope to be only the sixth best team in the nation. The highly respected Street <£ Smith's College Basketball spots Hope to be the second best team in the nation a m o n g Division III teams C o m i n g off a disappointing end lo last s e a son, the Dutchmen arc geared up to do better in t h e tournament than they ever have. "Our returning goal for the season is to win the conference and go further in the tournament than we have ever been and play the best that we have ever played in the tourn a m e n t " Van Wieren said. "What exactly d o e s that m e a n ? Well, I

don't even know that. Hopefully the players will." Hope was knocked out of the N C A A Division III tournament in the first round against BaldwinWallace University 72-69. According to Van Wieren there were many reasons for the early loss, among which were injuries and the last minute change of venue. "We were definitely distracted during the week due to the move and all the controversy surrounding it," Van Wieren said. "We played the poorest game while I've been coach. We shot only thirty-four percent that night as opposed to fiftyfour percent for the season." According to Van Wieren, the Dutchmen will be more mentally aware of the move for the off-season, and more conditioned for the c h a n g e of venue. Hope, in a t t e m p t to g e t a good feel for the Dow Center, played an exhibition game last Tuesday night, against Team Obras from Argentina. T h e Dutchmen defeated the visiting team 79-71, but Van Wieren was not pleased with his team's de-

All our players are better this year than they were last year. The attitude of our seniors is very positive and directional. —GlennVan Wieren

Graham rushes way to national honors NIOOLE MCCLAIN staff r e p o r t e r

If you were relying on sophomore runningback Brandon Graham ( ' 9 8 ) for personal record information you w o n ' t learn much. G r a h a m is a modest g u y f r o m Hudsonville, MI who plays for the love of the game rather than the numerous records he holds. Recently n a m e d Division III National Player of the Week, Graham also holds the 1995 M I A A rushing title. The last Hope player to lead the M I A A in rushing was fullback Bill Blacquiere with 4 9 5 yards eighteen years ago. Ironically, Blacquiere w a s G r a h a m ' s high school football coach. Graham believes he is where he is today because of, "encouragement from friends, family, and coaches". In H o p e ' s last g a m e against Olivet, G r a h a m retrieved more than just the football. Starting in only seven of the D u t c h m e n ' s nine games, he ended his season with 1,139 yards, becoming one of five Hope players to rush 1,000 yards. The last time this occurred was in 1974. He also set both the school record and M I A A singlegame rushing record by running 293 yards against the Comets. A

PIZASZ

portion of these yards were captured during an 81 yard sprint to the Olivet four yard line. G r a h a m c a r r i e d the ball 44 times Saturday, just five short of breaking the school record. Luckily, G r a h a m ' s o f f e n s i v e skills came through for him when he hurled a 48 yard touchdown pass to Doug Gle. "The one time I threw a pass like that I was in high school and I threw an interception," said Graham. G r a h a m plays off praise and continually acknowledge^ his fellow teammates conceding, "The reason why I was able to do anything this season was because of the linemen, fullbacks, and everyone else out there with me." Even though this year was "disappointing after the hopes held going into the season," Graham said he has faith Hope will "turn things around and win more games. It's going lo lake a lot of work, but we want lo w i n ! " Ending the season with a win gives the Flying Dutchmen something lo build on for next season. With a tailback as good as Graham, coach Dean Kreps can be assured of a more promising season next fall, when the grid-iron warriors once again lace up their cleats lo punish M I A A foes.

weyejie

The Anchor!

fense. "They shot sixty percent and that statistic is jusl way too high," Van Wieren said. Duane Bosma ('96) led all scorers with 18 points, while Jeff Van Fossan ('96) finished the night with 16, and two others had ten. The starters for the game, and probable starters for the season w e r e B o s m a at c e n t e r , Kevin B r i n t n e l l ( ' 9 6 ) at p o i n t , J o e l Holstege ('98) at off-guard. Marc Whilford ( ' 9 7 ) at small forward, and Van Fossan at power forward. However, David Meulenberg ('97), a power forward who can hit both short and long range jumpers, is sidelined with ankle troubles. The Dutchmen will get off lo a difficult start, as they play their toughest opponent. For the first lime in a while, the D u t c h m e n will be the u n d e r d o g when they face Bethel College on Friday night in the Cornerstone College Classic Tournament. Although not many have ever heard of Bethel College, they have a powerhouse basketball team and won the NAIA Division II championship. "Bethel returns most of their players from last year and are very intact,"Van Wieren said. "They are a lough leam." According to Van Wieren, the tougher non-conference teams the Dutchmen face, the more they will more T I T L E on I I

i

Anchor

photo

-v

-c;

b y Jill F i s c h e r

UP AND IN: Joel Holstege ('98) scores two for Hope In their victory over Team Obras.

struggle t o fit it all In GLYM W I L L I A M S staff r e p o r t e r

The trials and tribulations of the Hope College swim leam never end. Dan S h e l l e y ( ' 9 8 ) and J o e Zupancic ('98) are swimmers and they always will be. They dedicate a n y w h e r e b e t w e e n f o u r and six hours of their day lo s w i m m i n g . Lifting, swimming, showering, thinking about swimming, eating dinner at Phelps with the leam. Everything they d o d e f i n e s what a swimmer does. A b o v e all this they even have time lo actually do their homework. Although the swim team is jusl as much a part of Hope College as the other sports, Shelley finds most other sports to be entirely different. In other sports, says Shelley, the practices are used to work loward team unity. However, s w i m m e r s use their practices lo gel in shape and are not fully in shape until the very end of the season. In swimming it is all training and conditioning and little else. "Heck yes it is hard," Shelley said." I do think that we spend more time in practice than other teams, but whether or not it is more difficult, well that is debatable. I mean which is harder? Hitting an 80+ mile per hour sinking inside fastball with a skinny bat or putting a round ball through a cylindrical hoop of equal diameter? The same can be said for s w i m m i n g . It is hard to judge. The differences are too abundant." Shelley is apparently a fan of pain, as he was pit 17 for Even Year in the Pull, which, he said, is perhaps one of the most strenuous pits to be in. He has an uncompromis-

ing love for both. It is almost like smoke and fire with Shelley. You can't have one without the other. "I love them both, but I would have to say that Pull is much different," Shelley said. "Pull is more abusive, both mentally and physically. I mean part of that could be d u e lo t h e f a c t l h a l t h e s w i m coaches have Ph.D's and really for sure know everything that they are doing, whereas the Pull coaches just stand up there and do their thing. S w i m m i n g is mentally strenuous also, don't get me wrong. Christmas and Thanksgiving break are the hardest because you are here on campus and no one else is here but swimmers. All there is to do during that time period is swim." The swim team doesn't have a h o m e c o m i n g g a m e to celebrate, they don't have a "Dew C r e w " to •cheer them on; in fact hardly any fans other than parents even show up for their meets. So why do they do it? " S w i m m i n g helps me balance my s c h e d u l e b e t w e e n c l a s s e s , swimming, work, whatever; and I think that makes me a better student and it will definitely make me a better worker once I am in the real world," Zupancic said. "I do it for the leam unity," Shelley said." I don't think there is a closer group of guys on campus. There is no one on the team I dislike at all. The friendship makes it all worth while. I think I ask myself every year why I do it? Then a t e a m m a t e s a y s s o m e t h i n g or a teammate shows their love for me, and I stay," said Shelley. "I don't do it for the fame, that's for sure. There is none. It's not the most glorious of all the sports. I

think I do it for the workouts. I feel great after every w o r k o u t , " said Zupancic. "I work hard all season and I guess do this whole thing that I d o for the league t o u r n a m e n t . League was the greatest moment of my life. Everyone swims hard and cheers loud." According to Zupancic, people ask him all the time why he does it. Why does he swim? Why doesn't he just up and quit? " S o m e people look at it like there is a long three years left of swimming, but I look at it like there is only three years left," Zupancic said. "Three more years and then I am done s w i m m i n g competitively. I love swimming. I don't know what I would do without it." Dan Shelley and Joe Zupancic are s w i m m e r s and they always will be. After some lime they will be gone from Hope and they will still be swimmers. Always. Their daily lasks and endeavors make you ask yourself if it is i m p o r t a n t to d o something even though you receive very little recognition. Isn't it pretty to think so?

Cosby's Pick of the W e e k . 'Tis the season to be jolly, and what better way to enjoy the holidays than with a pot of jello pudding. This Thanksgiving Theo gets to carve the turkey. I'll teach him using a cabbage and my Julie Childs voice. Claire thinks we are t h i s is t h e i n s a n e but will learn. I only way he Hope to p i c k its w e e k sweep games, e n d a n d men's w o m e n ' s . I'm going out on a limb but hey this is Hope basketball.


November

the

I 5, I 995

Anchor

Sports

Frigid temps slow runners Soccer team falls n i n g in," G r a f said. "I would h a v e PETER EMERY staff r e p o r t e r

Frigid a r c t i c w i n d s , a n d s n o w s w e p t t h r o u g h the C r o s s C o u n t r y Regional hospitalizing r u n n e r s and f r e e z i n g the p e r f o r m a n c e o f the teams. T h i s past S a t u r d a y the M e n ' s and Women's Cross Country teams c h a l l e n g e d their mental a n d physical c a p a b i l i t i e s a s t h e y r a c e d in

waited until M o n d a y . " C o a c h Mark Northuis and other c o a c h e s voted o n w h e t h e r or not to p o s t p o n e the race d u e to the m e d i cal p r o b l e m s that c o u l d o c c u r . N o r t h u i s v o t e d that the r a c e s be p o s t p o n e d for at least t w o hours to see how c o n d i t i o n s were. "We n e e d e d to take a step back to look at the s e v e r q n e s s of race c o n d i tions," Northuis said. A f t e r hear-

deathly c o n d i t i o n s at the Regional

ing the meet w o u l d be run as s c h e d -

r a c e in A l m a , M i c h i g a n . At t h e meet, the w o m e n placed fifth and

uled, n o t h i n g c o u l d be d o n e to s t o p the f o r c e s o f nature and c h a n g e the m i n d s of the m e e t ' s o f f i c i a l s .

the m e n ninth. W i n d chill t e m p e r a t u r e s w e p t t h r o u g h at b e l o w t w e n t y d e g r e e s

Ellen S c h u l t z ( ' 9 8 ) missed qualif y i n g for n a t i o n a l s by one f o o l . S h e

Northuis said. Dan Bannink ('97), w h o put aside the mental a s p e c t s of the race, believed that he w a s physically strong in the race. "It w a s n ' t just w h o had the most heart, but w h o c o u l d stand on their feet," B a n n i n k said. Bannink did keep o n his feet and finished with a time of 29:42, p l a c i n g tw enty-second at the meet, missing nationals by eight s e c o n d s . " T h i s w a s the worst racing c o n ditions any of us h a v e ever raced in," he a d d e d . "I w a s happy with my effort and sad that I w o n ' t be joining Eric Carpenter at nationals."

with fifty m i l e - a n - h o u r gusts. T h e c o u r s e w a s buried u n d e r six inches

w a s n ' t a w a r e that s h e w a s s o close

Carpenter ( ' 9 6 ) , w h o also battled the e l e m e n t s , placing t w e l f t h over-

to n a t i o n a l s a s the girl in f r o n t of

all with a t i m e of 29:24, qualified

of slush and ice. In the m i d d l e of the c o u r s e laid t w o lakes, w h e r e ice

her sprinted the e n d . "I t r i e d t o r e m e m b e r that the

for nationals and will be racing next Saturday in La Crosse, W l . C a r p e n -

w a t e r reached the k n e e s of r u n n e r s ,

w e a t h e r is the s a m e for e v e r y o n e , "

f r e e z i n g l o w e r legs. J e s s e Graf ( ' 9 8 ) , w h o w a s hospi-

Schultz said. "I kept telling myself: ' y o u c a n m a k e it t h r o u g h t h i s . "

ter w a s d i s a p p o i n t e d that the w o m e n ' s and m e n ' s t e a m s will not

talized f r o m s y m p t o m s of hypoth-

Ellen said she w a s sad that the

e r m i a , d r o p p e d out o f the r a c e . O n c e on the g r o u n d , he started c o n -

w o m e n ' s and m e n ' s t e a m s w o u l d n ' t be t r a v e l i n g to nationals next w e e k

best. " D e s p i t e the c o l d w e a t h e r it

v u l s i n g and lost control of his body. " M y b o d y lost c o n t r o l and my

and w a s distraught at the meet results. " W e still have s o m e t h i n g left

b r o u g h t the t e a m closer," Graf said. The m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s teams

c o r e t e m p n e e d e d to b e r a i s e d , " Graf s a i d . He w a s r u s h e d to the

t o p r o v e ; t h i s is n o t t h e w a y it should have e n d e d , " Schultz added.

looked out for o n e a n o t h e r in their

hospital a l o n g with f o u r other runners f r o m d i f f e r e n t t e a m s , w h e r e he w a s treated and released. " T h e c o n ditions w e r e r i d i c u l o u s to be run-

TITLE from

be j o i n i n g him at nationals, but rem a i n e d c o n f i d e n t he w o u l d d o his

of P e n n s y l v a n i a , Staten Island o f New York, a n d North Park of Illinois. Both W i d e n e r and Staten Is-

T h r o u g h o u t history there have been countless sports teams w h o s e talent s e e m s to o u t n u m b e r the players. An e x a m p l e of s uch a sports team is the H o p e College m e n ' s s o c c e r squad w h o finished the s e a s o n at 1 5 - 2 - 1 , w o n t h e M I A A , and placed nine p l a y e r s on the A l l - M I A A team. A l s o t h r o u g h o u t history s uch highly touted t e a m s h a v e lost in the clutch g a m e s and d i d n ' t m a k e it past the first round of the playo f f s . An e x a m p l e of such a sports team is the H o p e C o l l e g e m e n ' s soccer squad, w h i c h went into the p l a y o f f s ranked fifth in the nation a m o n g Division III s c h o o l s a n d harbored the M I A A M o s t Valuable P l a y e r in M i d - F i e l d e r J o h n

rankings, records,

tally d i d n ' t have o u r h e a d s in the g a m e . I d o n ' t think it had an e f fect o n the H i r a m g a m e really. T h e loss d i d n ' t carry over into the post s e a s o n in the m e n t a l state." D e s p i t e the early exit f r o m the t o u r n a m e n t , the D u t c h m e n placed an a l l - m i g h t y nine players o n the A l l - M I A A intercollegiate s q u a d . T h e p l a y e r s on the first team w e r e goal keeper Aaron

ing Dutchmen w a l k e d o f f the field

Paul R o s e n b r o o k ( ' 9 6 ) , and f o r w a r d

with a pain in their hearts that w a s a 1 -

Geoff

Rodocker

( ' 9 7 ) . T h e p l a y e r s on the s e c o n d t e a m All-

0 l o s s to t w e n t y -

Ellen placed first on the team with a t i m e of 21:06. M a r i e Matchett ( ' 9 7 ) and M i c h e l l e Neal ( ' 9 6 ) ran a

of the season. N o w it's time for runners to thaw out and rest a s track

M I A A were Riker, mid-fielder co-captain Nathan

great race d e s p i t e the bad weather,

season quickly a p p r o a c h e s .

H i r a m C o l l e g e in the first round of the Great L a k e s Col leges Association Tournament. " T h e y d i d n ' t really o u t p l a y

Josh S h e l d o n ( ' 9 7 ) . T h e g o o d n e w s a b o u t next y e a r ' s t e a m is that the D u t c h m e n

will most assuredly h a v e c o m p e t i -

h a n d e d j u m p shot, w h i c h he c a n

t i o n in t a k i n g t h e M I A A c r o w n again. T h e D u t c h m e n , a c c o r d i n g to Van Wieren, are y o u n g e r this y e a r

easily hit f r o m outside. D e s p i t e losing only t h r e e se-

fourth

ranked

us, w e just c o u l d n ' t s c o r e against them and t h a t ' s it," R y a n G r o u l x ( ' 9 8 ) said. " I t ' s not that we played poorly,

last s e a s o n . Matt B r o w n ( ' 9 7 ) is back f r o m an ankle injury that he

ter." A step into the w a y b a c k m a -

suffered last year that caused him

better," Van Wieren said. " W e are

d e r i n g is h o w l o n g it will take for the y o u n g e r p l a y e r s to m a t u r e .

chine reveals that H o p e ' s first loss of the season c a m e against M e t h -

absolutely thrilled to m e e t the potential that t h e s e t e a m s p o s s e s s . I

A m o n g t h o s e y o u n g p l a y e r s is s t a n d o u t n e w b i e Pat S t e g e m a ( ' 9 9 )

think that by a l i g n i n g o u r s e l v e s with tougher teams, w e will b e c o m e

w h o b r e a c h e d the rarely passable

Van Wieren. All M I A A t e a m s , with the exception of A l m a and Adrian, have

just s i m p l y not p r e p a r e d . We to-

fielder C o n l o n , forward co-captain

p l a y e r s to g r a d u a t i o n . T h e question Van Wieren is pon-

in e s s e n c e m o r e c o m p e t i t i v e , " said

that g a m e at a l l , " C h r i s R i k e r ( ' 9 8 ) said. "The whole team was

and talent, the Fly-

and have lost t h r e e A l l - C o n f e r e n c e

n a m e n t last year. " T h e m o r e p e o p l e w e play the

a s g o o d a t e a m a s Hope, j u m p e d out q u i c k at the D u t c h m e n and c a u g h t t h e m s l e e p i n g in. " W e w e r e just not ready for

Angeli ( ' 9 6 ) , f u l l b a c k Tyler Will i a m s ( ' 9 6 ) , f u l l b a c k Jason C u r r i e ( ' 9 6 ) , mid-

Conlon ('97). Despite the g l a m o u r ,

niors f r o m last y e a r ' s t e a m , the varsity s q u a d is much different f r o m

land w e r e in the Division 111 tour-

h o m e g a m e of the s e a s o n against K a l a m a z o o C o l l e g e on Wednesday, O c t . 25. K - Z o o , w h o is not

races, k e e p i n g the e n t h u s i a s m alive as the team finished the last meet

IO

i m p r o v e . A m o n g the difficult n o n c o n f e r e n c e o p p o n e n t s are W i d e n e r

T h e D u t c h m e n ' s second loss of the y e a r c a m e 2 - 0 at the last

GLYN WILLIAMS staff r e p o r t e r

barrier b e t w e e n varsity and j u n i o r varsity, a n d will play for the b i g b o y s this s e a s o n . Van Wieren described his rising

to sit out through all of the s e a s o n . B r o w n w a s a starter on varsity as a

season.

year n a m e d Rodocker.

S t e g e m a provides a rare b o n u s to

f i d e n c e a lot in the off season and I

a c o m e d y r e v u e in t w o - a c t s Written by Peter Cook & Dudley Moore

tgoal m e d i u m in that a r e a . "

There's Saturday Night Live... Before that we had Monty Python... And in the beginning there was Not only Peter Cook but also Dudley Moore... The Fathers of Sketch Comedy!

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p l a y e r s have m a t u r e d . "All players are better this year than they w e r e last year. T h e atti-

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Claude Lareau Independent Consultant

a l l - e n c o m p a s s i n g ten j u n i o r s on this y e a r ' s t e a m , i n c l u d i n g o n e M I A A player, and an A l l - M I A A f o r w a r d w h o transferred here this

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other o n e w a s on the second team

ers, the o l d e r , m o r e e x p e r i e n c e d

and directional," Van Wieren said. " W e worked on strength and con-

"I used to come home from work with no energy left to do much of anything, but now with Body Wise. I have more energy than IVe had in years!" Jan McClung, Dorr, MJ

t h o s e f i v e p l a y e r s w e r e o n the first t e a m A l l - M I A A , a n d t h e

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i m p r o v e d s i n c e last s e a s o n . With

"With Body wise, I lost 45 pounds of fat. over 18", and my energy & stamina has doubled." Claude Lareau, Holland Ml

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<2

11-15-1995  
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