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VULI'ME VI

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Thfi Anchor. W h a t e v e r small-souled cavilers, called critics, m a y say of t h e quality a n d style of his writings, t h e salt of a pure and lofty motive will be found to be a better preserver than " t h e more ideal t r e a t m e n t of the more ideal t h e m e s . " ***

The. Anchor

Before leaving the subject we suggest t h a t hereafter the degree of A. M. be c o n f e r r e d o n l y upon those who have passed s a t i s f a c t o r y e x aminations in at least t h r e e s t a n d a r d works t o be selected by the alumnus from a much larger list prescribed by the Council. *

* * 1 h e increase of lawlessness and desecration and general d e g r a d a t i o n ot taste, which makes it In his address at the Christian K n d e a v o r c o n itcccssary for " n e w s p a p e r s " to publish detailed vention Dr. J. H . Harrows m a d e a beautiful apa c c o u n t s of prize-fights and other brutal ex- plication of scripture quotations to the various hibitions of h u m a n ingenuity and strength, is buildings of the world's fair. W e q u o t e : "It but a logical and l e g i t i m a t e o u t c o m e of the would be easy for the biblical s t u d e n t t o find L I C E N S E system. T h i s system, akin to the a p p r o p r i a t e scriptural words to write on e v e r y " I n d u l g e n c e s " which m a d e L u t h e r "a fanatical structure in the world's fair. Helow t h e gilddisturber of t h e peace," is thriving in this c d ( l o m c o f t h c a c i m i n i s t r a t i o n b u i l d i n g t h e Christian nation with but feeble protest trom ; m a s t e r w o r k o f o n c o f t h c a r c h i t e c t s / f t h i s t h e m i g h t y a r m y of proft ssed Christians who c i t y j w o u | t | i n s c r i b c t h c W Q r d s 0 f Isni^i,: - T h e could t h r o t t l e and d e s t r o y .t in the space of a g o v e r n m e n t shal! be upon His s h o u l d e r s ; ' o v e r single year. T h e prize-fight, horse race etc., : t h c m a c l l i n c r v H ; L I I , v v o l l i d w l i t c ; - K V C A ' I H . U S C f u r t h e r suggest the fearful waste of talent and is builded bv some man, but he t h a t built all e n e r g y naturally resulting from the unques- things is God;' over the t r a n s p o r t a t i o n buildtioned devotion to purely material pursuits. ing I would write: ' M a k e straight a highway *

*%

W e t a k e p l e a s u r e in e x p l a i n i n g at this earliest o p p o r t u n i t y what we believe gave offense only because it was m i s a p p r e h e n d e d . W e feel sure that all lovers of H O P E will agree with us when we say that while we do not object to examinations, or Council-witnessed e x a m i n a t i o n s as such, we feel that s t u d e n t s have a right to complain of being compelled to hang around several d a y s a f t e r recitations cease to attend " e x a m i n a t i o n s " which have little or nothin<r to do with p r o m o t i o n s and are a c k n o w l e d g e d on all h a n d s to be mere m a t t e r s of form, often affording no proof of t h e s t u d e n t ' s a t t a i n m e n t or t h e t e a c h e r ' s ability. T h a t institution, whether a s t a t e university t h r o n g e d with s t u d e n t s and d i p l o m a - s e e k e r s or a scantily a t t e n d e d denominational college will eventually suffer if it forego e x a m i n a t i o n s , or substitute mere f o r m a l "quizzes" for rigid and reasonable tests of scholarship and training. Let the Council, then, not only exercise its privilage oi nttending e x a m i n a t i o n s but discharge its duty of conducting, by c o m p e t e n t committees, e x a m i n a t i o n s t h a t shall show at once the a m o u n t and quality of work actually d o n e and the nature and extent of i m p r o v e m e n t s required. E i t h e r let this be d o n e or t h e m a t t e r a l t o g e t h e r neglectcd {or sometimes formal e x a m i n a t i o n s become worse than ridiculous—///rr may lead to bod habits of study and indifferent methods of instruction.

for our God;' over the palace of fine arts: ' T h e g a t e of the t e m p l e which is called b e a u t i f u l ; ' over the agricultural hall: 'Hehold, a sower went forth to sow;' over the electrical p a l a c e : ' H i s lightenings enlighten the world;' over t h e woman's pavilion: 'She stretcheth out her h a n d s to the needy;' over the horticultural building: 4 1 am the Rose of Sharon and the Lily of t h e valley;' over the building of t h e United S t a t e s g o v e r n m e n t : ' H e hath not dealt so with a n y nation;' over the unique and beautiful fisheries building: 'And the fishes of the sea shall declare unto thee;' over the mineral palace: Mn his hand are the d e e p places o f t h e e a r t h ; ' o v e r one of the resplendent g a t e s to the exposition g r o u n d s I would write the p r o p h e c y : ' T h e k i n g d o m s of this world shall b e c o m e the kingd o m s of our Lord and his C h r i s t / and o v e r every closed gate on S u n d a y morning I would inscribe in letters of gold, for all eyes t o see. the immortal statute wherein is wrapt up t h e Christian future of America and of t h e world. ' R e m e m b e r the S a b b a t h day t o k e e p it holy.' " IVH ARE BUILD/NG. In youth many are apt to be m o r e enthusiastic in their/V/ZX'than in their work. W e look upon a noble life as we would sraze at a h a n d some building, forgetting all the patient labor it has cost and how many small pieces g o toward making it what it is. It requires m o r e strength and energy to faithfully carrv out anv

plan than it does to imagine or conceive one. Kvery one has laid some plans for the future— grea*. Ijeautiful ones o f t e n t i m e s . Vet they forget the t h o u s a n d s of little t o u c h e s which a f t e r m a n y years, m a k e t h e m successful, and their beautiful castles come crashing to the earth. It is easy to believe yourself worthy of lame a n d honor because, on the d a y you g r a d u a t e d when e v e r y t h i n g looked bright, you planned s o m e grand career for yourself. Vour idea was as far from reality as the plan of the building which the architect has upon p a p e r and which cannot be b r o u g h t into existence unless lie has material and assistance. Hy littles great t h i n g s are a c c o m p l i s h e d ; and r e m e m b e r that every honest word and d e e d is o n e more s t o n e a d d e d to the castle you are erecting, even t h o it passes unnoticed by the world. W e are all building, consciously or unconsciously, and one day the world shall see our castle c o m p l e t e d and it remains with ourseli to m a k e it such that we need not be a s h a m e d to have o t h e r s e x a m i n e it. WESTERN 67/ rIUZA TIOX. If the " C o l u m b i a W o r l d ' s Fair," with t h e unsurpassed g r a n d e u r of its buildings, the vastness of its scope, the inspiring b e a u t y of its a r c h i t e c t u r e , t h e s y m m e t r y and art of its arrangement and so much more besides, did not alr e a d y in clarion tone, proclaim to the world the rapid a d v a n c e m e n t of the west in population, in possesion, but above all, in culture, then t h e ever-increasing n u m b e r of its educational institutions with their ever-increasing a t t e n d ance would be proof irrefutable that the west is no longer, if indeed it ever has been, a scattered. restless tribe of fortune-seekers. Within a few years past Ann A r b o r Univcr•sity has not only equal led but o u t s t r i p p e d its eastern rivals, without in t h e least h i n d e r i n g or a b s o r b i n g t h e life and growth of t h e smaller institutions a r o u n d it. C o l l e g e a f t e r college, university a f t e r university with an untold number of normal and high schools have s p r u n g into existence in all p a r t s of the west. A n d yet e v e r y o n e is p r o s p e r o u s and cries for more room. It is g r a t i f y i n g t o note how p e o p l e turn aside from their m o n e y - m a k i n g pursuits to grant a liberal education to t h e i r sons and <laughters. A higher g r a d e of intelligence and civilization must be the natural result. The very building and e n d o w i n g of so many institutions is evidence of a d v a n c i n g civilization. I n d o u b t e d l v the west and particularly the

149

Mississippi valley is destined to b e c o m e t h e swaying, the controlling force of this nation in the future and the west is g r a n d l y fitting itself for that task. LOCAL

REMINISCENCES.

I Uend ut t h e A l u m n i M e e t i n g , J u n e 21. 'Ih!.] It c a i n e t o m e by nlirht That I must write On H o l l i i n d . Not t h c h i n d a c r o s s t h e sea of u i n d m i J I s . d y k e s , a n d g a l l a n t r y : I t s W e s t e r n n a m e s a k e — t h e r e t r e a t of i t s o)»|>restted. t h e c h o s e n scat Where enterprise and piety so happily c o m h i n e d . Free exercise a n d scope, a n d fair reward have s o u g h t to find. Here m i d the forests d e n s e , h a r d - h y t h e wind-wept lake. T h e y toiled a n d prayed these pioneers, for h o m e a n d conscience sake. A n d we t o - d a y f r o m v a n t a u e - u r o n n d o n w h i c h t h e y p l a c e d o n r feet. W i t h h e a r t s n o t v o i d of j r l a d n e s s a n d f e e l i n g s a s a r e m e e t . On l o o k i n g b a c k b e s l e a v e t o s p e a k of o n l y s u c h I m p r e s s i o n s As lie m o s t c l o s e a t h a n d of all o u r m e m o r y ' s p o s s e s s i o n s . We l e a v e t o o t h e r m i n d s j u s t n o w t o s p e a k iu s e r i o u s v e i n . And with familiar musings, free our own from solemn strain. We c h o o s e n o t f o r o u r s e l v e s a t h e m e of l o f t y i n s p i r a t i o n Hut tflve t h e m i n d i n d u l g e n c e in a h a r m l e s s d i s s i p a t i o n . We well r e c a l l iu t e n d e r y o u t h , w h e n lirst o n m e n t a l v i s s i o n T h e A II C in *rlory d a w n e d , we a l w a y s s h u n n e d c o l l i s i o n With older boys, stalwart and strong* Fearless a n d r o u f r h . a n d bent on wronfr. Who to the g r a n d e s t old school-house on y o n d e r elevation— T h e C o l o n y ' s first o r p h a n a g e , w e n t f o r t h e i r e d u c a t i o n . T h e y n e e d e d i t . t h o s e f e l l o w s , t h e rod a s m u c h a s b o o k . F o r t h e i r xeal c o u l d n o t l>e q u e l l e d by pedaKOKh* l o o k . And when forth from t h e door thev rushed like prisoners from jail. We l i t t l e u r c h i n s a l w a y s s o u g h t In m e e t i n g t h e m t o f a l l . We knew t h e m by t h e i r d i n n e r - p a i l s , t h e r e d s a n d g r e e n s a n d yellows. F o r u a u d y - e o l o r r d p a l l s wen* q u i t e t h e r a p e f o r t h o s e p r o u d f e l lows. We t o o r e m e m b e r w e l l a St ft my. a s t r i e t a n d f e a r l e s s t e a c h e r Whose exercise a n d soldier-drill were quite a taking feature. T h e w o o d s h e m a d e o u r m a r c h i n p r - K r o u n d s . h i m s e l f o u r *r»llant leader A n d t h u s w o r k e d off t h e a n i m a l - l i f e f r o m b o y s in S e c o n d K e a d e r . T o S h i e l d s in t u r n w e b o y s w e r e t a u g h t t o y i e l d In s w e e t s u b m i s sion : T h e m d s h e c a s t a w a y , b u t n o t to s h i e l d o r tfive p e r m i s s i o n To evil-deeds, fur. pity u s . f o r t h from his frock-coat pocket A s t r a p , o n e I n c h by t w e l v e In l e n g t h c a m e s h o o t i n g l i k e a r o c k et : A n d t i m e a n d t h n e a t r a i n it k i s s e d t h e b a c k of t h e o f f e n d e r . F n l i l we k n e w j u s t h o w t o s h i e l d t h e flesh w h e r e it w a s t e n d e r . " I h a t e t o p u n i s h b u t I see 1 h a v e t o " s a i d t h e m a s t e r . A n d w h i l e h e s p a k e , t h e stiiiKln!; s t r i p e s fell f a s t e r a n d yet faster. P r o f e s s o r D o e s b u r j f . t o o . a p p e a r e d iu l i n e of t h e s u c c e s s i o n We h a v e f o r g o t t e n h o w hr d e a l t w i t h j u v e n i l e t r a n s g r e s s i o n . Save o n c e . w h e n , for a n i i s d e m e a n o r with o t h e r boys as b a d We w e r e c o m p e l l e d to s t a y till h e e x c u s e d in t u r n e a c h l a d : T o o n e a n d o t h e r wort I w a s tfiven t h a t t h e y m i i r h t jro a n d p l a y ; A n d a f t e r a l l h a d b e e n d i s m i s s e d we s t i l l w e r e t h e r e t o s t a y . At last t h e m a s t e r took h i s b o o k s , r e t i r e d , a n d l o c k e d t h e d o o r ; O u r w i s t f u l e y e s p u r s u e d h i m t i l l we s a w h i s b a c k n o m o r e . We t i p - t o e d r o u n d t h e r o o m a n d t r i e d o u r b e s t to m a k e o u r e x i t . Hut e v e r y e f f o r t p r o v e d in v a i n , n o m a t t e r h o w w e ' d fix i t . O l u c k l e s s d a y . s w i f t nearliiK n l ^ h t . f o r a l l t h e w o r l d it l o o k e d As if to s p e n d its t e d i o u s h o u r s , a l o n e t h e r e , we w e r e b o o k e d . ' T w a s o n . t h e s e c o n d f l o o r . a n d we k e p t u p a f r a n t i c m o t i o n : A m a s o n w ith a l a d d e r s a w . a n d took a k i n d l y n o t i o n To set it u p w h e r e w e c o u l d p l a c e o u r f e e t u p o n i t s r o u n d . A n d s t e p by s t e p w e m a d e d e s c e n t a n d s a f e l y r e a c h e d t h e g r o u n d We'd been f o r g o t t e n , t h a t was all. no evil was d e s i g n e d . We s i m p l y p a i d t h e p r i c e of h c i n u s m a l l e r 1 h a n o u r k i n d . < ' o - e d n c a t i o n . in t h o s e d a y s , p r o v o k e d a h o l y s h u d d e r :


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It n e v e r w o u l d t a k e {ilace u s IOIIK 'IS m e n h e l d f a s t t h e r u d d e r And keep t h e i r m e m ' r i e s f r a g r a n t for m a n y c o m i n g d a y s . \N h o s e i i e a d s w e r e c o o l a n d l e v e l , a n d w h o s e h e a r t s w e r e p r e s s - A d o z e n , s c o r e , a h u n d r e d n a m e s a t o n c e a r e b r o u g h t t o m i n d . ed with fears The influential, great ami good, the generous and kind. That t h c c h i l d r e n of A m e r i c a w e r e w i s e a h o v e t h e i r y e a r s . T h e f a m e of s o m e is d u l y s u n g , a n d s h a l l b e d o w n t h e a g e s H e n c e t h e y s o l e m n l y d e c r e e d t h a t t h e r e m u s t be d i v i s i o n Inscribed upon t h e h e a r t , a n d traced on h i s t o r y ' s fair pages. B e t w e e n t h e p l a y - g r o u n d s of t h e s e x e s , a h i ^ h . r o u j r h l>oard par-- O t h e r s in t u r n w e r e m o r e o b s c u r e , b u t n o n e t h e less p o t e n t i a l tition. W i t h i n a s p h e r e m o r e ci r e n i n seribv'd t h e i r l i v e s w e r e a 11 e ^ s e n l la 1. ' T w a s to t h a t c r u e l m a n d a t e t h a t so m a n y of u s o w e T o o n e o f t h e s e I feel i m p e l l e d t o d e d i c a t e a l i n e T h a t we w e r e in o u r s e l e c t i o n , so n o t o r i o u s l v s l o w . A n d lay m y t r i b u t e of e s t e e m u p o n h i s n i e m o r y ' * s h r i n e . • A k n i g h t w a s h e of l a b o r , a n d w i t h t r o w e l a n d m o t a r - b o a r d T b e m o s t f r e q u e n t e d p l a c e in t o w n t o s t u d e n t s a t t h e c o l l e g e 1 T j i e p l a c e t o w h i c h t h e y a l w a y s w e n t to s u p p l e m e n t t h e i r k n o w - Hy s e r v i n g w e l l h i s f e l l o w - m e n , h e a l s o s e r v e d t h e I . o r d . Of m e d i u m b i g h t , a n d f a i r l y s t o u t . h U s h o u l d e r s s o m e w h a t b e n t . ledge. T h r o r a i n a n d s h i n e , t h r o s n o w a n d s l e e t , n n d e v e r y k i n d of H e b o r e t h e w e i g h t of t h r e e - s c o r e y e a r s , n o r w a s h i s v i g o r s p e n t . H i s l o c k s w e r e h o a r y , l o n g a n d t h i n , h i s l i p s w i t h f i m i n e r s pres* weat her, sed. ^ i t h ea^rer s t e p , a l o n e , in p a i r s , o r g r o u p e d a s f r i e n d s t o g e t h e r . H i s p i e r c i n g e y e . h i s s h a g g y b r o w , in k e e p i n g w i t h t h e r e s t . W a s t h e o f l i c e of t h e g o v e r n m e n t , f o r s o o t h t h e p l a c e of l e t t e r s : / H i s f a c e n o t w h o l l y w i n n i n g yet e v e r y t o u c h a m i l i n e . A n d w h e n t h e w i s h e d - f o r l e t t e r c a m e to o n e . a s if w i t h f e t t e r s R e v e a l e d a n e a r n e s t s o u l , o n fire w i t h e n e r g y d i v i n e . He was a n c h o r e d to t h e spot till every word was read. His lineage, like Melchisedec's to me was never k n o w n . And m i n d a n d heart with news nnd love were g e n e r o u s l y fed. Tho friends a n d neighbors many proudly claimed him for their own. Hut w h a t a s c h o o l of t r i a l w a s t h i s s a m e a t t r a c t i v e p l a c e F o r to u e t n o t h i n g , n o t h i n g : , n o t h i n g , w a s n i n e t i m e s in t e n t h e T r u e t o h i s n a m e , in f o r c e f u l t o n e s , h i s e c h o i i m v o i c e r a n g oiilc a s e . - A f'ltijt/trr in t h e bel 1 f r y of t h e r e g i o n r o u n d a b o u t . A H a p t i s t in t h e w i l d e r n e s s , a H o a n e r g u s h e . 'Twas on these short e x c u r s i o n s to t h e olhec t h r i c e n d a y . T h a t t h e s e g a l l a n t , h o p e f u l s t u d e n t s w o u l d s o m e t i m e s m e e t d i s - U h o left n o m e a n s u n t r i e d to s e e k f r o m s i n t o set m e n f r e e . Oreat c r d w d s he g a t h e r e d r o u n d h i m . a n d t h e silent e v e n i n g a i r . may. J u s t w h a t it w a s ' w e d o n o t k n o w , b u t s o m e t h i n g ; c a u s e d a f r i c - Hore t o a l m o s t e v e r y h o m e . I h e s e r m o n , s o n g a n d p r a y e r . I h e t o w n - h o u s e , t h e n t h e c h u r c h - i i e c a n i e t o o s m a l l to h o u s e t h e tion blessing,' F o r t h e t e r m s a p p l i e d b y b o y s in t o w n w e r e not of c h o i c e s t d i c O r to seat t h e wakeneci s o u l s w h o c a m e ( i o d ' s n a m e p r o f e s s i n g ; * tion. I ' e r h a p s t h o s e b i g g r e y s h a w l s p r o v o k e d t h e i r r i g h t e o u s i n d i g - A g e d of d a y s , y o u n g m e n a n d m a i d e n s . c h i l d r e n , t o o , w e r e t h e r e , K e c r u i t s a n d v e t e r a n s in s i n . t o - e e k t h e i r s o u l ' s w e l f a r e . nation : II is d o c t r i n e s d i d not s q u a r e p e r h a p s t o o r t h o d o x Inst r u c t i o n P e r h a p s a c l a s h of i n t e r e s t s w a s t h e c a u s e of p r o v o c a t i o n . P e r h a p s t h e t o w n - b o y s s i m p l y m e a n t to s h o w t h e m s e l v e s h e r o i c . H e e n t e r e d n o t t h e p r e a c h i n g r a n k s by r e g u l a r i n d u c t i o n . T h e r e m a y h a v e b e e n s o m e chafT a m o n g t h e w h e a t , h e s o w e d And teach t h e s t u d e n t s how to be u n f e e l i n g as the stoic. broad cast. Hut o f t e n f r o m t h e i r a m b u s h t h e s e m i s c r e a n t s w o u l d t h r o w . Hut t h e g o o d h e w r o u g h t i:i t i m e t h r o a l l e t e r n i t y s h a l l l a s t : M i s s i l e s of s n o w a n d ice a n d s t o n e , u p o n t h e u n s u s p e c t i n g f o e : His s i n g l e talent well i m p r o v e d , w h e n called his Ood to m e e t . A skirmish would ensue, where s t r e n g t h , agility, and nerve. U i t h j o y f u l h e a r t , h e l a i d a n o t h e r p o u n d at J e s u s ' f e e t . I n s t e a d of p o w d e r , s w o r d a n d g u n . t h e b e l t e r e n d w o u l d s e r v e ; A n d n tui' t h e Col l e g e , then t h e t o w n , w a s w o r s t e d in t h e t u s s l e — A n d m a n y s h a l l a r i s e a n d c a l l h i m b l e s s s d in t h a t r e a l m . W h e r e r a p t u r e s of d e l i g h t , r e d e e m e d s o u l s s h a l l o v e r w h e l m . Vet f o r t h e h o n o r s of v i c t o r y e a c h s i d e d i d n o b l y h u s t l e . T h e s i m p l e w a y s of b y - g o n e d a y s h o w p l e a s a n t t o r e c a l l : T h o t o r e t u r n t o t h e m I f e a r w o u l d not a g r e e w i t h a l l . T h e f e e t of t h e p e d e s t r i a n w e r e not so t e n d e r t h e n . A n d w o o d e n s h o e s in g r e a t d e m a n d f o r w o m e n a n d f o r m e n . To c o r r e s p o n d , t h e walks t h r o town were b u t a beaten p a t h t o r t h e c l a t t e r of s u c h f o o t - w e a r on b o a r d s , won hi s t i r u p w ra t h . T h e s t r e e t s w e r e n o t so h a r d a n d s m o o t h ; t h e o w n e r of a s t e e d An e y e f o r s t r e n g t h a n d s e r v i c e h a d . a n d n o t a n e y « f o r s p e e d . T h e b a y of M a c a t a w a b o r e a l e s s p r e t e n t i o n s n a m e . A n d l a k e a n d r i v e r w e r e n o t t h e n so w i d e l y k n o w n to f a m e ; Hut o n t h e i r g l a s s y b o s o m f l o a t e d m a n y a b a r k a n d s c o w . L o a d e d w i t h c o r d - w o o d , s t a v e s , a n d t i c s , t h a t a r e not s e e n t h e r e now. T h e r a i l - w a y t r a i n h a d n o t e s s a y e d t o v i s i t u s in c o u r s e . And post and passenger a l i k e m u s t use t h e old stage h o r s e : His going out a n d c o m i n g in, t h e driver's harsh tin h o r n . Were p l e a s i n g sight a n d m u s i c t h e n , t h o now t h e y seem f o r l o r n . A d a y of g r e a t s i g n i f i c a n c e , t o tow n a n d c o u n t r y f o l k . On w h i c h f r o m p e a c e f u l s l u m b e r s , a l l e a r l i e r a w o k e . Was t h e semi-annual m a r k e t , a happy gala-day. When our quiet streets were crowded thick with men and maide n s gay— An i n s t i t u t i o n o b s o l e t e , t h o o n c e w i t h i n t e r e s t f r a u g h t . Whore horses, cattle, swine and fowl were sold and freely b o u g h t . The e n t e r p r i s e and piety that marked those f o r m e r days W a s s u r e to find e x p r e s s i o n in s t r a n g e o r w e l l - k n o w n w a y s . T h e h e a t h e n in t h e far-off l a n d t h e i r s y m p a t h y h a d s t i r r e d . A n d e a g e r l y t h e y s o u g h t to b r i n g t o t h e m (iod.'s h o l y w o r d : A m i s s i o n a r y s h i p f o r t h e n a v y of t h e I . o r d . To convey the men equipped with shield and Spirit's sword i o fields of c o n f l i c t . — w a s s u p p o s e d to b e a t h i n g e s s e n t i a l : T h e s h i p w a s n e v e r l a u n c h e d , b u t t h e c a u s e w a s set a f l o a t . A n d is b e a r i n g c o u n t l e s s b l e s s i n g s t o t h e s l i o r e s of l a n d s r e m o t e : T h e S h i p w a s n e v e r b u i l t , yet i t s keel t h o l e f t t o r o t . Is t h e b a c k - b o u e o f t h a t zeal f o r ( i o d a n d m a n t h a t c h a n g e s n o t . T h i s place like every o t h e r too a liberal quota h a d . Of c h a r a c t e r s c o n s p i c u o u s . i n d H T e r e n t , g o o d a n d b a d . As e a r t h t o e a r t h a n d d u s t t o d u s t is s p o k e n o v e r m a n y We will not lift tin* s o m b r e s h r o u d t o s h o w t h e f a u l t s of a n y . T h e i r v i r t u e s we m a y e m u l a f e . t h e i r e X r t f H e m es p r a i s e .

L i k e d r i f t - w o o d o n t h e s h o r e of l h e s w i f t l y f l o w i n g s t r e a m . These stray and meagre t h o u g h t s however worthless they may seem. C a m e f l o a t i n g o n t h e t i d e of o u r b o y - h o o d r e c o l l e c t i o n A n d in I h e o r d e r of t h e i r c o m i n g t h e y g a v e o u r pen d i r e c t i o n . l i KA . A . V KN N K M A . ' 7 l » .

Autumn. It is A u t u m n , and thc birds have be^un t o leave for their southern home. Some take I'rench leave; o t h e r s d o not trouble t h e m s e l v e s about leavetakini*. S u p p o s e yourself a c c o m p a n y i n g me for a stroll alon<j the river. The b a n k s are covered with thick wood in which beech, b u t t e r n u t , and walnut p r e d o m i n a t e . A t this season of the year we may look for t h e wood-duck, swimming about on the water with her y o u n g brood. T h e song, if we may call the d i s c o r d a n t cries of the blue-jay a song, is heard in places. I his saucy blue-coat is now busily e n g a g e d in sticking beech-nuts in crannies of the bark of trees, for his sustenance dtii ing the winter. I he scjuirrel is beginning to hoard his store of nuts in some hollow limb that serves as his home. l i e is a busv little fellow, and whisks in and out of his door way in a manner that t h r e a t e n s " p o o r luck" t o ' the more slothful human nut-gatherers that may visit that patch of woods. They mav visit it a f t e r every sign of ;i imt has disappcar-

XiriE. A n c h o r ed. I hey will look at the trees and e x a m i n e t h e m t h o r o u g h l y , then scrutinize the g r o u n d , but not a nut will they find. T h e y will then begin to d e b a t e the cause on this wise: "It has been a fine season for nuts, no late frosts to kill the buds, no high winds to blow oil the nuts b e f o r e t h e y were ripe; then what can be the cause?" T h i s causes me to r e m a r k ; " G o to the squirrel thou sluggard consider its ways and be wise." " T h e loveliest time of all the year, is sweet and sunny May: It is then the flowers b e d e c k the fields with colors bright a n d gay." So says the p o e t : but are not t h e p a t c h e s of woods c l o t h e d in their J o s e p h ' s coat as pleasing to the eye as t h e m o d e s t arbutus, or the flaunting d a n d e l i o n ? C a n n o t a lover of nature enjoy him- or herself as well in a forest clothed in A u t u m n a l foliage, as in a spring time marsh filled with marsh-marigolds, skunk-cabbage and m a n d r a k e ? It is now that the call of the quail, t h a t bird which is pleasing to the sense of taste as well as to the eye. is heard on e v e r y hand. Now is the time that the sportsman rises early, and d e p a r t s with his gun and d o g . to dole d e a t h and destruction to every luckless rabbit within a radius of ten miles. H e t r a m p s all day. and returns at dusk, laden p e r h a p s with a w o o d - p e c k e r or a single rabbit that fell by his unerring aim. His p a t i e n c e is e x h a u s t e d ; he is e x a u s t e d physically, hungry as a bear, but, he g r u m b l e s not, for he has been hunting. So it is with t h e small boy who g o e s " c o o n i n g " melons, l i e is sick, very sick, to pay for his indulgence, bub he has p a r t a k e n of f o r b i d d e n fruit and is satisfied. C. H K K H U I S . H class. Will Carleton. ( F r o m t h e S t . L a w r e n c e Daily J

A Dailv r e p o r t e r found him last evening, on a spacious, breezy veranda, a l t e r n a t e l y re a di ng a c o p y of Horace, and gazing off t h r o u g h the trees across the River. " A n d so you k e e p up y o u r old college studies?" was asked. " K v e r y t h i n g worth learning, is worth remembering," replied Mr. Carleton, with a smile. "I always like to carry a few of the old literary masters with me into my vacation. Their work has lasted so long, that we know t h e r e must be s o m e t h i n g in it that is good for t h e human race. The g r e a t e s t test of the value of literary productions, is T i m e ; and we can trust the verdict of a jury c o m p o s e d of several j/enerat ions."

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" D o you have any particular course of reading, during vacation?" "I t a k e every t h i n g that feeds t h e heart, brain, or soul, laying aside what m a y b e t e r m e d the husks, and a p p r o p r i a t i n g only t h e best portions. histories, novels, poems, essays, news items, editorials a n y t h i n g that will impart new information, or old m a t t e r given in a new form, and t r a n s m i t t e d by the individuality of the a u t h o r . " * * * * * * # " A r e you satisfied with t h e reception of y o u r new book. "City Festivals?" It is only a baby, having a p p e a r e d July first, and has not had time to receive, to any great e x t e n t ; but the public are already b u y i n g large quantities." " D o the newspaper reviews please y o u ? " " T h e y are of all kinds. S o m e of t h e m laud me to the skies, and others, mostly written byretired r h y m e s t e r s whom the public has not appreciated. are quite sure that I am 'no poet." And it may be t h e s e are right. I do not care any t h i n g in particular about being called 'a poet' certainly not, if the insane stuff they have written is poetry. I do not care to publish anv thing for the e x p r e s s p u r p o s e of having a few o t h e r writers throw up their h a n d s in holy admiration and say. 'Oh my! isn't that e l e g a n t ! Q u i t e in my line! A l m o s t as good as that little t h i n g I did. the o t h e r day. you know!' while The People merely glance at the stuff, wondering what it is all about. I am trying to d o s o m e t h i n g with my pen. besides t h e a t t e m p t e d a t t a i n m e n t of the u n a t t a i n a b l e and imagining of the unimaginable." "Vou have definite motives, then, for all ot your work?' Always! A motive t h a t the d u d e school or rather out-of-school poets, can not u n d e r stand. True p o e t r y is not sickly fancy and s t e r e o t y p e d grace of diction. T o be genuine, poetry must deal with t h e realities of things— must a d d r e s s the brain, heart, and soul. You do not find any lah-de-dah work in David, in H o m e r , in Dante, in S h a k e s p e a r e , in Victor H u g o . T h e y will sacrifice e l e g a n c e of diction, for power and t r u t h , any time. T h e y were no doubt surrounded, all their lives, with the minnows of literature, nibbling at t h e m ; but they had no time to d e v o t e to t h e m . T h e s e great p o e t s had their work to do. and it has lived, in spite of the p i n w o r m s that are c o n s t a n t l y striving to bore holes in their r e p u t a t i o n , and only succeed in boring the public instead."


TL IK Anomor "Vou consider, as stated in y o u r p r e f a c e to " m o n e y - m a k i n g poet:"' I aim to show that A u " C i t y Festivals," that the m o t i v e is the first t h o r s h i p can be just as i n d e p e n d e n t as any occupation, and that to be a poet, one need not t h i n g to be considered in a p o e m ? " " U n d o u b t e d l y , and invariably. T h e world is be a financial imbecile, borrow money that he full of sorrow, suffering, crime discord, in- doesn't intend to pay. and be a burden on his h u m a n i t y , m u r d e r — a h u n d r e d , t h o u s a n d evils friends generally." " M a y I ask how much you receive for lecturfrom which it n e e d s help and deliverance; it has also much, joy, light, happiness, and good- ing. now?" ness, which are waiting and a s k i n g to be dis" M r . Carleton smiled, and replied: "Certainplayed, to the benefit of h u m a n i t y . W i t h all ly. T h e lecture platform has suffered a decline this work to be done, a writer who has t h e at- since t h e days of G o u g h and Heecher, it has tention of the public, and instead of trying to been said; and I only get two hundred dollars benefit his race, merely caresses himself with per evening." his pen, and strives only to see what graceful Most people would t a k e that willingly, for e x p r e s s i o n s he can produce, must eventually ex- an evening's work." said the Daily represenpect t h e world's c o n t e m p t , if it continue to titive. give him any a t t e n t i o n at all. H e is like some "Ves," replied Mr. Carleton. musingly "but it well-dressed g e n t l e m a n in a skiff, in view of a often t a k e s a good deal of work that the audience lot of p e o p l e who are drowning, and who, in- does not see. It is many times a great task stead of trying to save any of t h e m , strikes at- and hardships to reach the town in which one titudes, and seem to say, " L o o k ! See me! is to lecture. W a s h - o u t s snow-drifts, delayed H o w g r a c e f u l l y I can row! H o w sweetly I trains from every cause; night travel, insufficient skip about over the beautiful water! D o n ' t you • and indigestible meals, cold beds, wintry blasts see how fine I a m ? A n d never goes near the sweeping across the p l a t f o r m ; in tact, evens u f f e r e r at all." lecture fee ought to be enough, at least to give "Hut you d o not c o n d e m n entirely poetry the lecturer a first class funeral, in case it kills which has for its motives only the e x p l o i t i n g him. Hesides, trains get into such a tangle of of p r e t t y words and p h r a s e s ? " delay, sometimes, that we have to hire e x t r a " N o t wholly; any m o r e than I would a pea- locomotives, at from twenty-five to a hundred cock, who s p e n d s most of t h e time a d m i r i n g dollars, in order to get thro." his p l u m a g e and c o n c e a l i n g his feet. Kvery " H o w long do you stay on the river, Mr. t h i n g has its use. Hut I p r e f e r to try for a Carleton ?" g r a n d e r object, and wish to be reckoned as one "I don't know that is my idea of a vacation: who strives, however h u m b l y , for the highest a space of time with no definite plans. Hut, and noblest in h u m a n n a t u r e . " see here! 1 have been talking about myself " I t has been said, Mr. Carleton, that you are most of this interview, and have not had a a m o n e y - m a k i n g p o e t ; that you work f o r ' w h a t chance at you! I was once an editor myself, t h e r e is in it' in a financial sense; that you had you know; what do y o u — " but the reporter r a t h e r have y o u r books salable t h a n artistic." secured a promise of a future interview and " W h a t does 'artistic' m e a n ? ' asked Mr. Car- was "off." leton. " M y idea of it is, that quality which enables one to best accomplish the object of the EXCHANGES. work. I want my books to sell for two reasons: first, so t h a t whatever good t h e r e may be in Supt. D. H. Vntema begins his fifteenth y e a r them, may do the most possible g o o d ; second, at St. Johns.— VV/r Moderator. so that I may retain e n o u g h financial indepenAgricultural College c o m m e n c e m e n t was d e n c e to enable me always to write as I think held August 16. T h e g r a d u a t i n g class numand feel. T h e time was when a poet was k e p t bered 26. so p o o r that he could not live, e x c e p t with the Little V n t e m a dosen't know how to spell or kind permission of s o m e earl or d u k e ; the t i m e has now come, when the people are the lords, p r o n o u n c e his.name but is "at h o m e " at Supt. and t h e y a p p r e c i a t e a writer who says what he V's since July 2g. —Tltc Moilcrator. thinks, and e x p e c t s t h e m to pay him for his J. G. Schurman, a Canadian 36 years old. suci work, just the s a m e as t h e y would any one else. ceeds C. K. A d a m s as president of Cornell. I his is the only sense in which I can be called His salary is a paltry Si6,000.— Kx.

Tmhi Anchor.

153

C h a r a c t e r is what a man is when he t h i n k s no- forty years he has been c o n n e c t e d with t h e house of H a r p e r Hrothers, receiving, it is said, b o d y is w a t c h i n g him. Rant's Horn. H e n K n a p p , the G e r m a n inventor, will place a yearly salary of S20.000 for- his services on on exhibition at t h e W o r l d ' s Columbian Kx- H a r p e r ' s W e e k l y and H a r p e r ' s Monthly.— Printer s Ink. « position, a gun weighing 120 tons. Ex. Zanesville, ()., offers Adrian College authorities S100,000 and 60 acres of land and Michigan seems likely to lose her Protestant M e t h o d ist college.

A d r o p of ink may m a k e a million t h i n k ! And put by Scribblers into verse. W o u l d surely m a k e two millions curse.

Hut the education t h a t does not result in m a k i n g a boy gentle, m o r e kind, more courG e o r g e R. Herkaw, | a s u m m e r normalite, ) has teous, m o r e t h o u g h t f u l of others, more symbeen e n g a g e d as principal of the W o o d m e r e pathetic. m o r e helpful, more appreciative, more school of W e s t Detroit, for the c o m i n g year. obedient, more c o u r a g e o u s in the m a i n t e n a n c e The Moderator. of right, more high-minded than he was on en" C o u n t not t h e Irrevoenhle past tering school is a failure, no m a t t e r how much As w h o l l y w a s t e d , w h o l l y v a i n . intellectual k n o w l e d g e it m a y afford. Popular If. risintr on its w r e e k s at l a s t . To s o n i e t h l n g n o b l e r we a t t a i n . " Edueator. •"y

GRAVE.?

LIBRARY

BUILDING

AND

WINANTS

CHAPEL.

Length, 144 feet. W i d t h , So feet. The Library, having a stack room with c a p a c i t y for 40.000 books, is in le north end. 1 he C hapel, 60x60 feet, is in the south end. On t h e second floor of the central part are four tVure rooms. 1 he Museum occupies the u p p e r part of the stack room.

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All merit ceases t h c m o m e n t we p e r f o r m an BOOKS A N D PERIODICALS. act for t h e s a k e of its consequences. T r u l y in A recent Independent has a fine s y m p o s i u m on this respect we have our reward. Wiihehn von Railroad Problems. Humboldt. L a t e n u m b e r s of Our Day are rich in advance T h e way to settle t h e a m u s e m e n t s question t h o u g h t on live issues. In t h e Aug. number, is to cultivate t h e sort of Christians who don't J o h n H . Harrows, D. D. writes on " R e l i g i o u s think the first t h i n g in life is to be a m u s e d . Possibilities of the W o r l d ' s Fair;" and Rev. W. Young Metis Era. F. Crafts, on " T h e S a b b a t h School as a F a c t o r G e o r g e William Curtis, who died at his in Public K d u c a t i o n : " " T h e W o r k i n g m a n as home A u g u s t 31, was a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of the his own C a p i t a l i s t " is t r e a t e d by W. O. Mc highest and noblest qualities in m o d e r n jour- Dowell in t h e Sep. n u m b e r . T h e s a m e issue nalism. In his early life Mr. Curtis was as- c o n t a i n s Mr. C o o k ' s Hoston H y m n . " F l i t t i n g sociated with l e a d i n g dailies, but for t h e past W i n g s " and Hoston M o n d a y Lecture. " R u m •i #


'54

T H E .

A

N

sclling" .it t h e W o r l d ' s Fair." The Oct. mimbcr c o n t a i n s an elegant p h o t o g r a v u r e of W h i t tier; also W h i t t i e r ' s brief a u t o b i o g r a p h y . KxPres. C y r u s H a m l i n considers " T h e Latest A n dover a t t a c k on t h e A m e r i c a n Board." 1 he M o n d a y L e c t u r e i^ entitled " F a c t s and Fancies of t h e H i g h e r Criticism." " T h e Crisis of a P a r t y " by A u g u s t u s Jacobson, I l 7 PP- P ^ P c r 5 o c just issued by F. J . S c h u l t e & Co., Chicago, s t a r t s out with a rather far-tetched a r g u m e n t for protection. It goes on to speak truly and p o i n t e d l y about the d a n g e r s of c o n g e s t e d wealth and general ignorance; s u g g e s t s a succession tax to maintain manual training schools; it shows the distance between t h e t o p and b o t t o m of society, and says: "If the Republican p a r t y is to live, it must gird up its loins, put on its a r m o r and put an end to plutocracy." The style is incisive; the m a t t e r suggestive. " T h e A n d e r s o n s : B r o t h e r and Sister" by Agnes Giberne, a u t h o r of " T h e D a l r y m p l e s " etc., is an illustrated 12 mo of 347 pp. just issued by t h e A m e r i c a n Tract Society, New Y o r k , a t Si.50. It is an English story f r a u g h t with interest and Christian t e a c h i n g showing at once the folly of u n d u e p r i d e and excessive ambition. In the c h a p t e r " R e t r i b u t i o n " are finely shown t h e child's innate love of truth and justice and the s h o r t s i g h t d e n e s s a n d wickedness of a selfish, misguided affection. T h e book is more helpful because most natural; and the fine t h o u g h t is finer for t h e easy, almost lively, conversational style in which it is put. T h e A m e r i c a n Book Co. has put on the market, " The S c h o o l m a s t e r in L i t e r a t u r e " containing selections from the writings of A s c h a m . Moliere Fuller, Rousseau. Shenstone, Cowper, Goethe, Pestalozzi, Page, M it ford, Bronte, H u g h e s , D i c k e n s T h a c k e r a y , Irving. George Eliot, E g g l e s t o n . T h o m p s o n and o t h e r s introduced by E d w a r d E g g l e s t o n . T h i s book is a feast of fat t h i n g s in literature. It has been a d o p t e d by the Board of the Teachers' Reading Circle, of Michigan, as the book in culture s t u d y for this year's reading. In it. says the Board, " f o r t h r e e centuries we are placed face to face with t h e school-master. W e see him represented by himself in the writings of A s c h a m , Rousseau, Pestalozzi and others down to D ' A r c y T h o m p s o n of the present time T h o m a s H u g h e s p r e s e n t s him as a man, true to nature, governed by t h o u g h t s and passions similar to t h o s e that affect m a n k i n d in general.

O

H

O

K

. T L I M

but with t h e manly part of his c h a r a c t e r .always o u t w a r d " T h e quality of type, p a p e r and binding is of the best; t h e book contains 60S pp. K vo.and sells at Si.40. or to m e m b e r s of the Reading Circle. Si.30-

" A c r o s s the river!" A Prohibition club has been organized a m o n g the students. T h e silvery tones of a bright new bell now-adays call the boys to work and worship. Lovers of, music and the musical friends of thc institution will doubtless be glad to learn that t h c Upsalian O r c h e s t r a has resumed work with all its old-time vigor. But two m e m b e r s of thc Junior class t a k e u p calculus at present. I he rest of the class obtained permission, in lieu of it, to t a k e a special course in Dutch. H o p e College is ambitious to k e e p abreast of the times. In addition to the existing socalled base-ball and foot-ball clubs, a lawn-tennis club was recently started. For her size " H o p e " boasts a large n u m b e r of literary societies. No less than seven actually exist. All have organized for the t e r m ' s work and report a healthy, vigorous growth. Silent monitors, one for each class, will henceforth record all absentees from the morning Chapel worship. So the o l d t i m e historic roll-call is also relegated to the mellow past. Instead of oral e x a m i n a t i o n s at the close ol the year as was the custom, they w ill now c o m e at the end of every term and in writing, w ith from one to t h r e e hours allowed for each e x amination. T h e institution greatly misses the v a l u a b l e services of C. Dckker, and D. G l e y s t e e n . '91, to stir up some political discussion a n d enthusiasm during this most quiet of all Presidential campaigns. T h e full moon's beaming, benevolent smile, the generous a t t e n d a n c e of Y. W. C. A. m e m bers. the exceptionably large number of new students, the charming music and c h e e r i n g remarks, and last but not least t h e e x c e l l e n t quality of the cake and coffee and manifest social spirit were some of the e l e m e n t s t h a t combined to make the last V. M. C. A. reception of thc new students the most pleasing ami successful in the historv of the Association.

A N O I H L O R .

I he Rev. Samuel S t r e n g has been a p p o i n t e d to t a k e c h a r g e of Prof. Kollen's b r a n c h e s during his a b s e n c e East. 1 he s t u d e n t s in a t t e n d a n c e at college number about 200. T h c uniform increase in numb e r s promises much for the future. S t u d e n t s have been very busy this fall exercising their hrstcs in the n e i g h b o r i n g vineyards. " N e v e r tell tales out of school." Roseland this y e a r a d d e d t h r e e new b u d s to h e r floral collection at H o p e . T w o were very young and t h e o t h e r s o m e w h a t in the s h a p e of an S.

Laying of the Corner Stone.

O c t o b e r 12, t h c day celebrated at New York as t h c annivesary of the New W o r l d ' s discovery, was fittingly observed at H o p e College by laying the corner-stone of Graves Library Building and W i n a n t s Chapel. It was a beautiful a u t u m n a l day and the att e n d a n c e and exercises showed t h e universal interest felt in the p r o s p e r i t y of the college. Pres. Scott c o n d u c t e d t h c services o p e n i n g t h e m with a few a p p r o p r i a t e remarks, a f t e r which the order of the exercises was followed: 1. Chorus b y S t u d e n t s — / / / / / . Nearly all the Seniors a t t e n d e d t h e S t a t e 2. Paryer—Rev. J. W . Beardslee, D. D. C o n v e n t i o n of the Y. M. C. A. at L a n s i n g with 3. Music—"Praise y e t h e F a t h e r . " Choir, led as many more from o t h e r classes; in all about by Prof. J. B. N y k e r k , H o p e College. twenty. 4. A d d r e s s — Rev. William M o e r d y k , Presi1 he North W e s t e r n A c a d e m y r e p r e s e n t s dent of the Council of H o p e College. herself at H o p e this fall by a large n u m b e r of 5. Historical S t a t e m e n t — A r e n d Visschcr, strong, bright y o u n g men. Sister, send us Esq., S e c r e t a r y of t h e Building C o m m i t t e e . m o r e of such. 6. C o n t e n t s of Box. I he result of the recent e l e c t i o n in the 7. L a y i n g the C o r n e r Stone— Prof. G. J. KolM e l i p h o n e are as follows: President, J. De len. President of the Building C o m m i t t e e . J o n g h ; Vice President, J. E. T a k k e n ; S e c r e t a r y , S. H y m n . J . J . B a n n i n g a ; T r e a s u r e r . J. Van Ess; Marshal, 9. A d d r e s s — H o n . Edwin F. Uhl, Grand J. L a e p p l e . Rapids, Mich. Several of our y o u n g " H o p e f u l s , " instead of 10. D o x o l o g y . g o i n g to the Fair on T h u r s d a y a f t e r n o o n , Oct. Music a p p r o p r i a t e to thc occasion was well 6, went with thc fur on a second a r g o n a u t i c rendered u n d e r the direction of Prof. J. B. Nye x p e d i t i o n t o Macatawa Park. T h e y report a kerk. g o o d time. T h e able addresses of Rev. William Moer1 he " a r g o n a u t s " held a council in the rail- d y k e and A r e n d Visschcr were listened to w ith road region the evening of the 12th. Such ex- interest. T h e one chiefly c o n c e r n i n g t h e edp e d i t i o n s should be e n c o u r a g e d but like our ucational a d v a n c e m e n t of the Institution, show"inlant industries" no longer need to be. ed the obstacles c o n t e n d e d with in the earlier T h e social given by the Y. M. C. A. on be- d a y s and t h e present a d v a n t a g e s . The other half of the new s t u d e n t s was an entire success. t r e a t e d of t h c Institution's financial basis and I he Misses Steffens, C a p p o n , and Van Duren showed the sources of the building f u n d . T h e kindly relations sustained by " H o p e " to c h a r m e d t h e a u d i e n c e with their skill at the piano, a f t e r which r e f r e s h m e n t s and social institutions and persons of e m i n e n c e w as maniconverse were e n j o y e d . fest in the many c o n g r a t u l a t o r y t e l e g r a m s reAt the laying of t h c corner s t o n e of G r a v e s ceived and read. Prof. Kollen, President of thc Building ComLibrary Building, Oct. 12: the a d d r e s s e s were ot a high order. Mr. M o e r d y k t o u c h e d upon mittee, to whose e f f o r t s the College is chiefly the trials and t r i u m p h s of our institution in indebted for its new building, placed t h c corpast y e a r s and pointed toward the " o n c o m i n g ner stone with the following r e m a r k s : " A n d now I lay the Corner S t o n e of Graves l u t u r e " with large hope. T h e Hon. Edwin I'. L hi s a d d r e s s was m a s t e r l y and powerful Library Building and W i n a n t s Chapel in the both in delivery and s e n t i m e n t . His subject name of t h c F a t h e r , of the Son and of t h c H o l y e m b r a c e d t h e love and f r i e n d s h i p of books. I Ghost. A n d now let the building arise, and may the I he Historical s t a t e m e n t was f r e q u e n t l y app l a u d e d . 1 he laying of t h e corner s t o n e was |builders be g r e a t l y p r o s p e r e d in all their work And in t h c Library to he erected, may t h c impressive and the singing of the d o x o l o g y old and t h e y o u n g for m a n y ages, hold sweet i m m e d i a t e l y afterwards, most a p p r o p r i a t e .


I XTIB. A N C H O R .

T H E . ANOMOR. a n d profitable c o m m u n i o n with t h e s a g e s of t h c b e i n g realized in a b r o a d e r and more^ substantial manner. With s o m e changes thouroughly past and t h e p r e s e n t ! A n d in t h e Chapel m a y t h e y o u n g g a t h e r , consistent with a flourishing college t h e lutuic for m a n y g e n e r a t i o n s , for divine praise and welfare of H o p e would be a s s u m e d . Fellows, let t h e s e new a d v a n t a g e s s t i m u l a t e worship, a n d t h e r e b y o b t a i n s t r e n g t h and into g r e a t e r e f f o r t s ! T h o we may not be c a p spiration for t h e conflicts of life! A n d m a y t h e m o t t o of H o p e C o l l e g e , S P K K A s t o n e s in t h e social s t r u c t u r e yet we must be a IN DKO, " H o p e t h o u in G o d , " c a r v e d in this part of the f o u n d a t i o n . Seek t o be a c o r n e r C o r n e r S t o n e , be e n g r a v e d u p o n t h e h e a r t s and s t o n e ! CHARI.KS M C HRIDK. m i n d s of all!" Hon. Kdwin F. Uhl s p o k e forcibly and e l o q u e n t l y c o n c e r n i n g t h e a d v a n t a g e s of t h c s c h o l a r t h e e n n o b l i n g influences of g o o d literature. t h e p o w e r f u l influence e x e r t e d by institutions of learning, and t h e debt of civilization t o t h e intelligence and e n t e r p r i s e ol t h e D u t c h p e o p l e . The c o r n e r - s t o n e c o n t a i n s : S y n o d i c a l m i n u t e s , a c o p y ot De H o l l a n d e r , De G r o n d w e t , D e H o p e , De \ \ a c h t e r H o l l a n d City N e w s , T H E A N C H O R , O t t a w a C o u n t y Times, N. V. Christian I n t e l l i g e n c e r and Mission H e l d , s k e t c h of life of G. C. W inants. a S3 g o l d piece *n by Mrs. H . T. Searle, a s e r m o n by Dr. A. C. Van Raalte a n d a s k e t c h of his life by Rev. H . K. D o s k e r , C a t a l o g u e s of H o p e for 1S65 a n d I 8 9 2 , also of N. \V. C. A c a d e m y a n d W estern S e m i n a r y , R u t g e r s C o l l e g e and S e m i n a r y , comm e n c e m e n t a d d r e s s by Rev. Dr. Mandeville tor t h e y e a r 1S92, I n a u g u r a l a d d r e s s ot Tresident Thelps, a n d of Dr. S t e f f e n s , First C o m m e n c e m e n t of H o p e College, M e m o i r s of Rev. C. Van d e r Meulen, B i o g r a p h i c a l s k e t c h of H o n . N. F. Graves, p h o t o g r a p h s of Mr. Graves, Dr. Van Raalte, Dr. Thelps, and Dr. S c o t t , m e m morial of Dr. A. T. S t e w a r t , c o n s t i t u t i o n of t h e college, a r c h i t e c t u r a l d r a w i n g s by W'. K.. J o h n ston, first a p p l i c a t i o n for aid t o C o n g r e s s for H O N . N. F. G R A V E S . S Y R A C U S E . N. Y. i m p r o v e m e n t of H o l l a n d harbor, signed by Dr. H o n . N a t h a n F. Graves, President ol t h e Van R a a l t e , B. G r o o t e n h u i s and others, Dec. 12, 1862, list of s t u d e n t s , p r o g r a m of t h e exer- New Vork S t a t e B a n k i n g C o m p a n y ol S y r a cises, and several o t h e r p a p e r s , a n d p a m p h l e t s , cuse is nearly eighty years ol age and t h e s t o r y C o n g r a t u l a t o r y l e t t e r s and t e l e g r a m s were of his life is a record of incessant, useful occureceived f r o m t h e following: Revs. Dr. Thelps, pation. His ancestry is Knglish and is t r a c e d C. K. Crispell. H. N. Cobb. T. S t r y k e r . D. 1). t o the time of William t h c C o n q u e r o r . H e beD e m o r e s t , H. Utterwick, J. T. Bergen, 11. D e B . gan t e a c h i n g school at sixteen and c o n t i n u e d M u l f o r d , Tresident Scott of R u t g e r s college, tetaching and s t u d y i n g till 1S40 when he was and Tresident A n g e l of t h e Michigan I niversi- a d m i t t e d to the bar. In 1842 lie married Miss Helen T. Breese, who died t w o y e a r s later. ty. A m o n i j t h o s e in a t t e n d a n c e were Revs. A Mr. Graves then opened an office in New \ ork S t r a b b i n g , H a m i l t o n ; A. Van den Berg. Overi- City where he br.ilt up an e x t e n s i v e p r a c t i c e ; s e l ; I. J. Van Z a n t c n , G r a n d H a v e n ; W. G. Baas,; but his health failing, he r e t u r n e d to c e n t r a l B e a v e r d a m ; B. Van Kss. Roseland. 111.; A. New Vork in 1849 having married a sister 01 Buursma. G r a n d R a p i d s . his first wife. Miss C a t h e r i n e ^ Breese. I«»ur Now t h e h o p e s a n d a s p i r a t i o n s of t h e found- years before. ers of this collocre beirin t o lo(»k as if t h e v wi'ie In 18^2 t h e Burnett Bank '<>:• • mi/.ed at

S y r a c u s e and Mr. G r a v e s b e c a m e its p r e s i d e n t . For t h c n e x t t w e n t y y e a r s he was actively eng a g e I in financial e n t e r p r i s e s , lie t h e n retired f r o m active work, and with his wife, m a d e a t o u r a r o u n d t h e world c o n t r i b u t i n g articles t o t h e AVr*.' )'or/i' O/tSinwr, t h e S y r a c u s e Courier a n d the Xorthern Christ inn Advoeute. On his return he was chosen m a y o r of Syracuse, and h a s since served several y e a r s as p r e s i d e n t of t h e b o a r d ol e d u c a t i o n . Mr. G r a v e s is still a busy m a n ; he is t r u s t e e or p r e s i d e n t of several associations and institutions of his city and s t a t e and has l o n g been an efficient elder of the Reformed church. e is also one of t h e s u p e r i n t e d e n t s of the 'Theological S e m i n a r y at New Brunswick where he has e s t a b l i s h e d a lect u r s h i p on Missions. A n d finally, t h o so m a n y of his b e n e f a c t i o n s m u s t be o m i t t e d , it is most pleasant to record t h a t he has p r o m i s e d t o I • O P K C O I . I . E G K one of t h e best p r i v a t e libraries in central New York a n d S10.000 t o w a r d a f u n d for h o u s i n g t h e books. Thus will his w o r k s live a f t e r him; " The best t h a t any mortal hath Is that which e v e r v mortal shares."

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with but m e a g r e e d u c a t i o n , began life for himself at e i g h t e e n c h o o s i n g t o seek his f o r t u n e as a sailor t h o his f a t h e r ' s life and p r o p e r t y were lost in a s h i p w r e c k nine y e a r s b e f o r e . Tho losing all in a s h i p w r e c k b e f o r e he was t w e n t v t h r e e he c o n t i n u e d b u y i n g and b u i l d i n g until t h e o w n e r s h i p of fifteen vessels rewarded his persevering enterprise. D u r i n g t h c war he built five s t e a m b o a t s which he c h a r t e r e d to t h e g o v e r n m e n t for war p u r p o s e s . At t h e close of t h e war C a p t a i n W i n a n t s sold his fleet of vessels, a n d . as he retired f r o m active business, began t h e career of an e x t e n sive traveller. D u r i n g his travels, m a d e for t h e most part in c o m p a n y with his wife, and c o v e r i n g a d i s t a n c e of about o n e h u n d r e d 'itrul twenty-five t h o u s a n d miles. Mr. W i n a n t s k e p t a daily record which he a f t e r w a r d g a v e to t h e world in two i n t e r e s t i n g and instructive volu m e s e n t i t l e d " J o u r n a l of T r a v e l s over t h e C o n t i n e n t s of Kurope, Asia, and Africa, a n d the I s l a n d s of t h e S e a " ( 1 8 7 2 ) a n d " A r o u n d t h e W o r l d " p u b l i s h e d in 1877. In 1872 Mr. W i n a n t s settled at Bergen Point. N. J. h a v i n g previously been a resident of New York City. A s an elder of t h e D u t c h R e f o r m e d C h u r c h , m e m b e r of t h e Board of the A m e r i c a n Bible Society, t r u s t e e of t h e Board of D o m e s t i c Missions and d e l e g a t e t o the General S y n o d Mr. W i n a n t s has e n j o y e d just p r o m i n e n c e in religious circles. In 1841 Miss A m a n d a Miller b e c a m e the wife of Captain W i n a n t s and survives him t h o only of one of t h e four children born to t h e m is now living. .Mr. W i n a n t s was. for many years, an honored elder in t h e R e f o r m e d C h u r c h , and was a s t r o n g s u p p o r t t o this d e n o m i n a t i o n . A m o n g his m a n y g e n e r o u s acts s t a n d s t h e W i n a n t s D o r m i t o r y of R u t g e r s College at New Brunswick. N. J. h i s g o o d widow is now d o i n g for Hope College w hat, no d o u b t , he would h a v e been g l a d to d o had not his useful life been s u d d e n l y cut short by d e a t h , about two y e a r s ago. T l x u m u s t lu* t r m - t h y s e l f . If t h o u t h e t r u t h w o u l d t e n c h : T h y s o u l m u s t o v e r f l o w if t h o u Another's soul wouldst reaeli; ll n e e d - t h e o v e r f l o w of s o u l T o jrlve t h e l i p s f u l l s p e e e h .

— .1 mm.

C A P T A I N

G A R R E T

ELLIS

W I N A N T S .

Captain Garret FJlis W i n a n t s . of D u t c h and Knglish stock, was born on S t a t e n Island and

T h a t l i : ; h t . in r a p i d tllKht of f o u r t e e n million miles per d a y . S t a r t i n g a m i l l i o n y e a r s airo. Vet H a s h e s 011 i i - w e a r y w a y .

—.1 nun.


*5*

T M K AXNOMOR Historical Statement.

A f t e r a very h a p p y introduction in which the reports, feelings and c o n d i t i o n s leading up to t h e present t r i u m p h were clearly set forth, Mr. Visscher in his historical s t a t e m e n t , continued a very i n t e r e s t i n g a c c o u n t f r o m which we q u o t e ; " I t had first been whispered a m o n g t h e comm i t t e e m e m b e r s that a building t o cost about S 1 0 , 0 0 0 would answer our purpose, but architects, not slow to catch on t o our real wants, s t a g g e r e d us with t h e i r figures f r o m $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 to

S$o.ooo.

promise of his magnificent library t o p l a c e therein. Resolved, T h a t in consideration of his liberal gift, t h c library b u i l d i n g shall be called t h e "Graves L i b r a r y . " and shall have t h e n a m e placed p r o m i n e n t l y in t h c b u i l d i n g wall, a n d that t h c secretary turnish Prof. Kollen a c o p y of this action of t h e council, to be t r a n s m i t t e d to Mr. Graves. Resolved, T h a t our cordial t h a n k s are tendered to Mrs. Garret K. W i n a n t s of Hergcn Point, N. J., for her g e n e r o u s g i f t of 8 1 0 . 0 0 0 toward thc erection of a b u i l d i n g in c o n n e c tion with a library building; and p r a y for her t h e enriching g r a c e of t h c Moly Spirit with his most c o m f o r t i n g influences, t o a b i d e with her t h r o her life journey. Resolved, T h a t in c o n s i d e r a t i o n of her liberal gift the chapel building shall be called t h e " W i n a n t s C h a p e l , " and shall have t h e n a m e placed p r o m i n e n t l y in the b u i l d i n g wall; a n d that the secretary furnish Prof. Kollen a c o p y of t h e above to be t r a n s m i t t e d t o Mrs. Winants."

It was on S e p t . 10. 1891 t h a t architect W . K. J o h n s t o n p r e s e n t e d a plan which in general o u t l i n e s e e m e d to s a t i s f y every m e m b e r of the c o m m i t t e e , b a r r i n g of course its e x p e n s e . T h i s was provisionly a d o p t e d with t h c expressed s e n t i m e n t . o f " n o t h i n g v e n t u r e d , n o t h i n g gained." P r o m one to two weeks p r e c e d i n g the Christm a s h o l i d a y s Prof. Kollen asked and obtained C o r n e r Stone A d d r e s s . leave of a b s e n c e from his college duties to (BY HON. K. F. rill., OKANO ItAIMOS.] p r o s e c u t e his work in t h e Kast. flow far he Mr. President, Ladies a n d G e n t l e m e n : A citwas successful in his mission at this time was known only to few; suffice it to say. t h a t he izen of Michigan, interested in every work was now r e - t r a c i n g s t e p s and g a r n e r i n g sheaves t e n d i n g to t h e elevation and b e t t e r e d u c a t i o n of work done, a c q u a i n t a n c e s formed, and seed of all her people, I desire to a c k n o w l e d g e m y sown s o m e fo u rte e n y e a r s ago, when he for a obligations for thc o p p o r t u n i t y e x t e n d e d to mc limited t i m e was Council's financial agent in t h e t h r o Prof. Kollen, to be present and unite m y felicitations with yours upon t h e occasion of P^ast. D u r i n g t h e latter part of March, i m m e d i a t e - the laying of this corner s t o n e t o - d a y . 1 c o u n t ly p r e c e d i n g s p r i n g vacation, a n o t h e r leave of it a privilege t o be able p e r s o n a l l y to o f f e r m y a b s e n c e was g r a n t e d and Prof. Kollen m a d e c o n g r a t u l a t i o n s t o t h e F a c u l t y and all o t h e r s sure of t h e work which h i t h e r t o had been con- in any way c o n n e c t e d w ith this institution of ditional, and upon his return i n f o r m e d t h e learning upon this auspicious b e g i n n i n g in t h e council of his g r a n d and c o m p l e t e success, re- erection of what p r o m i s e s to be a b e a u t i f u l , p o r t i n g as secured t h e sum of S 2 5 . 0 0 0 and a c o m m o d i o u s and p e r m a n e n t h o m e for t h e libr e a s o n a b l e a s s u r a n c e that enough more was in rary of H o p e College—a most valuable a n d esreach t o raise this to $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 ; and t h e crowning sential addition to t h e e q u i p m e n t of y o u r p r o s g l o r y of it all —the p r o m i s e of a magnificent perous institution. 1 he occasion is of onc of g r e a t interest, not and very valuable library of 1 0 . 0 0 0 volumes. The action t a k e n by t h e council at this time only to those i m m e d i a t e l y c o n n e c t e d with t h e will b e t t e r e x p r e s s its feeling than a n y words College itself, not only t o t h e city within w h o s e municipal b o u n d s the building a b o u t t o be of ours can do: Resolved, T h a t t h e council t e n d e r their sin- erected shall stand, an o r n a m e n t for m a n y cere t h a n k s to t h e c o m m i t t e e for thc excellent g e n e r a t i o n s God g r a n t ! but t o the e n t i r e c o m work a l r e a d y done, and especially to Prof. mon-wealth whose brightest jewel in t h e diaKollen, t h c financial agent of t h e c o m m i t t e e , dem of her many e x c e l l e n c e s is her e d u c a t i o n for t h e successful work d o n e as the i n s t r u m e n t of P r o v i d e n c e of inclining t h c hearts of his al system. \ \ hen thc small colony of s t u r d y p i o n e e r s children t o devise liberal t h i n g s in this behalf. Resolved, 1 hat the council e x p r e s s their who had just crossed t h e A t l a n t i c in 1846 blazg r a t e f u l a p p r e c i a t i o n of t h e g e n e r o s i t y of the ed their way thro t h e t r a c k l e s s forest t o t h e Hon. N F. Graves, of Syracuse. N. Y., in his spot where we arc now a s s e m b l e d , a n d d e t e r m gift of b 10.OOO for t h e library building, and t h e ined on the shore of t h e great lake t o build

THE

ANCHOR.

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h o m e s for t h e m s e l v e s and t h e i r p o s t e r i t y , t o such traditions, and such a history, in e s t a b o n e a c q u a i n t e d with t h e history of t h e i r father- lishing a h o m e in t h e N e w W o r l d , should land it is not s u r p r i s i n g t h a t a m o n g t h c sub- m a k e a m p l e provision for e d u c a t i o n . j e c t s which c h a l l e n g e d their early a n d serious T h e recital t o which I have listened of t h e t h o u g h t was t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t of a school of t h e early s t r u g g l e s of t h o s e c o n n e c t i n g with l e a r n i n g for t h e e d u c a t i o n of t h e y o u n g . T h e y t h i s C o l l e g e their p e r s i s t e n c e amid d i a p p o i n t were t h e sons a n d d a u g h t e r s of sires who, in mcnts, their s t e a d f a s t n e s s amid d i s c o u r a g e t h e h o m e across t h e sea had for g e n e r a t i o n s ments, and their final t r i u m p h over all difficulb e e n recognized as a p e o p l e of rare intellec- ties is c h a r a c t e r i s t i c also of t h e p e o p l e . S a y s tual power; t h e y had p a s s e d t h r o t h e fiery fur- R i d p a t h : " N e v e r in all t h e world did man nace of cruel wars in t h e holy cause of free- have such a b a t t l e with n a t u r e as in H o l l a n d . d o m ; t h e y e v e r prized h i g h l y both t h c c o m m o n Year a f t e r year, g e n e r a t i o n a f t e r g e n e r a t i o n , a n d classical school, and m a d e liberal provision this s t u r d y and i n d o m i t a b l e p e o p l e f o u g h t back t h c hostile and ever a g g r e s s i v e d e e p , for t h e s p r e a d of l e a r n i n g . . T h e i r s t r u g g l e s , long c o n t i n u e d for their until at last far off in t h a t bleak n o r t h the figure of a man e m a n c i p a t i o n f r o m political and •ecclesiastical western horizone t y r a n n y , resulted in a m a r k e d a d v a n c e m e n t of s t a n d i n g c o m p l a i s a n t on t h c l o n g mole of t h e h u m a n mind. T h e D u t c h R e p u b l i c was a earth which his own industry h a d raised was The m o d e l i m i t a t e d by g r e a t nations, a n d a p o t e n - b e t w e e n t h e N o r t h Sea and t h e sky. tial force in t h e m a r c h or civilization. When Dutch Menerva planted a garden where thc t h c p e o p l e c a m e to rear a m e m o r i a l t o c o m - surly N e p t u n e had lately set his t r i d e n t . 1 heir m e m o r a t e for all t i m e t h e h e r o i s m of t h e t h r i f t was u n s u r p a s s e d , their a c c u m u l a t i o n s b u r g h e r s d u r i n g t h e siege of L e y d c n t h e y g r e a t e r t h a n could be found a n y w h e r e else f o u n d e d t h e g r e a t L e y d c n University justly from Riga to L o n d o n . " You are t o d a y indeed e n g a g e d in a noble p r o n o u n c e d " a s noble a m o n u m e n t as had ever been raised by a free p e o p l e , jealous of its and p h i l a n t h r o p i c effort whose silent and beneficent influence will reach to r e m o t e generafame." T h e g r e a t historian of t h e United N e t h e r - tions yet t o come. T h e s t r u c t u r e itself which lands, writing of this p e o p l e in t h c s e v e n t e e n t h shall be builded upon this f o u n d a t i o n , t h r o t h e c e n t u r y , said: " F e w s t r i d e s m o r e g i g a n t i c h a v e b e n e f a c t i o n s of t h e f r i e n d s of t h i s C o l l e g e and been t a k e n in t h e m a r c h of h u m a n i t y than of learning, wdl long stand as a m o n u m e n t t o t h o s e by which a p a r c e l of o u t l y i n g p r o v i n c e s t h e t a s t e and t h e intelligence of its builders. in t h e north of K u r o p e e x c h a n g e d slavery t o a In its b e a u t y of design, in its g r a c e of achritecforeign d e s p o t i s m and to t h e holy Inquisition ture,in i t s h a r m o n y o f proportion,in its a d a p t a b i l for t h e position of a s e l f - g o v e r n i n g c o m m o n - ity t o t h e uses for which it is reared, it will be a wealth in t h e f r o n t r a n k of c o n t e m p o r a r y pow- m u t e but e l o q u e n t witness to t h e wise t h o u g h t , ers, and in m a n y r e s p e c t s t h e f o r e m o s t of t h c t h e e l e v a t e d s e n t i m e n t , t h e ripe c u l t u r e and world. t h c high p u r p o s e of t h o s e who conceived, deH e r e was a r e p u b l i c a l m o s t without natural signed and buiJt it; and all who shall at a n y r e s o u r c e s which had s u p p l i e d by h u m a n intel- t i m e h e r e a f t e r feel t h e beneficient touch of its ligence and t h r i f t w h a t n i g g a r d n a t u r e had de- influence, will t h e r e b y be more richly e n d o w nied. Spain was overflowing with unlimited ed with m e n t a l a c q u i r e m e n t s . I t h u s s p e a k t r e a s u r e and had possessed half t h c world in of t h e influence of t h e building s t a n d i n g here. T h e r e v e r e n c e of a g r a t e f u l p e o p l e for H i m fee, and S p a i n was b a n k r u p t , d e c a y i n g , sinking into universal p a u p e r i s m . H o l l a n d , with who had led t h e m t h r o a long and weary f r e e d o m of t h o u g h t , of c o m m e r c e , of s p e e c h , march, with a pillar of fire by night and a pilof action, placed itself, by i n t e l l e c t u a l power lar of cloud by day, w h o had for t h e m s e p a r a t alone, in t h e f r o n t rank of civilization. An ex- e d t h e waters of t h e Red Sea t h a t t h e y m i g h t cellent reason why t h e p e o p l e were so well gov- pass t h r o dry shod> was r e p r e s e n t e d in t h c e r n e d , so e n t e r p r i s i n g and so p r o d u c t i v e , was great t e m p l e of S o l o m o n . W h o has visited t h c s i m p l e fact t h a t t h e y were an e d u c a t e d t h e seat of t h e A c r o p o l i s and not been r e m i n d p e o p l e . T h e s c h o o l was t h c c o m m o n p r o p e r - ed of t h e learning and t h e refinement revealed t y of t h c p e o p l e , paid for a m o n g municipal ex- in the artistic b e a u t y of t h e P a r t h e n o n ? W h o p en ses." It was t o be e x p e c t e d that m e m b e r s has stood amid t h e ruins of t h e Coliseum withof such a race as this, of such a n c e s t r y , with out recalling t h e scenes of cruelty which tl:c:e


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" A t a s t e for b o o k s , " says Gibbon, "is t h e d i s g r a c e d t h c rule of t h e imperial c i t y ? W h o has w a l k e d t h r o t h e b r o a d ailes or l o o k e d in g l o r y of my life. It is a t a s t e which I would t h e f r e t t e d v a u l t s of t h e g r e a t c a t h e d r a l s of not e x c h a n g e for t h e wealth of t h e I n d i e s . " . . . T h e n a m e s of S t h e p h e n Girard, of J o h n M e d i e v a l E u r o p e w h o s e m a j e s t i c d o m e s first g r e e t t h c m o r n i n g sun, a n d w h o s e r e c e d i n g H o p k i n s , of Peter C o o p e r , of G e o r g e P e a b o d y , a r c h e s h a v e been for h u n d r e d s of y e a r s r e s o n a n t of W a l t e r N e w b e r r y , of S a m u e l J. T i l d e n , of with sacred . m u s i c — w i t h o u t r e a d i n g ^crystall- J o h n J a c o b A s t o r , of E n o c h P r a t t , of J u d g e ized into s t o n e t h e d e e p religious fervor of t h e Parker, (if C. 11. H a c k l e y of our own s t a t e , Middle Ages?" It is written of N a p o l e o n ' s will be held in g r a t e f u l and lasting r e m e m m e m o r a b l e e x p e d i t i o n into E g y p t t h a t when b r a n c e a f t e r t h e s t o n e s t h e m s e l v e s which J a y t h e a r m y arrived in s i g h t of t h e P y r a m i d s all at t h e f o u n d a t i o n of t h e t e m p l e s their beneeyes were t u r n e d t o w a r d s those, t h e o l d e s t f a c t i o n s have h e l p e d to rear, h a v e c r u m b l e d m o n u m e n t s in t h e w o r l d : t h e spirits of t h e to d u s t . A n d so w h o s o e v e r shall c o n t r i b u t e a u g h t t o soldiers were r e a n i m a t e d a n d N a p o l e o n himthis b u i l d i n g which shall rise a b o v e this s t o n e , self, as he f o r m e d his i n f r a n t r y into five movw h e t h e r it be from t h e a b u n d a n c e of t h e o p p u ing squares, g a l l o p e d ' a l o n g t h e r a n k s and, t u r n i n g t o w a r d s t h o s e e v e r l a s t i n g m o n u m e n t s , lent, or w h e t h e r it be t h e widow's mite, even if cried to his men, " S o l d i e r s r e m e m b e r t h a t it be .a c u p of cold water to s o m e b u i l d e r h e r e e n g a g e d , shall lay u p in t h e g r a t i t u d e of its f r o m t h e s u m m i t s of t h o s e P y r a m i d s f o r t v centuries look down u p o n you and c e n t e m p l a t e beneficiaries, a t r e a s u r e which n e i t h e r m o t h nor rust shall c o r r u p t , for it shall be e n d u r i n g . y o u r d e e d s this d a y . " H i s t o r y r e c o r d s t h a t t h o t h e M a r m e l u k e s c h a r g e d with furious gal| W e l l , h e r e ' s y o u r Anchor; it is i n c o m p l e t e lantry, t h e y m a d e no impression u p o n t h e and i m p e r f e c t . Mr. M o c r d y k ' s a d d r e s s was F r e n c h who r e p u l s e d and v a n q u i s e d t h e i r as- not received but m a y a p p e a r in a later n u m b e r , sailants and won a v i c t o r y t h a t d e c i d e d t h e Mr. Visscher's historical s t a t e m e n t , as publishfate of E g y p t . ed, is like a man with his head cut off and his I h a v e t h u s far s p o k e n of t h i s b u i l d i n g itself. b o d y o t h e r w i s e m u t i l a t e d , Mr. U h l ' s a d d r e s s is W h a t shall I say of t h e incalulable benefit a b r i d g e d and even t h e list of c o n t e n t s is inf r o m t h e k i n g s and q u e e n s of t h o u g h t who c o m p l e t e — a n d for all this we can only o f f e r : shall hold c o u r t within its walls the b o o k s you o u g h t t o h a v e been t h e r e as you all knew t h e m s e l v e s ? N o t a l o n e to t h o s e who now t r e a d t h a t our s p a c e was limited and som e of y o u t h e c o r r i d o r s of y o u r C o l l e g e , but to all who k n e w t h a t I iik Anciiok was p r i n t e d p i e c e m e a l ; in t h e o n c o m i n g f u t u r e shall g a t h e r to w o r s h i p in fact, at t h e t i m e of t h e e x e r c i s e s t h e editoriat t h i s shrine, or d r i n k at this f o u n t a i n of t h e als had been p r i n t e d two weeks and t h e perHe c o n s i d e r a t e , w a t e r s of k n o w l e d g e . All who are here t o d a y sonals were m o s t l y in t y p e . will ere long, h a v i n g finished t h e i r c o u r s e in t h e n , please, as t h e r e p o r t we h a v e given h a s t h e school of time, be called t o e n t e r t h e <ireat cost nearly as m u c h t i m e as t h e rest of t h e pauniversity of t h e f u t u r e ; but in t h e G r a v e s per. A m o n g t h e articles o m i t t e d from t h e list L i b r a r y , w h o s e c o r n e r s t o n e you h a v e just of c o n t e n t s we would m e n t i o n an a d d r e s s bv p l a c e d in position, c o u n t l e s s s c h o l a r s in t h e t h e Rev. Dr. C. E. Crispell on " T h e S u p p l y ol a g e s which a r c t o follow will find inspiration, t h e Gospel Ministry," t h e only p a p e r p u b profit and d e l i g h t ; will find in t h e b o o k s u p o n lished in Arabia, sent in by Missionary P. J. its shelves, c o m p a n i o n s and friends, solace in Z w e m e r and t h e Northwestern Clussie. There grief, q u i c k e n e d p l e a s u r e in p r o s p e r i t y . H e r e were, too, several visitors w h o s e n a m e we h a v e t h e y will c u l t i v a t e a n d s t i m u l a t e t h e love of not s e c u r e d - ' b u t we have t o o m u c h faith in books, here t h e y will h e i g h t e n t h e d e l i g h t s ol F r a n k l i n ' s , " H e who is g o o d a m a k i n g excusliterature, here t h e y will s e e k t h e c o m p a n i o n - es is g o o d for n o t h i n g else," t o c o n t i n u e . ship of t h e wisest and most g i f t e d of t h e race " T h e local p a p e r s h a v e all t a k e n d u e notice and learn of t h e g r e a t e s t i n s t r u c t o r s f r o m e v e r y of t h e c e r e m o n i e s of t h e laying of t h e C o r n e r a g e of t h e w o r l d ' s history. Stone. The distinctively C o l l e g e organ did not t a k e t h e lead, as it m i g h t have done, and • • s i l e n t e o m p a n i o n s of t h e l o n e l y h o u r s . F r i e n d s w h o enn never a l t e r or forsake. as its r e a d e r s no d o u b t , e x p e c t e d it would d o . " Let m e r e t u r n to y o u , t h e t u r m o i l e n d i n g T h e c o r n e r s t o n e excercises were well r e p o r t Which worldly cares have on my spirit hrou^rht. A n d o ' e r y o u r o l d f a m i l i a r p a n e s hendiiiK* ed in o t h e r t h a n local p a p e r s , and a l t o g e t h e r it Itefresh my m i n d with m a n y a tran<|uil t h o u u h t . " was a g r e a t d a y for Hopk. E d . J

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H o l l a n d City are t o b e c o n g r a t u l a t e d upon t h e l a y i n g of t h c corners t o n e of t h e G r a v e s library b u i l d i n g . 1 his s p l e n d i d s t r u c t u r e will cost $75,000, a n d will be a v a l u a b l e a d d i t i o n to t h e college. Its completion will be an a s s u r a n c e of a g r e a t and p r o s p e r o u s f u t u r e tor H o p e college, and m a k e it what it s h o u l d be, o n e of t h e l e a d i n g sectarian i n s t i t u t i o n s of t h e h i g h e s t g r a d e in t h e s t a t e . Editorial, J / ' / r . f . s , ( G r a n d Rapids. ) PERSONAL AND ALUMNI.

Miss J e n n i e M u l d e r has r e c e n t l y e n t e r e d t h e 1) class. A r t h u r Oilell and E t h e l O b r i e n were married last m o n t h . P. F o s s is phsical d i r e c t o r ot t h e V. M. C. A. at Hay City. Prof. Kollen e x p e c t s t o m o v e into his new h o m e soon. Rev. Jt G. J l e k h u i s , '85, was seen on t h e C a m p u s Tuesday. (). C. F l a n e g a n is principal of t h e school at W i n d Fall. 1 ml. Miss F a n n i e S t e f f e n s , '91, is t e a c h i n g E n g l i s h at t h e N . W . C. A. Rev. H. S m i t s , '77, i s p r e a c h i n g for t h e C o n g r e g a t i o n a l i s t s in Y p s i l a n t i . 11. Van d e r Ploeg, '93, e n t e r t a i n e d his classmates Thursday evening. Prof. Hoers is e r e c t i n g a r e s i d e n c e on t w e l f t h s t r e e t near Third C h u r c h . G. Albers, '91. s p e n t a s h o r t t i m e in H o l l a n d b e f o r e he left for A n n A r b o r . Win. Talen, '95. h i ; just r e t u r n e d f r o m t h e western plains to join his c l a s s m a t e s , P. Hraak, C class* a t t e n d e d a V. M. C. A. social at G r a n d R a p i d s Tuesday e v e n i n g . H o n . G. J. D i e k e m a . 'Si. is t h e R e p u b l i c a n c a n d i d a t e for A t t o r n e y ( j e n e r a l of M i c h i g a n . A r e n d Visscher. '72. has been n a m e d as cand i d a t e for*prosecuting a t t o r n e y of O t t a w a Co. Miss F a n n y S t e f f e n s , '91, has a c c e p t e d a position as t e a c h e r of H i s t o r y at O r a n g e City, la. A. T e P.iske, a f o r m e r m e m b e r of t h e S e n i o r class, is t a k i n g a p o s t - g r a d u a t e c o u r s e at H a r vard. M r . - M y e r s a n d Miss Cook i n s t r u c t o r s in t h e H i g h S c h o o l , visited t h e d i f f e r e n t r o o m s recent 1 v.

H . J u i s t e m a , '90, received his A. M. d e g r e e at New H runs wick last J u n e . Geo. E. C o o k , f o r m e r l y a 94, h a s a s s u m e d t h e d i g n i t y of p e d a g o g u e in V r i e s l a n d . H . G. K e p p e l , '89, is t a k i n g a p o s t - g r a d u a t e c o u r s e in m a t h e m a t i c s at Clark University. Dr. S t e f f e n s a t t e n d e d t h e P a n - P r e s b y t e r i a n Council, at T o r o n t o , C a n a d a , r e c e n t l y . Three ladies are enrolled in t h e D class of this year. Misses J a n s e n , S t e f f e n s , and A y k e n s . Mr. J. L., '92, has m a d e q u i t e a r e p u t a t i o n this s u m m e r as a pathfinder, following u p t h e trail of a n o t e d war-vessel. P. J. Z w e m e r , '87, w h o r e c e n t l y led t h e Y. M. C. A. left for A r a b i a , t h e 12th t o e n g a g e in mission work. J o h n Van der Meulen, '91, is again e n g a g e d in t e a c h i n g at t h e N o r t h w e s i e r n A c a d a m y , O r a n g e City, la. G. T y s s e , '93. has been a p p o i n t e d a m e m b e r of t h e G r a n d R a p i d s * District C o m m i t t e e ot t h e Y. M. C. A. J a c o b Van Der Meulen, '95, who last y e a r was obliged t o leave his studies, h a s j o i n e d his c l a s s m a t e s this y e a r. H o m e r Van L a n d e g e n d , 92, h a s g o n e for A n n A r b o r where he i n t e n d s to t a k e a course in civil e n g i n e e r i n g . Geo. D a n g r e m o n d , who c o u l d not c o n t i n u e his studies last y e a r on a c c o u n t of ill h e a l t h , has r e t u r n e d this t e r m . H e n r y De J o n g e , a H last year, has c h a n g e d his position as s t u d e n t to t h a t of a clerk in S t e k e t e e ' s g r o c e r y Store. G. 11. D u b b i n k and H . J . Pietenpoll will att e n d t h e I n t e r - S e m i n a r y Mission A l l i a n c e at A u b u r n N . Y. Oct. 27 —3°Rev. H. Van Ess, R o s e l a n d , III., h a s been t a k i n g his vacation t h e past two w e e k s and h a s s p e n t part of it in our midst. W;. T. J a n s s e n , '93, d u r i n g t h e recent convention at L a n s i n g served as p a s t o r in G e r m a n M. E. c h u r c h , on S a b b a t h m o r n i n g . O. A u g u s t i n e , o n c e a m e m b e r of t h e junior class who has been s t u d y i n g at S e a t t l e , W a s h . , is now t a k i n g an a d v a n c e d c o u r s e in C h i c a g o . The new s t u d e n t s w h o h a v e c o m e f r o m t h e N. W. C. A. a n d h a v e e n t e r e d t h e F r e s h m a n class h e r e are, S. H. D e Pree, H. D y k s t r a , F. L u b b e r s , P. Meyer, D. C. Ruigh, H. W i e r k s , G. Van Diest.


T H E .

Chas. Mc Bride, who a t t e n d e d Olivet college last year, has returned to H o p e and will continue his studies here.

XtiEi

A N O M O R

Prof. Kollen goes East again next week. John De Beer is studying at t h e Presbyterian Seminary, Dubuke, la. J. Sietsema, *91, preaches to the new congregation at Britton, Lanawee Co., tomorrow. A. Oosterhof, '92, has recently been to Ann Arbor to have his eyes treated. J. Van der Meulen, '92. and Sterengberg, '93, s p o k e at the Columbian exercises last night. W. and 11. Birchby have entered the C class. H e n r y Huizinga is holding two or three campaign meetings a week. H e reports good meetings and says the people hear Prohibition gladly.

Geo. Kollen, '92, who has been engaged in the Law Offices of G. J. D i e k e m a this summer, has returned to Ann Arbor. Misses Reka Essing, Dena Van Heitsma, and Maria Van Doorne will not return this term, but have taken positions as teachers. W a l t e r Smith of Roseland, 111. last y e a r of the D class, has not been able to return this fall on account of t h e death of his father. Geo. Huizinga has left t h e H's and gone into t h e drug business in this city. Sick s t u d e n t s can obtain pills, medicines, etc. at his stand. T h e Gates A r e Closed 1 he Seminary has opened with eight new Now that t h e national commission of t h e members: Schilstra, Reeverts, Oosterhof, Dub- World's Fair has definitely decided that t h e bink, Steffens, L u x e n , V e l d m a n , Van der Ploeg. gates of Jackson park must be closed on SunRev. IL G. Birchby, the pastor to succeed day, it is proper that the citizens should recogRev. J. T. Bergen in H o p e Church, has reach- nize the power which has brought about this ed Holland. H e was installed W e d n e s d a y action. That power is unquestionably the overevening, thc 19th. whelming sentiment of the American people. Prof. W. C. Hewitt, who conducted the T h e sentiment directed the action of congress, Teachers' Institute here last Spring, is now as it did the action of the national commission. It is time to face fully and fairly the situation professor in political e c o n o m y at Oshkosh, as it now exists. T h e gates are closed on t h e Wis. Salary $2,400. Prof, and Mrs. Doesburg returned a short weekly day of rest. To open them in the lace time before t h e opening of this term, from a of the prevailing sentiment of the nation is visit to the home of their daughter, Mrs. W. H . c 1 early impossible. T h e y are unwise who hold out against this Gallagher, of Chicago. Rev. S. Streng, of Kalamazoo, has been en- final settlement. T h e people to-day and togaged to t a k e Prof. Kollen's place for a time, morrow find the opportunity to participate in in order to give the latter more time to devote or to witness the ceremonies attendant on t h e dedication of the World s Fair buildings. Is to t h e Library Building. it not true that during next summer by concertCards are out announcing the marriage of ed action they will readily supply themselves Miss Clara H u m p h r e y and Mr. H. H u d s o n of with holidays on which to visit the great E x p o W a y l a n d . Miss H u m p h r e y was a m e m b e r of sition, then c o m p l e t e and open to view in all t h e present F r e s h m a n class. its beauty. — Chien go News Reeoni, Oct. 20. Philip Soulen, '92, and Reka Boone were A m o n g the thousands of testimonials of married at the h o m e of the bride's parents, cures by Dr. Miles' New Heart Cure, is that A u g . 31, '92. T h e y have made Portland, of N a t h a n Allisons, a well-known citizen of Oregon, where Mr. Soulen has e m p l o y m e n t , Glen Park, Pa., who for years had shortness of breath, sleeplessness, pain in the left side, their home. shoulders, s m o t h e r i n g spells, etc.; one bottle A. L. Warnshuis, A class,had t h e misfortune of Dr. Miles' N e w . H e a r t Cure and one box of of breaking his arm, while at work as carpen- Nerve and Liver Pills, cured him. Peter later on t h e new parsonage at Gano. H e has, quet, Salem. N. J., is a n o t h e r witness, who for however, entirely recovered and is not prevent- twenty years suffered with Heart Disease, was pronounced incurable by physicians, death staled from beginning his studies. ed him in the face, could not lie down for fear Supt. McLean of t h e city schools, led the of smothering to death. lmme(Jialelv after usYoung People's meeting at H o p e Church Sun- ing the New Cure he felt better and could lie down and sleep all night, and is now a well day evening. t man. The New Cure is sold, also Free Book, Ripaiis T:IL>iiIos: for som* stomach bv all Druirirists.

163

A N C H O R .

VAN DER VEERE'S Gibj M e a t JMarUet.

W e s t 'MicKigarv STEAM LAUNDRY

—o

Choice. Meats of All Kinds, PORK, ROASTS, BEEF.

HAMS, LARD, SAUSAGE.

W e would call t h e attention of t h e STUD E N T S and t h e public in general to t h e fact that we have established a S t e a m L a u n d r y in Poultry, Oysters and G a m e t h e city. W e are supplied (as a visit to our OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON. Give mc a call. Satisfaction Guaranteed. works, opposite the O t t a w a F'urniture F a c t o r y will convince y o u ) with a full e q u ip m e n t of WM. VAN DER VEERE, E i g h t h Street. ( F i r s t W a r d ) H o l l a n d . Mich. t h e latest machinery and conveniences for turning out first class work. Look out for our new delivery wagon; it will receive and deliver work in any part of the city. For convenience work can be left at thc stores of V o n k m a n & D y k e m a and at J. Kruisenga. Our work is first class c /ty" cJS/C rSf / a and we guarantee satisfaction.

MOOSE BRO'S. V T ^ T T T T T R I P A "D RICL «>" 100 VISITING CABES SENT V X UN W 10 a n y inhlross, p o s t p n i d . on re, « elpi of 75 Cts. F o u r ns. Write v o n r nnniu p l n i n l v . A l>l>it KSS: J O H N

D. K A N T E R S .

JOB P R I N T I N G . HOLLAND, MICH.

© S T U D E N T S Leave

yoLir

work

H O L L A N D ,

©

at the

Sotisfioetion (/imrnnteed, G.

J.

A.

Opp- L y c e u m If a l l .

P E S S I N K ,

PROPRIETOR. HOLLAND, MICH.

HUIZINGA & MARTIN, Carries a full line of

College a n d School Books, DRUGS, S T A T I O N E R Y , P A T E N T M E D I C I N E S and

D r u g g i s t s Specialties. t&sT' Preseriptions Aeenrately Prepared. Cor. Highlh and River Streets, HOLLAND. MICH.

M I C H .

Wm. L a m o r e a u x . — A CALL A T HIS—

JorvSoriaJ p a r l o r s BELOW

A!/ 11 or/- First C/oss.

-

—G 1 V E

H O L L A N D CITY LAUNDRY, Awarded 1st. Premium in '91 and '92 at the S. (). and W. A. Fair.

-

the A M E R I C A N

"Wilt" is a friend studont hitnself

HOUSE.

of students, having

been a

PENSIONS! THE

D I S A B I L I T Y B I L L IS A L A W .

SOLDIERS DISABLED SINCE THE W A R are E N T I T L E D DeiHMident w i d o w s a n d p a r e n t s n o w d e p e n d e n t w h o s e s o n s d i e d f r o m o f f e c t s of a n n v s e r v i r e a r e I n c l u d e d . If you w i s h y o u r

JAMES TANNER, L a t e C o m m i s s i o n e r of P e n s i o n s ,

WASHINGTON. D . C .

^©•ocooof»o«o®o«o^«>oooo®»«>ooo*»oo©r>cRIPANS TABULES repilatoo the stomach, liver a n a ooweu, and «> ' p u r i f y t h e blood; a r e s a f e and effec-® . t o a l ; t h e best medicine known f o r O findiirestion. biliousness, headache,'O constipation, dyspepsia, chronic • liver troubles, dysentery, bad c o m - J r plexion, dindness,offensive b r e a t h « „ und all disorders of t h e stomach, ^ ® liver a n d bowels. One t a b u l e prives immediate r e - e Oliof. Take one a t meal t i m e . Sold by Itrufnrists. A® • trial bottle sent by mail on receipt of 16 cents o O RIPAKS CHEMICAL CO., 10 Spruce St., New York, e Aoeo^oeoo«oooo«**«*«*«4>o«**o«oeooo«ooe


164

T

p WANTED:

M FL

OR S T U D E N T

A ERKMMAANI ,E. ^N,T. O F F I C E A S S I S T A N T A ss P PE E i t h e r G e n t l e m a n or Lady. No p r e f e r e n c e q n a l l f a t i o n s R beiiiK e q u a l . S a l a r y $7rK). a n d K a l l u a y f a r e p a i d t o Oflice j j if e n j ? a p c d . E u c l o s e r e f e r e n c e a n d s e l f - a d d r e s s e d s t a m p Hj e , , e n v e l o p e to IIENKV JONES, Secretary. p|

jS S (Jr fTi

C E N T R A L DRl Articles, etc. I

Fresh

EGGS and BUTTER. F R U I T S IN T H E I R S E A S O N .

FISH

HOLLAND,

and EIGHTH

STS.

-

MICH

U

u l Surgeon. Ortice. next River St.oflice hours, lit t o 12 >i. in.. of the Kye. Kar. Nose, and Thronl

S r , r K , : , i I , 0 ( , , i N

1,1 D'and^fU^ I'aints. Paints anct ()fls. ViV'i ( hoice ( imirs. Also. Medicines. General Insurance Xirent ^presentliiK live principal coiii|ianles. 70 Kl^hthSt. '1:' ,U"Vtl7t-J 15reymail's Hlock. cor. Kiirhth and .Market .sts. tias admlnisterefl. V r N ^ , r h ' \ o r o f Ni»th street l i v e r y and Sale ...i.h./i V, . y ,, Mu rs!i?l t s , , , u ! , e, , a, rofr l a p e s t o s u p p l y d e m a n d . 1 h a v e a l s o f « , n ; ie^ V ""^rtaker. \ .| , u . ;irsi . o u t n t w i l l IK- f u r n i s h e d at r e a s o n a l i l e p r i e e s . KO(l J B l Y " " ^s( s u c c e s s o r t o M e y e r . HrowV-r A: Co.) d e a l e r in f u r n i t u r e . C a r p e t s , Wall P a p e r , C u r t a i n s , e t c . R i v e r S t . i, • ' l , U ' ! , k , r ' Hooks, S t a t i o n e r y , F a n c v t i o o c . s . 1 o \ s . M u s i c a l I n s t r u m e n t s , e t c . A r o m o l c t e lim* o'f

e a y S 011 "llo hmd'mIHi - V X L - 1 Umanager. iioiiaiui, MU II. nII. kKlekintveld, 1

A

A K

C JMn^liM khwl G a m J in s e a i o n r

A.

KT

T

WM

^

•.

V A I , K U

,

Ki ,lt

-

street,

Vkk

« k , P r o p r i e t o r . Dc.ilMeats, Poultry. Oysters, etc.

M. K I E K I N T V E E D .

1 I> KS ^(•..II 1 n r M t . 7 T1 o0 1n let .^t A 'vVth-'l r t i c l e s 'a n, dVfc" F a n c'y G o o d s . fully c o m p o u n d e d . EiKhth St., First W a n l .

^ i ' e m l c a l s . catfLlniPrescrii>tlonx i " i u o n f cart

h D ;..V,V|,h- } C h r i s t i a n F a m i l y N e w s p a p e r , p u h l i s h e d ^ C o l l e g e p r i n t i n g olllce. K. KANTKICS, P u b l i s h e r

r o u n d i n g c-oun'ties

School, and College Textbooks, Holland Bibles, Psalm Books, Blank Books, Memorandums, Paper, Pens, Pencils, Ink, Tablets, Etc.

Uellable Agents and Salesmen wanted, special i n d u c e m e n t s to Dealers. F o r P a m p h l e t irivlmr I n d o r s e m e n t s , e t c . . a d d r e s s

Odell Type Wriier Co., ARENTS!

CITY BAKERY.

Albums, Plush Goods, Dolls, JUST ARRIVED D A T E S , N E W FIGS. Blocks, Games and Toys. FEESH BALTIMOEE ) A l w a y s on h a n d . OYSTERS

ITS

C A U S E S

AND

i

D E C 5 R F F ^ u i s h ^ H w d S e of

A.

F O N T A 4 N E .

&

WASH.

OR

$3.00

C . F. G U N T H E R , 212 s t a t e S t r e e t .

CHICAOO, ILLS.

Horsford's

ATonic

ACID

Phosphate

A most e x c e l l e n t and a g r e e a b l e tonic and appetizer. It nourishes and invigorates t h e tired brain and b o d y , i m p a r t s renewed e n e r g y and vitality, and e n l i v e n s t h e tuncttons. I>ESCKIPTIVE PAMPHLKT FKEK.

Runt ford Chemical

Works,

Provide nee, R. /.

OR

D A N G E R .

A N D W I T H O I T T H E I SK O F C H L O U O F O R M

V i t a l i z e d Air, Ether, o r E l e c t r i c i t y , AT T H E

Gervtral-:-DeiAtal

Parlors,

Opposite K a n t e r s Hro's.

i.^

>

>

All o p e r a t i o n s i n d e n t i s t r y s k i l l f u l l y p e r f o r m e d a n d at p r i c e s c o n s i s t e n t w i t h l l r s t - c l a s s w o r k . S E T IS F A C T I O N G F A R A N T K E D I N E V K K V C A S E .

4 Ac A

&

F O R

H U B L E Y .

G R O C E R I E S ,

G. V A N DRY

A A 4 « A < A < 4 4 4

FOR

B U T T E R ,

FUTTEN

GOODS

G. V A N

< tA* At aflk Ac sAr aAt At jA* At Ac Ai At At & G I L L E S P I E

C f T l o x . — B e s u r e t h e w o r d '• H o r s f o r d ' s " is o n t h e l a b e l . o t h e r s a r e s p u r i o u s . N e v e r s o l d in b u l k .

V9 e , V~ ! 17 :

I*. Teeth Extracted Without Pain

CURE,

TACOMA,

Add ress

FOR

W

"

Scieutincanv treated by an aurist of worldwide reputation- T E A C ^ E ^ S GO-OPERATIVE FISSOG\J\J]OP indicated and troat,,| entirely cured, of from 20 to :MI vear< r 70-72 DEARBORN ST.. CHICAGO. euVtv i !r 'i "i I V * " have failed. How the in 'dirtl< u t\ Is reached and ftnd the causeents removed, fullv explained cir- E s t a b l i s h e d In ISS4. P o s i t i o n s filled, 2:100. S e e k s T e a r h e r « u ^ eures fmm pmnilnent a n - a m h l t l o u s f o r a d v a n c e n . e n t r a t h e r DR.

( S u c c e s s o r to C. (i. Swensbervr.)

C O N F K K K K D f o r ANV P K O F K S S O I N profit'ieiicv 0 f F o r 1 naVtTenl 0 t h o f < V , fVu s' -s

American Collfsre of Arts and Soi'tnccs!BH^TIO, x! V

for t h e m than m o n e y .

1-6E d u c a t e t h e m at t h c G R A N D R A P I D S ( M i c h . ) B U S I N E S S C O L L E G E , L e d y a r d Hlock, c o r n e r of Pearl and O t t a w a - s t s . V I S I T US. F o r catalogue, a d d r e s s A. S. P A R I S H .

J O H N P E S S I N K , IVopV

Manager.

DEAFNESS,

( j i v e y o u r children a k n o w l e d g e of H o o k - k c c p i n ! g , ^ S h o r t h a n d , T y p e w r i t ing, T e l e g r a p h y , E t c .

$2.10,

BEWARE OF SUBSTITUTES AND IMITATIONS.

FLORIDA ORANGES CONFECTIONERY,

KIEKINTVELD,

CHICAGO, ILL.

$1.25,

KKKKUS TO I L L CLIICAOO.

LD

<.f 1 h e DOUBLE CASE CEELL.

CANDY!

F o r a S a m p l e R e t a i l B o x . b y e x p r e s s . Pbkpaii». of R E S T C A N D V IN A M E R I C A . P u t u p in e l e p a n t b o x e s s u i t a b l e f o r p r e s e n t s .

io d o better work t h a n any maclilne m a d e . It c o m b l n e s MI///plivitji w i t h 1/11 inl.ilitj', xjirn/. rnxr of ojijirrn//»»/;, w e a r s l o n g e r w i t h o u t c o s t of r e p a i r t h a n a n y o t h e r m a c h i n e . l i a s n o Ink r i b b o n t o b o t h e r t h e o p e r a t o r . It is nmt, xnhstnntmi% u l e k l e - p l a t e d . p e r f e c t , a n d a d a p t e d t o a l l k i n d s of t y p e w r i t i n g . L i k e a p r l n t i i i K p r e s s , it p r o d u c e s s h a r p , c l e a n , l e g i b l e n i a i i u s e i i p t s . T w o o r t e n c o p i e s c a n be m a d e a t o n e w r i t i i i f r . A n y i n t e l l R - e i i t p e r s o n c a n b e v o m e a n o p e r a t o r In t w o d a y s . We o f f e r $ 1 , 0 0 0 1 ° ' t o y o p e r a t o r w h o c a n e i i u a l t h e w o r k

It will be m u c h

A s usual, only first-class g o c d s are k e p t .

H.

SEND

at H o1 n e

' * 0,"ei"l paper m e d i u m for Ottawa and sur-

DEPOSITS.

J . W. 1 I E A R D S L E E . V i c e - P r e s ' t .

CANDY!

WRITER.

DEAKliOKN ST.

TIME

ISAAC M A L J I . C a s h i e r .

S 2 0 " i l l b u y t h e C D E L L T Y P E W R I T E R w i t h 7S c h a r a c i e r s . a i u l $ | 5 for t h e S I N G L E C A S E L D E L L . warranted

l ro,,rIl,,wr

»

ISA \ C C A P P O N . P r e s i d e n t .

THE ODELL

358-364

$35,000.

P A Y S 1 xNTKREST O N

8 i o Broadway, New York.

- ^ • A T ^

-

savings b a n k d e p a r t m e n t .

Spencerian Pen Company, TYPE

-

M I C H .

T r a n s a c t s a g e n e r a l b a n k i n g business and has a

F O R TRIAIJ* w i l l wend n nnmple c a r d , 1*2 PENS, dlflerent p a t t e r n s , f o r 6 centH in ntampii.

- Tailoring and kepairinr.

H O L L A N D .

CAPITAL,

8,

K ' ^ i f T ^ h Y h St.^*

^

FOR S A L E

O F

T h i s pen is specially a d a p t e d for A c c o u n t a n t s , Book-Keepers and Correspondents. I t is made of t h e b e s t E n g l i s h steel b y t h e most experienced workmen.

^ ' " I }\- ?•' "mkes >rood and cheap TKUSSCS, hoth single and douhle. I mhrellas neatly repaired. First Ward.

B ^ !

and Crockery.

t ,M *

THE FIRST STATE BANK

aiul ISoardin^; St>il»Ic

3<|ONE. II .pronHetoroI Livery. Hoardliijr. Saie and Pee«l stanies. hirst-class rijfs constantly on hand. .Market street. noo t >I kt I work guaranteed. . "V.First S1 8,,"V " 'r 'ind Repairer. Cheap. *rord Ward.

Fine Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions

CORNER

ry e t J !» i -» i. ' > | H C III I L \ ,

165

A N C H O R

Z SPENCERIAN •o PEN CO.NJY.

1 k , , , l t r 1,1 S l < ^ KF i T,:,: - 'f;* 'VV/ ' ' J^y <ioo<ls. (irocerles. tnul , lot k Ki 1 11 ..md^of o^-k^ry * ' ' - - " •""l Ifv^rsts. S|.v.-I(.lly

G. G. SMEENGE. Strietly

DIRECTORY.

STOKK.—Druuf 1 . < ' h e m l c a l s . I'errumes. T o l l e l II. KKK.MKKS, M. D.. Proprietor.

H II

attention paid to handling

T H E I

b| j,I H A U R I N O T O N . Kl). J . . L h - e r y . H a c k . S a l e Corner Seventh and Market streets.

CIIICAOo/lLL. S

Spccml

X O H O R ,

STUDENTS'

T E A C H E R

m

A

AND

FURNISHING

GOODS,

G. V A N P U T T E N

E G G S .

<SC S O N S . FANCY

PUTTEN

AND

All

&

ARTICLES.

SONS.

HATS

AND

CAPS.

&. S O N S .

WM. B A U M G A R T E L ,

SHAVING

PARLOR.

HAIRCUTTING A SPECIATY. G I V E MF, A ( ' A L L .

C o r . E i g h t h it C e d a r S t s .


r

THFI A x c i t o k . .

166

H. W Y K H UISEN, T H E

W E L I .

TH E L I T T L E

DR. M. VEENBOER

K N O W N

©J E W E L E R,©

H a s t a k e n office-rooms in t h e b a s e m e n t of his block.

H a s o p e n e d a s t o r e on Main S t r e e t , west of Bosnian Bros. C l o t h i n g S t o r e and has on h a n d an e l e g a n t line of

4 8 BOSTWICK ST.,

GRAND

Special attention paid to Repairing. H. W Y K H U I S E N .

G r a d u a t e of t h e P h y s i o - M e d i c a l C o l l e g e of I n d i a n a , s i n c e IS77. L c c t u r c r of H y j r e n e a t t h e al»ove c o l l e p e . s i n c e isxii.

C. A. S T E V E N S O N

A p p o i n t e d P r o f e s s o r of M a t e r i a M c d i c a in t h e F l o r i d a I nivt-rs i t y , in

T H E HOLLAN J E W E L E R HAS THK KINKST ASS<»HTMKNT

P o s t i i m d u a t c of t h e P o l y c l i n i c of New V o r k , s i n c e i s s i , w h e n * S u r g e r y , I>ise:isesof ( h i l d r e n . a n d F r i n a n . Ann l y s i s i n a l l C h r o n ic D i s e a s e s , h a v e Im-cii s t u d i e d a s s p e c i a l t i e s .

K

A l s o o f f e r s f o r s a l e o r e x c h a n g e . L o t s . H o u s e s a n d l.ol< in d Farms.cheap. ;II.«I

HOLIDAY GOOD

OKKICE HOCKS—!I t-i n a . m . ; 2 t o I p . m .

IN T H E C I T Y .

C. DEKEISER

Newspa er and

p

W A NTFH , f C i t y T T , / " V l 1 1 LuU

S I N DA v s — : : t o

S U B S C R I B E FOR

P.

Periodical

SUBSCRIPTION AUKXCY. Lt-ave o r d e r s f o r a n y p u h l k - a t f o n s In t h e I n i t i a l S t a t e s o r C a n a d a w i t h h i m at t h e P o s t o f f l e e , H o l l a n d . M i c h .

L

RAPIDS. MICH..

And has a H o s p i t a l near t h e city, w h e r e CI i r o n i c Diseases are t r e a t e d and Surgical O p e r a t i o n s are p e r f o r m e d .

Watches, Clocks, etc.

-'! *

THEANCHOR

4k

Fvirrxitvire Store. JMeat M a r k e t I wish t o call y o u r a t t e n t i o n t o m y new line of

Book-cases-and Serelaries c o m b i n e d a n d s i n g l e at a very low price,

STUDENTS EASY CHAIRS Bet ter trades. Five Otfk Officc Chairs, Mirrors, Carpets, Cut tains. Tables, Hall Racks, Easels, Music Stands, Picture Frames, Beds, double and single.

Spring Mattresses, Pillows, Wallpaper, Hat-racks, and everything in the Furniture line.

tinent.

For

J. H. BAEZEL & CO., Is t h e p l a c e t o b u y c h o i c e

ROASTS AND HAMS, a s well a s all k i n d s of

Fresh and Salt Heats, Lard. Fork and

S p e c i a l i n d u c e m e n t s given t o l a r g e q u a n . t a t i e s b o u g h t a t o n c e . E s t i m a t e s given for - - POULTRY AND GAME IN SEASON. - f u r n i s h i n g new h o u s e s a n d r o o m s . W e g u a r a n t e e y o u s a t i s f a c t i o n . C o m e and see m y g o o d s b e f o r e p u r c h a s i n g elsewhere, and T r y us a n d we will g u a r a n t e e S a t i s f a c t i o n , we a r e s u r e of y o u r t r a d e . flgf" N e x t d o o r t o Dr. S c h o u t e n ' s D r u g S t o r e .

JOHN DEGRAAF.

J. . B A R R E L & C O .

South River Street, H O L L A N D . M I C H .

H o p k i n s'

ONLY $ 1 . 0 0

p a r t i c u l a r s a d d r e s s . A M E R I C A N C O L L E G E OK A R T S

AND SCIENCES. B u f f a l o . New Y o r k .

—OF—

S A U S A G E .

A 100211

C o - o i w r a t i v e P r o f e s s o r In e v ery a n d VilluKe o n t h e A m e r i c a n C oo n -

THE-

0

'

•'

j-

-

Stra3t Studio.

N o t h i n g but

Strictly Firstelass | IT CURES X # # # # # # # #

IN M A N : RHEUMATISM SCIATICA BITES CUTS LUMBAGO NEURALGIA STINGS BRUISES

PHOTOGRAPHING

THE AILMENTS OF

MAN BEAST HAS

STOOD THE TEST OF

IT CURES IN BEAST: FOOT ROT SCREW WORM SCRATCHES SPAVIN HOLLOW HORN S H O U L D E R ROT WIND GALLS SWINNEY

h r a n M U S t a ^ f - L i n i m f : n t P e n e t r a t e s t h e muscles, mem- I b r a n e s a n d tissues, t h e r e b y reaching t h e seat of disease 1

-AT-

D. M. LE CLEAR'S, G R A N D RAPIDS, MICH.

P H OTO'S Of all Sizes and Styles. Fine Finish. Prices Reasonabe. A g e n c y for Gale Glass M o u n t s t h e y h a v e n o equal.

Special Rates-

which is a property not found in any other liniment The I Housewife Farmer, Stock Raiser or Mechanic cannot afford to be without it. It should be kept in every 1 household for emergencies. It will save many docto^ ' 0

rtti™ »t »t ^ - 7 ^ -

a t 25C

-

50c

r n(1

- -

$ i-oo a bottle. 1

To Glasses, Clubs, etc. W. D. H O P K I N S . Prop'r. HOLLAND, MICH.


HOPE C O L L E G E HOLLND, MICHIGAN. DEPARTMELNTS: GRAMMAR

S o HOOL, G o LLEGIATE, T H E O L O G I C A L

S T U D I E I S in G R A M M A R S C H O O L a n d C O L L E G E : ; Latin and G r e e k ; Literature;

Knglish, Dutch,

F r e n c h and

German;

their G r a m m a r , H i s t o r y ami

Logic, R h e t o r i c and Klocution ; Pure and A p p l i e d M a t h e m a t i c s ;

Physics and A s t r o n o m y ; C h e m i s t r y and Geology ; Phsyiology, Zoology, Hotany and Biology; Mental, Moral, Political and Christian Philosophy; Sacred L i t e r a t u r e ; G e o g r a p h y , H i s t o r y , Civil G o v e r n m e n t and P e d a g o g y ; Hook Keeping, Drawing, Music and A r t .

COURSES:

CLASSICAL, SCIENTIFIC, LITERARY, NORMAL, BUSINESS. THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT: T h e W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y has a course of s t u d y as full and practical as its sisti r seminaries in thc W e s t .

CORPS OF INSTRUCTION. T w o T h e o l o g i c a l p r o f e s s o r s ; Seven p r o f e s s o r s in the C o l l e g e ;

Principal in the G r a m m a r

S c h o o l ; L a d y Principal; Director of N o r m a l Classes and Training, and a T u t o r ; 12 in all.

LOCATION. On t h e Chi cag o & West Michigan railway, at t h e head of Macatawa Hay, 160 miles from Chicago, 25 miles from G r a n d Rapids, and 6 miles from t h e well known S u m m e r Resorts of Macatawa Park and O t t a w a Heach.

H e a l t h y and pleasant, being comparitively

warm in winter and cool in s u m m e r .

EXPENSES. T h e s e are very m o d e r a t e , r a n g i n g from S i 2 0 t ( ) S i 6 0 for board, room, washing, books, fuel and light d u r i n g the school year of 40 weeks. F o r f u r t h e r information or c a t a l o g u e a p p l y to R E V . C H A S . S C O T T . D, D., President. P R O P . C. D O E S H U R G , Secretarv.


10-01-1892