09-25-2002

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Hope College •

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Holland, Michigan • A student-run nonprofit publication •

S e r v i n g the Hope College C o m m u n i t y for 116 years

Soccer breaks K-zoo at home Men's soccer scores huge conference win Ben DeHaan SPORTS EDITOR

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A/fCHOfif PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA Tim Kelly, a senior midfielder, searches for open teammates downfield during Hope's Saturday home game against Kalamazoo. Hope won 6-1, making their record 6-1-1.

It's almosl impossible to pick the M I A A winner after only t w o conference games. However, when y o u ' r e able to beat the defending c o n f e r e n c e c h a m p i o n and y o u r arch rival in the same week, it certainly will improve your chances of being on lop. T h i s is exactly what happened to the H o p e m e n ' s soccer team on Saturday. C o m i n g off a thrilling o v e r t i m e w i n o v e r C a l v i n last Tuesday, Hope took on Kalamazoo C o l l e g e , the d e f e n d i n g M I A A c h a m p s at Buys Field on Saturday, looking to score another huge win. " A f t e r beating Calvin there was a lot of emotion for us at practice for the rest of the week," said Steve

Smith, head coach for the Dutchmen. " W h e n w e walked on the field for the g a m e on Saturday, I think our guys were more ready than t h e y ' v e ever been." Even after letting u p the first goal, the D u t c h m e n not only c a m e back, but d o m i n a t e d f o r the rest of the game, cruising to a 6-1 victory and c l a i m i n g the o u t r i g h t lead in the conference in the early season. " K a l a m a z o o had been playing in.credible lately, and it was a surprise to see th e m playing the w a y they w e r e on S a t u r d a y , " S m i t h s a i d . " T h e y p l a y e d in the s a m e O h i o tournament that w e played in a few w e e k s b a c k , a n d 1 t h o u g h t they played better than us in it. T h e y were really hurting emotionally, which is disappointing, because every team in the conference k n o w s t h e y ' r e better than that."

m o r e S O C C E R o n 12

Student Congress representatives elected Though the results have not been released, new representatives have been chosen Kurt Koehler STAFF REPORTER

For Ben Manting ( ' 0 6 ) and Julie Wiant ( ' 0 5 ) running f o r student congress was a great w a y to get involved in the H o p e College community. " I ' v e always been interested in stuff like this. Back in high school I was involved in student government. It is a good was to get involved in the Hope College c o m m u nity as a f r e s h m a n . " said Ben Manting ('06).

Wiant agreed. "I thought it would be a good way to get i n v o l v e d a n d r e p r e s e n t my d o r m . " s a i d Wiant. Student congress elections were held Monday and Tuesday. T h e elections marked the third lime that students have voted f o r their representatives

R i m m k e ( '03) feels that a good group of representatives were elected. "I think they're an excellent group. Everybody w e ' v e contacted was in attendance tonight. A lot of people spoke up, even more so than at most first meetings and didn't seem shy. which is always a benefit. I ' m looking forward to getting lo k n o w all of them," said

on-line. T h e newly elected representatives will attend meetings of student congress and serve on student-faculty committees. Manting is eager to get lo work. " O n c e I get on a c o m m i t t e e all the ideas will start to flow. I ' m interested to see what committee I'll get," said Manling. Student C o n g r e s s Vice President Bryan

Rimmke. This fall's elections were held a w e e k later in the school year than they have been in the past. "It was a little later this year, because we're really working hard on f i n d i n g a good system to do on-line elections. W e ' r e working with c o m p u t e r science p r o f e s s o r Ryan M c f a l l , w h o ' s d o n e an excellent j o b , but

w e ' r e trying lo find a w a y lo phase him out a little bit so w e can run it by ourselves, so we d o n ' t have lo ask a professor lo help us out each time," said R i m m k e . R i m m k e did not feel the delay had adversely affected student congress. T h i s year's election also saw the Collage, Dykstra, Scott, and Voorhees districts as well as an Apartment district (Biedler, B r o w n stone, Bnimler, Vennema, Gazelle, C h a m pion, Cavanaugh) u p for grabs as no one filed petitions to appear on the ballot in those districts. " T h a t ' s a c o m m o n thing f p r us in student congress. It's really hard for people in cottages lo go around and knock on doors and

more CONGRESS on 5

Pull prep almost done Hope classes of '06, '05 do battle in ,105th even-odd struggle. Rebecca Hillyard S T A F F REPORTER

Grueling daily practices, sometimes excruciating as lactic acid surges through already sore muscles f r o m the previous day. All the practices build upon each other in preparation for up to three short hours of just one day. In the process, relationships are forged and lifelong memories created. T h e Pull is the oldest of American colle-

g i a t e t r a d i t i o n s . P u b l i c i z e d by D a v i d Letlerman and Sports Illustrated, this unique tradition is an intense physical and mental challenge. It is essentially a tug-of-war with a large rope over the Black River. Begun in 1898, the current form of the Pull consists of 18 pullers and 18 moralers on each team. T h e pullers entrench themselves in pits for the duration of the event as their moralers act as their eyes and ears, c o m m u n i c a t i n g c o m m a n d s f r o m their coaches, giving encouragement during the Pull and refreshing them with water. W h e n asked what makes the Puller, Kelly

more PULL on 2

AAJCHOff PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

Brian Hammer ( 06) practices as the anchor for the freshman Pull team.

Inside Anchor@Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

Research ranks Hope Campus, Page 2

Faculty puts on play Arts, Page 3

Science with kids Spotlight, Page 5

Ultimate Frisbee Sports, Page 8


C A M P U S

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B E A T

September 25, 2002

Hope ranks high in research Undergraduate research is essential to college experience. Jen Troke C A M P U S BEAT EDITOR

If s t u d y i n g t h e e f f e c t of angiotesin II on the metabolic rate of rats after h e m o r r h a g e sounds interesting, check into undergraduate research. It s h o u l d n ' t be too difficult to find an opportunity, since Hope recently tied for fourth in the nation f o r undergraduate research by U.S. News and World Report. Lisa Hardy ( ' 0 3 ) was interested

in the rat question because physiology relates to her field, pre-med. " ( R e s e a r c h ) s h o w e d me that there are several uncontrollable aspects that required flexibility and patience, two qualities that will be necessary in my f u t u r e as well," Hardy said. J a n e t A n d e r s e n , p r o f e s s o r of mathematics, received National S c i e n c e F o u n d a t i o n s u p p o r t her joint case-studies-based course with Greg Murray, professor of biology. "What is unique about our course is that w e are attracting an audience of math m a j o r s w h o d o n ' t k n o w much biology and biology m a j o r s

w h o d o n ' t k n o w much math and h a v i n g t h e m w o r k t o g e t h e r in teams," Andersen said. An integral part of research is the interaction b e t w e e n participants, especially professors and students. "I am better acquainted with the biology p r o f e s s o r s and staff bec a u s e 1 spent an e n t i r e s u m m e r working in Peale," Hardy said. "My relationships with t h e m are more familiar and relaxed although still respectful." J a m e s Gentile, professor of biology and dean for the natural sciences, is also an advocate of undergraduate research. He has been inv o l v e d in national e f f o r t s to in-

Chavez lecturer challenges apathy Valde Garcia touts rewards of hardfought battles Kurt Koehler

islature. G a r c i a w a s t h e k e y n o t e s p e a k e r of W e d n e s d a y n i g h t ' s f i f t h a n n u a l C e s a r E. C h a v e z address. Garcia spoke about e m p o w ering Hispanic leadership and why Hispanics should aspire to lead. " W h y do you want to be a leader? Leaders get shot at all the time; verbally, everybody always criticizes t h e m ; they a l w a y s w o r k hard — why do you want to be a leader? Most of us have a built in sense of justice. We want to make things right," Garcia said. "You can't do that f r o m the sidelines. If you want to be a leader in your community, you have to be willing to step out and be willing to take those hits. If you d o n ' t help make the rules someo n e will make the rules for you." In his speech, Garcia outlined t w o keys to leadership: k n o w l e d g e and persistence. " I ' v e been unemployed. I ' v e had low-paying jobs. I ' v e started f r o m the bottom and w o r k e d my way up. You never quit. T h a t ' s how to e m p o w e r Hispanic youth — no matter what color you are, you have the right to participate in the process, to have a voice in what goes on, and to be a leader," Garcia said.

ANCHOR PHOTO COURTESY PUBLIC RELATIONS

James Gentile, professor and dean for the natural sciences.

Congress from 1 get twenty-five signatures. It's much tougher to do that than if y o u ' r e living in D u r f e e and you just h a v e to walk d o w n the hall," said R i m m k e . " W e were really excited that four people turned in petitions f o r o f f - c a m p u s spots. I would think that would be a hard one to get petitions turned in for." Turnout for the election was normal for

a fall election, but a little higher than the 18.1% that voted last fall when on-line voting w a s only used in the Scott, Cook, and o f f - c a m p u s districts. ' T u r n o u t seemed to be what it normally is f o r an on-line election which is much higher than it is if w e ' r e sitting around a table asking people to v o t e , " said Rimmke.

„ . Campus Briefs Campus Briefs „ Campus Briers

S T A F F REPORTER

Valde Garcia, Michigan state senator (RSt. Johns), k n o w s all too well the challenges that face Hispanics aspiring to hold leadership positions. Prior to his first campaign f o r the state legislature, Garcia w a s told he had no chance of winning. " P e o p l e said, 'Valde, you c a n ' t win in this area.' It was rural, mostly white and very conservative. And what h a p p e n e d ? I won. All I said is, 'This is what I am, and this is what I believe. And you can either join me or get out of my w a y , ' " Garcia said. Garcia represents M i c h i g a n ' s 26 ,h district that i n c l u d e s L i v i n g s t o n , S h i a w a s s e e and Clinton counties. He is o n e of the first t w o Hispanics ever elected to the Michigan leg-

crease integration of research. "My goal is to always compete with the world c o m m u n i t y in research, and that is what w e have d o n e , " Gentile said. " H a v i n g d e d i c a t e d and exceptional Hope students over the years has been the key." Hope will host its second annual Undergraduate Research S y m p o s i u m at Haworth on Oct. 2. Admission is free, and work f r o m about 100 students will be featured.

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'Fellowship of the Rings' reading "The Fellowship of the R i n g " is the first book in the fantasy series ' T h e Lord of the Rings," by British author J.R.R. Tolkien (1892-1973), which has sold over 5 0 million copies since its publication in

Garcia also expressed concern that m a n y Hispanic students d r o p out of school because s o m e o n e has told t h e m they can't be success-

T h e department of English will sponsor a m a r a t h o n r e a d i n g of J . R . R . T o l k i e n ' s "The Fellowship of the R i n g " in the Pine Grove on Friday and Saturday. T h e reading will run f r o m 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Friday and from 10 a.m. to approximately 3 p.m. on Saturday. T h e public is invited; admission is free. Students, faculty and administrators will read in 10-minute segments. M o r e than 100 readers will participate in the estimated 17-hour duration of the marathon.

ful. Student reactions to the address were en-

French Consul General on campus

thusiastic. "I felt that he talked at a level that I could understand, and he also did a very nice j o b of relating the topic of leadership to not only the students but also the adults f r o m the community. He brought with the speech laughter and h u m o r which w a s a refreshing differe n c e , " said Dinah Rios ( ' 0 5 ) . T h e Cesar E. Chavez address was the first event scheduled to c o m m e m o r a t e this y e a r ' s National Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs f r o m Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. Other Hispanic Heritage Month events will include a Hispanic Food Festival today in the Phelps and C o o k dining halls, showings of the films " M y American Girls: a D o m i n i c a n Story" and "Carmen Miranda: Bananas is My Business" in the Maas C o n f e r e n c e room on Oct. 1 and Oct. 9 respectively, and a performance of the play " C e s a r C h a v e z Died Tod a y " on Oct. 10 in the Knickerbocker The-

T h e address "France and the U.S.: Two Worldviews at O d d s ? " will be presented by the H o n o r a b l e Dr. D o m i n i q u e D e c h e r f , French Consul General in Chicago at 4 p.m. on Tuesday at Hope College in the M a a s Center conference room. T h e talk will consider the difference and similarities in the cultural perceptions of politics in France and the United States. T h e public is invited; admission is free. Decherf s research interests include U.S.French analysis, French foreign policy, A f rica, religion and international affairs, religion and human rights, and the relationship between church and state. H e is the author of several scholarly p a p e r s , and d u r i n g 2000-01 was a Fellow at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard

serving as charge d'affaires in Angola f r o m 1977 to 1979 and in Tanzania f r o m 1979 to 1982; as deputy consul general in Jerusalem f r o m 1982 to 1986; and as c h a r g e d'affaires in Burkina Faso f r o m 1989 to 1993, in Saudi Arabia from 1993 to 1994, and the Ivory Coast and Liberia f r o m 1994

University. He has been with the French consulate in Chicago since the s u m m e r of 2001. His o t h e r a s s i g n m e n t s abroad h a v e included

in Paris. Decherf s talk is hosted by the college's French Studies Colloquium. T h e Maas Center is on Columbia Avenue at 11th Street.

ANCHOR PHOTO COURTESY VALDE GARCIA

Valde Garcia, the state senator from St. Johns, spoke Sept. 18.

ater.

1954-55. T h e b o o k s are in the process of being adapted to film by director Peter Jackson. T h e film version of "The Fellowship of the R i n g " was released last December, and the second film, "The Two Towers," will be released this December.

to 1997. Decherf w a s deputy spokesman with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Paris, France, f r o m 1987 to 1989, and was director of human resources with the ministry f r o m 1997 to 2000. He holds a Ph.D. in law from the Pantheon-Sorbonne in Paris, and master's degrees f r o m the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris and the Institut des Langues et Civilisations Orientales Vivantes (Swahili)

Pull f r o m 1 Vance, an '05 moraler, responded, "Heart. It's m o r e h e a r t t h a n a n y k i n d of p h y s i c a l strength." T h e joined c o m m i t m e n t can form strong bonds. "It's truthfully like nothing y o u ' v e ever d o n e before, and it's the hardest thing I ' v e e v e r d o n e . You create really, really close bonds with everyone involved in the team," said A d a m Rodriguez, '05 Puller. Pull alumni, also current students, act as

coaches. The teams consist of members f r o m the f r e s h m e n and sophomore classes, with the juniors coaching freshmen and seniors coaching sophomores. T h e coaches can bec o m e more than c o m m a n d i n g faces, however. " T h e y ' r e m o r e than j u s t o u r c o a c h e s ; t h e y ' r e role models and the parents of our Pull family," said John Hecksel, '05 Puller. Other Pullers can vouch for the familial feeling.

" I ' m closer with my Pull family than my actual f a m i l y , " said M i k e D e Young, ' 0 6 Puller. Pullers o f t e n b e c o m e close f r i e n d s and spend time together outside of Pull activities in classes, d o r m s and other student activities. "(Pull) teaches you to work cooperatively with others in order to reach a c o m m o n goal," said Mike Ross, ' 0 6 coach. T h i s year's Pull has been moved back an

hour. "We moved Pull f r o m 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. this y e a r b e c a u s e the football team is playing W h e a t o n , III., at 1 p.m., and we want students to be able to attend both events," said Diana Breclaw, director of student activities. This y e a r ' s Pull will take place on Saturday, S e p t e m b e r 28 at 4 p.m. at the Black River. Parking can be confusing, so spectators are encouraged to plan ahead.


Anchor,!

ARTS

S e p t e m b e r 25, 2002

Wind Symphony and Symphonette present concerts Ensembles to perform first concerts of the season on Friday Maureen Yonovitz A R T S EDITOR

Music is in the air with performances coming u p by the Hope College Symphonette and Wind Symphony. This Friday, 27 is the performance of the first two concerts, b e g i n n i n g with the S y m p h o n e t t e . T h e g r o u p will p e r f o r m in Dimnent Chapel at 8 p.m. "I think overall it's a very strong ensemble, e v e n and w e l l b a l a n c e d , " s a i d R i c h a r d Piippo, S y m p h o n e t t e conductor. " T h e y ' v e been working really hard." Piippo is looking forward to "showing students a variety of music" f r o m the Baroque period to the 20lh century. "(The Symphonette is) performing works m a n y students h a v e probably not heard," Piippo said. He believes that this concert will be valuable in "expanding their horizons in classical music." T h e S y m p h o n e t t e c o n c e r t p r o g r a m includes " C a r m e n Suite No. 1" by Georges B i z e t , " E l e g y f o r O r c h e s t r a " by J o h n Corigliano, "Concerto Grosso in D M i n o r Op. 3 No. 11" by Antonio Vivaldi, and "Sym-

phony N o . 103 in E Flat M a j o r " by Franz Joseph Haydn. "Concerto Grosso in D M i n o r includes a solo p e r f o r m a n c e by violinists Joe Deller ( ' 0 3 ) and Titus Munteanu ('04), and cellist Nicholas Toben ( ' 0 3 ) . "It's a very rewarding experience to be able to play with close colleagues of mine," Deller

said. P i i p p o e x p l a i n e d that " S y m p h o n y N o . 103" is nicknamed the " D r u m Roll," because Haydn w a s "trying to find n e w w a y s to do things so he o p e n e d the s y m p h o n y with a d r u m roll " something unusual for this type

concerts that w e put on," Deller said. "1 think it is a thrilling experience to witness people that you k n o w and share your lives with performing such great mu s ic . " T h e Wind S y m p h o n y ' s concert will take place at 8 p.m. on T u e a s d a y i n D i m n e n t

of piece. "I try to tell my friends about all of the

Chapel. ' T h i s is the most freshmen w e ' v e had in this group," said Steven Ward, Wind Symphony conductor. T h e y ' r e playing really well and I think it's going to be a terrific concert." T h e Wind S y m p h o n y will play five pieces f o r the c o n c e r t , i n c l u d i n g " C o m m a n d o M a r c h " by Samuel Barber, "Prelude Op. 34 No. 14" by Dmitry Shostakovich, " S l a v a ! " By Leonard Bernstein, "Prelude, Siciliano and R o n d o " by M a l c o l m Arnold, and "In e v e n i n g ' s stillness" by Joseph Schwatner. " W e ' r e going to be doing some really exciting music for the concert which I think will be a lot of f u n to listen t o , " W a r d said. " T h e r e ' s a lot of variety in the pieces we are playing." Jeremy Davis ('03), w h o is in his fourth year of playing bass and contrabass for the Wind Symphony, agrees. ' T h e combination of classic and m o d e m works that w e play should give every audience m e m b e r a n e w symphonic experience every concert," Davis said. Admission is free and all are invited.

-.'U

A/S/CHOR PHOTO

BY ROB ONDRA

The Symphonette practices in preparation for this Friday's concert.

VWS Season Begins Theater faculty take to the stage Elizabeth Berg brings talent and life experience to her work Maureen Yonovitz A R T S EDITOR

real life," Vissers said. In h e r book "Escaping into the O p e n , " Berg shares this talent with others in her explanation that "It's not so m u c h the description of the murderer killing someone that demonstrates his evil nature, it's the flatness in his eyes as he does it; it's the w a y he g o e s and gets an ice c r e a m immediately afterward." Beside having won numerous awards. B e r g ' s novels h a v e been chosen f o r O p r a h ' s book club, and one of them, "Until the Real T h i n g C o m e s A l o n g , " w a s adapted into a m a j o r motion picture. Vissers offers o n e reason for their popular-

Elizabeth Berg w a s n ' t always a writer, but now, having completed five national bestsellers after winning a " P a r e n t s " magazine essay contest, she is taking her work to Hope f o r the first installment of this y e a r ' s Visiting Writers Series. With past j o b s ranging f r o m c h i c k e n w a s h e r to r o c k ' n ' roll singer to registered nurse, Berg has h a d h e r s h a r e of e x p e r i e n c e s , ity. " E l i z a b e t h B e r g ' s n o v e l s are which she brings to her writing. highly ' r e a d a b l e , ' " Vissers said. "Berg's novels grip readers with " T h a t is, t h e y apthe j o y of f r i e n d peal, in a good way, ship and the to a wide variety of struggles of hupeople who buy manity," said Phil b o o k s and read ficWaalkes, ('04), stution." d e n t l e a d e r of Waalkes agrees, V W S . " H e r novel a d d i n g that a l o n g 'Talk Before Sleep' with the appeal is one of the most comes a deeper touching and captiPHOTO COURTESY VWS sense of meaning for vating books 1 have Elizabeth Berg characters and readread. Berg is a huers alike. m a n writer." " B e r g ' s writing is accessible and Like in ' T a l k Before Sleep," a f u n , " W a a l k e s said. " H e r n o v e l s story about a w o m a n ' s battle with have childish energy c o m b i n e d breast cancer, and " R a n g e of Mowith adult sensibilities." tion," Berg's novels often deal with T h e reading will take place this issues c o m m o n to w o m e n , but Thursday, September 26 at 7p.m. have drawn a wide male audience in the Knickerbocker Theatre. Adas well. mission is free and all are welcome. "I am looking forward to hearBerg's reading will be preceded ing Berg's perception of the genby a p e r f o r m a n c e f r o m the Hope der roles and complicated relationC o l l e g e J a z z E n s e m b l e at 6 : 3 0 ships between men and women in p.m., and will be f o l l o w e d by a her novels," Waalkes said. book signing immediately after the Carla Vissers, this year's V W S coordinator, especially enjoys Berg's novels because of the portrayal of the characters in her writing. ' T h e y ' r e vivid, believable, and accessible—the sort of characters you feel you m i g h t ' v e met once in

reading. A question and answer panel will be held that Thursday at 3:30 p.m. in the M a a s C o n f e r e n c e R o o m . There will also be a Salon discussion of the reading on Thursday at 9 p.m. in the Lubbers Loft.

Two-person play features work by Jean Bahle Anjey Dykhuis S E N I O R S T A F F REPORTER

T h o s e w h o have never seen a one or two-person show will get their chance w h e n t w o theatre department faculty members t a k e a n o r i g i n a l p l a y to the DeWitt Studio Theatre. On Thursday and Friday, Jean Bahle and Hope Theatre Department Chairperson Daina Robins will be presenting "America Herself," written by Bahle. In " A m e r i c a Herself," Bahle and Robins p e r f o r m as various i m m i g r a n t c h a r a c t e r s in the play, including parents, grandparents, and two sisters, Basha and Drusha, f r o m childhood to

adulthood. About four years ago, Bahle and Robins found similarities in their familes' immigrant pasts. Bahle's play began to take f o r m after this conversation. There have been several readings of the play so far, as well as two p e r f o r m a n c e s this past June. It has been a work in progress ever since, going as far as working for an entire year with Fred S e b u l s k e , director of the A c t o r s ' Theatre of G r a n d Rapids. "It's highly theatrical, delightful. You put an actor on the stage and a light on the actor and they just create," said Sebulske, w h o is directing Bahle and Robins. "It's a story about immigrants in a non-specific way; it's also a story of sisters," Bahle said. "But it's not autobiographical in any way." T h e narrative is m a i n l y f a b r i cated. with loose ties to the assump-

tions about immigrants that we as Americans tend to make, and the assumptions we inherit f r o m those who h a v e come before us. The story w r i t t e n in " A m e r i c a H e r s e l f is both humorous and serious. It is written w i t h irony, y e t w i t h o u t cynicism. "It's a mix of humor, irony, w r y n e s s ; it's not c h e a p , but witty - 1 love that about it. It's about something, not just a f u n n y s i t u a t i o n or b e i n g funny," Robins said. T h e Thursday show will be held at 9 p.m. and the Friday s h o w at 8 p . m Admission is free and open to the public. A f ter each p e r f o r m a n c e will be a short discussion of the play. " A f t e r all," said Bahle, "it is a work in progress."

A M C H O f f PHOTO BY ANNEKE MEETER

Theatre faculty members Daina Robins and Jean Bahle go over their lines for the two-person show, "America Herself."


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Staff member responds to student's criticisms

O v e r a l l , 1 d o n ' t m i n d the Pull. I m a y think that it is silly, a n d p e o p l e m a k e too big of a deal o u t of it, but I k n o w that I partici-

To the Editor,

pate in m a n y t h i n g s that other p e o p l e d o n ' t u n d e r s t a n d or appreciate. W h a t I d o m i n d a b o u t the Pull, h o w e v e r , is s o m e of the

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the m a j o r i t y - a c c e p t e d v i e w s ? 7. I ' v e h e a r d the a r g u m e n t

etc., expect s o m e t h i n g different

that H o p e is "alienating m a n y stu-

than a g e n e r a l liberal arts e n v i r o n -

dents and a l u m n i a n d d i s c o u r a g i n g f u t u r e contributions." I ' d like to see

attitudes of participants. A s k any Pull participant w h a t it is like to b e a part of this

( ' 0 3 ) letter ( A n c h o r 9/18).

q u e s t i o n s I h o p e J a m e s and others

ment. 4.

President

n u m b e r s , statistics t o support this.

l o n g - l i v i n g tradition, and you will get o n e r e s p o n s e : " Y o u just c a n ' t u n d e r s t a n d it unless you are a part o f it." Now, I u n d e r s t a n d

will consider. 1. W h y d o w e need to j o i n

Bultman, etc., h a v e very strong c o n victions for their stances. T h e y

I believe the lower contributions are mostly b e c a u s e of the state of the

this a r g u m e n t c o m p l e t e l y . I w o u l d say that you c a n n o t f u l l y

the rest of the c o u n t r y ( I ' m a s s u m ing h e ' s m a i n l y r e f e r r i n g t o col-

h a v e n ' t c o m e by t h e m lightly. T h e y are very a w a r e they a r e n ' t neces-

e c o n o m y , not H o p e ' s v i e w p o i n t s . 8. Is o u r goal to h a v e the na-

leges) in their v i e w p o i n t s o n h o m o -

sarily the " p o p u l a r " v i e w but feel

tion a c c e p t u s , n o t see us a s the

s e x u a l i t y or other i s s u e s he f e e l s H o p e is p e r h a p s b a c k w a r d s with?

they m u s t hold firm to t h e s e c o n -

l a u g h i n g s t o c k ? Is our g o a l to please the greater o r the smaller or

u n d e r s t a n d N y k e r k o r the A n c h o r if you are not directly i n v o l v e d in t h o s e activities either. But w h e n s o m e b o d y w a n t s to get a better f e e l i n g of w h a t these e v e n t s are like, I d o m y best to g i v e t h e m an a c c u r a t e picture. W h y c a n ' t this be d o n e with the P u l l ? M y n e g a t i v e o p i n i o n c o m e s f r o m a lack of k n o w l e d g e a b o u t the e v e n t . If a n y o n e is e v e r t o c h a n g e m y views, then I m u s t learn m o r e a b o u t the Pull. A n o t h e r attitude that b o t h e r s m e is the o v e r reaction t o a n y talk about the Pull that isn't s i n g i n g its praises. W h e n you say s o m e t h i n g a b o u t the Pull b e s i d e h o w great it is, it is v i e w e d as a n e g a t i v e o p i n i o n , a n d you a r e seen a s an e n e m y to the o r g a n i z a tion. F o r e x a m p l e , last year, the A n c h o r ran a n i n v e s t i g a t i o n of certain a s p e c t s of the Pull. A f t e r the article ran, one of the writers

Some

certain n u m b e r of students, faculty m e m b e r s , staff m e m b e r s , investors,

The

Board,

B e c a u s e e v e r y b o d y d o e s it

victions. 5. B e c a u s e it's not the m o s t

or b e l i e v e s a certain way, d o e s that m a k e it right or the best or w h a t w e

popular or accepted viewpoint, does that m a k e it w r o n g ? H i t l e r ' s view-

should c h o o s e ? M y b o y s w a n t t o

point b e c a m e very popular; did that

2.

w e a r b a g g y j e a n s with no belts to s c h o o l . M y c h i l d r e n are n o t all o w e d to w e a r j e a n s t o school because w e feel w h a t you w e a r a f f e c t s your study and work. W h e n we a s k e d w h y they w a n t t o w e a r these

stand firm to o u r convictions, e v e n if they m a y a f f e c t us in n u m b e r s , contribution dollars, e t c ? 9.

W h e r e w o u l d you like to

m a k e it right? Is there a c h a n c e that w h a t the m a j o r i t y s u p p o r t s isn't the

see the President and B o a r d of Directors lead us? Your w a y only a n d

b e s t or the right c h o i c e ? If you are

if not, t h e y ' r e o u t ?

a scholar of the B i b l e , did not G o d state m a n y t i m e s you will b e perse-

they are leading in a direction you d o n ' t a g r e e w i t h , d o e s that m a k e

Just b e c a u s e

c u t e d for y o u r beliefs, that Chris-

them poor leaders?

clothes it's because "well, every-

tianity will n o t be necessarily the

i m p a c t e d m y v i e w o f the Pull. I will be the first t o say that it is

b o d y d o e s a n d it's n o big d e a l . "

c o m p l e t e l y p o s s i b l e that all of the Pull p a r t i c i p a n t s that I h a v e s p o k e n with do not r e p r e s e n t the m a j o r i t y of t h o s e w h o take part

B e c a u s e e v e r y b o d y d o e s a n d bec a u s e t h e y d o n ' t see t h e e f f e c t s ,

" p o p u l a r " c h o i c e ? W h o is the Bible for? Christ's stances were not

Just some questions I've wond e r e d f o r a very l o n g t i m e and fi-

in the event. If this is the case, then I h o p e that s o m e o n e will one

d o e s n ' t m a k e it right or the b e s t .

the impact h e m a d e and is still m a k -

d a y be b r a v e e n o u g h to step f o r w a r d a n d a d d r e s s m y criticisms. A

W e ' r e t r y i n g to t e a c h t h e m b e i n g

c o n v e r s a t i o n like that just might c h a n g e m y stance.

" p o p u l a r " d o e s n ' t m a k e it " r i g h t . " 3. Hope's a CHRISTIAN

ing o n the w o r l d . 6. Why must

r e c e i v e d a d e a t h threat f r o m an a n o n y m o u s e - m a i l a c c o u n t . N e e d l e s s to say, e x p e r i e n c e s like this o n e h a v e seriously

liberal arts c o l l e g e and t h e r e f o r e a

p o p u l a r at that t i m e and yet look at

n a l l y w a s c o n v i c t e d to a d d r e s s them.

Hope join Pamela Valkema, Religion De-

" c o n t e m p o r a r y t h o u g h t ? " W h y is it i m p o r t a n t to b e p o p u l a r or part of

p a r t m e n t Secretary

Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n to a n y o n e w i t h i n t h e college a n d related c o m m u n i t i e s T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s the right t o edit d u e t o s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s N o personal attacks, p o o r taste or a n y t h i n g potentially libelous L e t t e r s c h o s e n o n a first c o m e first s e r v e b a s i s , o r a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a m p l e is t a k e n No a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f m a y v e r i f y i d e n t i t y of w r i t e r T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o r e f u s e p u b l i c a t i o n of a n y l e t t e r s u b m i t t e d L e t t e r s o v e r 5 0 0 w o r d s in l e n g t h will n o t b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r p u b l i c a t i o n .

Anchor Staff Staff

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff

Mail letters to the Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the Anchor office (located in the center of Dewitt, behind W T H S ) , or e-mail anchor@hope.edu

Anchor Staff

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Nick Denis Chad Sampson Jen Troke Maureen Yonovitz Ben DeHaan John Rodstrom Nicole IMIIIZ David Gutierrez Rob Ondra Rebekah Oegema Abbie Matthews Danielle Koski Ellen Vigants Mark Lewison

HOPE

COLLEGE

C^webeffpratttDatreafpreftoninpf

THEATRE

iresents

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"""EVERYMAN A Morality

Play of the Middle Ages

Senior Staff Reporters: Anyey Dykhuis, Kurt Koehler Staff Reporters: OHm AHmov, Brianna DiSatvio, Jared Gall, Rebecca HiHyard, Katy Korenstra, Kristen Morin

4

Photo Assisstant: Anneke Meeter The Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through the student s of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserv e the right to accept or reject any advertising.

the

Anchor

2002 fall semester, Issue #5 of 25

Thursday-Saturday, October 3-5, 2002 8:00 p.m. DeWitt Center

12 Street at Columbia Avenue Holland, Ml 49423 Ticket Office: 616-395-7890


Anchor

Ttie

S P O T L I G H T

S e p t e m b e r 25, 2002

Exploring science through the eyes of children Area elementary students spend their weekends learning about science

all of t h e m . " A s it is, e a c h s c h o o l year, be-

Nicole Lantz

T h i s b r a i n s t o r m i n g p r o c e s s is aided in part by the C l u b ' s advisors. ' T h e p r o f e s s o r s h e l p with ideas

f e r e n t age g r o u p s learn a b o u t differ-

and o v e r s e e the w h o l e p r o c e s s , "

ent a r e a s of b i o l ogy. T h e m o s t i m -

S a t u r d a y s in the labs of the Peale Science Center exploring the

L e n o n said. " T h e y guide us through a n d give ideas and s u g g e s t i o n s f o r

portant aspect, h o w e v e r , is that all

w o r l d s of c h e m i s t r y , biology, and

the u p c o m i n g s e s s i o n s . " N u m e r o u s H o p e s t u d e n t s like

kids get h a n d s on

t w e e n 1,300 and 1,500 e l e m e n t a r y aged s t u d e n t s s p e n d s o m e of their

J u l i a n n e L e n o n play a large part in

experience. " I t ' s o n e of the

the p r o g r a m s b y a s s i s t i n g in t h e p l a n n i n g and i m p l e m e n t a t i o n . R u n

few places around w h e r e kids can ac-

the s u m m e r s e s s i o n s see a m o r e di-

in part b y the C h e m i s t r y C l u b , vari-

tually touch stuff

P e a l e on a S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g , it's likely that y o u ' 11 find yourself in the

verse array of students. "During the s u m m e r we have

o u s students i n v o l v e d with c h e m istry, biology, p h y s i c s , and e d u c a -

rather than going to a zoo and looking

midst of s o m e very intelligent kids.

kids f r o m all o v e r the p l a c e , " G u g i n o said. " W e ' v e had | s t u d e n t s |

tion p a r t i c i p a t e in t h e c l a s s r o o m

at a n i m a l s

f r o m C a l i f o r n i a , N e w York, Texas,

sessions. " Y o u d o n ' t n e e d to k n o w a lot of

c a g e ; h e r e they can hold it," Hertel

Tennessee."

science t o h e l p . . . it's kind of o p e n

said. In

physics. While the sessions during the

SPOTLIGHT EDITOR

David Gutierrez

school y e a r mai nl y consist of k i d s f r o m the s u r r o u n d i n g c o m m u n i t y ,

INFOCUS EDITOR

If y o u ' r e e v e r w a l k i n g t h r o u g h

A l t h o u g h the m a j o r i t y of P e a l e ' s use goes to H o p e students, these facilities are not r e s e r v e d f o r H o p e students alone.

Many

college's pro-

around

the

t r a i n i n g p r o s p e c t i v e t e a c h e r s in

programs and have been com-

h o w to run field trips and p r o v i d i n g e x p e r i e n c e in w r i t i n g l e s s o n

love &•"

Last year I had over 1,800

of the c o m m u nity and

the

^the

mmammmm

fessors and students t a k e t e . t i m e to reach out t o the k i d s

kids

involvement," L e n o n said. T h e prog r a m is also particularly h e l p f u l for

M a n y of

of the

,

Lori Hertel, Biology

95

ears. Be-

United States. K n o w n as

cause of this, the d i -

the Little Science and Extreme Science Clubs, the basic f o r m s of these p r o g r a m s h a v e b e e n active at H o p e f o r o v e r 20 years. A f o r m e r w o m e n ' s basketball c o a c h . Tod G u g i n o , c h e m i s t r y lab director, b a s e d t h e s e o r g a n i z a t i o n s

f o r as m a n y as five

interested in b i o l o g y c a n c o m e for a tour in H o p e ' s a n i m a l m u s e u m , also k n o w n as the " H o l l a n d Z o o . "

the s t u f f e d birds a n d then w e start

Lenon ('03). "The Chemistry Club

taking live a n i m a l s out one by o n e , " said L o r i Hertel, d i r e c t o r of biol-

d e v e l o p s n e w p r o g r a m s and ideas

o g y laboratories, H o p e C o l l e g e .

interested."

making liquid ni-

loon into liquid, and p o u n d i n g a nail

at the things in the cabinets, and the b o n e s , a n d the s t u f f e d a n i m a l s a n d

f o r e a c h session to k e e p the k i d s

different

d e m o n s t r a t i o n s are d o n e f o r the k i d s ;

sion is the biology section. Students

continually coming up with new

summer camps. "We used to have summer bas-

many

trogen, s m a s h i n g a

"1 first let the k i d s look a r o u n d

a r o u n d t h e s a m e c o n c e p t s as h i s

chemistry,

plans. O n e a s p e c t of the s c i e n c e p r o g r a m s that has recently seen e x p a n -

rectors are i d e a s and l e s s o n plans. " W e try to k e e p the l e s s o n plans f r o m o v e r l a p p i n g , " said Juliane

in a

The age groups dictate each s e s s i o n ' s level of technicality. D i f -

racquetball, turning air inside of a bal-

ber

a few. " I ' v e p r o b a b l y d o n e [the d e m o n -

t h r o u g h o u t the c o m m u n i t y to exp a n d e n r o l l m e n t in the clubs.

e n j o y it m y s e l f , " G u g i n o said. O n e of the sections, the E x t r e m e S c i e n c e exon

past," L e n o n

more

also send out emails let-

Club, pands the

simple con-

projects

e n c e p r o g r a m s to get kids i n v o l v e d

ing robots and even

like b u i l d -

said.

/ f s e l ftremely

fun spending time with kids who are excited about what you're doing. -Tod Gugino, Lab Director

e n c e is p r o b a b l y the p r i m a r y f o c u s , and then e x p o s i n g t h e m to as b r o a d of a [science] b a c k g r o u n d as we can

"We

ting students know about the c a m p s . " S o far, the r e s p o n s e as been .t..Sludents d professors alike love the pro-

crude mi-

sciences f r o m an early a g e . " G e t t i n g t h e m e x c i t e d a b o u t sci-

tactics

" W e m a k e up b r o c h u r e s that get

people." T h e o r g a n i z a t i o n p r o v i d e s scia n d enthusiastic a b o u t all d i f f e r e n t

advertisement

distributed in the schools, as well as a mailing list f o r k i d s w h o h a v e c o m e in the

g o m o r e in depth with

I just b o r r o w e d i d e a s f r o m other

of

strations] a h u n d r e d times and I still

students to

only in the science a r e n a , " G u g i n o said. "It's not something 1 invented;

Juliane Lenon ('03) helps a student create his crocodilia habitat.

into a b o a r d with a b a n a n a are just

cepts and e n a b l e s the

ketball c a m p s , n o w we just d o those

A / J C H O f t PHOTOS BY ROB ONDRA

croscopes. Originally, the p r o g r a m started

gram.

out small, but has b e e n g r o w i n g at

time with kids w h o are excited

a rapid p a c e . " A lot of it s t a r t e d j u s t w i t h

about what y o u ' r e d o i n g , " G u g i n o

"It's extremely fun spending

are c o n t i n u a l l y o f f e r i n g d i f f e r e n t subjects, b e c a u s e if I only o f f e r e d

f a c u l t y ' s k i d s ' p r e s c h o o l s , " Hertel

said. W i t h t h o u s a n d s of e l e m e n t a r y

s a i d . " W e ' v e had g r o u p s c o m i n g

students participating e a c h year, the

c h e m i s t r y , c h a n c e s are I ' d h a v e a m u c h smaller p o p u l a t i o n that

for a l o n g lime. It's g r o w n just by word of m o u t h a m o n g teachers.

Little S c i e n c e C l u b and E x t r e m e C l u b look as t h o u g h they m a y h a v e

Last year I had over 1,800 visitors."

a bright and fulfilling f u t u r e here

is the s e c o n d , " G u g i n o said. " W e

would be excited about science than if I o f f e r a b r o a d e r b a c k g r o u n d f o r

Two members of the Little Science Club busy w o r k i n g on their projects.

T h e d e p a r t m e n t s also use a n u m -

on the H o p e C o l l e g e c a m p u s .

David

O V E R THE L I N E

Ready for a commitment... almost Infocus Editor "I v o w that I a m a l m o s t r e a d y to s p e n d w h a t c o u l d be the rest of m y life with you, u n l e s s s o m e t h i n g better c o m e s a l o n g . "

r e a d y to f u l l y c o m m i t . It's

significant other w h e n all t h e s e

Although I wholeheartedly m o c k the ridiculous practices of p r o m i s e rings and pearling, I w i s h

pearl r i n g ? T h i s " e n g a g e m e n t to p o s s i b l y b e e n g a g e d " p h e n o m e n a that takes p l a c e in the M i d w e s t is a c o n c e p t that I d o n ' t u n d e r s t a n d , or support. It's a waste of time.

creation of S w e e t e s t ' s Day, October's jealous response to

t h o u g h t s that m i g h t lead t h e m astray. T h i s " g e s t u r e of c o m m i t -

piece of jewelry. W h e t h e r it's a n issue of trust,

Valentine's Day, this is a n o t h e r d e n s e A m e r i c a n practice that drains m o n e y f r o m the p o c k e t s of

ment" becomes nothing more than a m o d e m - d a y chastity belt

insecurity, desparation, or naivety, I urge any w h o m a y find

for the i n s e c u r e b o y f r i e n d . W h y is this n e c e s s a r y ? W h y

t h e m s e l v e s in this p r e c a r i o u s

e m o t i o n s that only set up a c o u p l e for disaster b e c a u s e they a r e n ' t merely a partner-layaway p r o g r a m in ring f o r m .

karat " d i a m o n d , " or m o r e fittingly in w e s t e r n M i c h i g a n ,

this t h r o u g h y o u r daily interact i o n s is a far g r e a t e r gift than any

u p c o m i n g quarter, a n d this w a s

W h y w o u l d a n y o n e feel the need to say t h e s e w o r d s t o their t h o u g h t s a n d e m o t i o n s c o u l d be s u m m e d up in a small, .001

the result. M u c h like the recent

only look d o w n at the b a r e l y visible stone t o s u p p r e s s any

energy, f i n a n c i a l resources, a n d

I w o u l d h a v e c o m e up with the

the naive. A n o t h e r p r o b l e m I h a v e with the p s e u d o - e n g a g e m e n t is the

idea. It's a great b u s i n e s s e n d e a v o r that p l a y s off of the del i cat e e m o t i o n s that a c c o m p a n y y o u n g love. It's a s if the m o n e y -

u n d e r l y i n g p u r p o s e of the ring itself. T o m e it s e e m s a s t h o u g h

m o n g e r i n g j e w e l e r s of the w o r l d

n i s m for the recipiant. If the w e a r e r s f i n d t h e m s e l v e s in a

c a m e together in secret t o d i s c u s s n e w m a r k e t i n g t e c h n i q u e s f o r the

this " s y m b o l of l o v e " serves as a deterrent, p e r h a p s a guilt m e c h a -

q u e s t i o n a b l e situation, they need

these emotions and sentiments can't be expressed through word o r deed is truly d i s h e a r t e n i n g . We h a v e b e c o m e so a c c u s t o m e d t o expressing our feelings through materialistic m e d i u m s that w e h a v e f o r g o t t e n [perhaps n e v e r learned] that telling y o u r p a r t n e r h o w you feel and s h o w i n g t h e m

situation t o take a m o m e n t and analyze their c o n d i t i o n . If w h a t I have written h a s no relevant application to y o u r situation, feel f r e e t o disregard w h a t you h a v e just read. H o w e v e r , if you find yourself a s k i n g questions, m a y b e y o u should rethink the circular b u r d e n w r a p p e d around y o u r finger.


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C l a s s i f i e d

Take Back the Night protest violence against women this Thursday 9pm in the Pine Grove

Live From T h e Pew coming soon to an area near you.

Tuesday nights call Papa John's and order a large pizza and mention Dance Vlarathon. 20% of the profits will go for Dance Marathon. Offer is good from now to Dance Marathon.

WTHS 89.9

355-7272

F R B S H m / AM> sophomores: r

VANDERPRO V!! a w e r e c n p sez:

Girls, wanna have guys make you signs and buy you candy? Wanna be part of one of Hope's oldest traditions? Come to the women's rally on Wednesday, October 9, at 8:30 p.m. in Phelps Cafeteria.

c i 3 a c = = 3 c = 3 a c = i c = i c = = i c r D C = )

MAYOCUNIC

Moi-wtoy

vuglits

art spn0lirttl

s t f l r t L ^ n t 6:00

m ^ t s

SUMMER HI

try

FOR JUNIOR NURSING STUDENTS

w ^ n t or

•Jtqq'u spci0hettL w i t h f r e s h gflrUc b r e a d avui

Colleen- How about those pancakes? -N

p o s s e ' s g o n n a be...what ' b o u t u ? W o r d .

Spaghetti Night at the Kletz

nt the Hdrtz!

Come play ultimate! 6:30 Wed. 3:00 Sun.

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Ben DeHaan

Anchor

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Sports

S e p t e m b e r 25, 2002

Pol

T H E EXTRA POINT

7

Dutch unbeaten in MIAA John Rodstrom SPORTS EDITOR

T h e H o p e College w o m e n ' s soccer t e a m i m p r o v e d to 2 - 0 in M I A A play a n d 3-5 overall by n a r r o w l y beating Kalamazoo College 2-1. T h e win w a s t h e D u t c h ' s s e c o n d

Sports Editor

Bowing out B o w : vt- to yield, submit. If y o u just h a p p e n t o be on H o p e ' s athletics site t o c h e c k on the results of any other athletic then this w o r d will s p u n d pretty c o m m o n . It s e e m s that w h e n e v e r H o p e is o u s t e d in a g a m e , w e n e v e r lose: we bow. T h e debate, t h o u g h , is do w e really w a n t to b e k n o w n for that e v e r y t i m e that w e ' r e u n a b l e to c o m e out o n t o p ? In the end, i t ' s still a loss, but look at the c h o i c e of w o r d i n g . T h e w o r d b o w is a little bit h u m i l i a t i n g , especially if w e ' r e losing to a t e a m without class, or C a l v i n for that matter. H o p e has a f i n e intercollegiate athletic p r o g r a m . With all the victories w e chalk up, y o u can say that w e ' r e not really used to losing. But w h e n w e d o w a l k a w a y f r o m the contest as the failures, it's d e c l a r e d that w e b o w e d ? Just h a v i n g that is a n insult t o injury. It's u n d e r s t a n d a b l e that w e w o n ' t win e v e r y g a m e . H o w e v e r , w h e n w e lose, w e ' r e n e v e r s u b m i t t i n g . I d o n ' t k n o w of a single c o a c h here that w o u l d think their t e a m w o u l d g i v e up. In a sense, this an idiocyncrise that I ' v e had for a w h i l e , b u t it d o e s s o u n d o d d , d o e s n ' t it? T h e c o l l e g e w e b s i t e will n e v e r b a s h on o u r o w n school f o r losing, b u t look at it this w a y : if w e ' r e a l w a y s " b o w i n g " t o o u r o p p o n e n t s , e v e n a f t e r a c o m p l e t e thrashing, h o w are the athletes h e r e s u p p o s e d to get critiscm f r o m the m e d i a ? But I s u p p o s e t h e r e is a n o t h e r a p p r o a c h to the situation. A n o t h e r d e f i n i t i o n f o r this w o r d is n o d d i n g in respect t o a o p p o n e n t . T h i s c a n e a s i ly be a p p l i e d t o H o p e athletics. T h e c o a c h e s h e r e p r i d e t h e m s e l v e s o n s p o r t s m a n s h i p , fair play, etc. F o r us t o b o w to a n o p p o n e n t s e e m s a p p r o p r i a t e . W e are a c l a s s act school with c l a s s act individuals. S o h a v i n g this said I ' d like t o a c k n o w l e d g e e v e r y athlete at H o p e , s o take a b o w - or not..

i

in a row, with both w i n s by a score of 2-1. T h e Dutch d e f e a t e d archrival Calvin C o l l e g e last W e d n e s day in a c o m e f r o m behind victory. A g a i n s t K a l a m a z o o , the D u t c h trailed after only 6 minutes of regulation had passed, with K a l a m a z o o h o l d i n g the 1 - 0 lead f o r m o s t of the g a m e . D e s p i t e the one goal deficit, H o p e kept the o f f e n s i v e p r e s s u r e up, h o p i n g t o catch a break. That break c a m e with 15 minutes r e m a i n i n g in t h e g a m e . N e g e e n M a s h g h a t i ( ' 0 6 ) knotted the score at 1-1 o f f a 1 vs. 1 b r e a k a w a y . Dawn Gillam ('05) followed shortly a f t e r w a r d s with the goa h e a d goal off of a f r e e kick. T h e D u t c h e n d e d t h e g a m e with a 15-9 e d g e in shots o n goal, while H o p e G o a l k e e p e r M a r y Ayres ( ' 0 3 ) c h a l k e d u p 6 saves. " S a t u r d a y w e p l a y e d o k a y , alt h o u g h we kind of squeaked by. W e still got the j o b d o n e , " A y r e s said.

AMOHOft

PHOTO COURTESY PUBLIC RELATIONS

Dawn Gillam ('05) dribbles through two Calvin midfielders. ( ' 0 6 ) . G i l l a m and M a s h g h a t i w e r e

in the M I A A a l o n g with A l m a C o l -

credited with the assist. "It f e l t r e a l l y g o o d to get t h e

lege and Albion college. Things

g a m e winner, especially b e c a u s e it w a s m y first c o l l e g e g o a l , " T y l e r said. "It w a s g o o d t o get a win o v e r Calvin because of the rivalry," T^ler said. Despite being troubled offensively in the p r e s e a s o n , the D u t c h

c o u l d g o either w a y f r o m h e r e for the D u t c h . E v e n t hough the season is still y o u n g , the D u t c h are looking to c o m e a w a y with the title at the e n d of the season. " I t ' s totally u p f o r g r a b s r i g h t now, w e just h a v e to m a k e sure w e s h o w u p m e n t a l l y to e v e r y g a m e , "

struck first with u n d e r 5 m i n u t e s left in the first half. T h e D u t c h re-

h a v e b e g u n to step u p their o f f e n s e

A y r e s said. " W e ' r e still in it, but we h a v e to

and c o n v e r t w h e n the g a m e is on

step it u p and play with e m o t i o n .

s p o n d e d in t h e c l o s i n g s e c o n d s ,

the line. "Finishing has b e e n o u r big prob-

W e ' r e just going to play it one g a m e

s q u e e z i n g in a g o a l b y K a t e D o m b o s ( ' 0 3 ) d u r i n g a m e l e e in

lem. W e ' v e b e e n w o r k i n g on I v s .

the goal b o x . H o p e took the lead with 2 0 m i n -

1 drills, finishing and playing 100% in p r a c t i c e so that w e c o m e out j u s t

utes r e m a i n i n g in the g a m e off a d o u b l e assisted goal b y Emily Tyler

as s t r o n g in o u r g a m e s , " Tyler said

In the C a l v i n g a m e , the K n i g h t s

H o p e is n o w tied for first p l a c e

at a t i m e , " T y l e r said. T h e D u t c h will r e t u r n t o t h e i r h o m e pitch t o take on Albion C o l lege in a n u n d e f e a t e d M I A A s h o w d o w n this Saturday. K i c k o f f is at noon.

V-ball dominates St. Mary's

Soccer from 1

Dutch recover from heartbreaking 5 game loss to K-Zoo, easily defeat St. Mary's: 3022, 30-14, 30-22.

D e s p i t e c o m i n g into the g a m e full of e m o t i o n , the D u t c h m e n w e r e

thought. W i t h o n l y t h r e e minutes passed

u n a b l e t o get o n t h e s c o r e b o a r d

in the s e c o n d h a l f , L o o m i s w o u l d take a n assist f r o m T y l e r B a s l e r

John Rodstrom

K a l a m a z o o w o u l d s e e all d a y ,

a l m o s t i n s u r m o u n t a b l e lead of 5-1. But L o o m i s w a s n ' t pleased with

SPORTS EDITOR

though.

Hope would recover

just a hat trick. He p r o v e d that he

t e a m split a pair of M I A A m a t c h e s

quickly a n d n e v e r look b a c k . Just minutes after Kalamazoo's

c o u l d give b a c k to his t e a m m a t e s as they had given t o h i m , w h e n h e

last w e e k , f a l l i n g t o K a l a m a z o o

goal, Bryant L o o m i s ( ' 0 3 ) w o u l d lie

C o l l e g e in five g r u e l i n g g a m e s 233 0 , 3 0 - 1 6 , 3 0 - 1 8 . 2 8 - 3 0 , 15-12 and

the g a m e up with a b o u t t w e n t y - t w o m i n u t e s left in the first h a l f , off an

f o u n d Basler o n a cross with twenty t h r e e m i n u t e s l e f t in t h e g a m e .

thrashing St. M a r y ' s College 30-22, 3 0 - 1 4 , 3 0 - 2 2 . T h e Flying D u t c h are

assist f r o m E d H u e b n e r ( ' 0 4 ) . T h e m o m e n t u m w o u l d carry the

of the net, f i n i s h i n g off K a l a m a z o o with a sixth g o a l . T h e goal also

n o w 5 - 7 o v e r a l l a n d 2 - 3 in t h e

D u t c h m e n e v e n further, as L o o m i s

g a v e Basler, along with L o o m i s , of

MIAA. T h e victory for H o p e c a m e at a

s c o r e d a g a i n only a f e w m i n u t e s

r e c o r d i n g a g a m e s c o r i n g both a

later, this t i m e o f f an assist f r o m Dan Olsen ('05). The score would

goal a n d an assist. O n the D u t c h m e n d e f e n s i v e unit, M a r c u s Voss ( ' 0 3 ) and J e r e m y

first, a s K a l a m a z o o ' s N i c k H o u d e k netted the g a m e ' s first goal t w e l v e m i n u t e s a f t e r the o p e n i n g whistle. That w o u l d b e the only lead that

T h e Hope w o m e n ' s volleyball

critical time, as the Dutch f a c e d the possibility of 4 losses in the M I A A season, and almost certain e l i m i n a tion f r o m c o n te n tio n f o r the r e g u -

A / / O H O f f PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

Kelley Hutchins ('05), Lindsey Brink ('04), and Katie Hall ('04) prepare for the serve against Saint Mary's College.

lar s e a s o n c h a m p i o n s h i p . T h e D u t c h c a m e t h r o u g h with

f o r the Flying Dutch with 7 kills.

played awesome. We could have

their b a c k s t o the wall, and are h o p ing to use this win a s a catalyst for

Also scoring for the Dutch was L i n d s e y B r i n k ( ' 0 4 ) with 6 kills,

g i v e n up, but we d i d n ' t , " H u t c h i n s

a turnaround. " W e f i n a l l y started p l a y i n g like

while McKenna Troyan ('04) and H u t c h i n s c o m b i n e d for 2 5 assists.

w e k n e w w e could. It w a s f u n , and e v e r y o n e p l a y e d w e l l . It s h o u l d

In the K a l a m a z o o g a m e , the up-

h e l p us m m it (our season) a r o u n d , " said Kelley H u t c h i n s ( ' 0 5 ) T h e D u t c h will b e f i g h t i n g a n uphill battle f r o m h e r e o n out, with

p e r c l a s s m e n stepped u p their g a m e , nearly c a r r y i n g the d a y b y putting up i m p r e s s i v e stats. L u i d e n s h a d a n o t h e r solid g a m e with 19 kills a n d 14 digs, while Katie Hall ( ' 0 4 )

e v e r y M I A A match a m u s t w i n . " T h r e e l o s s e s m a k e s it a lot

c h i p p e d in 11 kills, 15 digs, and 4 a c e s . K a r a VanAssen ( ' 0 3 ) had 12

harder to win, but if we play the best we can, I think w e can beat a n y o n e

digs, A l e x i s M i c k ( ' 0 3 ) had 10 digs,

in the c o n f e r e n c e , " Hutchins added. " T h e w h o l e t e a m thinks that we can win the c o n f e r e n c e . " A g a i n s t St. M a r y ' s , C o - c a p t a i n M a r t h a L u i d e n s ( ' 0 3 ) led the w a y

said. In the end, it w a s n ' t a lack of will that d o o m e d the D u t c h ; they j u s t

lose to the Hornets. H o p e w o u l d continue the scoring t r e n d , a n d this t i m e , it w a s T i m K e l l y ' s ( ' 0 3 ) turn to m a r k his n a m e on the s c o r e s h e e t , as he n e t t e d the ball past the k e e p e r o f f an assist from Adam Chafee ('03). The D u t c h m e n n o w held a 3-1 lead over

of the g a m e , a n d giving H o p e an

Basler b o o t e d the ball in the back

R u b u r g ( ' 0 6 ) split t i m e in the net, and only needed to m a k e a c o m b i n e d three saves o n the day. H o p e w a s also the d o m i n a n t t e a m o n s h o t s o n goal, outshooting the H o r n e t s 14-4. T h e win also catapulted H o p e in to the top f i v e t e a m s in the national

ran o u t of s t e a m . "It w a s close in the f i f t h , but w e d i d n ' t p u s h e n o u g h , w h i c h is w h a t

the shocked defending M I A A

rankings. H o p e is currently ranked

champions. H o p e ' s last goal of the first half

we h a v e t o b e a b l e to d o , " H u t c h i n s

w o u l d c o m e f r o m D a v i d Gonthier, ( ' 0 6 ) with less than ten m i n u t e s left

f i f t h in the nation. ' T h i s win really b g a v e us a lot of p o s i t i v e e n e r g y , " s a i d S m i t h .

said. T h e Dutch will travel to Albion C o l l e g e t o d a y for a n o t h e r l e a g u e m a t c h b e f o r e h e a d i n g to O h i o o n Friday and S a t u r d a y f o r a t o u r n a -

and T r o y a n had 4 2 assists. T h e K a l a m a z o o g a m e w a s a tight contest the entire way, with s o m e

m e n t hosted by Wittenberg Univer-

of the hottest action c o m i n g in the first, fourth, and f i f t h g a m e s .

confident. " W e are fired up and w e ' r e g o -

' T h e first and f o u r t h g a m e s w e

give H o p e a lead that it would never

( ' 0 5 ) a n d k n o c k e d in his third goal

sity. U n d a u n t e d by the p r e s s u r e of t o n i g h t ' s g a m e , the D u t c h r e m a i n

ing t o w i n , " H u t c h i n s said.

in the half to i n c r e a s e H o p e ' s lead to 4 - 1 . D o w n by three goals g o i n g into the s e c o n d half, the H o r n e t s k n e w

" B u t w e h a v e t o be on top of o u r g a m e f r o m n o w on. T h e r e is absolutely no r o o m for error n o w . " H o p e will t r a v e l to A l b i o n o n

that they would have to play a g a m e of " c a t c h - u p " b e f o r e t h e y c o u l d

Satruday to take o n th e Britons. "It will b e a tough m a t c h , " said S m i t h . " W e tied t h e m last year, and

e v e n think about d e f e a t i n g the D u t c h m e n t on their o w n pitch.

A l b i o n is c a p a b l e o f b e a t i n g a n y o n e this y e a r on any g i v e n

H o w e v e r , the D u t c h m e n w o u l d n ' t even give them time for such a

day." Kickoff is at n o o n at Albion.


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S e p t e m b e r 25, 2002

Football team is back on track Dutchmen score first win in Platteville over Pioneers

Platteville w o u l d score first in the g a m e in the o p e n i n g quarter, driving 85 y a r d s a n d e n d i n g with a 2 3 yard t o u c h d o w n pass to create a 7-0 for Hope. The Dutchmen would answer im-

Ben DeHaan SPORTS EDITOR

mediately on a two play scoring

Better late than never, but e s p e cially w h e n y o u ' r e p i c k e d t o win

drive, with Butler finding Joe V e r s c h u e r e n on a 4 4 - y a r d t o u c h -

your conference. T h e D u t c h m e n football t e a m w a s

d o w n p a s s to cut the lead t o 7-6.

able t o b r e a k their t w o g a m e los-

f o r the point in the s e c o n d quarter. With 12:04 left, the D u t c h m e n

ing s t r e a k last S a t u r d a y as t h e y d e f e a t e d n e w o p p o n e n t Platteville

Hope would eventually make up

d r o v e 12 plays d o w n the field, and

(Wi.) 3 2 - 2 0 . " W e both played h a r d , s o il w a s

J a m i e B u i k e m a p u s h e d the ball in f o r the score. A n o t h e r failed extra

really a nail-biter," said D e a n

point left H o p e w i t h a 12-7 lead.

Kreps, Head Coach. "We knew that w e were g o i n g to have t o score

p o s s e s s i o n with a one yard run a n d

some points." T h e g a m e w a s literally a p a s s i n g shootout between Hope quarterb a c k Phil Butler ( ' 0 4 ) a n d P i o n e e r

Platteville w o u l d score o n the next failed to c o n v e r t the point a f t e r to r e g a i n a 13-12 lead. The Dutchmen managed to sneak in one m o r e score b e f o r e the half,

A/VCHOFf PHOTO

Devon Quinn ('04). Matt Baumbach ('03), and Joel Vershueren {'04) celebrate a t o u c h d o w n during Hope's 32-20 victory over Wisconsin-Platteville. H o p e t o o k an i n t e r c e p t i o n f r o m

p a s s i n g arsenal c o n s i s t e d of c o m -

t h o u g h , as they ran a t w o - m i n u t e drill that w a s c a p p e d o f f with a Joel

pleting

3 4 of 5 5 p a r s e s f o r 441

Soloman ('03) touchdown recep-

yards, along with three touch-

tion, and a two-point conversion left

of the field, a n d B u t l e r hit D e v o n Quinn ('04) on a 23-yard pass for

d o w n s . Stetzer w a s not far b e h i n d ,

H o p e with a 2 0 - 1 3 h a l f t i m e lead.

c o m p l e t e i n g 3 4 of 6 2 p a s s e s f o r

In the second half, the D u t c h m e n w e r e a b l e t o d r a w the first s c o r e .

q u a r t e r b a c k T o m Stetzer. B u t l e r ' s

4 2 7 yards.

COURTESY PUBLIC RELATIONS

their o w n t w o - y a r d l i n e the length

the score, p o s t i n g a 2 6 - 1 3 lead. T h e P i o n e e r s w o u l d c l o s e the g a p o n their next possession, driving 64

y a r d s a n d f i n i s h i n g with a six-yard score. W i t h t w e n t y m i n u t e s left in

day, a 10-yarder to Q u i n n . H o p e ' s

the g a m e , a n d the s c o r e 2 6 - 2 0 , it

lead for the r e m a i n d e r of the g a m e , g i v i n g the D u t c h m e n t h e i r f i r s t

still a p p e a r e d t o be a n y o n e ' s g a m e . But H o p e w o u l d seal the g a m e n o

d e f e n s e w o u l d p r e s e r v e the 3 2 - 2 0

their next p o s s e s s i o n , a n d B u t l e r

victory of the s e a s o n . H o p e will host W h e a t o n Univer-

t h r e w his third t o u c h d o w n of the

sity on Saturday. K i c k o f f is at 1:00.

Men's ultimate gains experience at sectionals .

John Rodstrom SPORTS EDITOR

I t ' s a w e l l k n o w n t h e o r y in sports that if a t e a m w a n t s to take

,

i

.i. . J....*

Qtnta M i c h i g a n , Illinois, Illinois Michigan State,

settled, H o p e c o u l d not c o n v e r t o n

State, and Indiana. E a c h is one of

a late lead a n d m u l t i p l e s c o r i n g

the best t e a m s in the c o u n t r y a n d

opportunities, a n d e n d e d u p f o l d -

no stranger to nationals. A t the highest level of ultimate,

ing by a s c o r e of 15-14. In the last g a m e of the day, the

their g a m e to the next level, they m u s t c o m p e t e against better t e a m s .

D u t c h m e n had a r e m a t c h a g a i n s t G r e y A r e a . A l t h o u g h H o p e easily

T h e ultimate team took this d o g m a to heart this w e e k e n d , r u n n i n g into stiff c o m p e t i t i o n at t h e ment. A vast m a j o r i t y of the other t e a m s at the t o u r n a m e n t c o n s i s t e d of grizzled veterans o n highly c o m -

V

ish the j o b , falling short a n d l o s i n g

w e especially need a c o m m i t m e n t

13-11. "Hope College ultimate has a to o v e r c o m e this s e a s o n . It has the t e n d e n c y to lose g a m e s after b e i n g

ing a w a y with a 1-4 r e c o r d on that day, H o p e f o u g h t to the e n d and e n d e d up with three g a m e s determ i n e d by 2 points or less. The Flying Dutchmen opened the t o u r n a m e n t with a n a r r o w loss Af/CHOff

PHOTO BY JOHN RODSTROM

players, a luxury that H o p e c a n n o t

day, they w e r e a g a i n u n a b l e to f i n -

psychological barrier that it has yet

petitive c l u b t e a m s . D e s p i t e c o m -

it is not u n c o m m o n t o see t e a m s with o v e r 2 0 c o m p l e t e l y d e d i c a t e d currently a f f o r d . " W e need to p r a c t i c e m o r e , and

d e f e a t e d G r e y A r e a earlier in the

Michigan open sectional tourna-

to A n n Arbor United f r o m the easte m side of the state, f a l l i n g late in

t o the bitter e n d . W h e n the d u s t

f r o m 10 g u y s w h o will practice at least 4 times a w e e k , " S h e n said. As the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n c o n tinue t o reevaluate their g o a l s a n d

a h e a d late in the g a m e . " S h e n said.

priorities and prepare f o r the Spring season, they are constantly teach-

" I t ' s all d u e to o u r lack of experi-

ing beginners the basics of the g a m e

ence." " O u r t e a m n e e d s t o l o o k at its

and accepting n e w m e m b e r s t o the t e a m . In addition t o practices that

priorities and o u r g o a l s f o r the sea-

are o p e n to a n y o n e willing to play, casual pick-up g a m e s are held twice a week, on S u n d a y s at 3:00 p.m. and

the g a m e by a score of 13-11. H o p e

F a c i n g a t e a m with m o r e s u b s ,

m o r e a n d m o r e t o m a k e u s into a

son," S h e n said. T h i s s p r i n g D u t c h m e n will b e

q u i c k l y r a l l i e d in t h e f o l l o w i n g

greater o r g a n i z a t i o n , a n d m o r e ex-

n a t i o n a l c a l i b e r t e a m , " said K a i s e r

f o r c e d to c o m p e t e with scores of

g a m e to d e f e a t a n o t h e r c l u b team. G r e y A r e a , 13-9. T h e D u t c h m e n

p e r i e n c e , H o p e w a s d e f e a t e d in

Shen ('04), Hope co-captain. Still in c o n t e n t i o n t o a d v a n c e to

D i v i s i o n I t e a m s that h a v e the fa-

on W e d n e s d a y s at 6 : 3 0 p.m. "We're always welcoming new

cilities a n d c o m m i t t e d p l a y e r s to

players e v e n if they d o n ' t h a v e any

the q u a r t e r f i n a l s , H o p e rallied to meet the c h a l l e n g e of a Detroit area

p r a c t i c e e v e r y d a y , all y e a r r o u n d . Vying for the s a m e national quali-

e x p e r i e n c e . " S h e n said. "If y o u ' v e got t w o legs and t w o

t e a m , S A C , f i g h t i n g tooth and nail

f y i n g s p o t s are t e a m s s uch as O h i o

arms, you can play this g a m e . "

f a c e d their t o u g h e s t c h a l l e n g e of the

day

in

the

third

game,

Slippedisc.

Eric Barendse catches the disc for a score.

short order, 13-3, a n d left to p o n d e r the q u i c k lesson f r o m the g a m e they h a d just p l a y e d . " W e need to be in those situations

Hope golf teams place at tourney Ben DeHaan SPORTS EDITOR

T h e m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s golf teams entered separate MIAA

M I A A . Saint M a r y ' s w a l k e d a w a y the w i n n e r s , f o l l o w e d c l o s e l y b y Albion and H o p e . T h e D u t c h ' s top g o l f e r s on the

t o u r n a m e n t s on Saturday. T h e m e n ' s t e a m , w h i c h h o l d s the top

day were Emily C o l e n b r a n d e r (*03),

spot in the c o n f e r e n c e s t a n d i n g s l o o k e d t o h o l d o n to t h e i r s p o t ,

shot a n 86. The m e n ' s team were unable to

w h i l e the w o m e n ' s t e a m h o p e d to

c o m e out v i c t o u r i o u s at their m e e t in C a l v i n . T h e K n i g h t s c l a i m e d

take the m e e t victory and still be r e c o g n i z e d as a c o n t e n d o r for the

a n d Brittany P h i l o ( ' 0 6 ) , w h o both

their h o m e tournament, shooting

M I A A title. P l a y i n g at Calvin, the w o m e n ' s

308 a s a t e a m . Calvin w a s f o l l o w e d by O l i v e t with 307, A l m a with 308,

t e a m w a s able t o pull o u t a third

a n d H o p e with 310. E v e n with the f o u t h - p l a c e f i n i s h ,

place finish a m o n g the rest of the

H o p e still l e a d s the c o n f e r e n c e by a slender two strokes over Calvin. H o p e did m a n a g e to take the medalist honor, as Alden H o k s b e r g e n ( ' 0 6 ) shot a 71 to win the t o u r n a m e n t . H o p e w a s also led by Justin S p y k e r ('05), w h o rec o r d e d a 7 7 , and K o d y Taylor ( ' 0 5 ) and Ryan Shedd ( ' 0 5 ) , w h o e a c h rec o r d e d a n 81. T h e D u t c h m e n will c o m p e t e at the O h i o Invitational o n Saturday, while the D u t c h will host the next M I A A t o u r n a m e n t on S a t u r d a y at the W i n d i n g C r e e k Golf C o u r s e .

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR 141 E I 2 T H S T PO BOX 9000 H O L L A N D MI 4 9 4 2 2 - 9 0 0 0

Non-Profii Organization U.S. Postage PAID Hope College


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