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S E P T E M B E R 7. 2011 • S I N C E 1887

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ARTS

FEATURES

SPORTS

Summer movies

Support a cause, Join a club

Scandalous side of college sports

What did you miss while you were outside this summer?

Looking for something to do? Get involved on campus - check out these ideas.

And you thought football players were boring. See what athletes at other schools have been up to.

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Time to Serve connects communities

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r H O T O S COURTESY OF H O P E P R

A D A Y O F V O L U N T E E R I N G — M o r e t h a n 3 5 0 Hope College s t u d e n t s Joined f o r c e s t o improve t h e Holland c o m m u n i t y Saturday. S t u d e n t s v o l u n t e e r e d at l o c a t i o n s I n c l u d i n g Christ M e m o r i a l Church, Boys & Girls Club, C o m m u n i t y K i t c h e n and t h e Holland Rescue M i s s i o n . The event was f o l l o w e d by an Ice c r e a m social.

Hope athletics searches for new Dutch energize H o p e sQt uh d. reW n tcs anrl and fans, m u s t be serious in their efforts to spread school spirit. The seven-page application r e q u i r e s n o t only t w o letters of r e c o m m e n d a t i o n , one f r o m s o m e o n e affiliated with H o p e , b u t also t h e c o m p l e t i o n of five individual essay q u e s t i o n s o n topics such as " W h a t d o e s t h e w o r da ' iviuununucci Mountaineer' m e a n to mcaii ^

C l a i r e Call CAMPUS CO-EDITOR

The D u t c h M a s c o t Selection C o m m i t t e e is looking t o hire s o m e o n e n e w to fill those m u c h beloved giant w o o d e n s h o e s and rally H o p e College f a n s at various school events t h r o u g h o u t t h e year. The applicants, whose ultimate goal is to excite aand na

vou?" and a n d " W h a t d o e s it m e a n you?" to be a mascot?" By t h e t i m e a n e w D u t c h is selected, h e or she will have g o n e t h r o u g h two interviews, each of a half h o u r length, with t h e selection c o m m i t t e e a n d a trial r u n as D u t c h at t h e first h o m e volleyball g a m e this Sept. 23. O n l y 10 applicants will b e asked to ^ be interviewed and

tthe h e c o m m i t t e e will t h e n n a r r o w it d o w n to only t h e t o p four potential m a s c o t s to dress as D u t c h for t h e t r y - o u t . "Although o u r application process is extensive, it is t h e process t h a t we have chosen t o find the truly d e d i c a t e d participants," said Matt Richardson, resident director of the College East A p a r t m e n t s . ^ :

The The nn ee w w D D uu tt cc hh will will b e c h o s e n based o n t h e a m o u n t h e or she interacts with f a n s at t h e g a m e as well as overall character portrayal and e n t h u s i a s m . "The D u t c h m a n should b e able to get a c r o w d riled up," said C a t h e r i n e H y b a n k s ('15), a task not quite as easy as it may s o u n d . SEE

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Center for Writing and Research opens ••• Jessica Snltko CAMPUS CO-EDITOR

N o w that t h e a c a d e m i c year h a s begun, s t u d e n t s will soon be b o m b a r d e d with p r e s e n t a t i o n s , e x a m s and t h e e v e r - d r e a d e d research papers. Writing a s s i g n m e n t s can b e a little less p a i n f u l this year, however, d u e to a helpful addition to Van Wylen Library. Over the summer, Hope College e x p a n d e d t h e W r i t i n g C o r n e r into t h e C e n t e r for W r i t i n g and Research, w h i c h will give s t u d e n t s free assistance o n p a p e r s and o t h e r a s s i g n m e n t s . The new center serves t h e s a m e basic p u r p o s e as t h e W r i t i n g Corner, b u t with several additions. "It's n o longer just a corner," laughs David Cunningham, the center's director. W h e r e a s t h e c o r n e r offered W H A T ' S INSIDE

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primarily rvrto-rvn.nno o n e - o n - o n e writino writing help for s t u d e n t s , t h e center will n o w provide s e m i n a r s and w o r k s h o p s t o i m p r o v e writing skills. Furthermore, writing assistants will be o n h a n d to help with study abroad applications, r e s u m e s a n d even locating resources. "This year we're w o r k i n g closely with t h e reference desk so we also provide m o r e help with research materials," said Sarah Krueger, a writing assistant. According t o C u n n i n g h a m , w o r k i n g with a w r i t i n g assistant on a paper is m o r e beneficial t h a n getting help f r o m a tutor. "It's a parallel p o s itio n t o a TA," he said. Writing assistants are r e c o m m e n d e d by faculty a n d then u n d e r g o an extensive application process. Once chosen, they receive specialized

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t r a i m n p o n h o w to training best help s t u d e n t s with their papers. W r i t i n g assistants can give aid o n everything from b r a i n s t o r m i n g topic ideas t o c o r r e c t i n g grammar mistakes. Even s t u d e n t s w h o already consider themselves to be d e c e n t w r i t e r s can benefit f r o m going t o t h e Center. "Sometimes it really just helps t o get a second o p i n i o n o n writing for mistakes you m i g h t not have picked u p t h e first time," said Cara Haley ('13).

SEE WRITING, PAGE 2

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FEATURts 7

V R i T T N

P H O T O BY CAITLIN KLASK

N E E D H E L P ? J U S T A S K - A t u t o r helps another s t u d e n t In Van Wylen Library, t h e new home to t h e Center for W r i t i n g & Research. The new center has expanded t o b e t t e r m e e t t h e needs of Hope s t u d e n t s .

VOICES 8

Got a story idea? Let us k n o w at anchor@hope.edu. or call us a t 3 9 5 1 7 g 7 7 1

SPORTS 11


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CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Friday

Sept. 9

Longboarding picks up speed on campus Laura Kraay GUEST WRITER

SAC Mentalist Christopher Carter Knickerbocker Theatre - 8 : 3 0 p.m.

Saturday

Sept. 10

Community Day Picnic 1 1 a.m. - 1 p.m. - W i n d m i l l Island

Sept. 1 1

Sunday

9 / 1 1 Interfaith Service 4 p.m Maas A u d i t o r i u m

Sept. 12

Monday "Rebirth"

Fall R i m Series a t the Knickerbocker Mon. - Fri. - 7 : 3 0 p.m.

SEPTEMBER 0 7 . 2 0 1 1

When walking through t h e Pine Grove, t h e s o u n d of a longboard's wheels o n t h e s m o o t h p a v e m e n t is not an unfamiliar s o u n d . They are quickly b e c o m i n g a staple on Hope's campus—alongside black squirrels, N o r t h Face and Vera Bradley, of course. W h e t h e r o n e participates for t h e social factor or simply for t h e p u r p o s e of getting t o class, it is e v i d e n t that H o p e is filled with longboarders. Many students choose l o n g b o a r d s for t h e convenience they provide. Brian M u l h e r n ('14) p r e f e r s a l o n g b o a r d t o a bicycle b e c a u s e of the a d d e d

ease, "Unlike a bike, it doesn't n e e d to be locked. You can take it with you to class." l o h n Turkis ('14) e c h o e s this s e n t i m e n t , "Based o n t h e size of H o p e , a l o n g b o a r d just m a k e s m o r e sense (over a bicycle.) It's less of a hassle." According to Gallic and Scott, w h o are e m p l y e e s at RIT/ Skatecasa in d o w n t o w n Holland, H o p e s t u d e n t s have increased sales for t h e store. Since classes started, their selling rate h a s d o u b l e d . The higher end of t h e selling s p e c t r u m is a b o u t 12 l o n g b o a r d s per w e e k and averages a r o u n d seven. Based o n last year's sales, this level typically stays a b o u t c o n s t a n t until Michigan's winters

IN BRIEF MORTAR B O A R D A W A R D S The Hope College chapter of Mortar Board, an honor society for college seniors, recieved 14 national awards at an annual conference this summer. The chapter was also recognized as one of the lop five chapters in the country. A m o n g the awards recieved was a "Golden Torch Award" for leadership and service, a "First Book Award'' for raising the most books in a national virtual book drive, and 12 "Project Excellence Awards."

force t h e l o n g b o a r d e r s to trade their c h e r i s h e d b o a r d s for b o o t s , gloves and a'heavy w i n t e r coat. However, despite t h e joy longboarding provides for those w h o do it, not e v e r y o n e is pleased. O n o n e occasion in t h e Pine Grove, an angry passerby p u s h e d M u l h e r n off his longboard. He d e s c r i b e d t h e incident as deliberate. In some towns, like B i r m i n g h a m , Mich., the distaste for l o n g b o a r d e r s is shared. It is b a n n e d in s o m e public places a n d t h o s e w h o violate t h e rule can be s t o p p e d by a police officer. However, Mulhern, who is not only s p o n s o r e d by two l o n g b o a r d i n g c o m p a n i e s (Bees Knees and Skathletics), b u t also competitively longboards, a r g u e s against this logic. "Skateboarding can give longboarding a bad rep. Sometimes when skateboarders

J U S T C R U I S I N ' — W h e t h e r on t h e way t o class or j u s t l o o k i n g for a good t i m e , more s t u d e n t s are p i c k i n g up a longboard. P H O T O S BY C A I T L I N K L A S K

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d o tricks they grind on the rail, b e n c h e s and o t h e r public places. L o n g b o a r d i n g isn't destructive. Tricks involve t h e b o a r d and t h e road'" M u l h e r n said. If you're considering joining t h e r a n k s of t h e longboarders, be pleased to hear that, according to M u l h e r n , t h e s p o r t h a s a quick learning curve. However, like any skill, practice is required. He r e c o m m e n d s practicing at t i m e s w h e n there aren't p e o p l e a r o u n d — s o t h e Pine G r o v e at 10:20 a.m. m a y not be t h e best t i m e . In addition t o those tips, learning with a g r o u p can add a f u n social element. Whether it is a lone longboarder or a g r o u p of f r i e n d s rolling to the beach, a day doesn't s e e m to go by w i t h o u t a sighting. Will the l o n g b o a r d s s t a n d t h e test of time or join t h e back of closets like last season's Snuggie?

KITCHEN OPEN UNTIL 2 A.M.

A f t e r a n e w D u t c h is selected, he or she m u s t be m e n t o r e d by t h e previous D u t c h o n h o w to behave while dressed as the m a s c o t . To p r e v e n t t h e need for any disciplinary action against any unsuitable behavior, t h e n e w D u t c h will be c o a c h e d o n w h a t is and is n o t a p p r o p r i a t e b e f o r e a t t e n d i n g any official H o p e s p o r t i n g events. It is n o t just t h e application a n d training processes that are t i m e c o n s u m i n g , however. Becoming the new Dutch requires t h e dedication of s o m e w h e r e b e t w e e n 10 and 15 h o u r s each week as well as m a n d a t o r y a t t e n d a n c e at every H o p e football game, m o s t m e n a n d women's basketball games.

volleyball g a m e s , cross c o u n t r y m e e t s a n d soccer g a m e s . "If b e c o m i n g t h e next D u t c h is not a g o o d fit for an individual," Richardson said, or if it would b e t o o great of a c o m m i t m e n t , o n e could still b e c o m e a D u t c h handler, a s o r t of b o d y guard for D u t c h as h e a t t e n d s H o p e events. In the search for a r e p l a c e m e n t D u t c h , Richardson said " W e h o p e to s u p p o r t H o p e with t h e best e n t h u s i a s m and e x c i t e m e n t t h a t a D u t c h can bring." Ultimately t h e job of Dutch, w h o e v e r m a y be inside t h e c o s t u m e , is t o bring o u t everyone's school spirit and to represent H o p e in t h e m o s t positive way.

Writing Center now open • WRITING, f r o m page 1 The best p a r t is that n o t only will a trip to t h e C e n t e r i m p r o v e your g r a d e o n a single a s s i g n m e n t , but it will help you b e c o m e a better writer overall. "The best way to improve writing is s o m e kind of o n e - o n o n e conversation," C u n n i n g h a m said. "You need a coach. W r i t i n g assistants are t h e personal trainers of writing." The c e n t e r shouldn't b e c o n s i d e r e d a place for remedial help; it is t h e r e to give s t u d e n t s s u p p o r t and help t h e m reach t h e next step of writing. Haley said, " C o m i n g h e r e

takes s o m e of t h e p r e s s u r e off of writing a paper...Because writing is such a process, we a r e just o n e m o r e h e l p f u l s t e p along t h e way." Located o n the first floor of Van Wylen Library, The C e n t e r for W r i t i n g and Research is open Monday through Thursday f r o m 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sundays f r o m 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. Walk-ins are always w e l c o m e b u t if you would like-to m a k e an a p p o i n t m e n t you can d o so by visiting the research help desk, calling extension 7904, or clicking o n "writing" o n t h e Library's h o m e p a g e .


THE

ANCHOR

^WbRLD Libyans hope for end to violence as Gadhafi remains on the run

SEPTEMBER 7 , 2 0 1 1

Shubham Sapkota GUEST WRITER

It started in mid-February and while it did show signs of ending a week ago, M o a m m a r Gadhafi persisted in making this a "long war." Inspired by the revolts in neighboring countries, the people of Libya stirred in rebellion against their leader, Gadhafi, who has ruled the country for over four decades. The protests soon turned into a bloodbath as t h e government used extreme measures to subdue t h e uprising. With intentions of fighting "until the last man," pro-Gadhafi forces have used violent measures such as b o m b a r d ment and gunfire to get rid of anti-government officials. This did not stop even when the gove r n m e n t s action was s h u n n e d by the international community. As the fighting escalated in major cities such as Brega, Misrata and Zawiya, t h e U.N., hoping to protect the civilians, declared a no-fly zone over Libya which caused the government to declare a cease fire. However, the pro-Gaddafi forced did not appear to heed the cease fire and went on hunting the rebels down. It was w h e n t h e violence spread towards Benghazi that

countries like France, the U.K., and t h e U.S. started their attack on government tanks and bases to make sure that the U.N. no-fly zone was maintained. After the coalition troops started their air raids, the rebels

controlled by the government. While NATO's involvement in Libyan domestic issues may have enraged the pro-Gadhafi forces, it appears to have been necessary to aid the civilians. H o p e College history profes-

R E B E L R E S P O N S E — Libyan forces opposing M o a m m a r sponse to low-flying government a i r c r a f t In Brega in eastern

started to fight back and take control of several coastal cities. Under the control of NATO, the coalition t r o o p s began to attack important military bases

sor Tamba M'bayo says, " N A T O help was necessary during that point in Libya. We never know what can happen if international aid is not provided soon. We do

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warrants for their arrest. Soon after, the Gadhafi regime was no longer seen as the established government in Libya. After a period of stalemate during which the pro and anti-Gadhafi forces experienced roughly equal success (or perhaps failure), the rebels entered the capital city of Tripoli. This major step in the war appears to have overthrown the Gadhafi regime, but the deposed "King of Kings" is still urging his troops not to back down. While the whereabouts of Gadhafi are unknown, he still appears to be playing mind games with his opposition, declaring that the war is not over yet. W h e t h e r what he says is actually true or not and whether the seven-month long violence has actually ended can only be revealed in the days to come. In the meantime, P H O T O COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATED P R E S S the citizens of Libya are Gaddafi t a k e their positions In rebracing themselves for Llbya In March. an interim government, hoping for an end to ramcurred f r o m June to August, pant violence in their nation. the International Court of Justice declared Gadhafi, his sons and his officers guilty of humanitarian crime and issued not want any incidents like the Rwanda genocide all over again." As the fierce attacks raged on, humanitarian aid from the U.N. began to reach civilians during the battle in Misrata. Amidst the attacks, which oc-

•Perspective

Assassination of al Qaida's second in command unlikely to have major impact

High-ranking Syrian official resigns amid brutal crackdowns by government forces

Megan Stevens

Cory Lakatos

GUEST WRITER

W O R L D CO-EDITOR

ror? That de pe nds on w h o m you ask. Of course, it is only natural for the Last Saturday an u n n a m e d U.S. of- American people to display a certain ficial announced the assassination of al a m o u n t of skepticism; they have been told several times the war on terror has already Qaida's second in c o m m a n d , Atiya Abbeen won. Perhaps some believed in t h e dul Rahman. He declined to c o m m e n t war efforts back then, but it is safe to say on the circumstances involved, but it was later revealed that Rahman was killed m u c h faith in the war was lost when, during the Bush administraby a CIA drone strike in tion, the c o m m a n d e r the mountains of Pakistan. in-chief a n n o u n c e d that Rahman, a Libyan c i t i - ^ ^ the country might not zen, joined Osama bin LadIt is my percepbe able to win the war. en in the 1980s and made a "I don't think you tion that al Qaida is n a m e for himself as a scholcan win it," then-Presiar and an explosives expert. weakening in light dent Bush told "Today According to the official, of a whole series of Show" anchor Matt he "ran daily operations for events. Lauer during his 2004 the group" for the past year — D R . JACK H O L M E S reelection campaign. and was p r o m o t e d to secH O P E PROFESSOR "I think you can creond in c o m m a n d after the ate conditions so that... death of bin Laden in May. those w h o use terror as The National Countertera tool are less acceptable to the world." rorism Center placed a $1 million reward W h e n asked if the supposed weakenfor information leading to his capture. ing of al Qaeda might lead to an early It is not known who will replace Rahman, and, said a former jihadist in a re- withdrawal of American troops in Afcent appearance on C N N , the position ghanistan, Dr. Jack Holmes, H o p e College will be difficult to fill. He was consid- political science professor and author of "Mood/Interest Theory of Ameriered the go-between for al Qaida and its affiliates, the one m a n both sides can Foreign Policy," said, "I do not betrusted, the "nerve center of al Qaida's lieve that this situation alone will affect global terrorist operations." Accord- our... schedule one way or another. It is ing to the u n n a m e d U.S. official, his my perception that al Qaida is weakendeath was "a major blow to al Qaida." ing in light of a whole series of events." This single assassination, although no From that point of view it would apd o u b t an important event, will not necespear that al Qaida is on shaky ground. sarily cause the dancing in the streets that After all, once the brain (or the "nerve followed the era of World War II. Troops center") of any major operation is taken will remain in Afghanistan for now, out, the rest of the body is sure to folwith the majority of U.S. troops schedlow. Is it possible that this assassination uled for withdrawal by the end of 2012. could signal the end of the war on ter-

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ments so that it would appear that the m u r ders had been committed by a r m e d gangs. Amnesty International has made similar allegations, estimating that at In the most recent development in least 88 people have died due to varithe continuing unrest in Syria, goverous types of prison abuse in Syria in the norate attorney-general Adnan Bakkour, the top legal official in the city of Hama, last five m o n t h s . Neil Sammonds, the resigned claiming that the security forc- organization's researcher on Syria, said, "These deaths behind es are guilty of torbars are reaching masture and other crimes sive proportions and against humanity. appear to be an extenCompared to These deaths behind sion of the same bruother Syrian citbars are reaching mastal disdain for life that ies, the situation in sive proportions and we are seeing daily on Hama has been parappear to be an extenthe streets of Syria." ticularly tumultuous. sion of the same brutal Amnesty InternaBakkour is the first tional also said that high-ranking Syrdisdain for life that we a total of over 1,800 ian official to resign in are seeing daily on the people have died since protest, which could streets of Syria. anti-government probe an indication that — N E I L SAMMONDS tests began in March. t h e regime's position A M N E S T Y INTERNATIONAL Foreign journalists is beginning to worsen. have been barred f r o m 55 D o u b t wascast u p o n the country and these his claims when the Syrian state news agency alleged that he exact claims remain nearly impossible to confirm, but it is clear that the Syrhad been kidnapped by a terrorist group and forced to speak against the govern- ian people have been experiencing b r u ment. However, Bakkour insists that he is tal crackdowns f r o m their government. Peaceful and violent demonstrations speakingfreelyin his YouTube statements. alike have been interrupted by mass arBakkour charged Syrian security forces and pro-regime militias with crimes rests, security forces opening fire on protestors, and the use of tanks by the army. including but not limited to the arrest O n Aug., 30, thousands of Syrians enof approximately 10,000 peaceful protestors, the death of roughly 320 people gaged in an anti-government street protest marking the beginning of the Muslim under torture in prison, the demolition festival of Eid al-Fitr. Worshippers exiting of houses while their occupants were m o s q u e s after the morning prayer that still inside and the m u r d e r and burial in a mass grave of upwards of 420 people. ended the m o n t h of Ramadan banded S E E SYRIA, P A G E 4 In the case of this last crime, Bakkour claimed that he was asked to falsify docu-


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WORLD

THE ANCHOR

SEPTEMBER 7 , 2 0 1 1

Indian government yields to protesters Rachel Kabagabu GUEST WRITER

After fasting encouraged by Indian activist A n n a Hazare and pressure f r o m t h o u s a n d s of others, India's g o v e r n m e n t has moved forward to pass legislation to create more transparency in the government. The goal of the fast, started Aug. 16, was to get Parliament to pass a piece of legislation called the Lokpal Bill. W i t h the introduction of the bill, government officials and proceedings would become m o r e visible to the public a n d those w h o complain about illegal doings in the g o v e r n m e n t , called whistle blowers. All the u n r e s t in India c o m e s after a turbulent spring and s u m m e r of riots a n d outrage in the Middle East, starting in Tunisia and spreading to Egypt, Lebanon and Libya. However, unlike those countries, activists used the m e t h o d of "Satyagraha," a term for a non-violent approach to change coined and started by M a h a t m a Gandhi. The protests are coming f r o m a point of m u c h justification: India's g o v e r n m e n t has a long history of corruption. With a C o r r u p t i o n Perception Index of 3.3 on a scale of 0-10 with 0 as highly corrupt, India has s o m e of

the worst c o r r u p t i o n in the world. Charges against Parliament members include bribery, human trafficking, a n d rape. Though the version of the Lokpal Bill that was passed is not the original version that Hazare a n d his followers had wanted, m a n y still c o u n t it as a victory. "There is no silver bullet," says Professor of International Studies Annie Dandavati. "Corruption c a n n o t be rooted out, but this is a step toward accountability." The bill currently P H O T O COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATED P R E S S in Parliament includes investigations of A N T I - C O R R U P T I O N P R O T E S T — Activist Anna Hazare leads a hunger strike in New Delhi, India, In accused c o r r u p t response to a series off c o r r u p t i o n scandals In the Indian Parliament. officials to be about c o r r u p t i o n in India. some see it in another light. of its problems,, like education completed within "He is a follower of Gandhi, O n Aug. 28, Hazare was a n d rainwater conservation. a year and the power to so people understand," said admitted into a hospital after In 1991, he started his dismiss corrupt officials. Dandavati. "He is fasting to c o n c e r n s about his health arose. organization, Bhrashtachar Hazare is n o stranger to make a political statement, The 72-year-old was discharged activism. After spending 15 Virodhi Jan A a n d o l a n (Public because as a citizen, he is tired four days later eating solid M o v e m e n t Against C o r r u p t i o n ) . years in India's military, he of what has been going on." food and maintaining a n o r m a l In the last decade, Hazare has took a voluntary retirement to With the continued support blood pressure. Over the years, r e t u r n to his h o m e village of gone on three hunger strikes, all m a n y have disapproved of of the g o v e r n m e n t a n d its people, of t h e m achieving their purpose, Ralegaon Siddhi, in the western India can c o n t i n u e making a Hazare's m e t h o d of protesting, f r o m forcing c o r r u p t ministers state of M a h a r a s h t a . There, he transition to a less c o r r u p t nation. calling it blackmail, but to resign, to raising awareness helped the village solve some

Drug gangs threaten, intimidate teachers in South Mexico Anneliese Goetz W O R L D CO-EDITOR

On Aug. 31, 140 schools in Mexico a n n o u n c e d that they would not o p e n themselves to students, due to threats of extortion f r o m d r u g gangs. There are 1,400 schools in t h e city of Acapulco, Guerrero, located in the south of Mexico, a n d 600 teachers have been threatened that if they do not give the gangs half of their salaries, including holiday bonuses, the teachers will suffer the consequences, which include physical attacks a n d kidnapping. The d r u g gang also suggests that a n y o n e w h o dislikes their d e m a n d s can leave. Teachers reported that at least eight of their co-workers have b e e n kidnapped in t h e days preceding the d e m a n d s . The r e p o r t s are unclear if the

schools are closing because the teachers refuse to c o m e into work or if the school districts intend to refuse the d r u g gangs. Either way, s t u d e n t s are not in schools getting an education. One elementary school was circled by g u n m e n driving a r o u n d the school with their rifles p r o t r u d i n g f r o m the windows. This re port was given by an elementary teacher, w h o refrained f r o m giving reporters her n a m e out of fear of reprisal. It is this kind of hostile presence s u r r o u n d i n g schools that has resulted in so many educators abstaining f r o m entering the classroom. A n o t h e r teacher with the responsibility of h a n d i n g out paychecks received a letter stipulating that t h e d r u g cartels be given a list of all the teachers' names, addresses.

NEWS FROM THE OTHER HOLLAND A game show recendy launched in the Netherlands that selects two individuals who are facing deportation from the country, and pits them against each other. The two contenstants are asked questions about Dutch culture, language and history, and whoever answers the most questions correcdy, wins a large sum of money to spend after they are deported. The loser of the contest wins a prize of tulip bulbs. The premier of the show will feature a aeronautical engineer who will be deported to Cameroon and a Slavic languages students who is facing deportation to Chechnya. The creaters of the game show claim that they are showing support for the plight of the contestants, but other claim that they are mocking the sad condition that these people face, a spokesman from Holland's Refugee Support Group, Wouter van Zandwijk addressed the controversy. "The program is sick, but let's face it, the reality is sick too."

p h o n e n u m b e r s , voter registration, and the district's payroll within 15 days. The d e m a n d s for 50 percent of teachers' salaries will go into effect on Oct. 1. This is on the heels of a d r u g cartel related arson c o m mitted last week at the Casino Royale in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon. In the five years that the Mexican g o v e r n m e n t has b e e n waging its war on drugs, this has b e e n the worst attack. The fire was lit at t h e entrance, forcing the o c c u p a n t s of

the building back inside; m a n y of t h e m were later found dead, mostly f r o m smoke inhalation. At least five have b e e n arrested but authorities report that the arson most likely involved u p to 12 criminals. Police are currently investigating the c r i m e to see if it too is related to threats of extortion. If so, it is a frightening example of the m e a s u r e s the cartels will go to in order to ensure that their d e m a n d s are met. Authorities responsible for

school safety were not available to the press for c o m m e n t , but reporters h a d previously been told by R a m o n Almonte, the G u e r r e r o chief of police, that n o teachers had r e p o r t e d any abductions recently. This is the same m a n w h o urged the Mexican g o v e r n m e n t to make it easier for Mexican citizens to p u r c h a s e firearms, presumably for their own safety. Teachers said t h e gove r n m e n t is ignoring the situation a n d their safety as well.

Syrian official steps-down in protest • SY R IA , f r o m page 3 together to call for an end to President Bashar al-Assad's regime. Seven protestors were shot dead by security forces a t t e m p t i n g to dissolve the d e m o n s t r a t i o n s . The U.S. and E.U. responded to the brutality of the Syrian g o v e r n m e n t with e c o n o m i c sanctions over the s u m m e r and have also called for U.N. sanctions. O n Aug. 18, President Barack O b a m a called for Assad to step d o w n in order to pave the way for "a Syria that is democratic, just, and inclusive for all Syrians." This sentim e n t was e c h o e d by the E.U, U.K., Germany, a n d France. Though the government has m a d e minimal concessions such as amnesty for s o m e political prisoners, Assad has remained defiant, maintain-

not fall despite internal strife a n d external pressures from the international community. He continues to assert that Muslim extremist groups and

foreign conspiracies are responsible for the unrest. It remains to be seen if m o r e officials will follow Bakkour's example and defy the regime. uydin

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P H O T O COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATED P R E S S

H A M A A T T O R N E Y G E N E R A L R E S I G N S - In a Sept. 1 s t a t e m e n t In a YouTube video, Adnan Bakkour charged the Syrian government w i t h numerous war crimes.


SEPTEMBER 7 , 2 0 1 1

ARTS

THE ANCHOR

5

Blind Boys of Alabama to lift students up with legendary gospel sounds Andrea DeVrles GUEST WRITER

Looking for a great way to kick off the year? C o m e to D i m n e n t Memorial Chapel on Sept. 10 to witness a performance by fivetime G r a m m y winners Blind Boys of Alabama. After years of working to get the Blind Boys to p e r f o r m at H o p e College, things have finally fallen into place, and H o p e students, staff, along with m e m b e r s of the Holland community will now have the opportunity to experience this renowned gospel group. Formed in 1939 at the Alabama Institute of the Negro Blind, the Blind Boys of Alabama remained exclusively on the black gospel market until

1983 when their role in the Obie Award winning play "The Gospel at Colonus" brought the group to a new level. From there they have earned five G r a m m y awards, p e r f o r m e d with many well-known artists including Prince, Ben Harper, Tom Petty and Peter Gabriel; have been inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame; and they have also appeared on "The Tonight Show," "Late Night with David Letterman," the G r a m m y Awards telecast, "60 Minutes," and on their o w n holiday PBS special. Known for their live performances, this gospel group is expected to put on a riveting performance at H o p e especially in the unique setting of

c o n t e m p o r a r y spiritual material the Dimnent Memorial Chapel. "Having them in the setting to their latest album "Take the High Road" which blends of D i m n e n t Chapel is almost too good," Derek Emerson, country and gospel styles, and features country artists including the director of events and Vince Gill, Willie Nelson and conferences at H o p e said. Emerson expects a large Lee A n n Womack. This concert is the first in a n u m b e r of community m e m b e r s great line-up of p e r f o r m a n c e s as well as students to come coming to H o p e this year. experience this legendary Emerson said we have a lot to group. Even if you aren't a fan of look forward to. "Hope College has no gospel music, the Blind Boys of Alabama may still appeal to you. shortage of events this year or "Students will see one of t h e any year," he said. "In addition to t h e six groups all-time great gospel groups and in the Great Performance Series, likely hear some music they are the student-led concert series not used to hearing," Emerson is also gearing up and will host said. The - Blind Boys offer M a t t Kearney in September. Five something for everyone, f r o m jazz groups are c o m i n g to Hope this year so there is a chance to traditional gospel selections to

hear some outstanding jazz as well." The Blind Boys of Alabama concert begins at 7:30 p.m. on Sept. 10 in the D i m n e n t Memorial Chapel on the H o p e College campus. Ticket prices are $6 for students and children, $13 for senior citizens and $18 for regular admission. Tickets can be purchased at the ticket office in the main lobby of the DeVos Fieldhouse on weekdays between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Don't miss this opportunity to experience t h e gospel group that has spread inspiration internationally and is n o w bringing its incredible talents to our community.

Four summer movies

you might've missed

Elena Rivera

Michael Naughton GUEST WRITER

STAFF WRITER

The greasy p o p c o r n smell, the air conditioning, t h e plush seats are tokens of a movie theater. To escape the heat and perhaps forget about t h e 65-hour Taco Bell workweeks, movie theaters are an oasis in the s u m m e r m o n t h s . And s u m m e r movies are the pinnacle of that oasis, making a weekend with friends even better by quoting favorite lines f r o m the next blockbuster hit. Below are some s u m m e r highlights to make sure to catch on DVD in the fall. 'Bridesmaids' (R, S t a r r i n g K r i s t i n Wiig, Rose Byrne) In a movie p r o d u c ed by Judd Apatow, written by Kristin Wiig (of SNL fame), and starring favorites of television and screen alike, there are a lot of expectations to uphold. "Bridesmaids" does so, and t h e n some. It starts out as a stereotypical chick flick plot: Lillian (Maya Rudolph) is getting married, and entrusts her best friend, the somewhat quirky Annie (Wiig), to be her maid of honor. Annie quickly realizes what an overwhelming task this actually is, and begins to crumble under the pressure of being a bridesmaid as well as struggles in her personal life. Annie is also caught in competition with Lillian's new, incredibly gorgeous, insanely rich friend n a m e d Helen (Rose Byrne), w h o tries to o n e - u p her at every turn. In one of the best scenes in the movie, t h e two try to out-do one another while toasting Lillian and her fiance's engagement, grabbing the mic f r o m each other with frequent hilarity. Annie also meets an adorable Irish cop n a m e d Nathan (Chris O'Dowd), who is completely smitten with her, although she is far f r o m ready to comnjit to an adult relationship. Although it is easy to write this all-female c o m e d y as another badly p r o d u c e d movie destined for the Lifetime channel, Wiig's script is full of raunchy gems expected f r o m Apatow movies like "The 40-Year-01d Virgin" and "Knocked Up." Plenty of b a t h r o o m humor, a storyline with a a air marshal and drunkenness galore combined with a realistic portrayal of the dynamics of female friendship make Bridesmaids'the best comedy of the summer, if not the next couple of years. 'Another Earth' (PG-13, S t a r r i n g Brit M a r l i n g , W i l l i a m M a p o t h e r ) "Another Earth" is a quiet, subtle portrayal of the way people deal with guilt and loss, set in a sci-fi backdrop of the discovery of a second earth that is identical to our own. Rhoda (Marling, a co-writer of the film), a budding physicist fascinated with the cosmos, tragically hits a family with her car the same night the other earth is found. Four years later, she emerges from prison, totally unaware of the discovery of a parallel wprld and determined to make a m e n d s with the family she scarred. She also enters a contest to win a trip to Earth II, dedicated to her d r e a m of seeing t h e universe. It is a movie of possibilities, what ifs hanging around each corner. It is a movie of coping: How does one return to n o r m a l life when everything has changed so drastically? Because of these dichotomies, every action that Rhoda takes is marred with significance and regret. Cleaning, driving, even speaking...all of these things are colored with the life Rhoda could have had, ghosts of a future she can never have. This is one indie film that lives up to its premise, a daring sci-fi brainteaser folded into a masterfully acted drama.

Movies mean a great deal to my family. W e are frequent customers at the Family Video down the block from us and spend many evenings watching movies together. So when my sister acquired a job at a movie theater and got up to three movie tickets for free every time she saw a movie, we were very excited. Situated in the very plush n e w cinema in my town, large reclining seats included, 1 enjoyed two s u m m e r blockbusters that are w o r t h seeing on DVD, if not in theaters. ' H a r r y P o t t e r a n d t h e D e a t h l y H o l l o w s P a r t 2' (PG-13, S t a r r i n g D a n i e l Radcliffe, E m m a W a t s o n , Grint)

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It is i m p o r t a n t to mention that I have a bias: I love Harry Potter. So if you're a fellow fan of the series, you probably have already seen t h e movie. In fact, you've probably seen it more than once and maybe even w o r e a costume to the midnight viewing. Though for anyone else who finds themselves skeptical of the current fantasy franchises, the most recent Harry Potter film is not anything like its vampire cousins. The newest installment to the H P franchise is the best movie of the series. It is action-packed but at the same time it is intimate and thought-provoking. H a r r y Potter and his two best friends, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, must destroy the rest of the Horcruxes to weaken Lord Voldemort and allow Harry t h e chance to deal the final blow. O u r trio travel about Britain, overcoming many challenges including dangerous spells, an albino dragon, and of course, death eaters, eventually bringing them and their friends to the ultimate last battle. The young trio of Radcliffe, Grint and W a t s o n have h o n e d their acting abilities to bring about a m o r e introspective look into their relationships as they are tried by the daunting tasks laid before them. There has been incredible pressure to make this film as epic as the last book. Personally, I felt that the media made more hype than the movie deserved, but it still delivered an enjoyable viewing experience that was befitting to the end of the series. ' X - M e n : First Class' (PG-13, S t a r r i n g J a m e s McAvoy, M i c h a e l F a s s b e n d e r ) The newest installment in the "X-Men" series is a p r e q u d to the previous films, depicting the backstory of the mutant team and a few main characters. Directed by Matthew Vaughn ("Stardust," "KickAss"), starring McAvoy (Charles Xavier), Fassbender (Magneto), and Jennifer Lawrence (Mystique), the movie enlightens the audience as to h o w it all started. Enlisted by the U.S. government, the newly formed team of m u t a n t s must stop the Soviet presence in Cuba from starting World War III, which of course is being master-minded by a malicious mutant. Of all the sequels in the series, this latest movie seems closer in style and production to the first movie. The cast is an interesting mix of well-known stars and previously u n k n o w n actors. The action is entertaining, but there is also a strong emphasis on character development and relationships. This was a s m a r t choice by the writers Singer and Turner, considering that few comic movies have such a rich and diverse cast. Balancing t h e action-driven plot against the character development of s o m e of the m o r e key characters, the movie offers a satisfying viewing, even to those who haven't read the comics. "X-Men: First Class" not only breathes new life into the series, but also into the super hero movie genre as a whole.


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Brand new to Hope this year, is an organization based out of Indianapolis called Building Tomorrow. As a non-profit organization, Building T o m o r r o w partners with over 20 colleges and universities nationwide to raise awareness and f u n d s for the construction of primary schools in sub-Saharan Africa. Sophomore Susan Haigh ('14), decided to bring Building Tomorrow to Hope after going on a mission trip to Kyeitabya, Uganda this summer. After catching a glimpse of what life is like in Uganda, Haigh said, "1 could not walk away from what I had seen and pretend that I had not realized the absolute injustice and most extreme form of

Ballet Club's mission is to spread the love' of ballet throughout Hope's student body. All levels of dancers are welcome to join, even those with no prior experience in ballet. Many times, students who have never danced before will join and as a result, a beginner class has been designed to teach new dancers the basics of ballet. Ballet Club is best known for its annual Christmas p e r f o r m a n c e of "The Nutcracker" which will be held this year

on Dec. 9 and 10. Auditions will be held Sept. 8, at 8 p.m. Those w h o do not audition for "The Nutcracker" but have an interest in ballet are still encouraged to join. According to Ballet Club m e m b e r Stephanie Rankin ('12), "It's a good way to meet new people ... and a way to learn about ballet which is the beginning of all formal dance forms," said Ballet Club M e m b e r Stephanie Rankin ('12). For more information, email balletclub@hope.edu.

inequality I had ever seen before." Haigh said that her initial goals are to inform H o p e College of the work Building Tomorrow is doing to transform the lives of the Ugandans one village communityatatime,byproviding t h e m with primary schools. BuildingTomorrowdoesfocus on providing quality education, but it is truly a holistic approach to the core problems that exist in remote African villages. "By involving oneself in Building Tomorrow, one not only has the chance to reciprocate t h e gift of education that we are so blessed with at H o p e College, but also to provide hope for these villages in many areas involving their basic needs ... I hope and

Have a passion for animals? Club Animalia is a student group open to anyone who loves animals or is interested in working in an animal-related field. Collectively, Club Animalia aims to promote the well-being of animals both on Hope's campus and t hr oughout the Holland community. This is achieved through many different outlets including

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a partnership with Harbor H u m a n e Society; volunteering at places such as John Ball Zoo and the Critter Barn; semester trips to the zoo; and participation in Zoo to You, an outreach program that teaches local elementary school students about animals. Club Animalia meets weekly and participation indifferenteventsisencouraged. For more information, email clubanimalia@hope.edu.


Si n i Mm K 7 , 2011

BORROW student body at Hope earn about Building ind will be inspired :tion," Haigh said. red action isn't much, rs alone is enough 7 bricks for a b r a n d and a donation of ch student would be j n d an entire school. Tomorrow is open vho wants to give a to be a part of the Âť. the planning,and uting of ideas, ; interested in taking towards a large goal. >morrow is holding Saturday, Sept. 24, as auditorium from 1 a.m. Admission

is an optional donation of $3. "Everyone should find a way to get involved with Building Tomorrow because I truly believe that this organization encompasses so m u c h of what we are called to do here on earth. It is a way to be a part of something bigger than yourself Haigh said, "1 think each person was m a d e for a greater purpose than fulfilling their own needs and wants, Everyone has a unique, essential gift to give and when our passions are combined together, beautiful things happen," Haigh said, To make a donation or for more information, visit www.buildingtomorrow. org/chapters/hope or email hope@buildingtomorrow.org.

In addition t o popular act i v i t i e s like Pull, Nykerk & D a n c e Marathon, Hope offers a diverse array of s t u d e n t groups. Visit: www.hope. edu/student/life/groups, h t m l for a c o m p l e t e list of s t u d e n t groups at Hope.

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MUNb According to C o m m o dore Scott Brandonisio (13), sailing is a hobby that you can take with you for the rest of your life. Hope Sailing is a club that meets every week, starting this Friday, until mid-October. N o matter the skill or experience level, Hope Sailing has something in store for you. Beginners can look forward to learning basic sailing skills such as rigging and de-rigging a boat, reading the wind, learning how to race and a variety of different sailing tactics. For those who have a little m o r e familiarity with sailing, Brandonisio says that being part of the sailing team

not only allows t h e m to gain m o r e experience, it helps them develop leadership skills by helping others learn how to sail. Additionally, it is a great opportunity to meet other Hope students who have a passion for sailing. The sailing team holds daily practices M o n d a y - Thursday each week from 3 - 6 p.m. While practices are not mandatory, Brandonisio strongly encourages attending them, especially for those who hope to participate in a regatta (a weekendlong sailing competition). For additional information, contact sailing@hope.edu.

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8

VOICES

THE ANCHOR

SEPTEMBER 7 , 2 0 1 1

His will

Sketch Comedy

Columnist

Caitlin Klask Co Editor-Ln-Chief

e

Taking a lot of classes about media inevitably leads to talking a lot about TV. From f r e s h m a n year in my introductory c o m m u nication classes to my capstone c o m m u n i c a tion theory class this semester, I've h e a r d the ism masses. word "escapism" probably a billion times. Watching the fifth and final season, I don't think I understood escapism until I the 89th out of 110 episodes, I'm startstarted watching sketch comedy. ing to wonder what it was in t h e first place C a r t o o n s over stimulated my childhood that made me so attached. The thing about brain, reality T V was asinine to me in high sketch comedy as a genre is that i t s less of school and I'd rather j u m p off a bridge than an e n t e r t a i n m e n t m e d i u m and m o r e of an watch an hour's w o r t h of M T V or those actual science. Saturated colors combined competition shows. I sort of liked the Food Network, but since I didn't cook, I still didn't with a w a r m laugh track and familiar faces of escape. Sit-coms probably started it for me. I characters almost biologically put a viewer at ease. would essentially stay up until Unlike newer sketch 3 a.m. to watch "The Nanny." comedies like "The Whitest Still laughing after years of Kids You Know", I apprecire-runs, 1 wouldn't say I had I finally found that ate "Kids in t h e Hall" for reached an escapist point. escapism I heard so satirizing subjects without Then, I got into standup much about. coming off as pretentious. comedy, the likes of Demetri It can be dark w i t h o u t being Martin, Mitch Hedberg and inhospitable, and it can be Jim Gaffigan. I c a m e to unfunny without being cruel. derstand my taste for blunt The characters' wittiest jokes are never h u m o r that was s o m e h o w both satirical and u n d e r m i n e d by a sense of entitlement, either. direct. My palette was cleansed; I think I just I don't feel brainwashed when I watch epineeded a catalyst. sodes in a row; I feel cultivated by a smarter Escapism finally c a m e in t h e pilot episode of "The Kids in the Hall" that Netflix (and T V show than most. In a sit-com, an audience comes to know a trustworthy boyfriend) r e c o m m e n d e d to me. I watched it twice, and time went on, a character so well, they sometimes think m o r e highly of George Costanza than they and seasons one and two b e c a m e available to w a t c h instandy. O n e thing led to a n o t h e r do of their o w n friends. That's good and fine, but George Costanza isn't real. - one 4 a.m. b e d t i m e o r skipped reading asWith "Kids in the Hall" and other sketch sjgftOWit led to a n o t h e r - and I had watched comedies, audiences get to know Dave Foley t l ^ n all. via Mr. Heavyfoot or Mark McKinney via Nletflix must have noticed; soon enough, the Headcrusher and Mark and Dave are every episode was at my disposal. There was definitely real. In fact, I just got tickets to the surf rock music theme, there were t h e see Dave Foley do s t a n d u p in Chicago. The epitomic '90s transition scenes and there point is that "Kids in the Hall" seems, to me, were t h o u s a n d s of personalities transmitted a healthier and m o r e realistic obsession than by only five young guys. most. Within a Canadian T V show f r o m two I lost track with my escapism idea, but it decades ago, I finally f o u n d that escapism I'd ties back in at the end: watch "The Kids in heard so much about. Sketch c o m e d y shook

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h a n d s with my brain, and I joined the escap-

My hand quivered as I knelt down. Never in a million years would I have expected to be doing this. I mean . . . you hear stories about it as a kid, even at missionary conferences, but there I was at Linda C o m p o u n d in Lusaka, Zambia, waiting for a miracle. 1 thought back to the previous individuals I had the privilege of praying for that started this whole thing. First it was David, the little boy with a headache who could hardly stand. He was now outside the building screaming in laughter as he played jumping jacks with his friend Nellia, a girl whose stomach h u r t so much she was crying just a few hours ago. People soon c a m e forward with their broken limbs, stomach aches, headaches asking to be healed. Children asked for their parents to stop being alcoholics. A couple asked for their marriage to be healed. A w o m a n brought her daughter who had a t u m o r growing on her face. Lines started forming outside. W h a t I had hoped to be a discipleship meeting for those w h o had recendy accepted Christ as their Savior soon turned into a line of people wanting a "magical prayer." The spirit calmed my overwhelmed heart as I explained that I was not a miracle healer. Similar to our public health work and water purification everything and I mean everything was by the Grace of God. If they were to be healed or helped, it would be through the will of God. With the help of translators egcji jj^rson had a clear u n d e r s t a n d i n g that the Lord would only heal by His will. It was an afternoon of miraculous wonders. People screamed in wonder and ran to get their family. W h a t fascinated me was that even when somebody was not healed, they walked away as happy as the others. And then there was Eneless. The blind 80-year-old w o m a n ambled up to me. She heard me preach earlier that week and now begged me to heal her son. Having lived in the shanty town community all her life, Eneless has experienced i m m e n s e a m o u n t of pain and suffering. N o w living with three grandchildren in a broken d o w n m u d hut, most of her children had left the c o m p o u n d or died from HIV, except for her son Bailan, a worker w h o recendy lost the ability to walk. There were h u n d r e d s upon h u n d r e d s of helpless, vulnerable families like this in Linda. Even with our clinic's meager help, this family was helpless, no food, no clothing, litde support. The survival of this family relied on this man's legs. Ashamed of his state, he sat crouching over his cane. H a n d trembling, I kneeled down on the red clay next to him praying for G o d to heal him. Hours passed as my sweat mixed with my tears. It was hard to accept, but if G o d was going to heal him it would not be that m o m e n t . Disappointed and dejected I trudged back to the clinic. I c r u m b l e d in a corner as I let the waterfall of tears come. It is beyond anyone's understanding in this world, h o w God's will truly works. Jesus himself healed one lame m a n out of the multitude at the Pool of Bethsaida (John 5:3). Did he not care about everyone else? As I took the pulpit o n Sunday, for the fourth time that week, I w o n d e r e d h o w I could preach the message of Christ. Living in a m u d hut for eight weeks with litde power or running water doesn't give me t h e right to preach, why should they listen to me? I m e a n 1 don't have to stay in this c o m p o u n d where one in five are H I V positive, and people drink out of streams. I would

Samuel Tzou

the Hall."

leave. They couldn't. Clearly distraught, I f u m b l e d in my words in my sermon early on. That was until I saw Eneless walking in out of the corner of my eye. She wasn't there to see me; she was there to worship the Lord in his house. A n d this was his s e r m o n . It was his mission trip. It was his work. It was his plan. It was his

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love that she wanted to follow. Christ's love for mankind brought him to earth. It was not nails that held him to this cross; it was his love for you, me, Eneless, Bailan and the rest of mankind. Eneless accepted Jesus Christ as her savior that Sunday. She ac-

Send inquiries or submissions to anchor@hope.edu. You know you want to!

cepted the greatest gift ever given. The faith that Eneless has in Christ's love should drive us to continue to serve the kingdom. It's this same faith that gives me reason to believe perhaps G o d healed Bailan soon after and he's taking care of his mother now. A n d even now, his will be done. Sam spent eight weeks in Zambia this summer doing water purification work. While there he was asked to take on a pastoral role in addition to his public health duties.

ANCHOR Chris Russ Caitlin Klask

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SEPTEMBER 7 , 2 0 1 1

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9

Open-minded people more likely to win lottery

m

These thoughts crowded my mind as 1 considered the year ahead of me. I resigned to the fact that I now had three extra assignments to complete every day, including Sundays. W h y is growing up so hard? "Just start simple and build from there," advised my mother, who has a black belt in cooking. "If you want to eat, you will learn to cook." I nodded, but doubted that

Melody Hughes Copy Editor

it would be that easy. My parents generously f u n d e d a trip to Meijer before they zoomed h o m e w a r d , leaving me alone with the do-it-yourself dining hall, also known as the kitchen. I dodged cooking for a day and a half by attending a friend's birthday dinner and cleverly sequestering leftovers for the next meal. But 1 could not avoid the kitchen indefinitely. As my stomach r u m b l e s could no longer be ignored, I took a deep breath, retrieved a saucepan f r o m the cupboard, and began with the m o s t basic recipe that 1 knew. Here goes nothing. I splashed a dollop of olive oil into t h e pan as it heated o n the burner. I added a pinch of minced onions and the sizzling duo began to smell fantastic. Positioning a tortilla on top of t h e crackling onions, 1 (clumsily) flipped it after a few seconds. In adorning the tortilla

Well not exactly but I recently discovered that having an open mind can result in thrilling self-discoveries. I've got anecdotal proofi Becoming an upperclassman presented me with this classic college dilemma: to continue meal plan or to discontinue meal plan? 1 leaned heavily toward the first option, reassuring myself that I would certainly not have the time or energy to mess around with food prep or grown-up grocery shopping. However, after consulting The Calculator it became clear that tending to my own meals was the savvy choice. So, 1 called business services and cancelled my meal plan for the semester. W i t h one p h o n e call, I had sealed my fate. Panic ensued. I don't even know how to cook rice. Heck, 1 don't have a spatula to my n a m e ... Can I exist on cereal alone?

with a flourish of shredded cheese, I completed My Very First Meal. It was the best dang quesadilla that I have ever consumed. While rinsing the dishes, I realized that I actually enjoyed making (and eating) my own meal. Instead of the loathsome chore I had dreaded, cooking reduced my stress level and put a smile on my face. 1 approached the kitchen with a little swagger in my step at dinnertime. Throughout the weeks' meals, I felt my inner Rachel Ray shine through as I conquered a few novice recipes. To improve the dish-washing scene, I blasted some p u m p up jams f r o m my iPod. 1 will now openly admit that I love to cook. Although I have about four recipes under my belt, I cannot deny this new passion. I misjudged the possibilities of cooking, but now I am looking forward to lunchtime and beyond. W h e r e else can I hit the jackpot if I completely open my mind to new endeavors? Melody has fwt turned on the oven yet, but hopes to conquer that in the near future.

Making illinoise

Classic freshman mistake

Rachel Lundstrom Columnist

Jennifer Hermenet

i

Columnist

First week jitters

A little over a week ago, I sat in a car for just over three hours. Unlike a large portion of Hope's campus, I'm f r o m Illinois. Contrary to popular Michigan belief, the pronunciation is actually Illinoy, not Ulinoise. To me, Holland is slightly different than my h o m e t o w n . There aren't as many big-box stores nearby, and the town c o m m u n i ty is close to the college c o m m u nity. It was quite a long car trip, but it was definitely w o r t h it. After a few days of class, I have met tons of new people. Some f r o m Michigan, s o m e f r o m Illinois, and some f r o m far away states like California, W y o m i n g and N e w York. C a n you imagine flying here f r o m across t h e U.S.? Some of our classmates did. Although it seems like we are mainly Midwesterners around here, the student body represents 43 states. I have learned all about the culture of horseback riding, and w h a t it's like to go to N e w York City and not be a tourist. Each student has his or her own travel story, w h e t h e r it was a super-long car ride with his or her family, a plane ride with a parent or taking the train across the country. Fortunately for me, my classmates extend to even m o r e diverse places. I have met people f r o m Australia, South Korea, Japan, and France. O u r student

1 take my key out, put it in the keyhole, turn it to the left and open t h e door. 1 step inside the cubicle that I now call h o m e and throw my backpack on a chair. 1 then lay on my futon after an exhausting day of five classes, the thoughts of all my quizzes and h o m e w o r k buzzing around in my head. I realize 1 am not a child anymore and I've walked into an educational world nothing like t h e hallways of my old high school. It's Friday. I've officially been here for a week. I've run around c a m p u s trying to find what class is where, messed up the panini maker twice, walked into the wrong classroom asking, is this Spanish?" and received all the giggles and classic freshmen eye rolls that c a m e with each event. Yes, I'm the definition of a "classic freshman". I have no idea what's what. I spent four hours reading one chapter of my history book because I was so stressed about my first quiz, which I didn't even end up having; I got locked out of my d o r m ; I lost my car keys, and so on. But despite all those mishaps, I seem to be doing just fine. This is all something I ' m It's all one massive adjustment. In high school, not used to, but something I I never did h o m e w o r k or studied for quizzes and have to experience. got by just fine. N o w I spend the majority of my weeknights doing only schoolwork. — J E N N I F E R HERMENET My social life gets put on the back b u r n e r and AA classwork takes over. The thoughts of h o m e w o r k , quizzes, and m o r e h o m e w o r k whirl through my head. This is all something I'm not used to, but something I have to experience. It isn't bad though, it isn't bad at all. I love this c a m p u s thus far. W h e n I allotted 20 minutes to walk to class I realized that it only took five to get there. I sat in class 15 minutes earlier than it actually begun, yet another classic f r e s h m a n move. I was walking out of my d o r m earlier and saw a girl I had met on n u m e r o u s occasions, so I proceeded to say hello to her. I was then given a strange look, she was taken back that I had spoken to her like we were friends. She didn't r e m e m b e r that we had already met at least three times. So f r o m there I just looked like a weird girl desperate for companionship. I have to say meeting n e w people hasn't been something I've struggled with. I've met tons of new people in this past week, but if you ask me their names I won't be able to tell you. However, they don't know my n a m e either, all they know is that I'm my older brother s little sister. Every single place I go I hear, "Hey, are you Joe's sister?" Although I hated being known as Joe's sister in high school, I don't mind it as m u c h here. W i t h o u t him, I don t know where I d be right now. I'd probably sit in my dorm staring at the walls every night. My first week here has been a lot of things. It's been overwhelming, exciting, intimidating, fun, stressful and at times embarrassing. Thankfully 1 have my brother to introduce me into what life is like here so I make less classic freshman mistakes, as if that's possible.

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population represents almost 30 foreign countries! While you may be looking forward to studying abroad for a semester, these students have traveled here to the United States for their education. Although they are here trying to learn all about our culture, there is so m u c h we can learn f r o m them. Meeting people f r o m different countries, states or even towns isn't as hard as it may seem. You already have one thing in c o m m o n - you're H o p e students! Find out what their h o m e is like, their favorite home-cooked meal or even which sports are popular in their country. There's so much to learn, and you would be surprised at the similarities that p o p up. Were they involved in cool activities at their high school? W h a t did they do all s u m m e r ? Even though c a m p u s is a few square blocks, the relationships, interests and h o m e t o w n s are so much bigger and richer than space o n c a m p u s allows. So step out! Find a new friend f r o m Illinois (I promise we aren't as bad as our Chicago accents), say "hello" to s o m e o n e here f r o m another country or just learn about another culture through a language class. You'd be surprised h o w this c a m p u s reaches all across the globe!

a n d t y p o g r a p h i c a l e r r o r s . However, if s u c h m i s t a k e s occur, t h i s n e w s p a p e r may c a n c e l its c h a r g e s for t h e p o r t i o n of t h e a d if. in t h e p u b l i s h e r ' s reasona b l e j u d g m e n t . t h e a d h a s b e e n r e n d e r e d v a l u e l e s s by t h e m i s t a k e . A d v e r t i s e m e n t Deadlines: All ad a n d classified r e q u e s t s m u s t be s u b m i t t e d by 5 p . m . M o n d a y , prior t o W e d n e s d a y d i s t r i b u t i o n .

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NEWS

THE ANCHOR

SEPTEMBER 7 , 2 0 1 1

Remaining fall 2011 sports schedules Women's Soccer

Men's Golf Football Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday,

S e p t . 10 - W I S C . L U T H E R A N , 1:30 p.m. Sept. 17 - MILLIKIN, 1 p.m. Sept. 24 - H o p e at Lakeland, Wise., n o o n O c t . 1 - H o p e at A l m a , 1 p.m. O c t . 8 - K A L A M A Z O O , 7 p.m. O c t . 15 - A L B I O N , 2 p.m. ( H o m e c o m i n g ) O c t . 22 - H o p e at Trine, 1 p.m. O c t . 29 - bye Nov. 5 - A D R I A N , 1 p.m. Nov. 12 - H o p e at Olivet, 1 p.m.

Volleyball

lursday, Sept. 8, at Albion (The Medalist G C ) , 1 p.m. iturday, Sept. 10. at Alma (Pine River CC), n o o n Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Olivet (Bedford Valley GC), 1 p.m. ruesday, Sept. 20, at K a l a m a z o o (Milham Park G C ) , 1 p.m. iturday, Sept. 24, at T r i n e (Zollner G C ) , n o o n londay, Sept. 26, H O P E ( W u s k o w h a n PC), 1 p.m. londay, O c t . 3, at Calvin ( W a t e r m a r k CC), 1 p.m. mrsday, O c t . 6, at R P C ( T P C of Mich.), 9 a.m. laturday, O c t . 8, at A d r i a n (Lenawee CC), n o o n

Women's Golf ;Friday & Saturday, Sept. 9-10, at Olivet Invitational (The edalist G C ) , 2 p.m., 9 a.m. ursday, Sept. 15, at T r i n e (Zollner G C ) , 1 p.m. ednesday, Sept. 21, H O P E (Macatawa Legends G C ) , 1 .ITK

Friday, Sept. 9, at Trine, 6:30 p.m. W e d n e s d a y , Sept. 14, at Adrian, 6:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat, Sept. 16-17, at G r e a t Lakes Regional Challenge Tuesday, Sept. 20, at Albion, 7 p.m. Friday, S e p t . 23, S A I N T MARY'S, 7 p.m. (MC) Saturday, Sept. 24, at Kalamazoo, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28, at Calvin, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, O c t . 4, OLIVET, 6:30 p.m. (VBC) Friday, O c t . 7, at A l m a , 6:30 p.m. Saturday, O c t . 8, TRINE, 1 p.m. Friday & Saturday, O c t . 14-15, H O S T M I D W E S T INVI T A T I O N A L , tba (VBC) Tuesday, O c t . 18, A D R I A N , 6:30 p.m. (VBC) Friday, O c t . 21, A L B I O N , 6:30 p.m. (VBC) Saturday, O c t . 22, at Saint Mary's, n o o n Wednesday, O c t . 26, K A L A M A Z O O . 7 p.m. (VBC) Friday, O c t . 28, CALVIN, 6:30 p.m. (MC) Saturday, O c t . 29, at Olivet, 1 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Nov. 4-5, M I A A T o u r n a m e n t , tba

Friday & Saturday, Sept. 23-24, at Bethel Invitational (Blackt h o r n G C ) , 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29, at Albion (The M e d a l i s t G C ) , 1 p.m. Saturday, O c t . 1, at K a l a m a z o o ( M i l h a m Park GC), 1 p.m. Friday & Saturday, O c t . 7-8, M I A A C h a m p i o n s h i p (Bedford Valley G Q . l ).m. & 9 a.m.

Cross Country riday, Sept. 9, at W e s t e r n Michigan Invitational, 4:30 p.m. aturday, Sept. 24, at M I A A J a m b o r e e at Trine, 10:30 a.m. riday, Sept. 30, at Lansing C C Invitational, 5 p.m. Saturday, O c t . 1, at Louisville, Ky. Invitational, 10 a.m. Saturday, O c t . 15, at U W - O s h k o s h Invitational, 11:15 a.m. Saturday, O c t . 29, at M I A A C h a m p i o n s h i p s at A l m a , a.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, at N C A A G r e a t Lakes Regional at Obei in, O h i o , 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 19, at N C A A C h a m p i o n s h i p s at U W - O s h cosh, n o o n

esday, Sept. 7, UNIV. O F CHI., 4 p.m. y, S e p t . 9, A U G U S T A N A , ILL., 5 p.m. esday, Sept. 14, at Kalamazoo, 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17, at Trine, n o o n T u e s d a y , S e p t . 20, at Olivet, 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, A L M A , n o o n Wednesday, Sept. 28, A D R I A N , 7 p.m. Saturday, O c t . 1, A L B I O N , n o o n Tuesday, O c t . 4, at Calvin, 4 p.m. Thursday, O c t . 6, S A I N T MARY'S, 7 p.m. Saturday, O c t . 8, K A L A M A Z O O , n o o n Wednesday, O c t . 12, OLIVET, 7 p.m. Tuesday, O c t . 18, TRINE, 7"p.m. ursday, O c t . 20, at Albion, 4 p.m. aturday, O c t . 22, at Adrian, n o o n ednesday, O c t . 26, at Alma, 4 p.m. aturday, O c t . 29, CALVIN, n o o n uesday, Nov. 1, at Saint Mary's, 3 p.m. ur.-Fri.., Nov. 3-5, M I A A T o u r n a m e n t , tba

:

Men's Soccer

riday, Sept. 9, H o p e at D o m i n i c a n , 4:30 p.m. laturday, Sept. 10, H o p e at Aurora, 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13, at A l m a , 4 p.m. . iday, Sept. 16, M A D O N N A , 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17, W H E A T O N , 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21, at Calvin, 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24, T R I N E , 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27, at Olivet, 4 p.m. Saturday, O c t . 1, at Adrian, 7 p.m. Wednesday, O c t . 5, K A L A M A Z O O , 7 p.m. Saturday, O c t . 8, A L B I O N , 5 p.m. Tuesday, O c t . 11, A L M A , 7 p.m. •aturday, O c t . 15, CALVIN, 7 p.m. Wednesday, O c t . 19, at Trine, 4 p.m. laturday, O c t . 22, OLIVET, 7 p.m. luesday, O c t . 25, A D R I A N , 7 p.m. iturday, O c t . 29, at Kalamazoo, 3 p.m. lesday, Nov. 1, at Albion, 3 p.m. iur-Sat., Nov. 3-5, M I A A T o u r n a m e n t , tba

9/11 Service of Remembrance Sunday A 9/11 C o m m u n i t y Interfaith Service of Remembrance, reflection, a n d P e a c e m a k i n g will b e held Sunday, Sept. 11, at 4 p.m. at t h e H o p e College M a a s Auditorium. The service will include r e m a r k s by spiritual leaders f r o m Christian, Jewish, Islamic, and Baha'i faiths; readings and prayers; m u s i c by adult, children's, a n d bell choirs; and dance. A free-will offering will be taken to cover expenses, with r e m a i n i n g f u n d s d o n a t e d t o H o p e U n i t e d for Justice,

a c c o r d i n g to professor Steven Bouma-Prediger. People interested in walking together to the service will gather at t h e C e n t e n n i a l Park gazebo. River Avenue b e t w e e n 10th and 11th Streets, at 3:30 p.m. The Holland service, s p o n s o r e d by 10 local c h u r c h e s and four organizations, will m a r k t h e d a t e in 2001 w h e n planes w e r e c r a s h e d into t h e W o r l d T r a d e C e n t e r t o w e r s in N e w York City, t h e Pentagon, and rural Pennsylvania with t h e loss of t h o u s a n d s of lives.

Sponsors are the Hope College A. J. M u s t e C o m m i t t e e , Alliance for Cultural and Ethnic H a r m o n y , First Presbyterian, First U n i t e d M e t h o d i s t , Baha'i C o m m u n i t y of Holland, M a p l e Avenue Ministries, Grace Episcopal, Hope Church, Interfaith Congregation, Lakeshore W o m e n for Peace, H o p e College United for Justice, Third R e f o r m e d , Peace Lutheran, a n d St. Francis de Sales, B o u m a Prediger said.

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W e live in an exceptional c o m m u n i t y ; there really is n o place like H o p e . I'm so p r o u d t o be a H o p e s t u d e n t , especially after last weekend's T i m e t o Serve event. This w a s t h e f o u r t h t i m e I've b e e n involved with T i m e t o Serve and each year I've had a great experience. W h a t encouraged me most this year was t h e impressive turnout. After last year's less t h a n stellar a t t e n d a n c e , I had low e x p e c t a t i o n s t h a t s t u d e n t s would h o n o r their c o m m i t m e n t . I was h a p p y t o be p r o v e n w r o n g . First year s t u d e n t s flocked into Phelps to m e e t their u p p e r c l a s s m e n leaders at 8:45 a.m. Saturday.

They s h o w e d u p ready t o give of themselves, t o labor, to sweat, t o serve. I even had two s t u d e n t s in my g r o u p w h o didn't sign u p c o m e o u t t h a t m o r n i n g . A willingness t o serve is a strong m a r k of a H o p e College student. W h e t h e r you k n o w it or not, service is ingrained into o u r c o m m u n a l identity. H u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s participate in T i m e t o Serve, Spring Break I m m e r s i o n trips, a n d local v o l u n t e e r i n g sites like Holland Hospital and F r e e d o m Village. S o m e of t h e m o s t p o p u l a r m a j o r s h e r e at H o p e relate t o serving professions: e d u c a t i o n , n u r s i n g / p r e - m e d , and social work. M a n y o t h e r s plan to use

t h e i r d e g r e e t o serve o t h e r s a n d C h r i s t t h e rest of t h e i r lives. W e a r e a helping people. I w a n t to t h a n k all t h e s t u d e n t s w h o p a r t i c i p a t e d in T u n e t o Serve for giving of themselves and their time. Your participation and c o m m i t m e n t d o n o t go u n n o t i c e d in the community and on campus. I w a n t t o e n c o u r a g e all s t u d e n t s to get o u t and serve s o m e t i m e this year. G e t involved with Volunteer Services o n c a m p u s or find a m i n i s t r y off c a m p u s . I challenge you to serve with passion; we w e r e c r e a t e d to serve our G o d a n d His people. M e n and w o m e n of H o p e , let's m a k e this year exceptional t h r o u g h service. M a r c Tori ('12)


SEPTEMBER 7 , 2 0 1 1

—SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

Football scandals widespread outside Division III Violations less likely in lower divisions without athletic scholarships

11

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS Wednesday Women's Soccer

Sept. 7

vs. Univ. of Chicago. 4 p.m.

James Rogers ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

W h e n s o m e t h i n g or s o m e o n e dear t o y o u r h e a r t e n c o u n t e r s trouble a n d c r u m b l e s resulting from that encounter, you invariably b e c o m e h u r t . Maybe not t o t h e s a m e extent, but there will always b e a p a r t of you t h a t falters after the incident. J o r m a n y p e o p l e today, o n e of those special things they possess a f e r v e n t passion for is a s p o r t s team. Sports m i r r o r life experiences. They are t r a n s c e n d e n t and exciting. They deliver joy, sorrow, and pain. They teach lessons that s o m e o t h e r things simply c a n n o t . Therefore, s p o r t s b e c o m e p a r t of us. W h e n y o u r t e a m loses, you lose t o o and b e c o m e dejected. You w i n a n d b e c o m e spirited w h e n y o u r t e a m wins. W i t h t h e wide and seemingly endless p a i n f u l road amidst scandals t h a t college football is currently riding on, t h e r e are countless fans of t h e g a m e t h a t have been h u r t b e c a u s e their beloved t e a m h a s b e c o m e s w a m p e d by allegations a n d troubles. The g a m e of college football is pervasive. Its popularity and f a n f a r e are at p e a k positions, with b o o m i n g television ratings and p e o p l e of all ages s p o r t i n g attire of their favorite colleges and universities, s c r e a m i n g in b o t h agony and joy d u r i n g each contest. The aforementioned words could p e r s u a d e o n e t o believe t h a t college football is u n s c a t h e d and healthy. However, you w o u l d not be c o n s i d e r e d crazy if you say college football is o n t h e h o r i z o n of disaster. Prominent BCS NCAA Division I t e a m s a r e t h e m a i n subject of t h e matter. T h e y receive t h e m o s t notoriety w h e n they break an N C A A rule, w h e t h e r t h a t rule b e m i n u t e a n d r a t h e r picky, or substantial a n d negatively noteworthy. Nearly every time S p o r t s C e n t e r airs o n ESPN, there is n e w s of s o m e big-time Di^teion I football sqiiad facing allegations for c o m m i t t i n g faults

Friday Women's Soccer vs. Augustana, 5 p.m.

Saturday Football

Sept. 10

vs. Wisconsin Lutheran, 1 : 3 0 p.m.

IN BRIEF FOOTBALL FALLS IN SEASON OPENER

P H O T O COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A C C U S E D — In l a t e May Jim Tressel resigned f r o m his head c o a c h i n g p o s i t i o n a t Ohio S t a t e a f t e r a d m i t t i n g he k n e w of his players' a c t i o n s a g a i n s t NCAA rules.

p r o b l e m s are o c c u r r i n g at t h e Divisipn II a n d Division III levels. To provide f u r t h e r clarity of the o n g o i n g scandals taking place at t h e Division I level, a succinct s u m m a r y of a few schools involved in t h e m e s s would be helpful. The O h i o State Buckeyes were a c c u s e d of receiving cash and t a t t o o s f r o m a local t a t t o o parlor w h o s e o w n e r was t h e head of a federal drug-trafficking case, resulting in five players being s u s p e n d e d a n d t h e resignation of t h e i r f o r m e r well-respected h e a d coach Jim Tressel, w h o a d m i t t e d t h r e e m o n t h s later t h a t h e k n e w a b o u t h i s players' actions. Numerous Miami Hurricane players a c c e p t e d illegal benefits f r o m a b o o s t e r w h o disclosed information that he benefited 72 players in t h e M i a m i system f r o m 2002-2010 with cash, prostitutes, yachts, and plenty more. University of N o r t h Carolina football players also received i m p r o p e r benefits f r o m an agent, along with an athletic department tutor providing over $3,000 in e x p e n s e s and f r e e tutoring. Several o t h e r u n m e n t i o n e d To me, it is sad that the large schools are also a p a r t scandals continue...It is of t h e ongoing mess. College disheartening. football has been traveling d o w n — D E A N KREPS a dark a n d p a i n f u l road. H O P E COLLEGE FOOTBALL T h e accusations t h a t these HEAD C O A C H t e a m s are facing u n d o u b t e d l y affect t h e fans. The Buckeye fan 5 5 that lived a n d b r e a t h e d O h i o State football a n d w a t c h e d each game religiously w a s inevitably against t h e rulebook of t h e hurt when the program NCAA. It is obvious that t h e N C A A is was falling a p a r t a m i d s t t h e m a k i n g t h o r o u g h investigations c o n t r o v e r s y and resignation of into each and every team, but Tressel. It is i n d e e d interesting to h e a r t h e b u z z that Division I receives a b o u t t h e scandals blossoming causes o n e to w o n d e r if these

66

Sept. 9

at t h e Division I level, b u t being a s t u d e n t - a t h l e t e at a Division III school, I was eager t o find w h e t h e r similar p r o b l e m s also o c c u r at this level of t h e N C A A . It is difficult t o believe that only Division I schools face troubles a n d c o m m i t c r i m e s against t h e N C A A rules. W i t h a lack of love for O h i o State, Hope's h e a d football coach D e a n Kreps was still t r o u b l e d w h e n t h e Buckeyes w e r e accused. "To m e , it is sad t h a t t h e scandals continue," Kreps said. "I'm n o t an O h i o State fan, b u t I liked Jim Tressel. I t h o u g h t h e was o n e of t h e good guys' t h a t we had left in coaching at t h e m a j o r college level. It is disheartening." W i t h coaches ultimately being t h e p r i m a r y focus of a p r o g r a m scandal, t h e q u e s t i o n t h a t arises is if it is always t h e coach's responsibility. The players c o m m i t m o s t of t h e faults, b u t t h e coach can i n t e r v e n e and p u t an e n d t o t h e potentially p r o g r a m - b u s t i n g scandal. "I'm not sure t h e coach can c o n t r o l all of this," Kreps said. "If he k n o w s a b o u t it, t h e n that is a n o t h e r issue. I'm not sure h o w w e can e x p e c t a coach to k n o w what his players are doing 24/7." The coach teaches t h e g a m e that is being played, b u t t h e coach also n e e d s to teach o t h e r essential life lessons. "We n e e d to e d u c a t e t h e athletes, c o a c h e s and alumni," Kreps a d d e d . "At s o m e p o i n t we have to t r u s t those involved, until they prove t h a t they can't be trusted." W h e n asked a b o u t scandals o c c u r r i n g at t h e Division III level, Kreps shared his t h o u g h t s o n t h e subject. "1 don't think it h a p p e n s on

t h e s a m e scale in Division III, but there are s o m e questionable things that go on. The big o n e in Division III is t h e leadership a w a r d s t h a t s o m e schools give to athletes as p a r t of t h e i r financial aid. Some p e o p l e say that this is a 'gray' area. I t h i n k it is flat o u t unethical," Kreps said. It is a practice H o p e h a s never

I ' m not sure how we can expect a coach to know what his players are doing 24/7. —

DEAN KREPS

H O P E COLLEGE FOOTBALL HEAD COACH

55 d o n e in t h e past or will do in t h e future, Kreps said. Division III p r o g r a m s have not b e c o m e involved with i m p r o p e r benefits or large-scale m o n e y issues. It would b e c o n s i d e r e d a rare occasion to see n e w s of a Division III p r o g r a m c a u g h t in a rule-breaking m e s s o n ESPN. As Kreps m e n t i o n e d . Division Ill's m o s t c o m m o n questionable activity is t h e providing of extra financial aid d u e t o athletic ability. Because Division III is not p e r m i t t e d to give athletic scholarships, this t y p e of action is against N C A A rules. -Taking in Kreps' w o r d s a n d considering t h e fact t h a t athletic scholarships a r e n o t p e r m i t t e d at t h e Division III level, H o p e should be i m m u n e f r o m t h e c u r r e n t football scandals so widespread in Division 1.

The D u t c h m e n traveled t o Illinois Wesleyan and c a m e u p s h o r t in a 35-0 loss t o t h e Titans. It h a s been seven years since Hope's first s e a s o n - o p e n ing and n o n - l e a g u e win. W i t h H o p e trailing just 7-0 at t h e half, Illinois Wesleyean scored two t o u c h d o w n s in b o t h t h e third and f o u r t h q u a r t e r s . H o p e s o p h o m o r e Michael Atwell c o m p l e t ed 16 of 33 passes for 107 y a r d s in his collegiate d e b u t . N i n e diff e r e n t receivers c a u g h t a pass. T h e D u t c h m e n are h o m e with W i s c o n s i n Lutheran o n Saturday. M E N ' S SOCCER W I N S IN OVERTIME

The Dutchmen notched a 1-0 victory in overtime against Kenyon College on Saturday in Ohio. With two minutes remaining in extra play senior co-captain David Whitaker scored off an assist delivered by sophomore Grant Neil. Goalkeeper Logan Neil ('12) tallied three saves in the win. O n the previous day Hope ended in a l 1 tie with Denison. Andrew Abe ( ' 1 2 ) scored the lone Dutchmen goal in the fisrt half, while Logan Neil had five saves for the game. Hope's first home matchup will be Spet. 16 against Madonna. It will be a part o f the Bergsma Memorial Tournament hosted by the Dutchmen. GOLF TEAMS TAKE F I R M PLACE

The men's golf t e a m took fifth place in the Collins M e m o r i a l T o u r n a m e n t h o s t e d by Olivet o n Saturday. H o p e finished with 612 strokes for the 36-hole course, just 15 behind t h e t e a m c h a m pion. Senior c o - c a p t a i n A n d y T h o m s o n paced the D u t c h m e n with a fifth place finish, s h o o t i n g 76-73-149. The women's team headed to the N C A A Preview T o u r n a m e n t h o s t e d by T r i n e University. The D u t c h c a p t u r e d a fifth place finish in a field of 13 t e a m s . Their 36-hole score of 675 strokes w a s led by senior co-captain Emily Atsma's 85-82—167. The w o m e n ' s t e a m will h o s t an M I A A j a m b o r e e o n Sept. 21, while t h e m e n h o s t a j a m b o r e e o n Sept. 26.


| 2

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

SEPTEMBER 7 , 2 0 1 1

Volleyball aces first tournament of 2011

Dutch take Vanderbilt Invitational

prevail in t h e fifth and decisive f r a m e by t h e score of 15-8. So it was on to the championship match and a date A f t e r losing multiple seniors, with t o u r n a m e n t h o s t M o u n t including A l l - A m e r i c a n m i d d l e U n i o n . The Raiders had already blocker Jacie Fiedler, it was knocked off St. Mary's and reasonable t o w o n d e r w h e t h e r M o u n t St. Joseph in straight sets. the defending MIAA coH o p e claimed t h e t o u r n a m e n t ' s c h a m p i o n H o p e volleyball t e a m title by k n o c k i n g off t h e Raiders w o u l d have trouble adjusting at in straight sets, 30-28, 25-16, t h e start of t h e 2011 c a m p a i g n . Those worries have been p u t to a n d 25-20. G r a s m e y e r was h a d 15 kills rest: last w e e k e n d in Alliance, and picked u p a pair of service Ohio, t h e t e a m didn't miss a aces. Bratschie delivered 29 step. assists and Maier also had eight The Flying D u t c h w o n four m a t c h e s in two days, knocking kills. "The w o m e n played with a off t o u r n a m e n t host M o u n t lot of poise w h e n their b a c k s U n i o n in t h e final g a m e to claim were against t h e wall," head t h e t o u r n e y title. coach Becky S c h m i d t said after The 15th ranked H o p e t e a m the t o u r n a m e n t . "Jessica Maier o p e n e d u p t h e w e e k e n d series s t e p p e d u p in t h e M o u n t U n i o n o n Friday with a m a t c h against match, and Jenna G r a s m e y e r M t St. J o ^ p h . After d r o p p i n g s h o w e d t r e m e n d o u s poise a n d t h e first set 18-25, t h e D u t c h power in her first four collegiate took t h e next t h r e e sets, 25matches. 11, 25-15, a n d 25-21. Jenna "Greer Bratschie c o n t i n u e d G r a s m e y e r ('15), Jessica Maier to r u n an efficient offense ('13), and M a r i S c h o o l m a s t e r despite a d d i n g five n e w hitters, ('14) c o m b i n e d for 27 of t h e and Lindy Melville ( 1 2 ) a d d e d team's 4 3 kills. consistency and intensity f r o m In t h e second m a t c h o n t h e libero position, w h i c h really Friday, t h e D u t c h w e r e paired a n c h o r e d o u r defense. I a m against C a s e W e s t e r n Reserve p r o u d of the way they c o m p e t e d University. Building o n t h e against s o m e very good regional m o m e n t u m gained f r o m t h e teams." M o u n t St. Joseph match, t h e The Flying D u t c h began s q u a d swept C a s e W e s t e r n 26to defend its M I A A co24, 25-20, 25-22. G r a s m e y e r c h a m p i o n s h i p Tuesday against picked u p 19 m o r e kills, while A l m a and will take a trip t o c o - c a p t a i n Greer Bratschie ('13) Angola, Ind. to take o n t h e had 32 assists. T h u n d e r of T r i n e this Friday H o p e ran into s o m e trouble night. After nearly two full against G e n e v a College in the w e e k s of away g a m e s , Hope's first m a t c h Saturday m o r n i n g . next h o m e m a t c h will b e Friday, They w e r e d o w n a set after a 17Sept. 23, against conference foe 25, 25-23, 16-25 early showing, St. Mary's. The m a t c h will begin but c a m e back to t a k e t h e next 7 p.m. in DeVos Fieldhouse. set 25-14, and would ultimately

W i l l DeBoer GUEST WRITER

Men's team finishes second to last year's champion Albion

5 .

The t e a m s r a n o n t h e trails behind Ridge Point C h u r c h , a hilly course that Love said is good p r e p a r a t i o n for the u p c o m i n g season. "Especially this year it s e e m s like we're going t o d o a lot of golf courses w h i c h is nice b e c a u s e t h e f o o t i n g is a little m o r e even," Love said. "On this you w a s t e a lot of energy stabilizing yourself. It's g o o d that we're going t o have m o r e soft and flat surfaces t h r o u g h o u t t h e course of t h e season." After t h e men's race, the

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SPORTS EDITOR

H o p e College's men's and w o m e n ' s cross c o u n t r y t e a m s o p e n e d their season with t h e 45th Vanderbilt Invitational o n Sept. 3. Both t e a m s followed t h e p r e c e d e n t set by last season's squads, with t h e w o m e n claiming t h e Vanderbilt Invitational title for t h e s e c o n d year in a r o w and t h e men's t e a m finishing in s e c o n d place b e h i n d Albion. "It's a nice w a r m - u p m e e t for the season to start," N a t e Love ('12), o n e of t h e c o - c a p t a i n s of t h e men's team, said. T h e invitational began with t h e 8K men's race. Love w o n , crossing t h e finish line in 26:14, t h r e e s e c o n d s ahead of Albion's Deion Pruitt. Ben Zank ('15), Kyle G i b s o n ('12), A n d r e w M c K e a c h i e ('12) and Will H e w i t t ('13) r o u n d e d out t h e t o p five H o p e finishers in fifth, ninth, 10th and 12th places. Albion, Cornerstone and M u s k e g o n C o m m u n i t y College also ran in t h e invitational. Albion, t h e only M I A A school of those c o m p e t i n g aside f r o m H o p e , took the c r o w n . "Typically in t h e M I A A it's Albion, H o p e and Calvin fighting for t h a t o n e two three spot," Love said. "It's g o o d to get a c h a n c e to see t h e m b e f o r e t h e season starts a n d g e t s really into

P H O T O BY BETHANY S T R I P P

MOVING FORWARD—

Sherl M c C o r m a c k ( ' 1 4 ) f i n i s h e d s e c o n d In t h e w o m e n ' s race at t h e V a n d e r b i l t I n v i t a t i o n a l . w o m e n took to the course. Sheri M c C o r m a c k ('14) w a s t h e first H o p e r u n n e r across t h e line, finishing t h e 5K race in second place with a t i m e of 19:04, two seconds behind the winner Lauren Kettle of Albion. M e r e d i t h B u s m a n (14), Kate Nelson ('12), Camille Borst ('14) and Kelly Lufkin ('12) took f o u r t h , fifth, sixth a n d s e v e n t h places t o help H o p e win t h e invitational. Albion, which finished in sixth place in t h e M I A A last season, c a m e in s e c o n d in S a t u r d a y s meet. "Albion is t o u g h this year," Lufkin said. "I w a s surprised. They m u s t have put in a lot of t i m e so I w a s very s u r p r i s e d with h o w they ran. They ran really well. I think in o u r c o n f e r e n c e it'll b e Calvin, us and Albion u p there." T h o u g h t h e w o m e n ' s course varied slightly f r o m t h e men's d u e t o distance differences, the w o m e n still faced hills t h r o u g h o u t t h e race, w h i c h Lufkin said will be useful d o w n t h e road.

" O u r first c o n f e r e n c e m e e t at T r i n e is a really hilly c o u r s e so I t h i n k this is good preparation," Lufkin said. The Vanderbilt Invitational is H o p e cross c o u n t r y ' s only h o m e meet of t h e season. O n Friday t h e t e a m s will c o m p e t e in t h e W e s t e r n Michigan Invitational, their last race b e f o r e t h e M I A A season b e g i n s with a j a m b o r e e m e e t on Sept. 2 4 at T r i n e in Indiana.

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I Could W e Have a Word? (Six, actually.) You already know that donations t o the H o p e Fund support financial aid programs, k e e p Hope's facilities in l o p shape, a n d fuel a w h o l e range of student services, athletics a n d more. Important stuff, right? So, in six w o r d s , t e l l us w h y y o u ' r e g r a t e f u l f o r H o p e F u n d d o n o r s .

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W e may use your words in a future ad...and send you a spiffy prize. C ' m o n , share the love! To submit your six, g o to HopeFund@hoDe.edu.

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09-07-2011  
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