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The Anchor

'S VOLUME X X X V I

P O P E C O L L E G E . HOLLAXD, MICHIGAN,

W c d n m l a y , .I,,,,,, 2 ^ 1926 NUMBER NINETY-TWO

*

CHRISTIAN REFD CHURCH TO AID PAGEANT

*

ALETHEL\N B A N Q U E T On S a t u r d a y evening, May 29, t h e a n n u a l banquet of the Alethean society

w a s held in t h e W o m a n ' s L i t e r a r y C l u b . A f t e r a very delicious dinner, t h e hostesses and guests w e r e In a ( I I O R I S x q SING D l ' T C H PSALMS KOOd mood for t h e Interesting Scotch AS P A R T O P PROGRAM p r o g r a m t h a t w a s to follow. PHuom v 1 i iseilla \ ermeer, a c t i n g as t o a s t , u . a c u n g as toastOne ^ f t h e Christian R e f o r m e d ^ r e s s , introduced t h e s p e a k e r s a s c h u r c h e s of this city Is to assist In the *** " a w t h e m In Imagination, coining

STJT:ZZSZ

ZI TZJT-JT'C

* s

HEAVY SHOWERS DELAY PAGEANT

ADDISON BANQUET

MRS. GILMORE TO BE PAGEANT GUEST OF HONOR

W h i l e the s u m m e r z e p h y r s softly b r o u g h t In the a r o m a of t h e flowers a-nd t h e sun WwaaSs s e t t i n g In rroseate 0Seate M E M O R I A L DAY C R O W D GATH k . a n d E R S E A R L Y j D I S P E R S E D RY T T thelr W a y t0 t h e b a n N E P T U N E ' S BLESSINGS T I T6" ' q * of t h e Holland C o u n t r y Club. ONLY L I V I N G ' M E M B E R O P P I R S T r e s t f u l and yet joyous a t m o s p h e r e HOLLAND COLONY GIVES -Was Many were the anxious gla'nces cast ^ t h e melodious strains INTERESTING INFORMA^ ^ toward h e a v e n f r o m a h a r p TION Momorial

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choral union of t h e C e n t r a l a v e n u e " T r u t h , " Beatrice V a n d e r K a m p to O , c l o c k M o n d a y e v ( ) n | n K X e n eve'ry- W l t h " P T k l t n g wit n ^ V o a p U v ^ n g GUmore T ' b ' " t T 6 " M r S V a n R a a U e Christian R e f o r m e d c h u r c h u n d e r the T h e Bonny H e a t h e r , " Helen Z a n d e r t h l n ( f w a s r e a d y f o r ( h p flrst p r e 8 e n t ^ h u m o r t h e t o a s t e r s e n t e r t a i n e d t h e t h e P n l ^g.Ue8t 0f h 0 n 0 r ^ f L direction,of William B r o u w e r , h a s ex- t o "Hoot Mon," Dorotliy B l e k k l n k to Hon of "the P a g e a n t . Tho . 1 * ' ^ a ^ l e n c e . ' "'j ? . , , m 0 r e ' 8 t h e """f pressed a willingness to s i n g In one P l a d s and P r o f . L a m p e n to " T h e of the scenes In t h e p a g e a n t . H ghlands Tw-o muslca n u m b e r s , a 8010 duoi b

The society consisting of sixty vole. es will simr a D u t c h nmiim in f...... es, u m sinj, a D u t c h psalm in f o u r part harmony without accompaniment

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a s t h e e a r l y p i o n e e r Hollanders did

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nirtin-P This will m a k e realistic a picture t h a t Van Schelven paints when he tells the story of t h e t h r e e government e n g i n e e r s who c a m e to t h e colony to s u r v e y f o r a h a r b o r . A small sailing boat, a c c o r d i n g to Van Hchelven, flrst s t r u c k P o i n t Superior, n o w W a u k a z o o , t h e n c a m e to Anchor in t h e little inlet n e a r Hei'nz Pickling c o m p a n y , t h e n t h e Indian village.

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The g o v e r n m e n t s u r v e y o r s followed a path to t h e colony on a S u n d a y moi'nlng, but no one w a s a t h o m e . However t h e e n g i n e e r s h e a r d s o m e thing t h e y had n e v e r h e a r d before,

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and in which t h e take an Important

are t h r e e good places to e . t ,

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f o r a p o r t on t h e east s h o r e of Lftk© Michigan, a c c o r d i n g to Mr. Van ScheJ0 — ' T H E DORIAN BANQI E T

The E p i s c o p a l c h u r c h p a r l o r s Witnessed a scene of g a l a festivity jast Wednesday night w h e n t h e D o r i a n s celebrated their f i f t h a n n u a l b a n q u e t . Amid melodious s t r a i n s of m u s i c p l a y . cd by " T h e Colonial O r c h e s t r a , " f h e ..

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Mrs Gilmore expressed h e r desire to see w L Sohni e is exn t h ei P a g .e a n t t iwice. ceedinelv i„ , .. •'eedlngly Interested In Its production, a n d

s a v e flrst h a n d I n f o r m a t i o n a s to t h e c o r r e c t n e s s of t h e early scenes to be e n a c t e d In t h e P a g e a n t . T h e story of t h e i r f o u n d i n g of Holland

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MRS. LOCKWOOD IN T H A P P !

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of

a u d i e n c e was , 0r tr e d f o r h l 8 s t e r l i n g qualities, a n d Z T , Z ^ let us praise t h e L o r d f o r t h e r i c h leSSlne H e had won out " ^ bestowed upon our A l m a Mater a Miss Sand,-one S e h u t t of t h o J u n i o r ' " '"stitution founded class was awarded flrst place on he 0 n I , r a y e r a n d faith.

tion w a s keen, and t h e unable t o - ^ ^ e " •— • • clslon of t h o Judges who

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turne(1 ou t to h e a r t h e ,K e " v l'ou^h k ee en n fforesitrht oresieht deliver «««•» deliver t h e i r orations. Those aand nd t h a t We haVe our were present enjoyed a rare* f o r every oration, w a s d l s t l n . l U t i 0 n t 0 d a y ,

girls girls who treat,

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convictions t a u g h t me closely and to

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We a r e looking s e r e n e l y

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PeP a n d vitality as a resuU

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w a r d to th& s t a t e contest n e x t year, successful t e r m u n d e r t h e p r e s e n t h ad a v e a r e p r e s e n t a t l v e . ^ t o be m i n i s t r a t i o n t h e DickensJan b r o t h .

rlticizo less " T e m p e r a n c e Union in Michigan. Thi« P r o u d o t Second place was a w a r d e d e r s filled t h e society h a l l s with s o u n d s Cl C 20 eSb ' organization organization hhaas s been been very very effective effective t ot o MM, 8, 8s s Ag'nes Ag'nes Tysse Tysse ofof t ht hee SSoopphhoommoor ree o of f 1 1I fI ef e a aa s t ht heeyy elected elected officers officers f of or r t ht hee f afn l 1 11 t e rfoi.m m HHvlntr nut tho 1iniio,< in rln«H nn Vion -»» . • .. > Rpy McCullqcn. State S t u d e n t Y. M. iin class on h e r oration " N e w M a n s i o n s . " T h e following w e r e elected: n drivinbr o u t the Uquor trafflo in C, A. Secretary and \isitoi on t h e Michigan a n d in t h e entire nation. Her oration w a s distinguished espe 7 P r e s i d e n t , G e r r i t J . V a n d e r Berg, c I a V i c e p ocaammI p ) Uu8s,, wound up t h e mn eeting Lookwood showed showed tt hh aa tt tt hh ee c i a I^1 yy by by originality originality no ff tt hh oo uu gg hh tt aanndd - r e s i d e n t , B e r t V a n Malsem f fuKAim^ . by . ^OOkwood i ol/o floiiotm 1 V.ll ^ , f\ it ~ /k ft 4 J 1 » ^ ^ » X .. X 1 A .— ^ - %Van T — 1R. a a l tVe .v — calling e {e e eV nb e,1, e t hI ow\ Secretary, Nelson ^ " ^ *» » j i q U o r i n t e r e s t s were eager to win effective presentation of t h a t a visIon grea a ' ^ e n Ul ® a , u ^ the s t u d e n t s to their cause, for t h e n b o u g h t . T h e third place w a s given T r e a s u r e r , E r v i n R. V a n d e r J a g t . p l a c c f o r re& ty e e r m e SP t,le| to K of A.. J o s e p h W H y i n k . ^ r i n t e r e s t s would be safe. T h e M'ss E t h e l Heneveld of t h e F r e s h . |T. ltual c l i m e . ^ ' t e m p e r a n c e socieites, however, h a v e man class on her oratkvn " T h e HighJ a n i t o r (by lot), Myron J . K a s t i e n . Students des r ng to go or \ s g t a u g h t the school children t h e evils w a y s of Life." We a r e sure in t i m e — ii_[i_^^i C o n f e r e n c e this year ai „ rr™ u..o see Cornelius Ten Pas.

,Into r : t:h.e zb a nHqxu e t rh a lil . rT h ez room . rwas ., to~ .

artistically decorated with r a i n b o w colors and t h e tables were prettily

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luggest'ed A f t e r t h e p a g e a n t scene in c h a p e . 0 r a t l 0 n " I t ' « a Crime.." H e r oration. n o COmblned 0 A e 8 t | « ffellows „ „ Tuesday, May 25th. t h e s t u d e n t s w e r e " e r plendld voice and ™ E R S _ D 1 0 K E N S I A N SSOOCCI IEETTYY e U Q W S oouu chhtt t to o 0 t this hl3 tro ^ a y , May 25th. t h e s t u d e n t s wero P'enutu voice and pp ll ee aa aa li nn ^ privileged privileged to to listen listen to to Mrs Mrs M. M. LockLockeS »tage ^ a g e presence, presence, won won ffoorr her her " ' the ftdare8Qea

with ^ c—a m- e WW© were

t h e flrst s u r v e y o r s w h o ever surveyed

ven

cast

choral union will .no d, humo, Boston r e s t a u r a n t a n d part. U k e Geneva." H e showed how g r e a t .

While this h a s n o t h i n g to do tho . . . . _story, , , , vthese ..™ surveyors who to Holland to s u r v e y a h a r b o r

o

began to fall instead, and instead of \ . f R 1 I O P F r s R E P R E S E N T A - b y t h e e a r l y settlers, is very g r i p p i n g , I X K I X S T A T E T h e hl SANTTS" AND SI G I V E T H E I R "Putting it across" the footlights the ORATORICAL « t o r y of t h e e s t a b l i s h i n g olof College ccoonnttaaiinnss m muucchh to to show show V I E W S . Mc C T L L O C H VISITS cast put it across In a rousing pep X T E S T- N E X T Y* Ea-JAR AR .. IHI o p ee College r\ 1 ^ ^ « • .— t 4h V. e great A 6 The long delayed delayed Adelaide contest sacriflces m a d e by t h e e a r r.'oeting and dispersed f o r t h e night. MEETING fina,Iy t o o k I a c l y mitv <""i. P e in t h e college c h a p - ly settlers, who had little of this Rain c h e c k s were given t h e p a t r o n s ,p) ee ll ll aa ss t K r , ( , a AV orld's Bgoods, 0 o o a s b u > ' aafftteerrnnoooonn.. A " T h e Call of G e n e v a " was t h e s u b - who " h had a l r e a d y arrived, a r r i v e d , and e v e nr y' .. t •'Hday Alltthhoouugghh ' b ut t wwhhoo ggaavvee wwhhaat t ho m y o n e n a s j e c t f o r discussion at t h e weekly Y ^ y went h o m e to try It again on ' husy with pageant ^ t h e y could to s t a r t a school of )ract,ce ou m e e t i n g . May 25th. Arnold Van W y k Tuesday n i g h t . » last m i n u t e activities, a ^ « academic higher learn-

woods a m e tMhEe voices WUOUS c UUME VUIUBB of OI and Cilas W i e r s m a , delegates at «V last .«..V . ^ -.J — i i . . — T\. . » i . * • • 11 -U n r IN'IITI < I mi f n o in on! pioneers singing Dutch y e a r ' s C o n f e r e n c e , led t h e m e e t i nign. F

be depicted a t H o p e ' s p a g e a n t of 10

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Wh0

ADELAIDE ORATOR 1CAL CONTEST WON SUBJECT OF "Y" M E E T I N G . . a u i u n . . . a Z Z Z IS IlJ

log cabin, nestled In t h e woods w h e r e • P e a n u t s " gave his r e m a r k s flrst, they f o u n d Dr. Van R a a l t e p r e a c h i n g which included a brief r e s u m e of t h e flock.

]arge

Coquette's H e a r t . R a y m o n d Spoelstra founded the cUy o ^ H ^ The T a t l e r H e n r y G. B o v e n k e r k g a v e to the world H ^ p e

^ a r a c t e r s h a d been been assembled In *rpi,„ 1 ™ ' *t-. H ,- d " - - bJ o h n vDeBelln e Exar Carnegie Hall at 5:16 5:15 o'clock, o'clock w xvh*™ n i n e r . . . . M r . CaiMegie here Examiner....Mr. W Wvynnaanndd Winh*~. Wlchers they faced a battery of g r e a s e p a i n t s ^ and powders which w r o u g h t a g r e a t t r a n s f o r m a t i o n on m a n y faces. P i c tures of various g r o u p s w e r e t a k e n by r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of the press. W h i l e — all were waiting f o r d a r k n e s s to fall BY POLLY S f H I I T T O L H U I 1

s. P i c k i n g t h e i r way t h r u the Marlon De Young played a cornet psalms. Qnln pntltlpd Sonnv O'Mine." O'Mioft. u n d e r b r u s h , they c a m e n.w.r. upon tua t h e liftiik little solo entitled *"Sonny

to his

^

torrents

" " " ^ which had a l r e a d y g a t h e r e d two h o u r s H a r o l d Hessellnk whose Illustrious son . . ^ Edith Mc h o f n i . 0 , , Vocal Solnc essennK wnose illustrious sons a n d d a u g h t e r s befoie the opening procession of t h e ^ «oIos-~ n o w ar ^ r o g v a m . ffreat s p G c t a c l e "In t h e Garden of My H e a r t . " world.

the

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a n d

T h e society w a s ^ a p p y to h a v e with , e m

fall

The

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variety

to

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y g buted to women such .as F r a n c i s WIN Ethel Ilrneveld- n n » rrt. ' " lncl in,.rt „ » r n e v e l o . a s a f e t y - n r s t o r i - ness Tysse, t h e p r o b l e m of m o d e r n P R A T E R S ATTENTION!! laid, vyho ignored flattering o f f e r s tion* '""H^he NAW , , - ^ , , , ' ivew 1 o u n d a t l o n s by Alioo m a t e r i a l i s m . T h e j u d g e s w e r e Miss M les. f r o m colleges and became a devote^ i h r m a n - n .k« i , i n i m a n , a dlscussloin of t h e d r u g evil; Gibson, Miss M. Van Drezer, Miss L. After p a r t a k i n g of a s u m p t u o u s • T h e ninety-second a n n u a l b a n q u e t " T h e Devil's K i c k , " by Clarissa P o ^ . Boyd, Mr. G. V a n d e r B o r g h , and meal t h e large c o m p a n y enjoyed the page 3) ^ L u b b e r a aii ^ peni a n 01.atton b a g e d o n t h e p r o h i b i p r o f Coi_ • „ wM l ' l be held a t t h e W a r m F r i e n d W following " R a i n y Day p r o g r a m : " "e n m v tl«n question; " I t ' s a C r i m e , " hy San- lege f a c u l t y . 1. "I bring f r e s h s h o w e r s f o r the T a v e r n on J u n e 1 Uh, at 0 o ' e j o ^ VW E L C O M E T O SYNOD

ado.'.led with flowers and o t h e r dwlnt-

t h i r s t i n g flowers." H a r r i e t V a n d e r - M. bush.* Toastmistresfl. 'il^'hen clouds a p p e a r 4

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privilege and o^portvin-

" s u r e to ity f o r t h e s t u d e n t s u( M«pe. College 0 " , , , F r a t e r b a n q u e t ever 'held- Be like rocks r e ^ u r n t ^ e ppstcards a t once to t h e t o c o m e i n t o d i r e c t comniunicatloii |

lild towers," E l i z a b e t h Moir. "Vivid l i g h t n i n g s bash f r o m pole "Loud r o a r e d , t h e d r e a d f u l t h u n der," Alice Van H a t t e m . "Lay a little bit a w a y A little for a r a i n y d a y . " Cornelia De Klelne

0.

T h i s | s going to be t h e biggest

F r a t e r s wiH u l ^ 1 ^ I C I U K , , o s t «"veriiii.g body of | rv , , „ , their c l i u r c h . F o r this reason we 1 respond to toasts, fir. J . J.. B^nnlnga, . ^ ! • Heartily welcome you, i n e n i l ^ r s ^ t h e 2 90: Hey. George SUeinlnger, 'IG; Dr. G r m i r a l ^ | Sj.noa or Refori|led

secretary

T h e

fo,lowing

Clarence Holleman, '14; J o h n Albers, '26

Henry C h u r c h \\\ America, to spend a f e w

I

Music will be f u r n i s h e d days in o u r midst, In which we h o p e

s

Fraternal quartet, F r a t e r M«ok '28

by

the

" T h e p a t t e r of t h e s o f t rain over Bernenlber'(be'one head," Quartette. niversary in 1034. " T h e rainbow b r i g h t e n s to t h e set-

ting s u n , " D e n a Netti'nga. Pot o* Gold." Miss Boyd. 8. v The D o r i a n s wvere e r e privileged to have ns t h e i r special guest, Miss iviis« Boyd, o u y u , who In Dorian has t a k e n such aon n intprpflf: Interest in and h e r e n d e a v o r s . Although the progam w a s " R al iinnyy" ,, good gooa fellowship leMU""...,. and f r i e n d s h i p reigned In tthe h e Joyful lovful

twd

by

not

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be

00 16

>' b® " a c q u a i n t e d w i t h m a n y of you 5

hundredth a n . "" '

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1

HOPE COLLEGE 192

better i

Three year Subscription Blank for Subscription to An^

of

> I whole, but tliai y o u r | ^isl^ m a y b e profitable also to you in =

OUP c h l l I , c h

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ANCHOR ASSOCIATION

a s

you will f o r m a closer a c q u a i n t - j ance s tuuddeem n tss aannad with with t thhee 1| . | t | , uus a , l c 0 uwith s a a8 s m institution w h i c h is a child of t h e i h u r c h you r erepresent, present. W welcome = : w ee welcome (c.nurtrii von will d o o**iir h you ann#i n d will u r best to e n t e r t a i n 1 Dorians, ever h a v e s w a y in o u r h e a r t s y O U t ^11 w e ask of you Is t h a t you : a n d m a- y the colors of Hope and Dor- maKo yourselves yourselves aa ti hn oo m m ee with w u n us. us. So s o ^5 ne er fade fioni oour u r memorteB. memories. nmfltiihip and nnri cnniov lan ne'er f a d e from nloy. gtimii h a l , w 0 ,imvn ) a v e an profitable Q h e a r t s of all. The -t—M-a evening v.« closed B «u in a fitting*manner w h e n t h e D o r i a n s a'nd t h e i r guests sang t h e society song, ° Let love, loyalty, and f irli e n d s h i p , sister

X

chor from Oct. 192—-to Oct. 192Amount $3.00.

NameK

Address

|

W I L L I A M M. M . TUTTLE, 1 U 1 I L t , Subscription S u b s c r iPn t i o n Manager. Manacrpr WILLIAM manager. '


THE ANCHOR ^

Subscription

$1.50 P e r Year STAFF

Editor-in-Chief Bruno Bruns Associate E d i t o r s : — J a m e s Ten Brink Arlyne H a a n Department Editors Campus Alumni Sports Humor—

Pearie L e e n h o u t s Agnes TysoO R a y m o n d Smith Cornelius

Declaration of Independence July 4, 1776. It was b r o u g h t to Philadelphia from England in 1752. The bell w a s broken in hanging and so it was necessary to recast it. In 1753 tho words, "Proclaim liberty t h r o u g h o u t all t h e land unto all t h e i n h a b i t a n t s thereof," (Lev. 25:10) were inscribed on It. During t h e British occupation It was sunk In t h e Delaware river. F o r many years t h e Liberty Bell was r u n g a n n u a l l y on t h e 4th of July. On J u l y 8, 1835 while being tolled In m e m o r y of Chief Justice Marshall, it was broken. The bell now rests in t h e hallway of the Old State House In Philadelphia.

Muilenberg, In 1893 It was carried to t h e Paul Hunter Exchange ^Mary Crouch World's Fair. It h a s been exhibited Campusology Lillian Schmid In St. Louis in 1904, In San F r a n Questions .Lawrence Bonst cisco at the P a n a m a - P a c i f i c Exposition and in other cities where E x positions were held and thousands o t Reporters Head Reporter Russell D a m s t r a people came to view t h e emblem of Reporter William B o n n e m a Independence Day. Reporter Reporter

Hester Ossewaarde Lester K u y p e r

Questions SPRING Nature Is bound to express her good WHY feelings in the Spring, by sending t h e warm breezes, beautiful foliage, and

IS

T H E PAGEANT OVER "BIG"?

GOIXG

flowers and sunny days; and youth Is bound to heed her. It w a s Intended t h a t way. Everything is striving upward, new life courses thru every orga'nism. The very soul is refreshed in this season of youth. It should be easy now for the heart to be t r u e ^ - t r u e to the spark of sunshine which enters our very be-

The a'nswer to such a question m u s t In the n a t u r e of the case take t h e form of a prognostication. W e believe however, that we have just and good reasons for prophesying t h a t the p a g eant will be a success.. First of all " t h e P a g e a n t is going over big" because every Senior believes In it and is doi'ng everything

Let us think, then, of this spring as a milestone in our lives. Let us reflect a bit, and then begin anew. Get away f r o m the crowd and think. Ask y o u r , self hard questions. Have I said t h a t unkind word about my class m a t e ? Words break - no

In his power to m a k e it w h a t It ought to be. Second, t h e w o n d e r f u l co-operation of the rest of t h e school is such that t h e Pageant can be nothing other than a success. Last of all, the n a t u r e of the P a g eant itself is hound to m a k e it go over "big."

bones: hearts, though, sometimes. Is the P a g e a n t going over big?" I t Oh! "It were so much b e t t e r if we certainly is. It is s«; it m u s t be so; it could keep this spirit of sunshine; and cannot be otherwise. ' if we have a n y t h i n g good to say—say —Timothy A. Cramer, '26. It •now, and not wait until t h a t h e a r t 0 Is broken. . J „ , A pageant as big a n d as good h a s TT Have I judged wrongly? May we ali # ^ , A never before been staged In western ways r e m e m b e r t h a t there a r e so m a n y MJoiiicrnn ?• i .> ,, ^ Michigan. It is practically a new ext n o r n s f o r every rose. T h e kindlv . * y ... perience for t h e entire s t u d e n t body to t h i n g to do would be to inquire s i n . t a k e part In or witness a similar cerely—for to know all is often to f o r event. We a r e all interested because give all. it,s fv • something so different, so inspirT xi_ Have I the same good conduct at , , ' , Ing; because past years will be turned t h e dance that I have at t h e Sunday . . « j^i . in « . , back so vividly to us. Especially will School p a r t y ? Am I the s a m e a t 11 , ... ^ the older m e m b e r s of this generation P. M. as I am at noon. Of course—I 4 , 4 ^ ^ ^ rejoice to have the h a p p y memories of may have my good times, but "a truly , , , ^ 4. , , . their youth revealed once more. D u e good time Is one that is still a 0good 4 ^ ^ , „ . to the extensive advertising done by A1 time In reflection." . our committee it has become a topic T .. Am I the person my m o t h e r hopes # . , , ^ , of discussion not only in our immedand prays that I may be—am I w h a t . . . , , . late vicinity but also In our n e i g h b o r . my dearest f r i e n d s believe I am, . . .^ J lAl ing towns and cities. A thorough disAfter these private interviews with cussion creates a keener interest. yourself, you'll be a stronger, better, —C. De Klelne, '28. p u r e r man or woman. —oAnd now, since Spring is t h e time of There a r e t h r e e reasons why t h e •new life, of beginnings, may we begin anew with new hope. Lowell says, Pageant is going over "BIG." Firstly, it is going over "BIG" bet h a t not failure, but low aim, is c r i i m So let us set our ideals high, and be- cause everyone t h i n k s it is. Secondly, there is co-operation on gin right now. the

part

of

the

Campus News

Alumni News

Miss R u t h Miller f r o m Kalamazoo' and Miss Isabel Klover f r o m Chicago were on t h e c a m p u s last Wednesday for t h e Dorian Banquet. o Miss Mabelle DuMez, Queen of 1926, h a s been ill with tonsilitis. o Mr. and Mrs. Snyder f r o m Oak P a r k , 111, visited her sister, Helen Guhl and relatives in town this weekend.

Cornelius N. B a k k e r '23 is a g r a d u ate t h i s year of H a r t f o r d s e m i n a r y . He h a s been ordained a t t h e F i r s t Presbyterian c h u r c h a t H a r t f o r d , a n d will serve t h e c h u r c h a t Pocantico Hills on t h e Hudson. Mrs B a k k e r w a s Miss Marian Mersen '23 before h e r marriage.

o It Is rumored t h a t Harriet Va'nder. bush is expecting a visitor f r o m Baldwin, Wis. 0 The Kik, Van Oostenberg, Gowens, Damstra, Peelen, Krai group and friends enjoyed a beach p a r t y last week Wednesday. And Hope, too, took her p a r t in entertaining t h e P. T. A. Some Hope men were heard to say, they wished they could again be "Boy Scouts" and escort some of these gay school m a ' a m s about the city. o Ted Essebaggers traveled to Agnew, Michigan and delivered a g r a d u a t i n g address to the m e m b e r s of t h e eighth grade. He has not informed anyone a s to t h e n a t u r e of t h e speech but reports say t h a t the audience w a s thrilled.

Take heart with the day and begin again." , / — p . L. THE LIBERTY BELL • The Sesqul-Centennial Exhibition, celebrating the date of- t h e nation's birth of freedom, will be held in Philadelphia this year. Scenes f r o m t h e Revolutionary war will be shown in the big pageant that is to bo given there. The flrst Episode of the P a g e a n t sponsored by the Senior class of Hope College presents these s a m e pictures of w a r followed by the Declaration of Independence. The Liberty Bell which held a p r o m i n e n t place In our chapel t h e past week was loaned to us by t h e Sesqui-Centennlal Exposition, for use In our Pagea'.it. It is a replica, paper mache, of the real Liberty Bell which first

r a n g out

t h e adoption

of t h e

are: P r e s i d e n y P e a r l e Leenhouts. Treasurer, "Margaret Boter. Now M e m b o r s Hazel Albers,

.

Priscilla Ver Meer,

M a r t h a Van Buren,

J e r i n e Koning,

Alice L a m m e r s , J u n i a Fulder, Julia Ossewaarde. Stude: " P a r d o n m e for walking bn your feet." Stewed: "Oh, t h a t J all walk on 'em myself.^

f right, .1

College Banquets Engrraving wi<h Steel Die E m b o s s i n g c n Invilalicns & Placecards. Let us t a k e care of y o u r b a n q u e t n e e d s

Steketee-Van Huis Printing Co. The Largest and Most Modern Equipped Print Shop in Kolland 9 E. 10th St. Compiate Printing Service Holland, Nich.

formerly puffeckand strained to pull a 360-ton freight two electric locomotives haul a 66 J tontrJ™JS%We^o

tmin

nn thm spin

Electricity levels the Mountains •

^

1

In Mexico, romantic land cf pretty senoritas and languorous minctrefcy, practical American engineers have harnesced streams so that mountains may be leveled. . The winding thirty-mile Maltrata incline on the road from Vera Crus to Mexico City is now electrified. Ten electric loccmotiveG replace twentythree steam engines. The electrics haul twice the tonnage of the steam Icccmotdves—and in half the time, with obvious benefits to traveler, railreader, and shipper. V

t h r e e reasons a r e enough to a n y t h i n g go over "BIG." WM. Buitendorp, '27.

Silas C. Wiersma, '27.

J

Programs, Invitations and Piacecards for

When twn Mteam locomotivea eP Hope of Malt rata incline,

facu,t

The pageant will be a success because the s t u d e n t s a r e p u t t i n g t h e m . selves whole-heartedly Into it. The fac u l t y is backing t h e m and accommodating the students in every way Possible,-—the H O P E S P I R I T is in it. Moreover, t h e advertising committee has spread t h e news all over this p a r t of Michigan and t h e c h u r c h e s know and are talking about it. The n e w s . papers are pushing It. And who h a s ever seen conditions like these a'nd seen the H O P E S P I R I T fail? To help along t h e Synod members a r e all trying to get in t h e reserved scctlon for Friday night. The only t h i n g s t h a t are uncertain, a r e the w e a t h e r a'nd w h e t h e r we can accomodate t h e 10,000 who want to |t

A. D. I>. The Athletic Debt Diggers held their a n n u a l elections at t h e Green Mill last Wednesday noon. The results

i

These m a k e

T h e Rev. J o h n R. Mulder of B e t h any R e f o r m e d church, Chicago, tvill conduct t h e m o r n i n g worship h o u r f r o m W L S Chicago f r o m May 24 to May 29. Mr. Mulder is a Hope alum'nus and a f o r m e r professor of Bible a n d Philosophy at Central college. 0 F r i e n d s will be grieved to h e a r of the death of Willard Vander Meer *16, at Detroit, f r o m an a t t a c k of p n e u monia. Mr. Vander Meer was a t e a c h -

until last year.

JL

Susan Coolidge says: "Today is ours y w i t h the s t u d e n t bo and today alone." d y . which is so essential in an " E v e r y day is a fresh beginning. enterprise of this nature. Listen my soul to the glad r e f r a i n . Thirdly, t h e r e Is a great a m o u n t of enthusIa8m a And while old sorrow and older n d a spirit of sacrifice sinning displayed by all. And puzzles forecasted a n d possible gain, •

er at E a s t High school, Detroit, at the time of his d e a t h last Monday. He leaves a wife a n d t h r e e children. His sister, H a r r i e t w a s a s t u d e n t at Hope

The General Electric Company required but eighteen months to electrify Maltrata incline—locomotives, power plant, transmission equipment complete. Engineering skill, backed by vast manufacturing facilities, has enabled G-E to serve humanity in many ways. A series of G-E advertisements showing what electricity is doing in .many fields will be sent on request. Ask for booklet GEK-1;

t

Yet Maltrata is but an example of electrical progress. For •electricity is conquering the grades cf railroads and cf industry alike, the world over.

4

Impressive, no doubt, but still modest when compared with the possibilities of electricity in years to come. And it remains for collegetrained men, with trained capacity for initiative and leadership, to become ambassadors for further electrical conquests in foreign lands.

1

GENERAL ELECTRIC O I N B R A L

E L E C T R I C

C O M P A N Y ,

8 C H B N B C T A D 7 7

NEW

YOR

I

V


— — —

THE ANOHOB iini.^j

CONSULT US ABOUT YOUR EYE SIGHT A N D FOR

'

PERFECT FITTING GLASSES Clall on

Stevenson's OPTOMETRIST [Optical Specialist]

24 E. 8th Sr.

"THE TASK IN JAPAN" The following review of a newbook, The Task in J a p a n , " conies to us BUSY CONFERENCE with t h e best wishes of t h e Hope 1 Alumni Association in J a p a n : m m MANY ACTIVITIES A R E PLANNED The Hopeltes In J a p a n once more 1 FOR SESSIONS TO B E HELD wish to call the attention of the S t u - F

Fellows: Get y o u r S t r a w H a t at R u t g e r s , w h e r e you find the newest in P a n a m a s and Sailors.

" Many events a r e listed on t h e p r o . g r a m f o r the cen eral synod of the R e f o r m e d Church in America, which convenest in Holland, J u n e 3. . These Include a college d i n n e r to

dents and a l u m n i of Hope to anothei book d e a l i n ^ w i t h the present missionary activities in J a p a n . This book deals with t h e situation as we find it today In J a p a n , and It is especially written for students, Chris.

the delegates in Carnegie ha-ll F r i day evening. J u n e 4. a boat ride on .Lake Michigan t h r o u g h .the c o u r t , esy of the Holland c h a m b e r of c o m m e r c e the next a f t e r n o o n and t h e pageant of 1926 t h e evening of

tian workers, and all those who a r e ,®,l,,,IIIIIIID,,,,,l,,IIIIDII,ll,l,IIIIDIII,,,,l,l,IDIIIIIIIIIIIIDIIIIIIIIIIIIOIIIIIIIIIIIIOIIIIIIIIIIIiailllllllllllOllllllllllliailllllHIIIIBIIIIIIIIIIIIOIIIIIIIIlL deeply interested in tho^great task of 0 " Q m a k i n g disciples of all nations, with ! special emphasis given to J a p a n . : ^1 • • m mmm ** The a u t h o r of this new book to which we call attention has for many

g 1

J. J. RUTGERS CO.

| | I

19 West 8 t h S t .

Look over o u r S u i t s for Graduation

Spring Suits and Top Coats

Holland

^une years been professor of Comparative : Sunday, Ju'ne 6, t h e usual sacra- Religions In one of tho schools which 0 iMItlltl tUMMIIMIIIIINMIUIIIimilHIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI •niQ mental service will be held In First Is co-operatively conducted by our R e f o r m e d church, at which the new own Reformed church and t h e Prespresldent will preach t h e sermon. At byterlan. The a u t h o r Is known as a 3 o'clock a service f o r t h e synod will scholar and student, and his books a r e Get Y o u r E a t s be held a t Pine Lodge, t h e new as- thot provoking. at sembly g r o u n d s on Black Lake. In this new book I have personally Young People t o Moot found a fresh a'nd Interesting discus. s on At 6:30 a young peoples' contere'.ice ^ l>0th the religions of J a p a n , 14 East 8 t h S t . will be held In Wlnant's chapel in l n d o f t h e difficult t a s k t h e Mlsslonarc h a r g e of Rev. A. Duryea, educational i e a a n ( 1 Christians have before t h e m secretary of the board of* e d u c a t i o n . ' 1 " t h e l a n d o f t h e Rising Sun. 1 This will be a union meeting and d e . highly recommend this book to DU MEZ BROS. talis a r e being a r r a n g e d by He'nry Ny- those Hopeltes who feel t h e call of Dry Goods, Coats, Suits and boer, president of the Holland Union. Japa'n. In this hook you will be brot Millinery Sunday evening a union service will f a c e t o ' a c e w , t h those f e a t u r e s t h a t HOLLAND, • • MICH be held In Carnegie a u d i t o r i u m . Rev. w i l 1 m a k e or break your lives as workM. J . Hoffman, professor of church e r 8 I n J a p a n , as in •no o t h e r field of history at New Bru'nswlck seminary mission activity today. T h e l)0ok also h a s will be the speaker and Rev. W. Banm a n y valuable croft Hill, retiring president of the suggestions for candidates to a'ny synod, will preside. It Is expected all mission land in the F a r East. The local R e f o r m e d c h u r c h e s will dispense o l e ' r , r cut Ideas the a u t h o r m a k e s TKY with their evening service and join a l ) 0 U t Shinto, Buddhism and C o n f u c . THE WHITE CROSS ; In the u'nion service. ianlsm a r e groat helps to MlssionarThree experienced Barbers. les w h o w i s h to To H e a r MlsslonaiieH scive t h e F a r E a s t Hair bobbing a specialty. New missionaries pla'nnlng to go to peoples. * foreign Yours for H O P ^ , W fields will attend " * —a meeting on Vi, .iiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiieiiiiiiiniiiiiei m __ . 0. J O H N T E R BORG. Monday evening in the First Reformed church and each will be called to the platform for a word to the audience. S E N I O R ACTIVITIES F O R An informal receptlo»n will be given T H E ENSUING Y E A R the delegates and guests of synod. • * The cornerstone f o r Hope college's H e r m i n a R e i n h a r t will attend •The

STUDENTS

Nolenaar&DeGoede

. I

$25.00 $30.00 $35.00

: = I I |

P - S . B O T E R

O*"

*

Colonial

=

QTATT D

T

A

* •" I • A #

KRO-FLITE Seconds.

"

land in extending a welcome to t h e P a r e n t - T e a c h e r s Association conventio'n held on May 26, 27, 28. Carnegie Hall was used for t h e main sessions, while the chapel was also used f o r sectional conferences. Consequently,

Van T o n m n ' s I r

A(vjioN wioe €% INSTITUTION' I ii i ^ n n e y v o W ' V X D E DEPARTMENT PAI STORES

Tfpn i«

JLp

Fancy

silk

and

mer-

cerized mixed h o s e ; un•

s

usually

|

Rood q u a l i t y .

attractive

and

P l a i d s ,

fancies and

5V'l , '<'un c o l o r s .

Big values.

\-*r

E

Q

V

mond, president of the association Lowell. Clarence Lokker, president of the loStanley

= t u r e s of the conference is the boat ride 5 that w a s held on T h u r s d a y afternoon. i Many noted s p e a k e r s were secured • for the occasion and a large variety = of subjects was treated. Dr. Theodore | Soares of Chicago was t h e chief speakg or Wednesday evening, while William McAndrew. Supt. of Chicago schools, = delivered the main a d d r e s s Thursday • evening.

English P a n t s For Young Men In pearl grey and cream c o l o r s ; cut lull through ^ e a t ; e x t r a belt l o o p s ; cuff b o t t o m s ; e x t r a good q u a l i t y ; very stylish and r e m a r k a b l e values—due to our large buying p o w e r . Moderately priced a t —

GLAD TO SEE YOU

I)arta' Dorothy Vander Kolk. Mathematics t h e Ro c k f o r d High school. Edi t h Ban'ninga. English and Latin Central Lake, Michigan. Leona * Slthes, • History, W h e l a n

HOLLAND PHOTO SHOP 10 East 8th St.

English

f (

a'nd Latin,

D, J. DuSAAR

/ OR Distinctive Stationery, Unique Pro<fi grams and Menus, or Fine Papers, the / Holland Printing Co. can serve you best. Holland's F i n e s t P r i n t e r s

Albers,

Debating

. 210 College Avenue

and

• ' " " i o n . Mr. J A. Johnson, c h a i r m a n Drama, Union High school. Grand S Of t h e transportation committee and R a P i d s . | Mr. E. E. Fell, president of the state Theodore Vanden Brink. History E teachers' association One of t h e f e a . a n ( 1 Athletics, Lee High school. Grand =

49c »

Your h o m e for K o d a k F i n i s h i n g , Framing a n d Gifts

ca

| Men's Hosiery | For Summer

MAKE OUR PLACE

ln s

Some of the leading personages of School. the convention a r e Mrs. Fred M. RayAnna Tysse,

llllllllDllllimilliaiimillllllDlilllllllinaillllini

a

ln

in Ottawa County

with approximately 1,000 delegates a t . H l g : h s c h 0 0 1 tending the c a m p u s was alive for a Carol Van Hartesveldt. English and few days with this added life. F ren c h in t h e Cooperavllle High

Leading Sport Shop

•<

in

= «[SJ

The Oldest and Largest State Bank

Mabelle Du Mez. F r e n c h a^id E n g llsh

Shop

The Students' Banking Home

music at Taylor College. The following have accepted teach-

Hope College joined in with H o i .

Sweet

5

The First State Bank

in Scottvllle, Michigan.

50c. each

Q

0«TM

MEETING HELD ' T T ' r L , ,

I

. m •iiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMMiMiiN0 p

T h e best fancy S u n d a e s in t o w n . Light L u n c h e s . Special Candies. 8 East 8th St. Across from Warm Friend Tavern

new $225,000 chapel will not be laid Biblical Seminary" In New York City, while t h e synbd Is In "session because ' J c a n n e t t e Veldman will t a k e up a unavoidable delays In the plans for the Nurses' Training Course in P r e s b y t e r •new building. ten Hospital, Chicago. Lillian Scott will t a k e a course in 0

39c. each, $4. per dozen

& C O .

Don't forget, we sell Shoes

jj

GOLF BALLS S p a l d i n g Thirty

at the prices t h a t you like

FOR YOUR NEXT HAIR CUT OR SHAVE

a.

STRAWS! STRAWS! STRAWS!

g E E ^ 9 E S g $2.98 lo $5.90 • S iiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiipiMiiiiiiiiiDiiiimimiDiimnii

a

"Say it with Flowers"

ld3

R P « Adrian Zwemer, Science, Lowell, Charles Veldhuis. Principal of Coopersvllle High school. Henry Nyboer. History and Mathematlcs. F r e m o n t . • Everett De WUt, Principal of Chrls- W I tia n High school, Holland Anne Meengs, History and Latin, Rockford, Mich. Edythe Klerk, History, Byron Cen—otCi'. (Continued f r o m P a g e 1) Alo'nzo Wlerenga, Mathematics, worker for prohibition. Thru their South Haven. Timothy K r a m e r ( ? ) Annvllle, Ky. tireless effort prohibition, an Ideal t o looked for In 1915, h a s been realA CORRECTION ized In 1920. : • . An e r r o r was m a d e last week In reThe fact t h a t prohibition does not or as yet completely prohibit, can n o t - P t l n g on t h e dedication of the Mllebe denied. The speaker especially u r g . stone of 1926. Instead of being dedled t h e students of today to fight this cated to " t h e sons and d a u g h t e r s of foe until Its very end. Hope wherever they aro" It is dedlcat. A f t e r t h e address Dr. Nykerk as- ed to the sons and d a u g h t e r s of Hope sured t h e speaker t h a t Hope had al- who have left their native land and ways been In s y m p a t h y with those have crossed the seas and gone Into fighting alcohol and would always the missionary service. N continue to support those who are ———o battling for a clean and sober AmerLeon: "What Is your favorite tea?" lea. Ruth: "Settee.*

:

:

The Shady Lawn Florists Your College Florist J O H N B. VAN D E R P L O E G '22, Mgr.

"Our Business is Growing" i

••••••••#

Wagher & Bosch, Expert Barbers H AI R C U T 40 C E N T S S H A V E 20 C E N T S W e e k D a y s 8 a.m to 8 p m. — S a t u r d a y s 8 a m. t o 10 p.m. 74 E . E i g h t h S t .

Holland. Michigan

Get Extra Credits at Home— More than 450 courses in History, English, Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modem Languages, Economics, Philosophy, Sociology, etc., are given by correspondence. Learn how the credit they yield may be applied on your college program. Catalog describing courses fully, furnished on request. Write today.

tHnfticrsiitp of C b i t f g o 95 ELMS HALL

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

I .•>. •

<


t

THE ANCHOR

FINE PIANOS

Humor

- A N D A f t e r w o r k i n g all a f t e r n o o n on the p a g e a n t b l e a c h e r s w e would like to say t h a t t h e m a n w h o can invent a combination sand-hardener, woods o f t e n e r , periscope, a n d o p e r a glass will be able to r e a p a f o r t u n e . W e would even buy one ourselves provided t h a t a perfectly good f o r d shoe with only on blow out In it could be t a k e n In t r a d e .

Victor and Brunswick Records —at the—

MEYER MUSIC HOUSE 17 W. 8ih St. Pianos end Viclrolas rented at reasonable prices.

Quality Shoe Repairing—That's

Grreen Mill Cafe After you ride or walk stop at the G r e e n Mill for r e f r e s h m e n t s .

CLEANLINESS, SERVICE, QUALITY

Our Business May: " I s he Inclined to stoop to the vulgar?"

"Dick" the Shoe Doctor ELEC. SHOE HOSPITAL D. Schiftenur, Prop.

Green Mill Cafe

K a y : "No, It Is way above h i m . "

WE CALL AND DELIVER

Phone 5328

13 E. 8lh St.

Proprietor

/ H u g h e s : "SI f a i n t e d u p a t t h e Hall last night and we t h o u g h t he w a s going to die."

Ready Dislies, Hot & Cold for Busy Patrons

The

IJHIIe: "Well, did h o kick t h e b u c k .

Laughlin's Restaurant

>

.

Hughes: p.ile."

72 East Eighth St. "A Real Good Place to Eat."

i

"No,

lit

turned

a

little

College Inn

L u n c h e s put up. ^

YOUR WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIR WORK Get Prompt Attention at

PETER A, SELLES, Jeweler 14 East 8th St.

The p r o f e s s o r hat: asked t i m e and aga n f o r t h e s t u d e n t s to put m o r e personnl touch In I heir thi-mrs, so one of t i c p a p e r s which r e received ended t h u s : 'Well p r . f . h e w an- t h e wife a n d U-ddles; and by t'.ie way, b e f o r e I f o r g e t it, could you lend me five dollars?"

•'STUDENTS' FOREMOST EATING PLACE" F r e s h H o m e m a d e P i e s for h o u s e p a r t u s . L u n c h e s put u p and d e l i v e r e d . College C a t e r . C. E. P A T T E R S O N , P r o p .

First pedestrian: n e a r l y got y o u . "

Seniors! See Nick Dyk(ina f o r your g r a d u a t i o n Suits. Years of satisfactory s e i v i t e n c t i r n u r d for fine tailoring, pressing and repairing.

"Gosh, t h a t taxi

Corner College Avenue and Tenth Street

2nd d i t t o : : " I AHCW it w o u l d n ' t hit me."

me

First: "How's t h a t ? "

Over KEEPER'S RESTAURANT.

Second: " I t was yellow."

o

r-

D t Bey: " W h y hid you join t h e Salvation A r m y ? "

Arctic Frosl Bites

Malted Milks ISc. We have Candy in Boxes and Bulk. Also big line of Bars.

S t u a r t : "So I could play my cornet i.-i public."

5 CENTS

Visitor: " W h a t is t h a t historic lookIng d w e l l i n g ? "

WHEN YOU WANT THE FINEST IN

Native of P a s m i c : " T h a t !s tho h o u s e at w^ilch W a s h i n g t o n would have stopped if he h a d c o m e down this s t r e e t . "

Ice Creani) Candies, Fruits and Nuts,come to

Cola s Students Drug Store

—oProposed sign in Voorhees TIall:

A. PATSY FABIANO 2 6 W e s t E i g h t h S t r e e t ^

i

SUCCESSOR T O LINDEBORG'S 5 4 E. 8 t h S t .

ELENBAAS & FORTNEY

"In case of fire run, do not walk to Hie n e a r e s t h y d r m t . "

T h e p r e m i e r b a r b e r s of H o l l a n d .

L. L.

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In t h e r e a r , a t

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Connie: "I used to t h i n k R u t h : " W h a t m a d e you stop?*

Straw Hats

o '26: " I See they a r e giving t h e tenn i s t e a m gold r a c k e t s this y e a r . "

S t r a w Hat season is h e r e . W e a r e r e a d y with a good s u p p l y of good s n a p p y styles -1

'27: " W h a t a r e swimming team

8 t h St. -V •

Special Chicken Dinner Every Day

KEEPERS

65 West Slh St.

Holland, Mich.

E g g : "So h a v e 1; t h e y were longer." -oP r o f . : Your p n e u m a t i c c o n t r i v a n c e ^ h a s ceased to f u n c t i o n . Motorist: " W h a t ? "

OWN THE WATCH WE HAVE IT.

Geo. H. Huizenga & Co. JEWELERS

Opp. Warm Friend Tavern

Special pi ice until the end of the school y e a r .

The Lacey Studio

HOPE SPECIAL /

Prof.: T h e cylindrical a p p a r a t u s which s u p p o r t s y o u r vehicle Is no longer Inflated. Motorist: B u t —

Haan Bros. Drug Store

P r o f . : T h e elastic f a b r i c s u r r o u n d ing t h e c i r c u l a r f r a m e whose successive revolutions bear you o n w a r d In space h a s not r e t a i n e d Its p r i s t i n e ® roundness. Motorist: W o u l d y o i k i n d l v — iiiiiii0 Small B o y Het f n\l3 f er y o u ' v 1 " f t

Seniors! Graduation Pictures

BITES

• I I I I N I I I I t l l l l l l l l l l I I I I I I M I I I I I I I H I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I [TJ

P r o f . " I say, your tubula** Mr cont a i n e r h a s lost its r o t u n d i t y . Motorist: "I d o n j | quite—

You h a v e a l w a y s wanted.

Phone 2212

FROST

Home Baked Pies A S p e c i a l t y

2 3 W ? E i g h t h St.

*| :

CREAM OF UNIFORM QUALITY

Clarence Howard: "Joseph, because P h a r o a h m a d e a ruler out of him." W h a t W o T h i n k of Outside R e a d i n g Ham: "Well, I've read worse • books—

RESTAURANT

Home Cooking

Hoekstra's Ice Cream

— M i d d l e b u r y Blue Baboon. Dr. P i e t e r s : " W h o w a s the s t r a l g h t est m a n of Bible t i m e s ? "

. V1SSER & BAREMAN Phone 5445

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BULK

t h e y giving t h e goldfish ?"

—and—

EAST END DRUG STORE iiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiHiiiMimii,iimi,nun,,,,

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a flat tire! --0-

Jack Blue

W e h a v e o f t e n wondered w h y a lot m o r e fellows don't pool t h e i r money and buy a F o r d . T h e y could f o r m a c o m p a n y and call It "Lizzie, I n c o r . " On second t h o u g h t , j u d g i n g f r o m t h e c a r s a r o u n d t h e c a m p u s they m u s t be a f r a i d t h a t It would t u r n Into "Lizzie and Corpse."/ A w a r t Is y o u r ^est frien-3 OP. hand.

Students

For Real Malted Milks —See— J

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V " V

PROGRAM THE P A G E A N T OF 1 9 2 6 PRESENTED BY

THE STUDENT BODY OF HOPE COLLEGE OCCASION OF

ON THE

The Sixtieth Anniversary of the Founding of Hope College SPONSORED BY T H g C L A S S O F 1926

M A Y 31

JUNE 2 ON

HOPE

COLLEGE

JUNE 5 CAMPUS

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

8 : 3 0 O'CLOCK

EPISODE 1

P R O G R A M PI

SCENE 1

K

A peaceful night in the New England country. coal black steed rides furiously past. Paul Revere

OFFICERS O F T H E PAGEANT

Frederick H. Olert.. Director of the Pageant Lois G. Brockmeier. Author of the Book of Words J. L. Kollen .Composer and Director of Music Comeliua A. Hospers. ...Manager of Properties Paul Gebhard Business Manager Margaret M. Anderson, Carol Van Hartesveldt. Mistresses of Robes i'ranklin J• BhllllttlWP— — J r . . . M«uah. KaiUr of Coatames Ivan A. Bosnian : Mechanician George V. Steketee Stage Manager Henry Nyboer. Superintendent of Grounds Alvin J . Neevel and Peter Wesselink Publicity Agents Marion Pennings and Chester L. Yntema... Ticket Agents Hope College Orchestra, under the direction of J. L. Kollen, will furnish the music. Microphones and amplifyers installed and operated by the Western Electric Company of Chicago. Lights will be used to designate the ends of scenes and episodes.

PROLOGUE Directed by F. H. Olert. /

As the orchestra plays, there appears a long royal procession among whom are trumpeters; Father Time; Queen Nineteen Hundred Twenty-six; the three maids-of-honor, the Anniversaries of Seventeen Hundred Seventy-six, Eighteen Hundred Forty-six, and Eighteen Hundred Sixty-six, respectively; and the many Memories. Chief Trumpeter Richard Mallery Trumpeters,.. Edwin De Jong, Harry De Vries, John Ver Beek Father Time... Randal Bosch Queen 1926.. Mabelle Du Mez Maid of 1776 1 — W i l h e l m i n a Bos Maid of 1846 Gladys Kleinheksel Maid of 1866 Marthena Bayles Memories with fitting ceremony summon famous characters of 1776. MEMORIES—Hazel Albers, Marie De Cook, Wilhelmina Sprick, Evelyn Van Eenam, Alice Piasman, Henrietta Beyers, Gladys Moeke, Mabel Moeke, Anne Barkema, Edith Weaver, Sandrene Schutt, Marian Laepple, Joyce Klaasen, Margaret Boter, Roy Natress, Peter Scholten, Marion Pennings, Adrian Zwemer, Oscar Holkeboer, John Soeter, Peter Van Es, Paul Van Ess.

Paul Revere on a Harold De Vries

SCENE 2 A dim morning in the New England country. ble with their rude arms.

Minute-Men assem-

MINUTE-MEN—Timothy Cramer, Henry Bos, Russel Buitendorp, JPverett De Witt, Jacob Geerlings, Russel Nykamp, Albert Schaafsma, Bernard Shoemaker, Anthony SmtE^TElijE Weier, ArnolcTVan "Wyk," Aaron Ungersma, Gerrit Bevelander, John De Bell, Gerrit Kemme. SCENE 3 A heavy ambush of trees near Lexington. The company of MinuteMen arrives and is ordered back of ooncealment. The Red Coats, coming from the opposite direction, are surprised by the Minute-Men and flee in terror. RED COATS—Charles Veldhuis, Henry Bovenkirk, Carl Bovenkirk, William Maat, William Bonnema, Henry Burggraaff, Gerhardt Dekker, Egbert Fell, Russell Damstra, William Peelen, Matthew Peelen, Cornelius Muilenburg, Bruno Bruns, Philip Engel.

THE PAGEANT OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX Pageant directed and staged by F. H. Olert, assisted by Student Organizers Charles Veldhuis, Jeannette Veldman, Dwight Yntema.

LOCAL TIME

,

FIREWORKS SCENE 4 July 4, 1776. A raised platform in an open place in Philadelphia. As the Liberty Bell is heard triumphantly ringing, a speaker mounts the platform. • The noisy and rapidly collecting mob becomes hushed. Patriotic Speaker... George Damson To the tune of Yankee Doodle, a company of American Bluecoats passes by following the flag. BLUE COATS—Garret De Koning, Clinton Cole, Lester Bossard, Albert De Bey, Lewis Geerlings, John Mulder, Lambert Olgers, Earl Goodwin, Raymond Smith, Garret Nyweide, Howard Slyter, Harry Grond. INTERLUDE 1 Memories with fitting ceremony call forth Scenes of 1846. EPISODE 2 FIREWORKS SCENE 1 Fall of 1846. The band of Hollanders who feel that God calls them to go to America to .found a "oolony" under the leadership of Dr. Albertus C. Van Raalte, are sorrowfully taking leave of the Netherlands. Prepared to board the ship and surrounded by their friends, they sadly sing the song, "Farewell, 0 Land of Many Dykes."


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Dr. Albertus -C. Van Raalte. Norman Vanderhart Jean Grooters, Margaret Grooters, Helen Fehner, Cornelia Nettinga, Lillian Scott, Harriet Heneveld, Ethel fieneveld, Alice Lammers, Helen Van Ess, Dorothy Mulder, Ruth Van Kersen, Helen Zander, Max Houmes, Clarissa Poppen, Priscilla Ver Meer, Margaret Flipse, William Buitendorp, Russel Van Dyke, Alvin Neevel, Rutherford Huizingal l i s t e r Kuiper, Jay Wabeke, Alonzo Wieringa, Clinton Cole, James Van Der Ven. SCENE 2 February 9, 1847, between Allegan .and the Black Lake region, George S. Harrington of Allegan is conveying in an ox-cart a small party consisting of six men and one woman; The Reverend A. Ci Van Raalte, Evert Sagers, W. Netting and wife, J . Lankheet, J. L a a r l . man and Egbert Fredericks, (Mr. and Mrs. Grootenhuis have pre-l ceded these.) They are bound for the location selected by Dr. V a i t Raalte for the "colony." '

Harrington Dr. Van Raalte Evert Sagers...... W. Netting. Mrs. Netting Lankheet Laarman— Fredericks

*.

Dwight Ynteniflfc' .Norman Vanderhartf Barnard Lubem Derwin Hueninl Dorothy Van Der Kolk Theodore Essebaggers Delbert Kinnej Carl Cool

SCENE 3 Two weeks a f t e r the arrival of the first contingent. In a clearing stands the first log cabin. By the camp fire are Mrs. Nottini and Mrs. Grootenhuis, attending the cooking. From the forest com< the men, weary from the day's chopping. At length there approachefi the traditional band of Ottawas, accompanied by Mr. Isaac Fairbanks, a governmental agent appointed to teach the Indians farming, and the Rev. George Smith, the Missionary. Mrs. Netting. D. Vander Kolk Mr§. Grootenhuis — Edith Banninga Fairbanks — Gerard Poefc Indian Chief James Ver Meulen Indians—Anthony Smith, Theodore Van Den Brink, Kenneth Camp-: bell, Raymond Spoelstra. Rev. George Smith.. Stanley Albert SCENE 4

A

SCENE 7 A quiet Sunday morn in "de kleine stad." Two engineers sent by the United Stated government to inspect harbor possibilities, find no one at home. The city appears deserted. Wondering whether all the settlers have perished, they wander thrpugh the city until suddenly there bursts on their ears music "like the sound of many waters." The people of Holland are m church and they are heard singing Psalm 89, Vefse 7. Chorus supplied by Central Avenue Christian Reformed Church.) The singing stops and, a f t e r a few moments, people appear coming from- church. Dr. Van Raalte welcomes the engineers. Engineers.— _ J o h n Albers, James De Pree INTERLUDE 2—FIREWORKS Memories with fitting ceremony call forEh the Spirit of History. EPISODE 3 The Spirit of History appears carrying a scroll. The Spirit of History sings. She is followed by an interpreter. Spirit of History —Cornelia Nettinga The Spirit of History then holds out the scroll inviting all to read.. The record of Hope CoHege is then read by the interpreter. Interpreter Dean John B. Nykerk, Xitt. D. The Spirit of Hope College appears. '

SPIRIT OF HOPE COLLEGE

*

HARRIETT VANDERBUSH The Spirit of Hope College summons a procession of Hope College students, representing the departments and activities of the college. The procession is divided into seven distinct parts. PART ONE College Religion Bible Department Y. M. C. A. Y. W. C. A Student Volunteers Home Volunteers.^

...Russell Damstra Lester Bossard Hazel Lokker; Hester Ossewarde -~~~-JfVe<Jerick WilsonNelson Van Raalte

-

- FARTtWO College Oratory and Forensics Pi Kappa Delta

Ik—Bruno Bruns, William Tuttle PART ITfREE College Music

Directed by Katherine Keppel

Girls' Glee Club—Ardean Van Arendonk, Elizabeth Morrison, Edythe Klerk. Hope Harmony Club ^ J e a n and Margaret Grooters Men's Glee Club— — ^ A b r a h a m Pott, Alonzq Wieringa Hope College Orchestra Jacob Peion Hope Band JSiy. L William Hughes Trumpeters Henrietta Kots, Alice Ihrman, Margaret Hondlink

Staged by Ruth Kennel

PART tfOUR

Assisted at the piano .by Alice Van Hattem

College Stidies Keyword—Wisdoi)m

Spring of 1847. There arrives the large body of the Van Raalte group who had been waiting at Allegan for summons to come. Aftef; welcoming them. Dr. Van Raalte takes an ax and challenges the mert^ of the party. SCENE 5

Taken from the Pageant of 1916, written by Adrianna Kolyn (Mrs. T. H. Elferdink). Obstacles of the pioneers symbolically presented. GENII OF WATER—Anna Meengs, Edith Klerk, Mildred Ramaker; Katheryne Tyner, Dena Nettinga. GENII OF COLD—Adelaide Dykhuizen, Anne Tysse, Sarah Fred-: ricks, Betty Stegenga, Mildred Dulmes. GENII OF WILDERNESS—Geraldine Dykhuizen, Rose O'Leary,Leona Sithes, Nelvina Wassenaar, Ruth Nibbelink. WINDS—Katherine Keppel, Jeannette Veldman, Marriet De Groot, Florence Dulmes. Hunger Alonzo Wieringa Cholera... George Damson;^ Malaria Henry Van Duine Lightning. Stanley Albers Thunder. — John Albers Death Stanley Albers SCENE 6 Arrival of a later band of immigrants at Holland. Same Cast as Scene 1, Episode 2.

Ancient Languages Modem Languages. English. 1 History Philosophy Mathematics Physics Biology. Chemistry

i • **•

Lester Kuiper F r a n k Brokaw Mildred De Wolf Peter Wesselink Delbert Kinney -Neal Van Oostenburg .Vernon Samson Eliot Weier J a m e s De Pree

PART FIVE College Athletics Keyword—Action Football....Egbert Fell Basketball Melvin Lubbers Baseball J a m e s Poppen Tennis -Eugene Damstra Track .George Cliqennoi Sweater Girls—Sarah Fredricks, Eunice Brockmeier, Jeannette Veldman. Athletic Debt Diggers—Helen Van Ess, Mildred Raxnaker, Anne Tysse.


H O P E

C O L L E G E

P A G E A N T ,

1 9 2 6

PART SIX

MUSICAL P R O G R A M

College Societies Sorosis. Delphi. SibyllineDorian— Alethea-. Minerva...

Mary Waldron, Edna Cook -.-..Lillian Schmidt, Suzanne Dragt Arlyne Haan, Madge Rooks .Betty Moir, Eleanor Ver Wey Alida Den Herder, Beatrice Vanderkamp J u l i a Hoeve, Grace Wilterdink

Fraternal Cosmos Knickerbocker Emersonian Addison Dickensian. Meliphone

Carl Damson, Bernard De Pree William Peelen, Matthew Peelen Garret De Koning, Lewis Geerlings Barnard Luben, Harry Grond Raymond Spoelstra, Ernest Hornsby Alfred Popma, William Bonnema - -Marvin Kuizenga, Bernard Keizer

PART SEVEN

Pwhgue-OvenuTeand Royal Procession- "Coronatioii March from 'The Prophet," Meyerbeer. Memories-Chant and Chorale, Kollen. u - | C e n t S 1 l h annd n 1 - M o t i v e s from "N«;w World Symphony, DvorakInterlude I Memories—Chant and Chorus, Kollen C ne l, h0TU rewe11 0 L a n d of Man Dvlcl ~| // e fi T/ ' "New World V iJykes Kollen. Scene II. Motive from

College Classes Reverend Seniors—Frederick Olert, Lois Brockmeier, Franklin Hinkamp. Jolly Juniors—William Maat, Henry Bovenkirk, Harriet Heneveld, Florence Dulmes. Young Sophomores-^Julius Schipper, Henry Masselink, Howard Sluyter. f Verdant Freshmen—Gerald Bolhuis, George Lewis, George Killey, Lois Heinz, Margaret Barlow, Martha Van Buren. After all have passed. Queen 1926 speaks. 7 he queen sends out heralds. The people of the world come bearing laurels, and with fitting ceremony crown the victorious Spirit of Hope College.

Symphony, Dvorak. Scene III. New Country Motive, AToWcn. Scene IV. Men's Chorus "Ax Song,?' KoUen. Scene V Motives from Kollen, Burleigh,

' TSChaik0WSk)'-

F o S S L ^terludeH-Musical

background to Memories Chant,

Episode ///—Spirit of History[Soprano Recitative] Kollen Procession, Parts I II, III, IV Wagner's Venushurg J f r n p ? " 1 j7// T ® f r o m B i 8g e s ' Part VI, V I 1 ,

Me^e f

,

^...Geraldine Walvoord -.Sipfung Cheung Grace McCarrol Cornelius Muilenburg James Ver Meulen EPILOGUE QUEEN 1926

All spectators join in singing "America" in the Hope College Way. AMERICA

it *

My country! 'tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing; Land where my fathers died! Land of the Pilgrims' pride! From ev'ry mountain side. Let freedom ring I My native country, thee. Land of the noble-free. Thy name I love; I love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills: My heart with rapture thrills Like that above. Let music swell the breeze, And ring from all the trees Sweet freedom's song; Let mortal tongues awake; Let all that breathe partake; Let rocks their silence break. The sound prolong. Our fathers' God! to Thee , Author of liberty. To Thee we sing: (Soon may the world be bright With freedom's holy light; Protect us by Thy might, Great God, our King.

I

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a n d

S1"?.''

PEOPLE OF THE WORLD

Japan China Greece Arabia ^ American Indian....

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PERSONNEL CatherineLear*. M

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Ce/Zos—Norman Vander Hart, Cornelius Hospers. /fo.ss—Anne Eikenhout. F / u t e - r C h e s t e r Yntema. •

Clarineta—Ray Klaasen, Dwight Yntema. Allo-(foi French Horn) Ralph Muller. Trumpets Marion De Young, Margaret Hondlink.

' '

7 r o m o o n « - R o b e r t Hemkes.

Timpani—Vetnon Ten Cale. Bass Z>ru?n—William Hughes. Triangle and Cymbals-CAen Severence. Piano—Marion Ingham.

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T h e S e a l of H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n , a d o p t e d i n 18S7. — G o d ' b e w l t l ? UsU''Ch:

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Trans.

lt S t r e n g t h

APPRECIATIONS: Scott-Lugers Lumber Company Board of Public Works Holland City News Van Voorst Bros. Holland Daily Sentinel Meyer Music House Fair Association American Legion Band Holland High De Pree Hardware Holland Lumber and Supply Co. And all others who co-operated in making this pageant a success.


TO BE AMERICAN - IT IS E N O U G H *

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^ y - H A T a satisfaction is given to the hearts of title Affieffcans when genuine effort is spent recognizing the development of our Country and the achievements of men and their communities! Q A statesman, a manufacturer, or a home-maker can put his all into what he develops and find ample reward in his own record alone. But when one's fellowsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;when countrymen â&#x20AC;&#x201D; rise to show recognition for great accomplishment in which they pretend no part, we see the tremendous spirit of American fair play which aids men materially in doing their uttermost, seeing clearly without the dazzle of a reward.

HOLLAND FURNACE COMPANY World's Largest Installers of Furnaces

06-02-1926  
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