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Coronation

JS

in Pine Grove

Cindy Sonneveldt Chosen May Queen

QUEEN CINDY SONNEVELDT

Junior Cindy Sonneveldt w a s crowned May Day Queen in ceremonies held in the Pine Grove this afternoon.

stra Hall, was named an h o n o r a r y member of the court. She was runner-up to Miss Sonneveldt in the balloting.

Also announced in the ceremonies were the six members of Queen Cindy's court, the new members of Mortar Board and the winners of the fraternity and sorority scholastic trophies for last semester.

Queen Cindy is an elementary education m a j o r and is a member of the Delta Phi sorority. She and her court were chosen in all-campus voting Monday a n d Tuesday. All junior women with a cumulative grade-point a v e r a g e of 2.0 or over were eligible. THE Q U E E N received the crown from senior Mary Rynbrandt, retiring May Day Queen. N a m e d to Mortar Board this afternoon were Peggy Adams,

T H E C O U R T includes juniors .Jan De Boer, J o a n Granzow, Ellie Heath, Jill Nyboer, B a r b a r a Ryzenga and Sharon Staats. Mrs. Helena Post, housemother in Dyk-

Judi Cooper, Marcia Herrema, Carol Koterski, Jill Risser, B a r b Skidmore, Jean T a y l o r and M a r y Zuidema. Mortar Board is the national h o n o r sorority on campus. Its members are chosen for outstanding scholarship, leadership, service and citizenship. All junior women with grade-points of 3.0 or higher were considered. THE WINNER of the sorority scholastic trophy was K a p p a Chi, with an a v e r a g e grade-point of 3.007. Trailing them was Alpha Phi, with a 2.950. The Emersonian fraternity won the fraternity scholastic trophy with a 2.662 m a r k . This bested the 2.657 a v e r a g e of the Praters.

Fourteen faculty members will leave Hope at the end of this year. Dr. Kenneth Weller, c h a i r m a n of the economics and business administration department, h a s been named President of Central College.

23

Hope College, Holland, Michigan 49423

May 2, 1S69

CLB Will Decide

Blacks Ask Special Housing By George Arwady a n c h o r Editor A g r o u p of black coeds have requested permission to live together next year in college housing. Dean of Students Robert De Young h a s refrained from m a k i n g a final decision on the request and passed the matter on to the C a m p u s Life Board. (Miss Jackie Barker discusses this question in the "Black and Beautiful" column on page 7.) "THEY W A N T E D all-black h o u s i n g ," the Dean said. " T h e y wanted to live together because

Students Favor Parietal Hours Ovenvhel mingly Results of polls taken in the last two weeks show that students overwhelmingly favor both the present proposal and the principle of inter-room visitation and that the members of the faculty are four to three against both. The student poll taken as part of student elections last week asked if students f a v o r the present proposal for their particular dormit o r y . A total of 6 2 6 responded that they did; 2 4 7 said they did not. Eight hundred students felt that if a m a j o r i t y of the students in a particular d o r m oppose intervisitation then that d o r m should not have the right, while only 87 felt that the d o r m should retain the right. Students were in favor of the principal of inter-visitation by a vote of 797 to 86. The faculty voted 41 to 2 8 against the present proposal in a partial poll a n d 3 5 to 2 8 against the principal of inter-dorm visitation. Five faculty members did not respond to the second question. The student poll was conducted by the Student Senate and the faculty poll b y Dr. Richard Vandervelde, c h a i r m a n of the Student Conduct Committee.

they enjoyed each other's company." "Personally, I could buy this," the Dean said. "But 1 question whether the law would permit this and whether this is the direction Hope College wishes to go." DEAN DE YOUNG said he thus thought it would " b e good if it was aired" in the C a m p u s Life Board. " I explained that we could not deny white students the right to live in college-owned housing," the Dean said. " L e g a l l y there would be no problem if they wanted to live together with a few white students in there." T H E D E A N SAID that the black coeds' request might also conflict with a new system of priorities in housing which the Dean of Students office is putting into effect. This would give first choice in housing to seniors, second choice to juniors, etc. The Dean said this problem might be possibly averted, however. The Black Coalition column, which was distributed to faculty members Tuesday, will be presented to the C a m p u s Life Board as an appeal for the coeds'request to be granted. T H E C O L U M N emphasizes that the "request for special housing was put before Hope by a g r o u p of interested individuals" who a r e seeking an atmosphere in which they can function better as students. The column notes that foreign l a n g u a g e and fraternity students are housed together and says such facilities offer them a m e a n s whereby they can further their Selfhood. MISS B A R K E R notes the "tension and anxiety" whichcan m a r k the life of an isolated black student and claims that both subtle and blatant racism exist at Hope. "Blacks came to Hope to get an 'education,' " she writes, to function as students, and I would hope that the Hope College community would feel that they are worth the trouble of h a v i n g their needs attended." The legality of an all-black studies p r o g r a m and all-black dormitories on college campuses

The finals of the women's softball competition began the afternoon. Game time was 12:30 p.m. Following this, at 1:30 p.m. the men competed in the a n n u a l May Day track meet at Van Raalte field. The coronation ceremonies began in the Pine Grove at 4 : 3 0 p.m. Queen Cindy and her court will reign over a special h o n o r a r y dinner in Phelps Hall after the coronation. The climax of the d a y will be the May Day dance in Phelps Hall dining room f r o m 9 p.m. to midnight. The theme will be " S p r i n g P'ever."

Hope Loses 14 Faculty Members at Year's End

I COLLEGE

81st ANNIVERSARY -

T H E MAY DAY festivities beg a n at 3 p.m. yesterday with a Kite Flying Contest. Classes were dismissed today at 12:20 p.m. so that students could attend the afternoon events.

is now being examined by the federal courts. GLCA MEMBER Antioch College has been told by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare that it will lose federal funds if it continues to operate a segregated black studies program. Antioch has also been told it cannot operate an all N e g r o dormitory. Its Afro-American Studies Institute, one of the first in the nation, is open to 120 N e g r o students. The courses are held in a dormitory reserved for Negroes. A N T I O C H HAS appealed the policy of the federal government in the courts. The final outcome of the appeal has not yet been determined. If Antioch does not desegregate its p r o g r a m by the s u m m e r semester as ordered by HEW, it stands to lose more than one million dollars in federal funds.

K E I T H A C H E P O H L , assistant professor of art for the last two years, will be a faculty member of Pacific Luther University in T a c o m a , Wash. Dr. Philip Crook, professor of biology since 1955, has been m a d e c h a i r m a n of the biology department at Colgate University. William lYatt, assistant professor of history, will join thefaculty at the University of N e b r a s k a in Omaha. DR, ROGER S T E E N L A N D , as sistant professor of psychology and clinical psychologist of the Counseling Center for three years.

is leaving to start a clinic iaSouth Carolina. Miss Florence Wagg, instructor in Spanish, is leaving to return to g r a d u a t e school. Arthur Hielkema, head of lib r a r y technical service and instructor since 1966, has been m a d e head librarian at Northwestern College. REV. WILLIAM Hilmert, professor of religious education since 1952, Dr. William Schrier, professor of speech since 1939, Dr. J a m e s Van I^tten, professor of political science since 1952, and Dr. Eva Van Shaack, professor of biology since 1956, will retire at the end of this year. J a m e s Bultman, assistant professor of education, Alan Carter, instructor of political science, a n d Mrs. Beulah K a m p e n Maris, assistant professor of French, will go on leave at the end of this year.

Open House Proposal Gets Negative Response By Lynn Jones Asst. News Editor The Student Conduct Committee h a s sent the intervisitation proposal on to the C a m p u s Life Board after a straw vote in the committee registered d i s a p p r o v a l of the principle of inter-room visitation within our present d o r m system. T H E C O M M I T T E E voted 4 3 against this principle, with all student committee members voting in favor of it and all faculty and administrative members voting against it. The committee, however, did agree u n a n i m o u s l y in another straw vote that students need a greater degree of privacy on fcampus.

A decision on the actual interr o o m visitation proposal and a final decision on the advisability of any form of parietal h o u r s were left in the h a n d s of the Campus Life Board. All research done by the committee will be given to the CLB. DEAN OF S T U D E N T S Robert De Young noted that no guidelines have yet been established in regard to the amount of responsibility the College has for the governing of student lives. Thus, a l o n g with being requested torule on the intervisitation proposal itself, the Dean would like to see the C a m p u s Life B o a r d " a s k e d to undertake a t h o r o u g h study of what the role of Hope College should be in terms of c a m p u s living."

Second Speech Thursday

Boiling Speaks on Mid-East President L a n d r u m Boiling of E a r l h a m College will speak on " T h e Role of the U.S. in the Middle East Crisis" at an All-College Assembly at 8:15 p.m. M o n d a y in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. ON T H U R S D A Y Dr. Leon Levine, Director of the Institute for Middle East Studies, will speak in Winant's Auditorium at 8 : 1 5 p.m. on " I s r a e l ' s Future in the Middle East." President Boiling, a political scientist and former war correspondent, has recently been active in the Middle East crisis on behalf of the American Quakers. He met with cabinet leaders in J o r d a n , the United A r a b Republic and Israel last s p r i n g on a special mission for the Friends. TWO M O N T H S AGO he spent considerable time in Washington

and at the United Nations for the purpose of interviewing White House advisors. State Department officials and United Nations amb a s s a d o r s f r o m the Great Powers and the Middle Eastern countries concerning plans for the fourpower discussions that are now underway. Dr. Levine is a n assistant professor of history at Indiana University and has written extensively on the Middle Eastern situation. He received his Ph.D. from Brandeis University. Dr. Levine h a s published a number of articles on the Middle East, including "Arab Unity and N a s s e r " a n d " I s l a m and A r a b Nationalism, A Dichotomy?" Both speakers are sponsored by the Cultural Affairs Committee of H o p e College.

LANDRUM ROLLING


Paget

May 2, 19*9

Hope College anchor

'Communication' Topic Of Attorney's Speech B y C h a r l o t t e Whitney a n c h o r Reporter Michigan Attorney General F r a n k Kelley e m p h a s i z e d the problem of c o m m u n i c a t i o n and deemphasized the p r o b l e m of crime before a n All-College Assembly Tuesday morning. MR, K E L L E Y S T A T E D that the g r a n d f a t h e r s of o u r present generation had more accurate c o m m u n i c a t i o n t h a n we d o n o w because it only dealt with the immediate g r o u p . But now, he stated, " w e a r e a n a t i o n a l - i n t e r n a tional society a n d what h a p p e n s 5 , 0 0 0 miles a w a y c a n h a v e a great impact on o u r lives." M o d e r n m a n d e p e n d s on television for c o m m u n i c a t i o n , he said, a n d b e c a u s e of this the public receives a distorted picture of society. He went on to state that less t h a n one percent of the populace h a s been involved in a transg r e s s i o n of the law, a s in student violence on c a m p u s e s . B E C A U S E O F T H E relatively small n u m b e r s involved, Mr. Kelley revealed a fear that the American public is g o i n g to overreact to the crisis in crime. Such a development could v e r y well lead to a police state, he w a r n e d . Mr. Kelley also stated that crime statistics h a v e b r o u g h t a b o u t a " d i s t o r t e d picture of A m e r i c a n society." " E i g h t y percent of all violent crimes are committed by youth u n d e r 2 5 , " he noted. But, he e m p h a s i z e d , m a n y of these crimes a r e committed by y o u t h s venting out anti-social feelings. " M o r e t h a n 4 million y o u t h s a r e

AWS Planning Voorhees Tea The a n n u a l V o o r h e e s D a y Tea will be held T u e s d a y f r o m 2 to 4 p.m. in the l o u n g e of Phelps Hall. The tea is s p o n s o r e d b y the AWS Activities B o a r d , a n d all w o m e n of the College and guests are invited to attend. The tea is. held in h o n o r of Elizabeth V o o r h e e s , w h o s e gift m a d e possible the construction of V o o r h e e s Hall, the first w o m e n ' s d o r m i t o r y on H o p e ' s campus.

not getting involved in a n y c r i m e , " he noted. THE T H R E E - T E R M Attor ney G e n e r a l ' s next point focused on the necessity of m a i n t a i n i n g confidence in o n e ' s society. He s p o k e a b o u t the inherent rights a n d b a s i c freedoms preserved in the United States C o n s t i t u t i o n , m a i n t a i n i n g that the state " m u s t foster a n d protect m a n ' s d i g n i t y . " Next Mr. Kelley stated that the e m o t i o n a l reactions of o u r society must b e t r a n s l a t e d into real activity. He m a d e the illustration of G e r m a n y after World War 1, which he s a i d was in a n e m o t i o n a l frenzy, thus falling prey to the m a n i p u l a t i o n of Adolf Hitler. MR, K E L L E Y A L S O e m p h a sized the i m p o r t a n c e of e d u c a t i o n in o u r society, n o t i n g the respect which c o m e s with e d u c a t i o n . F o r this r e a s o n , he m a i n t a i n e d , the e d u c a t i o n requirements m u s t be raised for policemen. D u r i n g the q u e s t i o n - a n s w e r session which followed his speech, Kelley a l s o suggested a n in-service t r a i n i n g prog r a m f o r the present police forces.

anchor Essay

By

Sunday, May 4 in

THE S T U D E N T C H U R C H The Grounds at 9:45

Rouda

Academic Unreality In m a n y respects, these comments a r e a c o n t i n u a t i o n of C a n d y M a r r ' s e s s a y and Ron H o o k ' s E x a u g u r a l ( a n c h o r , A p r i l 2 5 ) , alt h o u g h I fear they possess neither Miss M a r r ' s zeal n o r Mr. H o o k ' s colloquialism. MY F E L L O W essayists will doubtless a g r e e that the Hope student has been mercilessly reminded since his m a t r i c u l a t i o n that here o n e is free f r o m the d r a f t , free (for the most p a r t ) f r o m the r i g o r s of r e g u l a r e m p l o y m e n t , free f r o m full legal responsibilities. The H o p e student is free t o d e v e l o p in a w o m b g r o w n m e t a p h o r i c a l l y immense yet literally fruitless. Student a p a t h y is but a n o t h e r term for the r e f u s a l of this institution to allow students to r u n their own lives; it is a n index of the failure of students to d e m a n d the reins of their futures. If, like I'haeton, we scorch the e a r t h , at least we will h a v e learned how u n r u l y the h o r s e s can be. B U T A L L T H I S , you sigh, we h a v e h e a r d before, most recently f r o m Miss M a r r , w h o s e

Government Restructure Meets AWS Approval The Association of Women Students h a s passed a p r o p o s a l restructuring women's government a n d h a s sent it to the w o m e n s t u d e n t s for ratification. Most d o r m s h a v e a l r e a d y voted on the motion, a n d the results a r e o v e r w h e l m i n g l y in f a v o r of restructuring. T H E N E W S T R U C T U R E will consist of three bodies: a W o m e n ' s Inter-residential Council, an Activities Council a n d a n Executive B o a r d , consisting of a president, a vice president, a s e c r e t a r y and a treasurer. The W o m e n ' s Inter-residential Council, u n d e r the new p l a n , would interpret College policies r e g a r d i n g women, o b s e r v e the c o n d u c t of women, assist the Administration in establishing effective a n d a p p r o p r i a t e h o u s i n g plans, a n d establish a n effective h o u s e council structure in the residence halls. It w o u l d a l s o serve

Bruce

as a m e a n s of c o m m u n i c a t i o n a m o n g the d o r m i t o r y presidents. I T W O U L D consist of the six d o r m i t o r y presidents, the president of the Executive B o a r d , a resident a d v i s o r f r o m each d o r m , and an RA representing the women's cottages as a group. T h e Activities Council, according to the p r o p o s a l , would be r e s p o n s i b l e for o r g a n i z i n g activities pertinent to women. It will consist of one representative f r o m each class, o n e representative f r o m each w o m e n ' s o r g a n i z a t i o n , one representative for nonresident w o m e n , a n d will be chaired b y the vice president. THE PRESIDENT, whose duties will be to call a n d c h a i r W. I.C. meetings a n d " t o fulfill the g e n e r a l duties of a n executive," m u s t be a j u n i o r or a senior with a 2 . 5 g r a d e - p o i n t a v e r a g e a n d one y e a r experience with w o m e n ' s g o v e r n m e n t . The s a m e q u a l i f i c a t i o n s p e r t a i n to the vice president. T h e s e c r e t a r y , w h o will prep a r e a n d distribute minutes of all meetings, m u s t be a s o p h o more, a j u n i o r o r a senior with a 2.3 grade-point average and " a w o r k i n g k n o w l e d g e of A W S . "

FREE!

Preacher: Dr. J o h n Beardslee New Brunswick Theological Seminary

live, it would seem, far t o o orten H a t h really neither j o y , n o r love, nor light. N o r certitude, n o r peace, n o r help for pain. IN H I S LAST Chance Talk. Mr. D a v i d C l a r k pointed to the " g o o d s t u d e n t " mindlessly g r i n d ing out p a p e r s which, a l t h o u g h

Contemporary Writers Posters

Dimnent Chapel at 11:00 • • •

c o m m e n t a r y on a p a t h y and ruleb r e a k i n g is reminiscent of Yeats' critique in " T h e S e c o n d C o m i n g " : T h e best lack all conviction, while the worst Are full of p a s s i o n a t e intensity. My predecessors h a v e a n a l y z e d the situation f r o m a political viewpoint; 1 should like to offer s o m e c o m m e n t s u n d e r the a c a d e m i c head. J u s t as we h a v e b e g u n to see t h a t a restrictive social atm o s p h e r e leads b o t h to a p a t h y and to the sense that here one is m a r k i n g time until liberation into s o m e real w o r l d , s o this attitude of unreality h a s p e r m e a t e d academic performance. I F O R O N E h a v e sensed all too often ( a n d I speak p r i m a r i l y of the h u m a n i t i e s ; w h a t the science faculties and students d o a b o u t the p r o b l e m of u n r e a l i t y is w o r t h y of a n o t h e r e s s a y ) that the issues raised a n d the points m a d e in classes a r e c o n s i d e r e d both b y students a n d faculty to h a v e n o "objective c o r r e l a t i v e , " to use a p h r a s e f r o m T. S. Eliot. T h a t is, when in Victorian Literature ( t o cite a p e r s o n a l l y f a m i l i a r e x a m p l e ) we discuss the l a p s e of o r t h o d o x faith a n d the e m p h a s i s on l o v e as agent of secular salv a t i o n , d o we a c t u a l l y consider the p r o b l e m a s relevant for o u r lives? As Matthew Arnold would h a v e it, the world in which we

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BOOK HOUSE (at your back door)

a c c u r a t e p a r a p h r a s e s of critics p r o p e r l y f o o t n o t e d , c o n t a i n not a single o r i g i n a l idea. Our " g o o d student" ( p o o r child, curried t h r o u g h o u t h i g h school, never told he h a s to think a s well a s r e g u r g i t a t e ! ) is a l s o a n e x a m p l e of m y point: ideas, p o i n t s of view, i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s , c o n c l u s i o n s a r e or o u g h t to be d y n a m i c , e x p l o s i v e issues, not e a s i l y c o n t a i n e d in a n e a t n o t e b o o k . T h e y point to, indeed are, issues of b u r n i n g imm e d i a c y for us. On the c o n t r a r y , we h a v e b e c o m e a c a d e m i c s l a v e s t o o u r futures, d e f e r r i n g intellect u a l i n v o l v e m e n t to s o m e unn a m e d d i s t a n t date. But as Eliot s a y s in "Little G i d d i n g " : This is the use of m e m o r y : P'or l i b e r a t i o n — not less of love but e x p a n d i n g Of love b e y o n d desire, a n d s o liberation F r o m the f u t u r e a s well as the past. I H A V E S K I R T E D the d a r k w o o d of Relevance p u r p o s e l y ; the issue of c u r r i c u l a r r e l e v a n c e is p a r t i c u l a r l y d a n g e r o u s for a n y o n e w h o will be involved in acad e m i a in the twenty-first century. Dangerous, but inescapable. I h a v e evidently lined u p on the side of the g e n e r a t i o n p l e a d i n g not only for i m m e d i a c y in social a n d political contexts, but ( t o r i s k c o n t r a d i c t i n g Yeats) for " p a s s i o n ate intensity" in the a c a d e m i c s p h e r e a s well. Courses in black literature, b l a c k h i s t o r y , ghetto s o c i o l o g y a n d p s y c h o l o g y , a n d m o d e r n poe t r y constitute o n l y one technique for f o s t e r i n g intensity. Recognition of the n o w n e s s of issues r a i s e d is yet a n o t h e r . But k n o w ledge g a i n e d t h r o u g h a c a d e m i c p u r s u i t is p r o t e a n ; it's b o u n d to c h a n g e s h a p e just when it seems m o s t a p p l i c a b l e to a specific problem. SO T H E R E - IS a third technique. The life of the m i n d properly u n d e r s t o o d in c o m p l e m e n t to social r e l a t i o n s h i p s fosters v a l u e s which a r e s u b v e r s i v e to the H o p e College a c a d e m i c limbo. A g g r e s s i v e n e s s a n d h u m i l i t y , pers e r v e r a n c e , honesty, tolerance, a n d love of l e a r n i n g s o m e t h i n g new, all c a n n o t wait until g r a d u ation to be exercised. The u n i v e r s i t y will s u r v i v e student unrest precisely b e c a u s e it m a n i f e s t s , at its best m o m e n t s , those very virtues students d e m a n d of it. And those virtues, exercised in the c l a s s r o o m , a r e a n a t h e m a to s c h o l a r l y stuffiness, to vagueness and distance, to b o r e d o m a n d r e m o v e . Cultiv a t e d in m i d n i g h t loneliness, the l e s s o n s of the u n i v e r s i t y a r e the stuff of this a f t e r n o o n ' s conflict a n d i m m e d i a c y .

Pre registration For Next Year Begins May 7 P r e r e g i s t r a t i o n for c l a s s e s next fall will b e g i n W e d n e s d a y a n d continue through Friday, May 16. The p r o c e d u r e for p r e r e g i s t r a tion will be v e r y s i m i l a r to that of a y e a r a g o , s a i d R e g i s t r a r Kenn e t h Vink. Students will set u p a p p o i n t m e n t s with their faculty a d v i s o r s , fill out class schedule slips, a n d t u r n them in t h e m s e l v e s to the R e c o r d s Office. T h e r e will b e n o r u s h to get t h e schedule s l i p s in a s n o classes will be closed. P r e r e g i s t r a t i o n will s e r v e o n l y a s a n i n d i c a t i o n of the size of the c l a s s e s next fall, a n d t o p r o v i d e i n f o r m a t i o n o n the dem a n d for c e r t a i n c o u r s e s . The p r o c e d u r e used d u r i n g the present semester w a s a b a n d o n e d b e c a u s e of the i n a d e q u a t e k n o w l e d g e it g a v e of c l a s s sizes a n d staff. A n o t h e r f a c t o r w a s that inc o m i n g f r e s h m e n c o u l d not be, served this s p r i n g . T h e g e n e r a l d i s s a t i s f a c t i o n of the s t u d e n t s with this p r o c e d u r e w a s a l s o considered in m a k i n g this decision, a c c o r d i n g to Mr. Vink. If a s t u d e n t is not s u r e whether h e will b e b a c k a t H o p e next fall h e s h o u l d p r e r e g i s t e r a n y w a y , acc o r d i n g to Mr. V i n k . If the student definitely k n o w s he will not be r e t u r n i n g he s h o u l d fill out a w i t h d r a w a l slip.


May 2. 1969

Hope College anchor

PageS

To Display Culture

Coalition Asks AAB for Room 'aM <>'

L I T T L E T H E A T R E — S t u d e n t a c t o r s r e h e a r s e " S p o o n River Antholo g y , " a r m y o r Little T h e a t r e p r o d u c t i o n which will be staged M a y 9, 10, 16 and 17. Actors a r e (left to r i g h t ) J o h n Lucius, J o a n n e K o r noeUe, Jim Piers, D a v e C r o t h e r s , Dee Parker, K a y H u b b a r d , Mike B o o n s t r a a n d N a n c y Meeusen. The p l a y is C h a r l e s A i d m a n ' s d r a matic a d a p t i o n of E d g a r Lee M a s t e r ' s poetry. Tickets a r e on s a l e in V a n R a a l t e Hall for $1.50.

William Boot Presents Piano Recital Tuesday Pianist William Boot will present a recital T u e s d a y at 8 : 1 5 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. The recital is s p o n s o r e d b y the Hope College music d e p a r t m e n t . Mr. Boot will p e r f o r m five maj o r w o r k s : A n d a n t e in D M a j o r a n d C h a c o n n e in D Minor by J o h a n n S e b a s t i a n Bach, Intermezz o in A M a j o r , Op. 118, N o . 2 a n d R h a p s o d y in B Minor, Op. 79, No. 1 b y J o h a n n e s B r a h m s , a n d S o n a t a in B Minor by F r a n z Liszt. Mr. Boot b e g a n his p i a n o studies with D o r o t h y Pelck Mc G r a w in G r a n d R a p i d s and continued them at the University of Michigan where he earned the degrees of b a c h e l o r of music a n d m a s t e r of music. He later studied at J u l l i a r d School of Music in New York with S a s c h a G o r o d nitski. Since 1967 he h a s p u r s u e d his studies with Mildred Victor in New York. F o r s h o r t periods he a l s o h a s w o r k e d with Victor B a b i n , Robert G o l d s a n d and Rudolf Firkusny. F o r the past several y e a r s he

Power Company Gives Property Deed to College C o n s u m e r s Power Co. h a s presented H o p e College the deed for a p p r o x i m a t e l y five acres of property needed to complete the acquisition of the College's biological field station in the Castle Park area. G o r d o n L. C a r s o n , C o n s u m e r s Power division m a n a g e r f r o m G r a n d R a p i d s , presented the deed to H o p e College t r e a s u r e r Clarence H a n d l o g t e n earlier this week. College b o a r d of trustees m e m b e r A. Dale Stoppels of G r a n d R a p i d s negotiated the acquisition agreement. Y e a r s a g o the p r o p e r t y w a s p a r t of a n i n t e r - u r b a n t r a n s p o r t a tion line between K a l a m a z o o a n d H o l l a n d . T h e field station was presented to H o p e in 1 9 6 6 b y the H o l l a n d Hitch C o m p a n y .

h a s taught p i a n o privately in S c a r s d a l e and White Plains, N.Y., and in his own s t u d i o in Manhattan. Mr. Boot was the winner of the a n n u a l a u d i t i o n s conducted at the University of Michigan, of the J o h n Wolaver M e m o r i a l Scholarship for the o u t s t a n d i n g pianist at the university, of a $ 1 , 0 0 0 g r a n t for s t u d y at J u i l l i a r d a w a r d e d a n n u a l l y in a competition s p o n s o r e d by the Grinnell F o u n d a tion a n d of the 1961 Bendetson N e t z o r g M e m o r i a l contest sponsored by the B o h e m i a n M u s i c i a n s Club of Detroit.

By J a n Dzurina a n c h o r Reporter The Administrative Affairs B o a r d established a s u b c o m m i t tee to study a request to devote a r o o m to black culture in the De Witt C u l t u r a l Center at their meeting on M o n d a y a f t e r n o o n . T H E S U B C O M M I T T E E con sists of Dean of Students Robert De Young, Tim Liggett a n d a representative of the Black Coalition. J o h n Brown, representing th Black Coalition at the meeting, asked that a r o o m be reserved in the new student center to be used for social functions by b o t h black and white students a n d for d i s p l a y of black art.

Dean Explains Housing Opportunities in Letter • A letter h a s been sent to all j u n i o r students f r o m the offices of the Associate Deans of Students e x p l a i n i n g the o p p o r t u n i ties for living on a n d off c a m p u s next semester. In this letter the Deans revealed that the College has p u r c h a s e d a new a p a r t m e n t b u i l d i n g on 13th Street. The building, located behind Zwemer Hall, will h o u s e forty-four girls in 12 a p a r t m e n t s . The three s t o r y structure is just now n e a r i n g completion. The letter a n n o u n c e s that the units in the b u i l d i n g of two bedr o o m s , living r o o m a n d kitchen with c o o k i n g privileges will be rented at a rate per student of $ 2 4 0 per semester. According to the letter, a n y student wishing to live off c a m p u s must submit a written request to the Associate Deans Office by Wed-

Development Man Tysse Leaves College Position Assistant Director of Development J o h n T y s s e has resigned, f r o m the H o p e College Administration to t a k e a local position with the Russell K l a a s e n Realty firm. Mr. Tysse h a s been associated with the College since 1965, when he w a s n a m e d to work in the A d m i s s i o n s Office. The following year he was a p p o i n t e d to direct H o p e ' s Centennial H o m e c o m i n g . In 1967 he was n a m e d Assistant Director of Development. Mr. Tysse m a d e the following statement u p o n a n n o u n c i n g his resignation: " I have enjoyed my association a s a m e m b e r of the H o p e College staff t r e m e n d o u s l y . 1 am delight-

Brown said, "All c u l t u r e s h o u l d be represented in the De Witt Cult u r a l Center." DEAN DE YOUNG expressed concern that " s u c h a request might be d a n g e r o u s in c r e a t i n g segregation." " T h e B o a r d should g o b e y o n d this r e q u e s t , " Dean De Y o u n g suggested, in o r d e r to discuss a n d s t u d y the black-white situation further. Brown replied, " T h e time for talking a n d r e - e v a l u a t i n g is over." Dr. J a m e s v a n l ^ t t e n noted, "We h a v e a g r o u p interested a n d willing to oversee the d e c o r a t i n g a n d financing of a p a r t i c u l a r section of the student center, so let's t a k e a d v a n t a g e of it."

ed with the p r o g r e s s of the development office in the last f o u r y e a r s . Our a l u m n i , c o m m u n i t y , c h u r c h and f o u n d a t i o n s u p p o r t h a s increased higher t h a n the n a t i o n a l a v e r a g e for the last several y e a r s . I u r g e all to continue to s u p p o r t the work of the president a n d the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n so the College can continue to g r o w in strength. " I t is with regret that I l e a v e the College, but 1 a m l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to m y r e l a t i o n s h i p as a s associate with the Russell K l a a s e n Realty firm. C o n t i n u i n g to live in H o l l a n d will allow me to continue with s o m e of the imp o r t a n t development p r o g r a m s and p e r h a p s be m o r e effective as a volunteer for the College."

Steaks, Seafoods

n e s d a y at 5 p.m. If p e r m i s s i o n is then g r a n t e d , a "residence clearing c a r d " will be r e q u i r e d with the off c a m p u s living a d d r e s s at a later date. In addition the letter states t h a t cottages will be a v a i l a b l e to seniors first, then j u n i o r s and then sophomores. The letter further a s k s that students indicate their h o u s i n g preference b y w a y of a n attached form.

SENIOR DON LUIDENS echoed both Dr. v a n Putten's a n d B r o w n ' s sentiments when he termed the request " a g r e a t idea which is a g o o d m o v e t o w a r d the e x p r e s s i o n of culture we a r e looking for." Dr. Robert W. C a v a n a u g h felt t h a t it would be interesting to h a v e a n a r e a devoted to black culture with objects of b l a c k art in a p a r t i c u l a r a r e a of the new building. DR, J O H N H O L L E N B A C H s a i d , " T h e A d m i n i s t r a t i v e Affairs Board should e n c o u r a g e all means for p r o m o t i n g m u t u a l understanding and appreciation for the c u l t u r a l patterns a n d herit a g e of o u r s t u d e n t s . " Dr. Hollenb a c h foresees the De Witt C u l t u r a l Center as a " m e a n s for p r o m o t i n g this u n d e r s t a n d i n g . " Dean for Academic Affairs Morrette Rider noted, " W e all seem a g r e e a b l e to seeing this principle c a r r i e d out, but w e d o n ' t k n o w h o w to c a r r y it out right n o w . " M A N Y P O S S I B L E sites were c o n s i d e r e d by the B o a r d , including the l o u n g e a r e a s b o t h in the recreation r o o m on the lower floor a n d outside the student g a l l e r y on the second floor. Clarence Handlogten, Treasurer of the College, said, " I t would m a k e s o m e sense to look at the student center p l a n s " in o r d e r to m a k e a definite r e s p o n s e to the Black Coalition request.

Board Candidates Students will c h o o s e five m e m b e r s of the C a m p u s Life B o a r d and f o u r m e m b e r s of the Academic Affairs B o a r d f r o m the following list of c a n d i d a t e s in a n a l l - c a m p u s election Wednesday.

CAMPUS L I F E BOARD

ACADEMIC A F F A I R S BOARD

Marshall Anstandig John Boonstra Bonnie B r o o k s Brian Clapham Marcia Herrema Fran Hooper Bill Leismer Jerry May

Judi Cooper Deb F o s h e i m Bev Greer Drew H i n d e r e r Chuck Lieder Mark Vander Laan Steve V a n Belt

C a n d i d a t e s f o r the C a m p u s Life B o a r d will be in the Coffee G r o u n d s on M o n d a y evening f r o m 9 to 10 to a n s w e r questions. C a n d i d a t e s for the Academic Affairs B o a r d will be in the Coffee G r o u n d s T u e s d a y d u r i n g the s a m e time period. Applications for positions on student-faculty committees a r e due M a y 14.

TEACHERS WANTED SOUTHWEST, ENTIRE WEST AND ALASKA SOUTHWEST TEACHERS AGENCY 1303 Central Ave.# N.E. Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 FREE REGISTRATION - G O O D SALARIES

Hope College Student Entertainment Series Proudly Presents

and Gourmet Table at the

Hotel Warm Friend Dining Room

IN SAUGATUCK a n d GRAND HAVEN it's

CORAL GABLES FOR —

LEISURE DINING

BANQUETS

Saturday, May 3, 1969, at 8:15 p.m,

SNACKS

Holland Civic Center

SERVING ANYTIME THE DELICIOUS

IL FORNO S PIZZA and SUBMARINES

Student H o p e Faculty

Phone

Saugatuck

UL 7 - 2 1 6 2 o r Grand

Haven

842-3510

for

Reservations

$ 1 . 0 0 w i t h I.D.

Staff Tickets on Sale: Van Raalte Lobby, Monday — Friday


Page 4

Hope College anchor

May Z, IMS

anchor editorials

Living Together

A

N U M B E R O F black coeds h a v e ever, a decision must be m a d e as to whether petitioned the Dean of Students for this is the direction in which H o p e College special housing for next year, a n d feels it should move. We believe the national the D e a n h a s sent the request on to the polarization of the races is a d a n g e r o u s C a m p u s Life B o a r d lor a decision. T h e development, but we d o not believe that Black Coalition h a s distributed a lengthy it is H o p e College's role to establish and r a t i o n a l e for the request a m o n g faculty enforce the patterns of racial living which m e m b e r s (see the " B l a c k a n d B e a u t i f u l " this c o m m u n i t y ' s white m a j o r i t y deem adcolumn on page 7 ) and is currently solici- visable. As J a c k i e B a r k e r ' s column points ting student signatures in support of the out, the p u r p o s e of this College is to serve request. the individual student's needs to the best The legal problem does not seem as of its ability. T o us it seems indisputable difficult to us as it does to other members that an opportunity for the coeds to live of this community. T h e g o v e r n m e n t action together would e n h a n c e the enjoyment and taken against black housing facilities at stability of college life for them and proAntioch College and the subsequent suit vide a better academic a t m o s p h e r e . The will, of course, set the precedent for girls certainly seem to think so. If a g r o u p American colleges a n d universities, but we of white students can be allowed to live wonder if the H o p e situation is not much together u p o n m a k i n g a request, we see different than that at Antioch. It seems to no reason why the s a m e request should us that black students living together in not be g r a n t e d for black students. p a r t of a college d o r m or cottage would OPK COLLEGE must be flexible, not constitute segregated housing. A black as the social and cultural backor part-black cluster in D y k s t r a , for ing r o u n d s of its students continue to stance, would still allow college h o u s i n g diversify. We urge the C a m p u s Life B o a r d to remain integrated. to s u p p o r t the black request for s e p a r a t e In addition to the legal question, how- h o u s i n g .

H

T

86.

The faculty a n d a d m i n i s t r a t o r s must, therefore, have h a d very s t r o n g feelings a b o u t inter visitation to ignore such student u n a n i m i t y . But did they? All the nonstudents on the committee expressed a concern that students should be given g r e a t e r opportunities for privacy on c a m p u s . S o m e of the m e m b e r s w h o opposed the principle in a straw vote had earlier said they favored some form of inter-visitation. The overriding factor behind their votes seemed not to be a concern with the wisdom of intervisitation for the individual student at Hope, but fear of the financial losses which the College might suffer if such a " l i b e r a l " decision offended our 44 conservative " a l u m ni and church friends. U C H FEAR IS nothing new at H o p e College. " W h a t will the churches t h i n k ? " 44 How much money will such a decision cost u s ? " " C a n we risk a d r o p in alumni g i v i n g ? " These a r e the types of prior questions which faculty a n d administrators always ask when they consider a n y p r o p o s a l for a c h a n g e in student, rules and regulations. Our constituency is very i m p o r t a n t to us; of this there can be n o question. What

S

we do question is whether it is quite as important as faculty m e m b e r s and administ r a t o r s seem to think. T h e students p a y the bills at Hope College—to the tune of a w h o p p i n g 73 percent of the operational budget. Yet the opinion of students is h a r d l y given consideration c o m m e n s u r a t e with students' financial contributions. The inter-dorm visitation issue will now be sent to the C a m p u s Life B o a r d . We u r g e it to lend a kinder ear to student opinion and give H o p e College a p r o g r a m which would be beneficial to its individual students.

The Fee H i k e Students will be asked to a p p r o v e or d i s a p p r o v e of a proposed $5 increase in the Cultural Affairs fee for next y e a r during an all-campus referendum next Wednesday. We recommend that students overwhelmingly e n d o r s e the proposed increase. The c o m p l a i n t that speakers a n d entertainers b r o u g h t to the College a r e not as interesting as they m i g h t b e i s a c o m m o n one at the College. Yet this situation c a n n o t be improved if m o r e funds a r e not m a d e a v a i l a b l e to the Cultural Affairs Committee. As the letter from the committee printed below points out, the cost of p r o g r a m s is p h e n o m e n a l l y high. For a respectable cult u r a l affairs p r o g r a m , additional funds a r e a must. The B o a r d of Trustees, in denying the previous request for a hike, h a s indicated d o u b t whether students wish such a hike. If the students are to influence the B o a r d ' s decision, the vote Wednesday must he both large and overwhelmingly positive. Each individual student should help i m p r o v e our cultural affairs p r o g r a m by a p p r o v i n g the $5 increase.

Readers Speak Out

" I ' m sure I speak for all of those present in welcoming the New York Philharmonic to our c a m p u s . . . . "

Art Buchwald

Understanding Faculty by Art Buchwald One of the things that impresses people about the student demonstrations is the strong stand that some members of the faculty are taking on the issues. I was on the c a m p u s of N o r t h a m n e s t y University and ran into a professor who was trying to stop his nose from bleeding. His clothes were torn u p and he was walking with a pronounced limp. " W H A T H A P P E N E D , Professor?" I asked, as I helped him search for his glasses. " T h e militant students just took over my office and threw me down the stairs." "Why, that's terrible," I said. " F r o m m y point of view it is, but I think we h a v e to look at it from their point of view. Why did they throw mc down the stairs? Where h a v e we, as faculty, failed them?" " A r e you going to press c h a r g e s ? " " O N T H E CONTRARY. If I pressed charges, I would only be playing into the h a n d s of the repressive forces outside the university w h o would like nothing better than to see the students arrested for assault." " B u t they did assault y o u ? " "Yes. I have to admit I was surprised about that. But there was one heartening note. As they threw me down the stairs, one of the students yelled, 'It isn't you, Professor. It's the system.' " " T h a t must have made you feel better." " A S I WAS T U M B L I N G down, the thought did occur to me that at least there was nothing personal in it." " S a y , Professor, isn't that the philosophy building going u p in flames?" " I believe it is. Now, why did they have to go and set fire to the philosophy building?" " I was g o i n g to ask you that." " I ' m not quite sure, because I haven't seen any of the students since they threw me down the stairs. My guess is that it p r o b a b l y h a s to d o with something the administration and the students are at odds a b o u t . "

of high quality, o u r selections were restricted by the staggering cost of performers. At present each committee has about $10,000. Groups such as " T h e Jefferson Airplane," " B l o o d , Sweat and T e a r s " or a m a j o r s y m p h o n y orchestra ask $8,000, $ 1 5 , 0 0 0 a n d $ 8 , 5 0 0 respectively for a single performance. A musical such as ' C a b a r e t " is $ 7 , 0 0 0 , while the C a n a d i a n Opera C o m p a n y receives $ 5 , 0 0 0 for an evening. It is practically impossible to b r i n g larger g r o u p s to c a m p u s with our present budget restrictions. We wish to e x p a n d your p r o g r a m for next y e a r and to b r i n g an occasional " n a m e " g r o u p to campus, but only s t r o n g support by the student b o d y will give us a viable a r g u m e n t to present to the B o a r d of Trustees at their next meeting. Accordingly, your committee a s k s that you vote " y e s " on the proposed $ 5 increase in the cultural affairs fee when you vote Wednesday. The Cultural Affairs Committee

W

"',kl:i j'"1 a id for the students of Hope Communications Board.

" B U T T H A T ' S A terrible thing to do." " I don't think we should m a k e judgments until all facts are in. I would s a y b u r n i n g down a philosophy buildingcould be interpreted as an unlawful act. At the same time, there a r e moments when an unlawful act can b r i n g a b o u t j u s t reforms." " B u t the books, the records, the papers are all going up in smoke. Shouldn't we at least call the fire department?" " I don't believe the fire department should be called until the faculty has met and voted on what course of action should be taken. There are times when a fire department can only inflame a situation. We should also hear from the students who started the fire a n d get their side of it. After all, they h a v e as much stake in the university as a n y o n e else, a n d if they don't want a philosophy building, we should at least listen to their a r g u m e n t s . " "I NEVER THOUGHTofitthat way," I admitted. " P r o f e s s o r , I know you can't see very well without your glasses, but I believe the militant students over at the q u a d r a n g l e are building a scaffold. They wouldn't h a n g a n y o n e , wo-ild they?" They haven't before," the professor said. "But it's quite possible that this is their way of seeking a confrontation with the establishment." As we were talking, a g r o u p ofstudents rushed up a n d g r a b b e d the professor. "We got one here," the ringleader shouted. "Get the r o p e . " " D O N ' T WORRY, P R O F E S S O R , " 1 shouted as I was pushed a w a y b y t h e m o b . "I'll get the police." " I wish you w o u l d n ' t , " he s a i d c a l m l y , . as the students led him toward the scaffold. " If we don't let the students try new methods of activism, they'll never know for themselves which ones work and which ones are counterproductive." Copyright (c) 1969, The Washington Post Co. Distributed by Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

| Off COLUOf

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Dear Editor On Wednesday, May 7, students will elect representatives to c a m p u s b o a r d s and will be asked by the Cultural Affairs Committee to endorse a proposed $5 a year increase in the cultural affairs fee. IN FEBRUARY, 1969 the Student Senate supported a proposed increase in this fee but the Finance Committee of the B o a r d of Trustees denied the request. Recently (April 19) the Student Congress reaffirmed the earlier endorsement of the S e n a t e " . . .with a strongly f a v o r a b l e vote." The present cultural affairs fee of $ 1 0 a year is divided about equally between the Student Entertainment Committee and the Cultural Affairs Committee, a division that will be maintained if a $5 increase is authorized by students a n d Trustees. F o r the 1969-70 academic year nine performances have been contracted including d r a m a , dance, gospel singers, jazz, Shakesperian g r o u p s a n d two soloists. A L T H O U G H T H E PROGRAM f o r next year is, in o u r view, well-rounded and

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&

The P a r i e t a l Vote H E STRAW VOTE taken in the Student Conduct Committee meeting Wednesday was highly disappointing. The students on the committee were u n a n i m o u s l y in f a v o r of the principle of inter-room visitation and the faculty and a d m i n i s t r a t o r s were u n a n i m o u s l y in opposition to the principle. The Hope committee s t r u c t u r e c a n only function as long as students, faculiy and a d m i n i s t r a t o r s respect the strong opinions of one another. As the poll results on p a g e one point out, the student b o d y is overwhelmingly behind the institution of some f o r m of parietal hours. The vote on the principle of inter visitation was 7 9 7 to

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May 2, 1969

The Growing Middle East Dilemma -1969 s SYRIA

CYPRUS Nicosia

ISRAEL to J u n e 4, 1967 Beirut •

area overrun J u n e 5-11, 1967

HEh

MEDITERRANEAN

ISRAELS

SEA

Tel A v i v - J a f f a Amman

Jerus GAZA

DEAD SKA

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Port Said

NEGBV \ otsm

JORDAN

SINAI PENINSULA

Aqaba

SAUDI ARABIA

U.A.R. (EGYPT)

Approx. scale of miles

Assembly

Monday Night

Mid-East Conference Opens Speeches by President L a n d r u m Polling of Karlham College and Dr. Leon Levine of Illinois State University will m a r k a cultural affairs conference this week on " I s r a e l and the Arabs: The Mideast Dilemma." PRESIDENT Boiling's address, which will b e a n All-College Assembly in Dimnent Memorial Chapel at 8:15 Monday night, will deal with " T h e Role of the U.S. in the Middle Kast Crisis." His speech will be followed by a question and answer period. Dr. Levine, Director of the Institute for Middle Kast Studies, will speak T h u r s d a y at 8:15 p.m. in Winants Auditorium on "Israel's Future in the Middle Kast." A question and answer period will also follow his talk. President Boiling's b a c k g r o u n d is in journalism a n d the teaching of political science. A war-time correspondent, Mr. Boiling's center of attention was the eastern Mediterranean, a n d he h a s visited the Middle Kast n u m e r o u s limes since the war. R E C E N T L Y , President Boiling h a s been working with the MidKast crisis for the American Quakers. ()n a special mission for the Friends last spring, he met with Cabinet leaders in J o r d a n , the United Arab Republic a n d Israel. In March this year he spent considerable time in Washington and at the United Nations for the purpose of interviewing State Department officials. White House advisors, and United Nations amb a s s a d o r s from the Great Powers

Conflicting Interests

United States Whlks Tightrope By David H a v i n g a "What should be the policy of the United States toward the various Middle-Kastern countries and their tangled international relations?" It is a difficult question, one which deserves recognition as a dilemma. WHY S H O U L D T H E United States be concerned with the Middle Kast? John Badeau, in his post-June War book " T h e Amer-| ican Approach to the A r a b World," finds but two p r i m a r y American interests in the Middle Kast ( m e a n i n g interests relevant to the security of the United States to the point of requiring commitments to their defense) —continued access to the r e g i o n ' s communications facilities and continued availability of its petroleum supplies. The problem arises not over the validity of these interests but over the question of whether they are the only ones worthy of America's commitment. Is not the continued independence of Israel vital to, at least, the m o r a l security of Am erica? Shouldn't the interests of American businesses also be protected? Shouldn't the United States seek to create true democratic states in the Middle East rather t h a n dealing with archaic

Editor's Note This special a n c h o r insert contains interpretive articles by a professor and four students who h a v e special interests in the Middle Kast. Dr. J o h n Hollenbach, c h a i r m a n of the English d e p a r t m e n t , has served in the Middle East on the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n s a n d faculty of the American University of C a i r o and the American University in Beirut. Don Luidens, a senior, spent a dozen years in A r a b n a t i o n s with his parents. Reformed Church missionaries. S h a r o n Wilterdink a n d D o u g Rozendal both spent the last academic year as students at the American University in Beirut. David H a v i n g a is presently a student of Dr. Hollenbach in the Middle East Seminar class.

monarchies a n d military dictatorships? W H E N A relatively clear-cut set of interests is formulated, how should they be protected and advanced? By force or the threat of force? T h r o u g h the United Nations, whose record in the Middle Kast h a s been mixed at best? T h r o u g h negotiations a n d / o r offers of aid with and to unstable governments? If the final alternative is chosen as the basis of a combination of means, with and to whom does the United States negotiate? The radical Nasser, who seems to delight in anti-Americanism, but is the public s p o k e s m a n for much of the Arab world? The m o d e r a t e Hussein, who seems a sane voice above the babble, but

is forever on the verge of ouster? Israel, at the risk of further alienating the A r a b s ? All three? I F T H E C H O I C E is made, when will the opportunity be present to negotiate a n d / o r offer aid? When the area is, as U.N. Secretary General U Thant belatedly pointed out, in a state of w a r ? When each country wants only one form of aid — a r m s ? When each government is threatened with overthrow as a result of military defeat? These few questions, oversimplified though they are, hopefully have suggested a bit of the complexity of the American dilemma in the Middle Kast. This dilemma is but one of those to be considered by the two men speaking this week.

UN Reaches 22nd Year Of Middle East Concern By Doug Rozendal The United Nations has been involved in the Middle Kast in one capacity or another almost since its beginning. In 1947 Britain asked that the question of Palestine be b r o u g h t before the General Assembly, since Britain herself h a d been u n a b l e to reach agreement with the Jews and Arabs in Palestine. A Special Committee on Palestine was formed " t o investigate all questions and issues relevant to the problem of Palestine." The m a j o r i t y opinion was that Palestine be partitioned with provision for economic unity and the establishment of Jerusalem as a trust territory. BOTH RUSSIA AND the United States supported this proposal and it was passed in the General Assembly. A five-member commission w a s formed to supervise the plan. T h o u g h partition did take place, the Israel-Arab war which followed soon after destroyed a n y semblance of unity between A r a b a n d Jew, and Israel was expanded at the expense

of the Arab sector of the partition. More recently, from the time of the Suez crisis in 1956, the U.N. had maintained a peace-keeping force on the Israel-Kgypt border in the Gaza Strip. In May of 1967, however, Nasser ordered the U.N. forces to leave, just as both Kgypt and Israel were mobilizing their armed forces for war. The ostensible reason for this measure was to keep U.N. forces from being a party to any war. IN NOVEMBER of 1967, the Security Council passed a key resolution on the Middle Kast situation. Its main points were: 1. Withdrawal of Israeli territories occupied since the June war. 2. Respect for and acknowledgement of sovereignty, territorial integrity, and political independence of every state in the area. 3. Guarantee of freedom of navigation through international waterways, and 4. A just settlement of the refugee problem.

'4 A

and the Middle Kastern countries concerning plans for the fourpower discussions that are now underway. P R E S I D E N T Boiling gave the commencement address for the Hope g r a d u a t i n g class of 1965. Those w h o have heard him speak describe him as a " s h a r p and vigorous s p e a k e r . " He has headed Karlham College since 1958. Dr. Levine, an assistant professor of history at Illinois State University, has been active on behalf of the Israeli cause for a number of years. Dr. Levine, an a s s i s t a n t ' p r o fessor of history a n d Middle Kastern Studies at Illinois State University, is the director of that institution's Summer Institute in Israel. He holds a Ph.D. in Near Kastern and Judaic Studies from Brandeis University. Dr. Levine h a s published a number of articles on the Middle Kast, including "Arab Unity and

N a s s e r " and " I s l a m and A r a b Nationalism, A Dichotomy?" Both President Boiling and Dr. Levine will meet with the students in Dr. J o h n Hollenbach's Middle Kast Seminar and invited guests to discuss the current crisis in more detail. The discussion with Dr. Levine will especially deal with political, social and economic aspects of modern Israel. DR. H O L L E N B A C H , who co^ ordinated the conference a l o n g with Dr. Paul G. Fried, encouraged students a n d faculty to attend the Monday and T h u r s d a y speeches. " T h e Middle East," he noted, " i s a tinder box that could ignite at any time and engulf the big powers as well as the s m a l l . " It is essential that Americans understand the complex dilemma in which this area of the world finds itself t o d a y . " Both President Boiling and Dr. Levine a r e sponsored by the H o p e Cultural Affairs Committee.

Middle East Timetable By S h a r o n Wilterdink 1917—Great Britain announced the Balfour Declaration which promised a "national h o m e " in Palestine for the Jewish people with the understanding that nothing would be d o n e to restrict the rights of the indiginous A r a b population. 1922—The League of Nations officially g a v e Great Britain Mandate privileges over Palestine and T r a n s - J o r d a n (although British administration had begun in 1917). Syria a n d Lebanon were put under French administration. 1930-36—With the rise of Hitler, Jewish immigration increased greatly and caused sporadic Jewish-Arab friction. 1942—The British first began to m a k e official mention of a Jewish state a n d partition was openly discussed. 1947—Great Britain, unable to handle growing hostilities, relinquished its Palestine Mandate to the U.N. which, in turn, turned the problem over to a commission of inquiry which w a s t o make recommendations. November 29, 1947—The partition of Palestine w a s approved by the U.N. with s t r o n g support from the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. May 15, 1948—The Mandate expired. President T r u m a n recognized the state of Israel within an hour. War b r o k e out immediately. 1949—Armistice agreements m a d e under U.N. auspices. De facto borders were established at cease fire line pending a peace treaty. Israelis made considerable territorial g a i n s beyond the original U.N. borders. July, 1956—President Nasser of Egypt nationalized the Europeancontrolled Suez C a n a l and closed it to Israeli ships, thus threatening British and French interests in the Middle E a s t October 29, 1956—Israel invaded Egypt's Sinai Peninsula with the support of the British and French a n d approached the canal. November 8, 1956—Cease fire a r r a n g e d under s t r o n g U.N. pressure. Israeli forces withdrew in March of 1957. June 5, 1^)67—The third m a j o r Arab-Israeli conflict erupted after m o n t h s of increased border hostility. Increased c o m m a n d o activity, heavy Israeli reprisals, and the closing of the Gulf of A q a b a to Israel were factors. Hostilities lasted six d a y s . Israel occupied ( a n d now occupies) the Sinai peninsula of Egypt, J o r d o n ' s West Bank, A r a b Jerusalem, and the Golan Heights in Syria. November 22, 1967—The U.N. passed a six-point resolution for peace in the Middle East. Sweden's G u n n a r J a r r i n g w a s appointed special U.N. representative to work out the details. May 2, 1969—The U.N. peace resolution is still to be implemented. Big F o u r talks between the U.S., Oteat Britain, F r a n c e and the USSR are u n d e r w a y in an effort to break the stalemate. Meanwhile artillery duels across the Suez are almost a daily occurrence, c o m m a n d o activity and support is increasing and there is a constant threat of a large-scale Israeli reprisal or A r a b attack.

• H

O N STRIKB—Students at the American University of Beirut demonstrate their opposition to Israel on the a n n i v e r s a r y of the f o u n d i n g of the Zionist state. This photo w a s taken b y senior S h a r o n Wilterdink, a student last year at AUB.


Hope College anchor

PageS

May 2, 1969

Steeped in Tragic Irony have craved and worked tocreate a nation in which they can live in peace and security. But it is the story of how these people on three occasions in the last twentyfive years have felt impelled to initiate military c a m p a i g n s in order to gain, hopefully, a measure of peace and security. And this goal still eludes them. T H E ARAB STATES, her defeated military antagonists on all three occasions, h a v e refused to believe her statements of peaceful intentions and a r e reluctant to come directly to the peace table with her, especially since they feel that they h a v e a better chance in negotiations if this is done under the aegis of the United Nations. Here they count on support to question the "justice" of the founding of the state of Israel. The Israelis, in turn, are skeptical of turning to the United Nations for resolution of the Arab-Israeli conflict. So, today, an impasse exists, sporadic fighting continues, and peace and security continue to elude the people of Israel. T h e rationale of the Israeli government in the court of world opinion for the wars of 1956 a n d 1967 has been that their actions were basically defensive, preventive measures t o w a r d off the threat of large-scale aggressive actions by the A r a b states and to eliminate the persistent guerilla attacks of A r a b extremists operating from these neighboring Arab states. There is real evidence to s u p p o r t their contention. HOWEVER, T H I S rationale holds only when it is agreed that the book of the past is open only from 1950 onward. The A r a b countries have refused to d o so. The actions of the past two decades they insist are all part of the resistance to the initial " a g g r e s s i o n " of the Israelis that led to the establishment of the state of Israel.

F A I T H OF OUR FATHERS—Israeli soldiers look for the first time at the Wailing Wall, the holiest spot for the Jewish faith. F o r m e r l y part of S o l o m o n ' s Temple, the Wailing Wall was seized along with the rest of Arab Jerusalem during the Six-Day War. By Dr. J o h n Hollenbach Israel's position in the Middle East today is not an enviable one. Like her Arab neighbors she is caught in a t r a p partly of her own m a k i n g , and no move that she m a k e s is without bad consequences. S H E F A C E S T H E Herculean task of getting the rest of the world, and especially her A r a b neighbors, to forget a phase of

recent history — the events of the period between 1917 and 1948 that b r o u g h t into being the state of Israel — and to accept the reality of the present geo-political situation as the base f r o m which to proceed with peace negotiations. The history of modern Israel is filled with tragic irony. It is the story of a people, subjected to persecution - subtle and violent - over m a n y centuries, w h o

How can this action be considered a closed book when over one million living sufferers — the A r a b refugees and their children — remain as a bitter testimony? In other words, the key to their argument is the right of Israel to exist. T H E R E IS MOKE, too, behind the mood of the people of the Arab countries. In the twentieth century, with its movement toward world order, the concept of universal h u m a n rights has been advanced and has been eagerly seized upon by people in underdeveloped countries, m a n y of whom lived long under foreign domination. The principle of self-determination is especially dear to them. At the very time that the people in the Middle East were hopeful of a s s u m i n g control of their own affairs, the state of Israel, they claim, was created in the heart of " A r a b c o u n t r y , " much against the will of the Arab people, with the strong support of the Western powers. One of them. Great Britain, had been the chief foreign overlord in the Middle East d u r i n g the past half century. T H E C R E A T I O N OF Israel in the Arab eyes was, and remains, an insult to the Arab people, a blow to their self esteem, a final act of " i m p e r i a l i s m . " On this they b r o o d ; nor has it helped that the r o a d to effective self-rule and development of better s t a n d a r d s of living in the newly independent Arab states h a s been rocky, especially in those countries without the b o n a n z a of oil. The rapid development of the Israeli economy, aided especially in the early years by massive financial g r a n t s and l o a n s from the western powers, h a s added to the resentment of the Arab people. So Israel, truly desirous of establishing firm b o u n d a r i e s a n d stable, peaceful relations with her A r a b neighbors, h a s faced, since her independence day, and still

faces these strong antagonisms. What is the way out? T H E R E IS divergence of opinion a m o n g the people in and out of government in Israel. The more hawkish g r o u p feels that force and only force can bring about peace. This is the only l a n g u a g e that the Arabs will understand. The m o r e dovish group, perhaps recognizing the inability of Israel to conquer the vast land and subdue the ninety million population of the opposing A r a b countries, advocates more forbearance and conciliation. Chaim Weizm a n n , first president of the State of Israel, once wrote, " I am certain that the world will judge the Jewish State by what it will do to the A r a b s . " On the issue of self-preservation, the maintenance of the State of Israel, the Israeli people are fully united. But how to b r i n g the Arab people and the A r a b countries to accept this as fact is a source of great frustration. SINCE THE J U N E war of 1967 the question has taken on additional urgency because additional h u n d r e d s of t h o u s a n d s of A r a b s havebeen b r o u g h t under their territorial control. Thus not only security against an external foe but against resistance within the country is a matter of growing concern. In the face of the unyielding position publicly taken by most of the Arab leaders in other countries, a n d of continuing incidents of sabotage, will f o r b e a r a n c e work? Will retaliation in strength work? Will counter proposals by Israel matching the note of compromise found in King Hussein's recent statements be a step forward or will they be considered simply an indication of weakness by the Palestine Liberation fighters and cause them to press their attacks more v i g o r o u s l y ? The task of the Israeli government is truly formidable.

Tinderbox for WW III

Fedayeen and Fatalism Challenge Arab Discretion By Don Luidens With bitterness and c a n d o r the youth told of the Israeli mistreatment of his occupied village on the Gaza Strip. " T h a t is when I decided that I would become a freedom fighter," he said. HIS N A R R A T I V E is typical of the " c o n v e r s i o n " of h u n d r e d s of college and high school youths to the cause of the fedayeen — the c o m m a n d o forces comprised of Palestinian refugees and other Arabs. Since the June 1967 war, the growth of the c o m m a n d o forces h a s been phenomenal. The p r i m a r y ambition of Palestinian youngsters, f r o m g r a d e school on up, is to join the fedayeen. This d r a m a t i c upsurge in the popular supportofthecommando forces reflects the growing belief in the attitude expressed in this m a n n e r by one wizened refugee: " F O R ALMOST T E N years after the 1948 War, we waited for the Big Powers to settle our problem with Israel justly and humanely. But they failed, and in 1956 F r a n c e and Great Britain aided Israel in the invasion of our lands. Then we waited another ten years for our adopted Arab countries to solve the problem, but their petty q u a r r e l s killed the chances for a n y lasting solution. After the 1967 fiasco we decided to take matters into our own h a n d s . " So successful have the refugees been that one veteran observer of the Middle East recently asserted: " T h e fedayeen are the single most important political factor in the Middle East t o d a y . " THE F E D A Y E E N , AS the " m o s t important political factor," h a v e become the most immediate problem facing the established g o v e r n m e n t s in at least two A r a b n a t i o n s — Lebanon a n d J o r d a n . Riots in Beirut last week ( 1 6 dead and m a n y more injured) nearly toppled the government for being too slow to aid the feda-

yeen. The stated objective of the Cabinet had been to aid the comm a n d o s in any way possible, without e n d a n g e r i n g the political integrity of Lebanon. The lYemier and his Cabinet h a d been selected shortly after Israel invaded the Beirut airport, and the Cabinet was known as the most militant in Lebanese history. IN JORDAN T H E political pressure of the c o m m a n d o s is particularly felt. Ever since his g r a n d f a t h e r was assassinated b y a Palestinian for his efforts towards bringing about talks with Israel, Hussein h a s been sitting on a powder-keg. Hussein, s o long dependent upon the West for his m o n a r c h y ' s existence, h a s been repeatedly humiliated by U.S. snubs and non-action. Shakespeare wrote " u n e a s y lies the head that wears the c r o w n . " In no other modern case is that saying so true. But the factor of the activism of the fedayeen points to another m a j o r problem facing the A r a b nations. Since the June 1967 w a r , 1.5 million Palestinian refugees have been living in A r a b countries. The economic problem which confronts these nations, already bowed beneath the weight of desperate circumstances, is quite obvious. IN JORDAN, T H I S economic problem is heightened by the fact that tourism, once the chief source of income, has d r o p p e d drastically. Jerusalem and Bethlehem, the prime tourist attractions, h a v e fallen into Zionist h a n d s . In the UAR, on the other h a n d , the economic crisis which could h a v e resulted in the loss of the Suez Canal revenue h a s been averted by g r a n t s f r o m oil-rich Kuwait a n d Saudi A r a b i a . Intra-Arab power struggles h a v e long been a significant problem facing the A r a b people. Nasser and his left-leaning government are n a t u r a l l y in direct political opposition to the m o n a r c h i e s

of J o r d a n and Saudi A r a b i a . Syria, Iraq and the shiekdoms present their share to the squabbles. Yet some sort of cooperation is absolutely essential for a general solution of the Middle Kast Crisis. IN HIS R E C E N T v i s i t t o W a s h ington. King Hussein suggested that a rapprochement had been reached between Nasser and himself. How strong this alliance is, and how much weight it will c a r r y with other Arab nations, h a s yet to be revealed. Internal strife h a s also added its share of difficulties to the Arab desire for a solution to the crisis. Hussein's throne is threatened by his own citizens. Beirut is rocked by riots between Moslem and Christian. Syria continues unstable due to a struggle between the political leaders in power a n d the military heirarchy seeking power for themselves. THE INTERNAL POWER struggle in Israel has a significant b e a r i n g upon the A r a b welfare. The death of Premier Kshkol last month unleashed a P a n d o r a ' s box of rumors. One of these, most often heard and least often refuted, s a y s that Israel has not finished growing. The r u m o r concludes that the objective of the Zionists is to return Israel to its divinely o r d a i n e d borders — from the Nile to the Kuphrates. With the milit a r y might of Israel, it is unders t a n d a b l e that this d a n g e r unsettles the Arabs. The greatest problem which faces the A r a b s — and, therefore the entire world — is their psychological state of mind. After centuries of foreign d o m i n a t i o n — from the time of the Greeks until the recent British and French mandates — t h e A r a b s have not known self-government. After centuries of " t a x a t i o n without representation" the A r a b s were finally learning the meaning of "self-determination." T H E N , W I T H I N T H E last two decades, they h a v e suffered three'

humiliating military defeats and n u m e r o u s diplomatic reversals. Although they have been upheld in countless resolutions in (he UN, the A r a b s are learning that true power does not lie with justice, but with military might. The psychological " d o w n " which this realization creates is recently mjiking itself known. The Arab people are falling

back on fatalism as their only source of comfort. Fatalism breeds hatred and cynicism within a person until he loses his sense of discretion. He reacts with violence and cunning. This fatalism, I fear, is slowly gripping the A r a b peoples. Unless action is taken soon to relieve them of their pressing problems, this fatalism will breed World War III.

F A C E O F TRAGEDY—A J o r d a n i a n refugee carries two small children 1 across the Allenby Bridge out of Israeli-occupied J o r d a n following the A r a b defeat in the Six-Day War. One a n d a half million refugees crowd c a m p s a r o u n d the Israeli b o r d e r s .


A

rv May 2, 1969

Hope College anchor

Page?

anchor review

RFK Account: Readable but Syrupy Editor's Note: The anchor review this week is written by senior political science m^jor C a n d y Marr. She reviews " 8 5 Days: The Last C a m p a i g n of Robert Kenn e d y , " by Jules Witcover (New York: G. P. P u t n a m ' s Sons, 1969).

mmimd

By C a n d y Marr Political m a r t y r d o m has a unique way of deifying its victims. It blinds us to their faults, m a k e s villains of their opponents, immortalizes their words, a n d attributes to them a stature a n d universal p o p u l a r i t y never attained in life. Sharpened by the unhealed wounds of temporal proximity and personal intimacy, the tragedy does not lend itself to objective chronicling. Y E T P O L I T I C A L assassination in the a g e of the m a s s media inevitably produces a deluge of teary, sentimental accounts of the life, death and legacy of the late leader. If some are better than others, none are very g o o d ; and the responsibility of appropriately detached assessment devolves upon future generations. There is in America t o d a y a sort of " h o l y trinity" of m a r t y r s to "the c a u s e , " the most recent addition to which is the subject of the " s u p e r b example of political reportage in depth" (to quote the book jacket) here under consideration. Since the assassination of Robert Kennedy last June, sufficient time h a s elapsed to witness the publication of several volumes p u r p o r t i n g to analyze the events and implications of the "last c a m p a i g n . " " 8 5 D a y s " is veteran Washington correspondent Jules Witcover's contribution to the roster.

Little Theatre Presents City, Vietnam Films The use of the d o c u m e n t a r y film as social a n d political commentary will be demonstrated in the showing of two documentaries S u n d a y at 7r30 and 10 p.m., in the Little Theatre. T H E PROGRAM IS p a r t of the theatre department's Basement Upstairs entertainment series. Admission c h a r g e will be 2 5 cents. The first film shown will be " T h e City of Necessity," winner of the Golden Gate a w a r d at the San F r a n c i s c o film festival, and selected for showing at the Edinb u r g h festival. The film is narrated by George Ralph, a member of the H o p e College theatre faculty. It was written by Stephen C. Rose, founder and former editor of "Renewal Magazine," and produced by New York filmmaker Robert N e w m a n . " T H E C I T Y O F Necessity," a study of Chicago, is an " o p e n ended" type of d o c u m e n t a r y , suggesting that the American metropolis h a s the potential foreither wholeness a n d humanization, or f r a g m e n t a t i o n and d e h u m a n i z a tion. The second film, "Vietnam Dia l o g u e , " features journalist-historian Richard Schoenbrun in a n e x a m i n a t i o n of U.S. involvement in Vietnam, focusing on the Paris Peace Talks. Basic questions a r e raised r e g a r d i n g the relation between policy in Vietnam and racial, political a n d economic factors on the domestic front.

CANDY MARR WITCOVER WAS A member of the family of reporters assigned to the R. F.K. c a m p a i g n la; spring and his book b e a r s the m a r k of the attachment to the candidate which invariably colors the accounts from such tours. An eyewitness account it surely is, but one told from the omniscience of hindsight and the painful

memory of the events that climaxed the c a m p a i g n . " I n the a n n a l s of presidential c a m p a i g n s , " s a y s the a u t h o r at the outset, "there may never have been another like the last campaign of Robert Kennedy." More importantly, the author seems to say, there will never be one like it in the future either. He sees those 85 days, from the announcement of his c a n d i d a c y to his burial at Arlington, as a transitional period in American politics, a watershed in the history of presidential c a m p a i g n s ; and it was the person of Robert Kennedy, not the spirit of the times, which made those 12 weeks so important. WITCOVER SEEMS to be try ing to justify the Kennedy campaign as some sort of holy crusade, for R F K ' s political opponents come off like the antiChrist and non-supporters become heathens and heretics. Senator Eugene McCarthy a p p e a r s like a nightclub opening act who set the stage for the feature attraction and liked the a p p l a u s e so much he refused to get off the stage. Given time enough. Witcover is certain, Kennedy would have been able to win over the entire audience but he could have done it much sooner had not the stubborn, selfish spoiler Mc-

II

WHAT T H E F U T U R E w i l l s a y of him m a y depend u p o n what those youth are able to d o with their political power and the degree of the credit for their accomplishments which they are willing to grant him, the author asserts. If they are unable to remake America in their image, Witcover intimates, it will be their own fault for not accepting R F K ' s leadership when he offered it, for refusing to help him m a k e up for the "lost time and lost opportunity" which Witcover sees' more as stolen than lost — stolen by a vindictive political enemy; by a politically naive and mis-

guided youth movement; by all those insensitive, status quooriented American voters w h o refused to see the light and desert the enemy camp, particularly those in that " o n e giant s u b u r b " Oregon where there are no ghettos and none of the problems to which^ Kennedy addressed his campaign. " 8 5 DAYS" IS, in the final analysis, a very r e a d a b l e chronicle of an interesting c a m p a i g n and a tragic assassination, but it is h a r d l y the brilliant political) analysis which the book jacket labels it. It falls far short of objectivity; and the last chapter, entitled sentimentally, " C a m e l o t Goes On," degenerates into a s y r u p y account of "the letting g o " (the realization on the part of the Kennedy-worshippers that life must g o o n without their hero). Witcover ends his book with a whitewashing of all Kennedy's political mistakes (if, indeed, he was c a p a b l e of m a k i n g mistakes), a nostalgic analysis of aW he stood for and all the country h a s lost with his passing. He weeps for the w a y it could have been a n d the w a y it w a s not. Most of all he makes a neargod of a candidate w h o was, after all, for all his virtues and ideals, just a man.

Black And

The Subject Is Housing Submitted by Jackie Barker The purpose of what follows is to explain the need for special housing for a g r o u p of women who have a c o m m o n culture plus c o m m o n interests. An explanation would not be necessary were it not a g r o u p of black women making the request. T H I S B E I N G T H E case, all sorts of personal views c o m e to mind concerning s e p a r a t i s m , law, etc. Unfortunately, theseviewscan overshadow clear insight as to the needs of this g r o u p of women. Concerned black students request that this be read with a tremendous amount of objectivity, thought about carefully a n d then, hopefully, each person (student, faculty, and a d m i n i s t r a t o r s ) will d r a w a conclusion in support of this appeal. This request for special housing was put before Hope by a g r o u p of interested individuals. " H o p e ' s reason for bein^ is each individual student." However, the a d m i n i s t r a t o r s presented with this request immediately labeled it. as a request for "black h o u s i n g . " Once it was viewed in this context, worries about law, race relations, and so on popped up. The desires and needs of this g r o u p of interested individuals were simply brushed over. When the students are black does Hope cease to function for " e a c h individual student?" I N T H E CASE of the different houses for fraternities a n d for foreign l a n g u a g e students, Hope is not concerned that some are all white. Instead, it is because these different cases concern students with c o m m o n interests that they are housed together — some-

times, technically, the result being segregated housing. So why can't a g r o u p of interested women who are b o u n d together by something far deeper than l a n g u a g e or fraternity interests, that something being L I F E , live together? Let us look at even another reason why foreign l a n g u a g e and fraternity students are housed together. Apparently because these housing facilities offer them a means whereby they canfurther^ their Selfhood to their own personal ends and whereby they can better prepare themselves for their future. Why cannot the same means be available to black women? ASSOCIATION CAN bring about assimilation and I am sure no black student came to Hope for that purpose. I feel Hope should consider the fact that being dabbed here and there in different d o r m s steals a part of black Selfhood and denies blacks an op-^ portunity to grow and develop as black men and women or, putting it in different words, it increases the chance of their becoming " b l a c k Anglo-Saxons."^ In this alone, there is a valid reason for interested black women to have the OPTION of housing together. Might I add, that becoming even one-half "black AngloS a x o n " does not better prepare any black student for his or her future nor does it prepare this student to function c a p a b l y or happily as a proud, competent individual in the world. I feel that it is of utmost importance that I point out that having interested black women housed together does not perpetuate separation, isolation, or what

The Best of Peanuts P E A N U T S

Carthy refused to yield to the inevitable. Witcover gives a detailed and tearfully repetitious account of the tragedy of the night at the Amb a s s a d o r Hotel and " t h e long trip home;" but the real tragedy, as he sees it, lies in "the fact that he died with m a n y of those who should have supported him most — the y o u n g activists — still turned against h i m . " It is only the absence of the cold perspective of history and a lack of maturity on the part of the activist y o u n g of today which prevent the nation from according Kennedy his due.

A n RIGHT, 5 0 ^ THE OTHER TEAM 6 H 0 U E P UP..THAT DOKN'T MEANTHEVRE GOWMA W I N !

W GOCLV, WE'RE MOT 60IN6 TO B£ AMV T E A M ' ^ 0 0 6 , ' WE'RE NOT (50NWA ROLL OVER AMP PLAV PEAP FOR ANVONE!

Edited by John .?rown have you. I can emphasize this by a s s u r i n g readers of this article that my residence on Durfee's third floor has not perpetuated nor h a s it increased m y involvement, concern, or friendship. Quite the contrary, I often feel like an isolated entity. There I feel no sense of community a n d there the fact that 1 am in a hostile environment is re-enforced. DEAN OF S T U D E N T S Robert De Young stated his m a i n reason for denial of this request as being a fear of b r e a k i n g the law. No law is valid unless it meets the general consensus of the people (whose normative values are constantly changing), l l u s Dean De Young was informed that, in a n y particular cottage, after all interested black women had been housed, a number of token whites might also be housed there in whatever space might be left. However, I suppose lily-white Gilmore and Van Vleck a r e examples of upholding the law. I would think that Hope would want to provide each student with an atmosphere whereby he could function competently and adequately in his role as a student. That particular functioning is impossible when a student is forever filled with tension and anxiety or when a student is forever frustrated and lonely. E V E N T H O U G H these feelings are very h a r d to articulate, one should not forget that they d o hinder a student's ability to function capably. Evidence of these sometimes inarticulate feelings can be seen when a g o o d number of black students voice a desire to leave Hope or voice their unhappiness at Hope. Reprinted

These feelings d o not h a v e to be voiced when you enter a sister's r o o m to find her crying or when you yourself become s o tense and frustrated that you become physically ill. These feelings are not unfounded. They are fostered by RA's who forever pester you at the " r e q u e s t " of other whites on your floor; by your g o o d white friends who speak to you on the floor, but once they are in public, they suddenly find their feet very pleasing to the eye; by the fact that no whites on your floor stop in to talk to you, only to get something; by the fact that you discover so m a n y whites w h o are so subtle in their racism that you become sickened by the sight of them and purposely alienate them, and so on. T H I S , OF COURSE, does not rule out a n u m b e r of blatant racists. Whites w h o call you "nigg e r , " those w h o burn crosses, etc. Blacks came to Hope to get an " e d u c a t i o n " — to function as students, and I would h o p e that the Hope College community would feel that they a r e worth the trouble of h a v i n g their needs attended. Before closing, might I also stress that blacks are on this campus as students, and not as redeemers of white people. I WOULD L I K E to close by asking readers of this article to rally a r o u n d the request, by a g r o u p of interested women who are black, for special housing. Consider the r e a s o n s behind such a request and evaluate it not in terms of your own personal values or desires, but in terms of its a s k e r s ' values, desires, a n d needs.

by permission

of the Chicago

UJOOF!

Tribune


Page 8

Hope College anchor

Most Courses Ever

Ken De Groot Named Head of Alumni Fund K e n n e t h P. E. De Groot, a m e m ber of the College B o a r d of T r u s tees a n d a Director at L a r g e of the A l u m n i Association, h a s been a p p o i n t e d c h a i r m a n of the 1 9 6 9 A l u m n i F u n d Drive. MR, D E G R O O T is president and g e n e r a l m a n a g e r of the U.S. Federal Engineering of San Diego, a research c o m p a n y eng a g e d in development a n d production of mechanical a n d electronic c o m p o n e n t s and systems. F r o m 1960 to 1967, he w a s the o r g a n i z e r , president a n d director of the lYemier S a v i n g s a n d L o a n Association of Orange, Calif., an association the assets of which grew f r o m n o t h i n g to $18 million. He resigned following merger J n 1967. Mr. De Groot! is a 1945 g r a d uate of H o p e College. He inter-

Hope Offers Varied Program

rupted his college studies to join the United States N a v y in 1943. F o l l o w i n g g r a d u a t i o n , he attended N o r t h w e s t e r n University, f r o m which he received a m a s t e r ' s degree in investment finance. MR. D E G R O O T is a m e m b e r of the IVesident's Council of Chapm a n College in O r a n g e , Calif., s e c r e t a r y - t r e a s u r e r of the O r a n g e C o u n t y Wine a n d F o o d Society, vice president o f t h e O r a n g e County S a v i n g s a n d L o a n League, a n d is a m e m b e r of the C h a m b e r s of C o m m e r c e in O r a n g e a n d S a n t a Ana. Mr.De G r o o t w o r k e d in C h i c a g o and Greenville, Mich, before m o v i n g to C a l i f o r n i a in 1955. He h a s served a s the president and director of the Sierra S a v i n g s and L o a n Association of San Bernad i n o , Calif.

FREE! GARMENT

May 2, 1 * 0

This s u m m e r the H o p e College S u m m e r School will offer a v a r i e t y of c o u r s e s a n d p r o g r a m s for h i g h school s e n i o r s , college students, high s c h o o l t e a c h e r s and g r a d u a t e students.

selected high school students, in which the student is given a chance to try college w o r k to g a i n a d m i s sion to H o p e College in the fall. THE SUMMER UPWARD B o u n d p r o g r a m is a n e d u c a t i o n a l project designed to include 4 0 d i s a d v a n t a g e d high s c h o o l students f r o m Greater M u s k e g o n a n d Ottawa C o u n t y in a seven-week s u m m e r e x p e r i m e n t a l course.

C o u r s e s will be offered in the d e p a r t m e n t s of art, b i o l o g y , econ o m i c s a n d business a d m i n i s t r a tion, e d u c a t i o n , English, foreign l a n g u a g e , history, m a t h e m a t i c s , p h i l o s o p h y , political science, physical e d u c a t i o n , p s y c h o l o g y , religion, s o c i o l o g y , speech a n d theatre.

Under s p o n s o r s h i p of the N a tional Science F o u n d a t i o n , special w o r k s h o p s will be offered to high school teachers in the a r e a s of chemistry, m a t h e m a t i c s a n d biology.

T H E S U M M E R session, except l a n g u a g e a n d special p r o g r a m s , will begin on J u n e 2 3 a n d will c o n t i n u e until Aug. 1. T h e foreign l a n g u a g e p r o g r a m s , which a r e offered in French, G e r m a n a n d S p a n i s h , will continue until Aug. 15. Eight credit h o u r s will be given for these.

Under the S l o a n F o u n d a t i o n p r o g r a m a n i n v i t a t i o n a l six-week c o u r s e in pre-calculus will be given to high s c h o o l g r a d u a t e s who wish to i m p r o v e m a t h e m a t i c s skills before entering the science p r o g r a m in the fall.

Classes will meet, u s u a l l y in the m o r n i n g , for 3 0 minutes for every class credit h o u r , five d a y s a week. The S u m m e r Trial Session, is a six-week p r o g r a m , set u p for

STORAGE

ALSO T H I S s u m m e r t h e N S O A Youth o r c h e s t r a Conference a n d the NSOA High School string T e a c h e r s Conference will be held

a t y o u r convenience. P h o n e : EX 6 - 4 6 9 7

DOWNTOWN

WESTERN MICHIGAN'S

Pay n o t h i n g u n t i l Fall

GREETING CARD CENTER SHIRT LAUNDRY

School Supplies

LEAN ECS

Clip & Save —

& BEAUTY

43c Value

PANTY HOSE TOOTHPASTE 99c 19c

4 3 E. 8 t h S t r e e t

-r-r

Tablets

C0PPERT0NE

Bottle of 1 0 0

Tanning Butter

$ 1 . 0 0 Value M I A Pressed

29c

89c

FACE POWDER Brush-On or Compact

Spearmint Limit Two

19c

6 Ox. A e r o s o l S p r a y

M a d e b y R a y e t t e Fabergej

Limit One

Limit Two

I

rr

T

69c Value

Sudden Beauty

Squibb

59c V a l u e Kiwi

$ 1 . 4 9 Value

SHOE POLISH

TOOTHBRUSH 39c

89c V a l u e

Gillette Knack

Schick K r o n a C h r o m e

RAZOR

Black o r B r o w n Paste

29c

89c

RAZOR BLADE!

3 Oz. Can

Limit Two

Limit Two

cr.

49c r-f-

5 . 8 Ox. Reg. Size Jergens

SOAP 4 Bars

15c

$1.29 Value $ 1 . 8 9 Value VO-5

A r r i d Extra Dry

SHAMPOO

DEODORANT

BARNES & HIND Wetting Solution

89c

79c

15 O z . Plastic B o t t l e Limit 4 Bars

|

-i—'

87c V a l u e

Limit Two

Gifts

$ 1 . 5 0 Value

A. P. C.

Macleans

49c

-

T h e Pels o r g a n is on l o a n to the College t h r o u g h a r r a n g e m e n t with the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d Joh a n n Heerspink, G r a n d R a p i d s p r e s e n t a t i v e of the Pels a n d Van Leeuwen firm of A l k m a a r .

T~1

Opaque

J

Party Goods

AIDS

T"!

HAIR SPRAY

The H o p e College String Quartet a n d o r g a n i s t Roger Davis will present a concert of c h a m b e r music S u n d a y at 4 p.m. in Winants Auditorium. M e m b e r s of the qiartet a r e violinists H a r r i s o n Ryker a n d David T u b e r g e n , violist Mrs. W a n d a N i g h Rider a n d cellist Robert Ritscma.

DOWNTOWN DISCOUNT

DVER 5000 NATIONALLY ADVERTISED

HEALTH

-

Stationery

Holland, Michigan

Limit 2 Pair per Coupon

Organist Davis, Faculty Quartet Present Recital

M r . D a v i s will j o i n with the q u a r tet in a p e r f o r m a n c e of the " H a n del C o n c e r t o for O r g a n and Strings, Op. 4, No. 5 . " Mr. D a v i s will be p e r f o r m i n g on the College's new Pels o r g a n . The b a r o q u e o r g a n is v e r y s i m i l a r to the one for which H a n d e l originally c o m p o s e d this work and on which the work received its first performance.

NEXT TO PENNEYS

W e w i l l r e f u n d t h e d i m e f o r y o u r call

Coupons Expire May 10, 1969

F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n concerni n g cost, r e g i s t r a t i o n , specific c o u r s e s offered, c o u r s e i n s t r u c t o r s a n d specific times, a bulletin of H o p e College S u m m e r School m a y be o b t a i n e d in the l o b b y of V a n Raalte Hall.

The s t r i n g quartet will p e r f o r m the Quartet in F M a j o r , Op. 9 6 b y Antonin D v o r a k , a n d a string q u a r t e t b y Polish c o m p o s e r Witold Lutoslawski.

W e w i l l pick up y o u r s t o r a g e o t y o u r d o r m

College at 6 t h

f o r a week in Augus t. In a d d i t i o n , an I n t e r n a t i o n a l P r o g r a m , in wnich students f r o m other countries c a n study A m e r i c a n culture, l a n g u a g e , e d u c a t i o n a n d society, will be held.

99c 2 Oz. Bottle

Limit O n e _i_L

i i ""I "I I I


Hope College anchor

May 2, 19$9

On The Wall

God Would've By D a v e Allen

A

JAPANESE TREAT—Freshman K a y Oae and junior Hideaki K i n o s h i t a , b o t h of J a p a n , d e m o n s t r a t e J a p a n e s e f l o r a l a r r a n g i n g t o the guests at I n t e r n a t i o n a l N i g h t in Phelps Hall last S a t u r d a y n i g h t Entert a i n m e n t for the evening w a s p r o v i d e d b y H o p e s f o r e i g n students, w h o c o m e f r o m 2 6 foreign countries, w h o either p e r f o r m e d or d e m o n s t r a t e d s o m e aspect of their c o u n t r y ' s culture.

Extra-Curricular Committee Tables Propsal by AAUP T h e E x t r a - C u r r i c u l a r Activities Committee on April 18 p r o p o s e d a new policy on c a m p u s o r g a n i z a tions submitted b y the H o p e c h a p ter o f t h e the A m e r i c a n Association of University Professors. The p r o p o s a l states that the College h a s the right to request a n a d v i s o r to a student o r g a n i z a tion. D A V E P A V L I C K , a student m e m b e r of the A A U P committee c o m p o s e d of students a n d faculty which d r e w u p the policy statement, said " e a c h o r g a n i z a t i o n s h o u l d h a v e a c o n s u l t a n t acting a s a l i a s o n between the College and o r g a n i z a t i o n to establish better C o m m u n i c a t i o n . " Dr. Elizabeth Reedy, w h o a l s o helped write the p r o p o s a l , noted " t h e A A U P statement is unofficial a n d w a s not r e a d y to be reviewed b y the E A C . " " T H E P O L I C Y , c o n c e r n i n g student o r g a n i z a t i o n will be r e a d y for EAC c o n s i d e r a t i o n after a final policy h a s been reached b y the A A U P committee a n d the cons o r t i u m , which includes such org a n i z a t i o n s as Believe a n d Action G r o u p , the Black Coalition a n d the New Democratic Left. The A A U P policy statement notes that " e a c h o r g a n i z a t i o n

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s h o u l d be free to c h o o s e its own c o n s u l t a n t ( a m e m b e r o f t h e faculty o r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n of the College), and institutional recognition s h o u l d not be withheld or w i t h d r a w n solely because of the inability of a student o r g a n i z a tion to secure a c o n s u l t a n t . " After much d i s c u s s i o n concerning the c o n t r o l of o r g a n i z a t i o n s a n d responsibility of the College for these o r g a n i z a t i o n s , the motion to send the p r o p o s e d policy statement to the C a m p u s Life B o a r d was t a b l e d b y C h a i r m a n Phil R a u w e r d i n k . T H E A A U P S T A T E M E N T will be reviewed at the EAC meeting tod a y , a c c o r d i n g to R a u w e r d i n k .

The first time it h a p p e n e d , 1 m e a n the first birth, w a s only a b o u t a year a n d a half after all the p l a n e s fell out of the s k y . T H E B L I M P S F E L L too. And kites, b a l l o o n s a n d gliders; they all fell. E v e r y t h i n g that flew, except b i r d s , b a t s a n d butterflies, fell out of the skies, all over the w o r l d . Paper gliders as well a s satellites plummeted t o w a r d e a r t h s i m u l t a n e o u s l y on that one d a y . Naturally there were m a n y c a s u a l t i e s and s o m e e m b a r r a s s ing incidents when m o r e t h a n one p l a n e fell in a c o u n t r y over which it s h o u l d n ' t h a v e been. Planes that were t a x i i n g d o w n r u n w a y s never got off the g r o u n d a n d helicopters s u s p e n d e d in air like d r a g o n f l i e s ( w h o a l s o didn't fall) d r o p p e d like rocks, their r o t o r s still b e a t i n g . B U T IT S H O U L D be noted that e v e r y t h i n g m a n m a d e that flew d r o p p e d s t r a i g h t to the g r o u n d , and m a y b e t h a t ' s what a m a z e d people m o s t of all. Maybe one c a n conceive of a stubwinged jet d r o p p i n g like a rock, but dirigibles a n d folded p a p e r gliders? — it w a s like physics d i d n ' t work a n y m o r e . And, a s a matter of fact, o u r physics, as we k n o w it, d i d n ' t w o r k a n y m o r e . Not on? did every object fall, but n o n e went u p a g a i n — a n d that b o t h e r e d people even m o r e . Now a j o k e ' s a joke, but when you fill a b a g full of helium a n d it d o e s n ' t g o up, d o e s n ' t m o v e , doesn't d o a n y thing, s o m e t h i n g ' s w r o n g . NOW D O N ' T B L A M E helium or hot air because they still acted like they a l w a y s did, they went u p b e i n g lighter t h a n air, but put them in a n y t h i n g m a n - m a d e and nothing happened. H u n d r e d s of t h o u s a n d s of kids all over the world folded millions

of sheets of p a p e r into gliders, but n o t h i n g h a p p e n e d except that the p a p e r p l a n e s just fell. B U T O N A m o r e sophisticated ( a n d f r i g h t e n i n g level) there were the physicists a n d a e r o - d y n a m i c engineers w h o s u p p o s e d l y knew why things flew, o r r a t h e r were s u p p o s e d to fly. In brief, they couldn't e x p l a i n it. It's not that the world h a d c h a n g e d because as n e a r l y a s they could figure, it h a d n ' t , but the physics of flight h a d (of course, you s a y , it c o u l d n ' t h a p p e n , but the fact is, it did). In d e s p e r a t i o n the physicists decided that there m u s t be a new physics, a l t h o u g h they d i d n t k n o w how to identify it if they found it, a n d a new w a y of flying to match it. So they tried flying ions, and m e s o n s , g a m m a particles and anti-matter — nothing w o r k e d , but they kept on trying. T H E T H E O L O G I A N S though, a n d religious people in general, had a different idea, in fact, a solution. The word for the d a y was " I f God h a d w a n t e d you to fly He w o u l d ' v e given you wings!" The fine Calvinist tradition was at last b e i n g upheld, a s m o s t believed it to be, b y the h a n d of God. There were even sects of certain right

U S E D BOOK P O L I C Y The bookstore will soon be buying back books for next semester (fall). It is the policy of the Blue Key to pay 50'/o to 60% of purchase price on most (not all) hard cover texts — paperbacks less and resell at 75%. EXAMPLE: WORLD LIT. TEXT, sells for $8.45 — we pay $5.10 we sell for $6.25 (12% — 76c Cost of doing business) our profit 44c.

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wing churches, m o s t l y t h o s e in C a l i f o r n i a , w h o saw the event a s a fore-shad owing of the cataclysm, the end of m a n a n d his machines. Religion w a s h a v i n g its d a y and science w a s s h a m e - f a c e d l y scratching its c o m m u n a l h e a d in feeble attempts to e x p l a i n a w a y the matter or c o m e to a m o r e p r o v a b l e solution. " B u t , " the t h e o l o g i a n s a r g u e d , "it h a s been proven!" B U T T H E N , I N a n s w e r , she was b o r n , the first of m a n y . She looked like, of all things, n o r m a l . Or almost n o r m a l . Her legs were short and her b o n e s were hollow, but, what w a s most a m a z i n g of all, she h a d wings: batlike, thin wings, attached where a r m s a r e s u p p o s e d to be! There were m a n y children b o r n this w a y , in fact all b a b i e s b o r n a n y w h e r e had these b a t w i n g s instead of a r m s . T H E I N I T I A L E V E N T in a s m a l l town hospital c a p t u r e d the i m a g i n a t i o n of the world to a greater degree t h a n a n y t h i n g that h a d ever h a p p e n e d before. Only one thing o v e r s h a d o w e d that event. On the d a y she w a s b o r n all c a r s , buses and r a i l r o a d s , a n y t h i n g that h a d wheels, stopped moving. People h a d to m a k e a decision.

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Page It

Hope College anchor

May 2, 1969

Nichols, Bnitfgers Win

Hope Takes 7th in GLCA Meet By Pete Struck a n c h o r Reporter H o p e College claimed two individual firsts while finishing seventh out of 11 schools in the Great Lakes College Association track meet at Oberlin S a t u r d a y . Dutch r u n n e r s captured a total of eight places in all d u r i n g the competition.

TRAPPED—Catcher Marly S n o a p a n d third b a s e m a n Jim L a m e r run down a Spring Arbor b a s e r u n n e r d u r i n g their d o u b l e h e a d e r T u e s d a y . Hope took the first g a m e , 6 4 , and lost the second, 6-2.

Dutchmen Split Twinbill With Tommies; 2-1, 5-4 By Bill Hoffman a n c h o r Reporter The H o p e C o l l e g e b a s e b a i l t e a m b r o k e out of a n eight-game losing streak last S a t u r d a y , edging Aquinas College 5-4 in the nightcap of a doubleheader after losing the opener, 2-1. The Dutch continued winning taking the first game of a doubleheader T u e s d a y against Spring Arbor 6-4, only to lose the second 6-2.

IN T H E F I R S T gam-? of the doubleheader against n q u i n a s G a r y Frens took the loss. The g a m e was marked by exv llent pitching from Frens, striking out six a n d w a l k i n g three, and flawless defense. The Dutch bats unfortunately couldn't m a k e good contact with the curve balls of the A q u i n a s hurler. Hope did m a n a g e to scrape together four hits and a run as Ken Otte b r o k e a seveng a m e batting slump. Aquinas, though outplayed, scored their first run in the third inning on a walk, sacrifice bunt and a b a s e hit to left. The winning home run blast c a m e in the fifth inning after two were out. DICK NORDSTROM went the first five innings of the second game, giving u p five hits and one r u n before he ran into trouble and was relieved by Bill O'Connor. In the seventh O ' C o n n o r had trouble finding the r a n g e as he walked three and gave up a base hit. Greg G o r m a n relieved O'Connor a n d ended the inning after three more r u n s had crossed the plate.

In contrast to the first game, the Dutch bats were active. Hope opened the third inning with a triple by Bob Cooper, w h o had four hits. C o o p e r scored on a b a s e hit by T e r r y Stehle and Jim Lamer added two more with a home run. Hope scored single r u n s in the fourth and seventh innings to win the g a m e , 5-4. P I T C H I N G WAS once a g a i n the big problem against Spring Arbor. In the winning effort Stehle required aid f r o m O ' C o n n o r in the sixth inning. The second g a m e saw Frens take the loss after relieving N o r d s t r o m . Frens struck out the lead-off hitter, but then g a v e u p a hit and four successive walks, putting the g a m e out of reach for Hope.

T R U E S D E L L , O F O H I O Wesleyan, won the shot put by a full two feet with a put of 5 0 , 4 , ^ That herculean effort is nearly five feet better than the existing Hope record which h a s stood since 1937. Ward, of E a r l h a m College, won both the l o n g j u m p and the high j u m p setting new meet records in both events. Ward's winning distance in the long j u m p w a s 23*6 3 / 4 " a n d he beat his closest competitor in the high j u m p by four inches as he cleared 6 , 6 M . M I K E BROWN O F Hope fin ished fifth in the discus as Lokey of K e n y o n won the event with a toss of 1 3 6 ' 1 1 " . Two more meet records were established in the triple j u m p and pole vault. Shade, f r o m E a r l h a m

Golfers Eighth in Invitational; Will Battle Kalamazoo Today By Bob Scott a n c h o r Reporter In their last meet prior to entering MIAA competition, the Hope College golf team finished eighth of 16 schools in the Alma Invitational golf t o u r n a m e n t last Friday. SOPHOMORE D R A K E Van Beek led the Dutchmen as he fired an 81 over A l m a ' s home course. Closely following him were teammates Fred M u l l e r a n d T o m Page, both holing out at 82. Rounding out Hope's team total of 3 3 0

Netmen To Face Kazoo In Crucial MIAA Meet The Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association tennis title m a y be decided t o m o r r o w at 2 p.m. when the flying Dutchmen face the Hornets of K a l a m a z o o at home. Hope and defending c h a m p i o n K a z o o are expected to A •oqf be the best i" the ' "•

WABASH C O L L E G E won its second straight team title, easily outdistancing host Oberlin. The c h a m p s totaled 102 points, Oberlin 69, Wooster 66, E a r l h a m 52, Ohio Wesleyan 51, Denison 50, Hope 411/2, De Pauw SS'/a, Albion 31, K e n y o n 21, and Kalam a z o o 10. Doug Nichols captured Hope's first gold medal in the javelin with a winning distance of 1 8 7 ' 9 " . Kent C a n d e l o r a of Hope also placed fifth for the Dutchmen in the event.

were E a r l h a m , Kenyon, Albion and Wabash. Hope's first two singles men reached the finals and were then defeated. Senior Doug B a r r o w lost to Brummet of K a l a m a z o o , 6 4 , 0-6, 6 4 , with Visscher losi*^ ' ; Hughs of Do Pauw, 6-?

points w a s Bill P'orbes with an 85. Hope w a s second only to Alma ( 3 2 9 points), the defending MIAA c h a m p i o n , with Adrian a n d Calvin finishing tenth and twelfth respectively. T H E ALMA Invitational closed out a series of t o u r n a m e n t s that were introduced to the Dutchmen's schedule this year. Coach Robert Brown h o p e s that such t o u r n a ment play will generate m o r e interest in golf at H o p e and thus attract m o r e interested individuals from the a r e a . Reflecting on the season thus far. Coach Brown felt that perf o r m a n c e s h a v e been exactly what he expected. He seemed greatly e n c o u r a g e d by the s t r o n g interest and enthusiasm displayed b y this y e a r ' s team. Coach Brown a l s o noted that his team h a s the potential to s u r p r i s e m a n y people in future m^ets. IN J T S F I R S T MIAA test of the season, the Dutch will face K College today Kn'amazoo F r o m e a r ' v 11s"

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College, set the new record in the first event with a j u m p of 45*5 3 / 4 " . Noth, a Wooster College representative, went over the b a r at in the pole vault to set the new m a r k . H o p e ' s Bill Bekkering finished in third place four inches behind the leader. D U T C H M A N RICK Bruggers won the mile run with a clocking of 4:19.2. T h a t time is one tenth of a second better t h a n his MIAA record. J o h n Shively of Ohio Wesleyan finished second in 4:20.9. Shively is the only r u n n e r who h a s beaten B r u g g e r s this s e a s o n . B o w e r m a n of Wabash finished fir • in the two-mile run in a time ol 35.4. Shively a g a i n placed second. FOX WON T H E 120-yard high hurdles for Denison College in a > ime of 14.9. Wooster's Sollman . n the 4 4 0 - y a r d intermediate r... dies with a clocking of 5 4 . 9 4 i- establish yet another meet record. Dave T h o m a s finished second in that event for the Dutch, six-tenths of a second behind the winner. T h o m a s holds the MIAA record in that event with a time of 54.2. Allen of W a b a s h won both of the dashes. His winning time in the 100-yard event w a s 9.9 seconds and 2 2 . 2 seconds in the 2 2 0 - y a r d sprint. WABASH A L S O WON the 4 4 0 y a r d relay with a time of 42.3. The Hope f o u r s o m e of Hudson

Wilson, T h o m a s Ralph Schroeder a n d Walt Reed finished tied for fifth. Oberlin's Wiley won the 440y a r d d a s h in 49.4. Birkbeck of Denison placed first in the halfmile run, crossing the finish line in 1:56.6. Rich F r a n k of Hope finished fifth in the event with a g o o d time of 1:58.3. WOOSTER WON T H E mile r e lay in 3 : 2 3 . 1 minutes. H o p e will resume dual meet competition S a t u r d a y as they face the Hornets of K a l a m a z o o at Kalamazoo.

Peace Corps Tests Approach Peace C o r p s entrance e x a m i n a tions will be given May 17 and J u n e 2 1 at 1:30 p.m. The e x a m i n a t i o n will be given t h r o u g h o u t the c o u n t r y on these dates. Local e x a m i n a t i o n sites are G r a n d Rapids ( Room 2 0 5 , Post Office Building, 2 2 5 Michigan St., N.W.) and K a l a m a z o o ( R o o m 53, Court Station, 4 10 W. Michigan Avenue). A complete listing of test centers c a n be obtained by writing the Peace C o r p s ' Midwest r e g i o n a l office (Peace Corps, 2 0 5 West Wacker Drive, Room 1510, Chic a g o , Illinois 6 0 6 0 6 ) .

Review of the News By H a r o l d K a m m Paris General Charles De Gaulle resigned M o n d a y as President of F r a n c e after serving since 1958. The 78-year-old general acted four h o u r s after his government h a d been defeated on an a m b i t i o u s legislative referendum which involved Constitutional reform that would h a v e changed the French Senate into a consultive body. In his last a p p e a l . Gen. De Gaulle asked his c o u n t r y m e n for " a show of confidence" that would permit him to serve out his term, which would h a v e ended in 1972. The defeat of the regime and the resignation of the President were events of such m a g n i t u d e that most Frenchmen h a d doubted that they would occur. Alain Poher, the Senate President, is the interim President and will o r g a n i z e Presidential elections n o s o o n e r than 2 0 d a y s and n o later t h a n 3 0 d a y s from now. Georges P o m p i d o u , d r o p p e d by President De Gaulle a s premier l a s t s u m m e r , was given u n a n i m o u s s u p p o r t b y the ruling committee of the Gaullist party. Pompidou pledged "stability" and c o n t i n u a t i o n of the Gaullist Fifth Republic. It w a s reported that Pompidou toM Gaulli-' 4 • J ^ :

raeli c o m m a n d o units traveled deep inside Egyptian territory to raid bridges and power plants. U N Secretary-General U Thant said that the troubled area was virtually in a state of war.

Washington, D.C. President Richard Nixon s p o k e out this week on c a m p u s d i s o r d e r s before a session of the U.S. C h a m b e r of C o m m e r c e u r g i n g school officials not to s u r r e n d e r to force" i n c a m p u s disorder. There c a n be " n o c o m p r o m i s e with lawlessness," he said, if free education is to survive. Nixon declared that peaceful dissent is welcome and called the current generation of students " o n e that deeply cares a b o u t A m e r i c a . " But " u n d e r n o circumstances," he declared, " s h o u l d students be given control of the colleges and universifies."

Washington, D.C. A proposed Constitutional a m e n d m e n t that would s c r a p the current Electoral College system won endorsement by a 28-6 House J u d i c i a r y Committee vote with s t r o n g bipartis a n support. T h e committee v '

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05-02-1969  
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