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H o p e C o l l e g e • H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n • A n i n d e p e n d e n t n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • S e r v i n g t h e H o p e C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r I 10 y e a r s

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Smoking banned in all housing STACY BOGARO campusbeat editor

Whose time is it anyway? Religion,

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Absent members on the Campus Life Board could have made the difference in the vote to ban smoking in all college residences in a special meeting held last Thursday, April 10. Only seven members of the Board's eleven voted 4-3 in favor of the resolution for "all campus housing to be smoke free beginning in the fall of 1997." Those not in attendance included Chaplain Delores Nasral|ah, Ron Wolthuis, associate professor of education, and Ryan Cook ('97), Student Congress president. Another representative from Congress, Jeremy Beard ('97), was also on the Board, but due to lack of attendance had lost his position in Congress. Vice President Katy Whitfield ('98) was asked to attend in his place, but did not attend. She would not have been able to vote since she is not a

formal member. Cook stated that he felt his presence was not needed due to the response he received in the previous meeting on April 1. and the fact that the resolution would be passed with or without his support. "They pretty much told us at the last meeting that our vote doesn't count and that they were going to pass it no matter what. T h e y d o n ' t give a d a m n about what we think," he said. "They would have done it in the summer. The only reason why they are going through the proper channel is so it looks good." Richard Frost, Dean of Students and also a member of the Board, disagreed with Cook's statement. "I do not believe that the Campus Life m e m bers ever stated or implied that student input is

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not important and essential to any discussion," h e s a i d . "I a l s o d o n o t b e l i e v e t h a t t h e resolution's outcome was known at the earlier meeting." Wolthuis was unable to attend due to u n c h a n g e a b l e lans made before t h e d e c i s i o n to hold a special meeting was finalized. D u e to a r e s o l u t i o n in their Constitution, Student Congress members must vote in the committees to reflect the vote that takes place in Congress. Cook would have m o r e N O SMOKE on 8

Hocus Opus A r t Dept. secretary and w r i t e r publishes first book. Intermission,

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Finai S t u d e n t Congress f o r u m cancelled. Campusbeat,

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A " Men's tennis reach coveted ten-win mark. Sports,

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T h e life o f a dance m a j o r can be q u i t e a balancing act.

Spotlight, p a g e 10.

^Disappearing funds endanger the Opus Visiting Writers Series. M I R I A M BEYER staff r e p o r t e r

Funding for the arts is no longer an issue only to be considered at the national level. Right here, in the m i c r o c o s m of Hope College, an identical c o n t r o v e r s y is r a g i n g . With the Student Congress Appropriations Committee's recent passing of the 1997-98 student activities budget to which each student, through the Student Activity Fee, contributes, the Visiting Writers Series has received serious cuts, and feelings on both sides are running high. The Visiting Writers Series is an activity conducted through the student organization OPUS. The series has run for over a decade, and has b r o u g h t w r i t e r s such as C h i a m Potok and Pulitzer Prize winner Gwendolyn Brooks to campus. Its mission is to bring diversity to the H o p e and Holland c o m m u n i t i e s , and to allow for contact between writers and Hope students. Jack Ridl, a professor in the English Department and the founding father of the series, says the whole thing started because he and his wife just wanted to give something to the college that it didn't already have. With funding f r o m his own pocket and an anonymous donor, Ridl started the series in the DePree Art Gallery, where attendance averaged perhaps 30 to 35 people. The series has since grown into an event held at the Knickerbocker Theatre where crowds reach 450 to 500. Student Congress started helping with the funding of the series approximately five years ago. M e m bers of Congress approached OPUS and asked them to help bring '60s novelist Kurt Vonnugut to campus. T h e two g r o u p s then decided to continue working together in order to expand and enhance the series. With the combined income, OPUS was able to bring in more prestigious writers from across the nation. As the series grew, O P U S asked for a larger budget from Congress, and received it. T h i s is what Ridl finds ironic about the recent cuts. m o r e OPUS on

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Anchor photo by Zach Johnson

C O M E A L I T T L E C l - O S E f l z Hasan Choudhry ('97), Sheryl Gabriel ('97), Deepa Ramakrishna ('97) and Khurram Ahmed ('00) performed a wedding dance in Images.

Images crosses c u l t u r a l l i n e s and Peru, which Muriuki was able to do on a few occasions, leaving the disheartened women behind. Framed by the flags of the naThe entertainment ranged from tions they represent, a "cultural col- upbeat African drumming to mel a g e " of over 100 students per- rengue and dancing ceremonies, to formed through song, dance, poetry somber and moving poetry readand fashion last Saturday night in ings from Palestine and Bulgaria. Each sought to give a glimpse into Images '97: A Reflection of Culthe culture of the country through tures. The third annual event took place its people. "Images gives us the opportunity in the f u l l - t o - c a p a c i t y K n i c k e r bocker Theatre and provided a full to pause and listen and hear the stoevening of activities beginning at ries of other people. We are able to 6 p.m. with an international bazaar, pause and reflect on our own heritage. the spirit of followed by a variety show and a who we are," party in the Kletz said Laurie E n g l e , Images as the grand fiI m a g e s g i v e s us t h e c o o r d i n a t o r and nale. Admission opportunity to hear w a s f r e e to all International Stuevents. dent Advisor. the stories of other The perforThe internap e o p l e . W e a r e a b l e mances were intional bazaar int e r s p e r s e d with cluded samplings to reflect on o u r video introducfrom each of the own heritage. tions to a major16 countries that gave a glimpse ity of the coun— L a u r i e Engle tries represented. into the culture of Images Coordinator This was overthe people. laid with an exMaster and Mistresses of Ceremony, Muturi ample of the nation's music that Muriuki ('97), Fatin Muhawi ('97) helped to place the audience in each and Jackie Williams ('00) opened of the show's destinations. Fashion the variety show and introduced shows also helped to set the scene for a variety of countries with stueach performance with humor and e x c i t e m e n t . Each was ready to d e n t s s p o r t i n g traditional dress leave snowy Michigan and lake off along with some more modern day for the warmer climates of Hawaii examples. STACY BOGARD campusbeat editor

"1 felt I was celebrating not only my ethnicity, but I felt part of other people's cultures through participating and just watching," said Fabi Monroy ('99). Rhythm Jungle entertained the crowd with their rhythmic African drumming for the opening act. This was soon followed by Muhawi and Jalaa' Abdelwahab ('97) who spoke of the grief faced by a Palestinian in search of his identity through the poem "Identification Card." "It was really interesting seeing the different cultures, especially the Palestinian poem. It was enlightening to "me," said attendee Liz Hall COO). Three wedding dances provided a glimpse at the differing traditions that exist throughout the world. Each expressed the happiness of the occasion, while amusing the audience with the antics of the performers. The Palestinian wedding involved a dueling slick dance, while Khurram Ahmed ('00) and Hasan Choudhry ('97) held a competition w i t h S h e r y l G a b r i e l ( ' 9 7 ) and Deepa Ramakrishna ( ' 9 7 ) in the Indian/Pakistani wedding dance to show who was better, the bride or the groom. Following a brief intermission the acts c o n t i n u e d , i n c l u d i n g Kremena Todorova ('97). who used her gift for poetry to detail the differences between Holland and her m o r e IMAGES on 2


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Campus Beat

S m o k e in Kollen, small fire in Phelps Kollen Hall East on Saturday, April 12 had students waiting outside as fire officials tried to determine the source. T h e fire alarm went off at 12:19 p.m. and when Public Safety w a s unable to determine the source of the smoke on the second floor, the fire department w a s called in. As m a n d a t e d , fire d e p a r t m e n t officials searched all r o o m s in the

building and were also u n a b l e to determine where the s m o k e ' s source when nothing was found smoldering. Another fire-related incident on the second floor of Phelps Hall East occurred early in the morning on Thursday, April 10. A fire alarm alerted Public Safety o f f i c i a l s to a d r i n k i n g f o u n t a i n which contained a smoldering paper c u p at 3:13 a.m.

Bikes t o b e o f f e r e d a t Saturday a u c t i o n Students interested in picking up a bike for cheap should attend the Bicycle/Surplus Property Auction this Saturday, April 19, at the Holland Police D e p a r t m e n t . Over 9 0 bikes, f r o m m o u n t a i n bikes to kids' B M X style wheels, will be up f o r grabs. All bikes auctioned off will be l i c e n s e d at no cost. City ordinance requires that all surplus materials of the city be offered u p in public auction.

Bikes have sold in pripes ranging f r o m as low as o n e buck to as high as $300, depending on the bicycle. Also on the auction block will be radios, c o s t u m e jewerly, tools,

KIM POWELL religion e d i t o r

T h e last in a series of Student Congress forums was cancelled due to lack of interest on the part of invited panel members. T h e forum was to discuss H o p e ' s Christian a t m o s p h e r e on M o n d a y night, April 14, when a majority of invited p a r t i c i p a n t s f a i l e d to respond to the RSVP. Invitations were sent a w e e k and a half b e f o r e the f o r u m to James Palmer ( ' 9 8 ) , student leader of Fellowship of Christian Students, A n n Barry ( ' 9 8 ) and John Brickner ('99), leaders of Union of Catholic Students, religion professors B o y d Wilson and Steve Bouma-Prediger,

b a c k p a c k s and more. Doors to the auction, to be held at the rear of the Police Department at 6 5 W. Eighth St., will open f o r v i e w i n g and r e g i s t r a t i o n at 8 : 3 0 a.m., with the auction beginning at 9 a.m.

First G r e e k a c a d e m i c r e c e p t i o n planned T h e first b i - a n n u a l G r e e k L i f e scholarship reception will be held this Tuesday, April 2 2 in the Herrick Room f r o m 11 a.m. to noon. Those honored include active G r e e k students w h o m a d e the D e a n ' s List during the fall semester, Greeks newly elected to Mortar Board and Phi Beta K a p p a , an honorary academic society, and the

sorority, fraternity and new m e m ber class with the highest GPA. General invitations were sent out to all involved in Greek Life, including students, the chairpersons of all departments, sorority and fraternity advisors, and other faculty. T h e P a n - H e l l e n i c C o u n c i l and Interfratemity Council plan to hold a similar reception each semester.

A g r e e m e n t forges interactive classroom STACY B O G A R D c a m pus b e a t e d i t o r

T h e technology of the future has arrived at Hope College in the f o r m of a joint agreement with Western Michigan University to house a distance learning facility on campus. T h e ten year agreement signed on April 4 splits the cost f o r installation and operation for a classroom equipped with a television between Hope and W M U in the N B D building next to the K n i c k e r b o c k e r T h e atre at 100 E. 8ih Street. T h e p r o g r a m includes learning via " c o m p r e s s e d video interactive t e l e v i s i o n " along with i n - p e r s o n instruction during the sessions. W M U will have use of the facilities in the evenings and on w e e k ends for their graduate programs in business and engineering. H o p e ' s nursing and c o m m u n i c a t i o n s departments, among others, will make use of the classroom during the day. "This is a unique and p o w e r f u l partnership between a private college and a public university to meet the growing educational needs of

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campus briefs A mysterious smoke incident in

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s u m m e r , a n d a d d i n g c o u r s e s in buyer behavior, business c o m m u nications, m a n u f a c t u r i n g facilities planning and design, and advanced digital signal processing. T h e p u r p o s e of the p r o g r a m is b e c a u s e it is a m o r e economical to teach through interactive television that is done over the phone lines. H o p e has also been interested in teaching in this m a n n e r to benefit the Hope/Calvin nursing program to help eliminate travel between the t w o institutions. " T h e technology also helps nonnursing students since it will allow H o p e to tie in with remote sites to b r i n g i n t e r e s t i n g l e c t u r e s to the c a m p u s , and there is also potential for use in connection with programs offered at the Haworth Center," said Bill A n d e r s o n , vice p r e s i d e n t of business and finance. "This is not intended to be a substitution f o r on-

the citizens of this part of West M i c h i g a n . " said W M U President Diether H. Haenicke in a released statement. "It demonstrates clearly the value of cooperation in higher

site interactive learning." T h i s t y p e of p r o g r a m is n o stranger to those at W M U , but it is a first f o r H o p e . W M U s e r v i c e s over 3,000 students each semester through their centers that include compressed video learning at facilities in Battle Creek, Benton HarborSt. J o s e p h , G r a n d Rapids, Muskegon, Jackson, Livonia, Kalamazoo, Saginaw and Traverse

education for the good of all." Business and education courses for W M U students have been offered on Hope's c a m p u s for over 20 years. This involves an M B A prog r a m i n t r o d u c e d in 1992. W M U continued to grow on H o p e ' s c a m pus by introducing graduate courses in educational technology and marketing m a n a g e m e n t this spring and

City. Richard G . Haworth, c h a i r m a n a n d c h i e f e x e c u t i v e o f f i c e r of Haworth, Inc., played a m a j o r role in b r i n g i n g the t w o facilities together. He is a 1965 graduate of Western Michigan and also a m e m ber of their Board of Trustees. T h e Haworth family is a major donor to both W M U and Hope.

C h a p l a i n Paul B o e r s m a , and P r i s c i l l a A t k i n s , C h a i r of t h e W o m e n ' s Studies c o m m i t t e e . Invited participants were asked to R S V P to Student Congress, and out of the seven invitees, only Atkins and Palmer responded. Atkins declined the o f f e r d u e to a time c o n flict and Palmer was the only one able to participate.

Other panel m e m b e r s said that they w e r e not notified in time to work it into their schedule. "1 got the letter the day 1 returned from vacation," Boersma said. " E v e n though the letter w a s dated March 21, I didn't receive it until April 14." T h e forum stemmed f r o m issues r a i s e d by f e m a l e s t u d e n t s a b o u t statements made in Chapel by Dean of Chapel Ben Patterson last fall, offending s o m e w o m e n with allegedly sexist c o m m e n t s , according to Student Congress representative Jessica Nelson ( ' 9 9 ) . Patterson was not invited to participate in the f o r u m and w a s not even notified that a religion f o r u m w a s taking place. "I would think that if it w a s something I said [that sparked the forum], I would have been invited," Patterson said. Patterson regrets that s o m e students f o u n d his c o m m e n t s o f f e n sive, but continues to stand behind what he said. "I think m e n and w o m e n are different, but equal," Patterson said.

" H a v i n g lived with a w o m a n for 2 6 years, I realize m o r e and m o r e we are different and I appreciate those differences." Patterson was not invited to participate in the f o r u m because Student C o n g r e s s w a s afraid that his position would prevent students f r o m freely expressing themselves, said Student Congress representative Matt Fretz ( ' 9 9 ) . T e n s i o n a b o u t the i n c i d e n t in Chapel has died d o w n , but Fonda G r e e n , D i r e c t o r of S p e c i a l Prog r a m s and m e m b e r s of Womens Issues Organization still see gender issues as important and in need of a discussion. " T h e language used to talk about m e n and w o m e n creates a barrier in the religious life of students," G r e e n said. "It d o e s n ' t w e l c o m e them into the spiritual life of H o p e College." T h e f o r u m w a s not m e a n t to be strictly related to gender concerns, according to Fretz. Il w a s meant to be a time for students to voice all their concerns, including discussion m o r e F O R U M on 8

IMAGES from I home in Bulgaria which " d e f i n e s w h o s h e i s " e v e n w i t h its dilipadated buildings and dirty streets. Marie Beaulieu ('97), Gerald Kassuba ('98) and Reina V e n d r a m i n i ( ' 9 8 ) k e p t the s h o w m o v i n g with a comical French skit that d e t a i l e d the d i f f i c u l t i e s t w o American tourists face when trying to enjoy an evening tea that in the end cost t h e m 65 dollars. T h e show cumulnated with a stop in S a m o a f o r a t r a d i t i o n a l s l a p d a n c e . T h r e e m e n in y e l l o w and orange sarongs with grass arm and leg bands were hoping to impress their sweethearts through this energetic and rhythmic dance as they s t o m p e d a n d c l a p p e d their w a y around the stage. Particpants were pleased, yet regretful after the performance. "I feel that il has gone too soon. It was just so interesting, even with us as international students, learning about others because w e d o n ' t know about their cultures either. I feel that w e are such a nice big family, I c a n ' t wait for the next one," said J. N a m u k a n a Sitati ('00).

Wanted THE ANCHOR IS LOOKING FOUTHE FOLLOWING POSITIONS FOR NEXT YEAR: CampusBeat

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C o v e r t h e issues t h a t a f f e c t t h e student body the most. Write a n d e d i t n e w s articles, h a n g o u t w i t h cool p e o p l e a n d e a r n a w e some experience that looks g r e a t o n a r e s u m e . P a y is a p h a t $250 p e r semester.

•Intermission

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p\r\oXo by Z a c h J o h n s o n

F L O W E R O F FAMS: In beautifully colored costumes, the Korean Children's Group performed a traditional fan dance during the first half of Images '97.

Earth Jam *97 Saturday, A p r i l 19 1:00pm-6:00pm

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C o v e r t h e latest h a p s i n t h e a r t r e l a t e d d e p a r t m e n t s , w h i c h includes writing and editing articles a n d live in a highly a r t i s tic f a s h i o n . Hey, get f r e e C D ' s f r o m m a j o r b a n d s , like K I S S , Def L e p p a r d , a n d s o m e lesser k n o w n yet p e r h a p s b e t t e r q u a l ity b a n d s . P a y Is $425 p e r year.

4? Jam in the Pine Grove with Environmental Issues Group and "Listen to great music "Buy h e m p jewelry from ATO "Make your own Tie-Dye T-Shirt


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Religioih

STRAIGHT T A L K

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Kim Powell

God's T i m e

Time is my most valuable commodity these days, and I ' m not alone. It's written on the tired faces of students I pass every day. In an effort to deal with the insanity of my life. 1 determined that the one thing I wouldn't compromise no matter what was my devotional time with God. 1 was doing all right and was actually pretty proud of myself because 1 was putting God first. Funny how just when you think you have a handle on life it all falls apart. It started when 1 found myself coming h o m e from the computer lab in the wee hours of the morning and 1 wasn't able to stay awake long enough to pray or read. As I was refusing lo make time for God. 1 was also refusing to make time for other people because I was sure nobody was as busy as I was. Life is stressful for everyone right now. We are all sleep-deprived, tired of classes, and nobody wants to write another paper, but is it really worth making ourselves and those around us miserable? When someone asks you how you are, do you immediately start reciting your daily planner? And do you use the excuse, I ' m too b u s y - j o r G o d ? If so than 1 regret to tell you that forgotten something important. We need to re-

member that all of our time really isn't our time at all, but G o d ' s time. Is it really too much for Him to ask that we take a f e w minutes out of our day to spend His time with Him? I know the answer is no, and yet time and lime again I find myself putting everything before God and at the end of the day too exhausted to do more than mumble an incoherent prayer. I've also found that when I do put God first, it is amazing how much better my day goes, I have a better attitude and I am better able to cope with the "stresses" of my life. We may not see it right away, but neglecting God is spiritual starvation. If God is the bread of life, then why do we insist on going days without feeding ourselves? We can't really believe that going to church and professing that God is our "All In All" and then going home and giving other obligations all our attention is bringing us closer to God. Being busy is one way that we are deceivingly pulled away f r o m God. I ' m not saying that you must devote an hour or even half an hour every day to God, but if we as Christians could take a few minutes out of each day just to tell God w e love Him and ask Him to remind us of His presence, then I think our dispositions would improve tremendously. W e ' d be surprised that the more time we give to G o d the more time we want to give. We can try to control our time, but whether you want to admit it or not, w e are all operating on G o d ' s time.

Anchor

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by J o s h N e u c k s

S I N G IX!: Darnisha Taylor ('94) and the Gospel Choir invite the audience to participate in praise and worship through song during their concert at Dimnent Chapel Tuesday night.

Gospel choir raises spirits I t ' s not a white thing. It's not ferent than other choirs at Hope," a black thing. It's all about worship- Taylor said. "I look at it as minisp i n g G o d , " T a y l o r s a i d as s h e t r y - o r i e n t e d , as a way to glorify Staying in their seats was too opened the concert. Worshipping G o d through music." T h o u g h much for the audience in Dimnent, G o d w a s t h e H o p e h a s had a as t h e s o u n d s of g o s p e l m u s i c theme of the congospel Choir since brought people to their feet during cert and the audithe 70's under the ence was invited the third annual spring Gospel It's n o t a w h i t e t h i n g . Black Coalition, to participate and Choir Concert. I t ' s n o t a b l a c k t h i n g . Taylor and Co-DiThe hour and a half long con- was even taught It's all a b o u t rector Vanessa cert brought energy filled music and one of the songs Allen have taken praise to approximately 800 stu- a n d s a n g a l o n g worshipping God. the choir under d e n t s and c o m m u n i t y m e m b e r s with motions. —Darnisha Taylor their wing to make H a l f w a y with student soloists and a dramatic Co-Director it a separate extrap r e s e n t a t i o n of C a r m a n ' s " T h e through the conG o s p e l C h o i r curricular activity Champion," that showed the battle cert, after a song at Hope. between Jesus and Lucifer as they by Emily Ratering T h e choir travels throughout ('99) "It's All About Worshipping fight over who the "champion" of the year to different churches in the You," Taylor asked for anyone that forever will be. The audience frearea as a way to minister to the comquently stood up during the concert did not know Jesus Christ as their to clap and sway with the 6 3 - m e m - savior to raise their hand for prayer. munity. And though Taylor admits T h e C h a p e l was q u i e t as Taylor that w h e n t h e y ' v e ran into other ber choir and three musicians. gospel choirs they have gotten some Students that attended the con- prayed for the audience. funny looks, given that few African L e s l i e K a y ( ' 9 9 ) w a s i m cert were happy that they did. Americans make up the choir, once pressed by the power of the d r a m a "It was awesome because we they start to sing people are imand the strong message of salvation got to stand up and praise, too," said in the performance.For Taylor and pressed. Debbie Paterick ('99). T h e choir h o p e s that people T h e choir w a s there to give the choir members, music is a way learn that loving God is fun and more than just a concert, according to reach people with the gospel. ' T h e style of Gospel Choir and exciting, and are drawn to God by to choir Co-Director Darnisha Taythe purpose of Gospel Choir is dif- worshipping him, Taylor said. lor ('94).

KIM POWELL religion editor

G u e s t l e c t u r e r speaks o n g e n d e r e q u a l i t y in Islam lowing her speech, Perreault was faced with and support her as well. Perreault covered a number of different a lot of questions on the equality that she topics in her talk, including the appropriate talked about and on Islam's ability to funcclothing a Muslim woman should wear and To counter the perception that women tion outside of its cultural context. H o p e s t u d e n t and P a l e s t i n i a n Fatin a defense of the practice of polygamy. in Islam are confined to narrow roles. Sister It is a requirement that men and women Shellie " S a f i a " P e r r e a u l t , a f r e s h m a n at Muhawi ('97) doesn't think it is as easy as keep themselves modest, Michigan State University and devout Mus- saying women are or are Perreault said. not respected. lim woman, took the position that the equalC o v e r i n g her body " T h e overall mesity of men and women is central to the relikeeps her husband interested sage of Islam is that it is T h e overall gion of Islam in a talk Wednesday night. in her, not other men interMen were created lo have a different role t h e n o r m f o r m e n and m e s s a g e o f I s l a m is ested, Perreault said. T h e than women, but not necessarily a superior w o m e n to h a v e certain t h a t i t is t h e n o r m clothing of most women in roles. I see this as a disrole, Perreault said. America reveals the body for m e n and w o m e n She supported this statement by citing a d v a n t a g e b e c a u s e it and incites men to lust. It is all of the f r e e d o m s that w o m e n possess. doesn't take into account t o have c e r t a i n self-degrading. Women can work outside the home, are not the dynamic nature of huroles. She defended poconsidered property, may choose their own manity and human soci—Fatin Muhawi l y g a m y as having a good husband, are allowed to divorce and having ety," she said. H o p e s t u d e n t (*97) purpose, especially if men One of Muhammed's children is considered a honor. are outnumbered by women, "People are going to c o m e in thinking t e a c h i n g s e x p l a i n s a as is the case in many lesswomen are oppressed. When they leave this m a n ' s view of his wife. It industrialized countries. says "the best man is the one who treats his seminar, I would like them to see that women A m a n can h a v e no m o r e than f o u r are highly respected in Islam," said Muslim wife well." wives. Each wife is treated equally and perThis includes paying a dowry for his student Hasan Choudhry ('97). forms a specific role. During a question/answer session fol- wife, and he is under obligation to educate

RYAN P A Z D U R staff r e p o r t e r

Perreault insisted that the realism of Islam is not necessarily bound to the Muslim culture. W h e n Muslims are removed from their country, they begin to realize that they can separate religion form culture, Perreault said. Muhawi disagrees with this assumption. "Islam addresses every single aspect of one's life, but it is very naive to assume that Muslim culture is not a reflection of Islam," Muhawi said. "I think the main problem I had was that her account pointed to the good points in Islam, but it did not address the negative aspects of Islam like polygamy or the issue of inheritance," Muhawi said. "She emphasized the good position, but did not deal with the way that women are treated by men." T h e i m p o r t a n c e of w a s one area on which everyone agreed, because women simply do not understand the rights they have as Muslims. Better e d u c a t i o n is necessary to help separate cultural traditions from the true practice of Islam, Muhawi said.


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our voice. Mourning w i t h Opus T h e O p u s Visiting Writers S e r i e s m a y be nationally acclaimed, but with budget cuts bringing it to its knees, it will be locally mourned. The series roped in G w e n d o l y n Brooks in 1993. Hope welcomed C h a i m Potok in 1995. And next year we'll be host to J o y c e Carol Oates. We as students should be thankful to this student group for continuing to bring in speakers of high calibre that impact students by the Chapel-load and Knick-full. But the visits o w e no thanks to the budgetary slashing of the Student Congress Appropriations C o m m i t t e e . Without the emergency supply of f u n d s f r o m Provost Jacob Nyenhuis, Gates' visit would have been a non-option. C a r v i n g u p the b u d g e t a r y p i e is n o e a s y task, and Appropriations takes pains to m a k e cuts judiciously and fairly. But this time the committee was misinformed. To assume that the Visiting Writers Series i s something that students attend only if they are English m a j o r s o r are required by a class is not only errant, it is insulting In this academic environment, it is conceivable, and in fact true, that many non-English majors know a good author when they read one. A n d students do on occasion seek intellectual stimulation without penalty of grade bribing. The n u m b e r of students to attend the last G p u s speaker numbered well over 400. W h i l e it m a y wish that it did, H o p e ' s E n g l i s h D e p a r t m e n t d o e s not boast that m a n y majors, or even m a j o r s and minors c o m b i n e d . It has been argued that the series is not just for students, since it is open to the c o m m u n i t y at no cost. The Anchor too is available f o r m e m b e r s of the c o m m u n i t y to pick up and read at no cost. So long as c o m m u n i t y interest does not hinder students f r o m taking advantage of the resources that the Student Activity Fee offers, there isn't any harm in it. Provost N y e n h u i s c a m e to the rescue this time, but w h a t about next time? A n d what about the authors that are lesser k n o w n , but equally well attended and appreciated by the H o p e C o m m u n i t y ? T h e idea that G p u s will now need to plead for f u n d i n g for the celebrated series one author at a time raises issues of censorship. What about the a u t h o r t h a t writes about sensitive issues? The author that lives'an untraditionaTTife?The'pulling of funding for an event that has proven itself as a winner to students time and again o p e n s the doors to censoring ideas and viewpoints. The Visiting Writers Series m a y be a part of the Gpus budget request each year, but it is the students' series. A n d it will be our loss if these d e e p cuts continue.

m e e t the press ed iton-i n-chief Jodi Mc Far land operation manager Arin Neucks campusbeat editor

Stacy Bogard

spotlight editor Amy Strassburger religion editor intermission editor sports editor production editor photo editors

copy editors business mgr./ad rep page designers ad designer cartoonists faculty advisor Dan Cwik

Kim Powell Melissa Herwaldt Glyn Williams Amy-Lynn Halverson Josh Neucks Zach Johnson Matt Sterenberg Jeff Crouch Michelle Piel Dave Schrier Jessica McCombs Jeremy Monty Tammy Bouwens Ashley Singer Tim Boudreau

staff reporters Heidi Huebner • David Gabrielse Noelle Wood • Mike Zuidema

• Miriam Beyer

staff photographers Nicole DeChelboer • Jess Grevenstuk The Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. One-year subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $11. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

Vol. I 10, issue 22

the

your voice.

umm Host pastor thanks Spring Break mission trip attenders Dear Editor,

dents.

l e a r n a b o u t t h e N a t i v e A m e r i c a n heriheri

W h i l e they w e r e with us your g r o u p

t a g e in t h i s r e g i o n . T h e y m e t m e m b e r s

I am writing to express the apprecia-

did several repair and i m p r o v e m e n t

a n d l e a d e r s o f f o u r d i f f e r e n t tribes, vis-

tion of the A p a c h e R e f o r m e d Church

p r o j e c t s b o t h o n t h e c h u r c h g r o u n d s and

ited a tribal c o m p l e x , attended a

and the Native American c o m m u n i t y

in the c o m m u n i t y i n c l u d i n g b u i l d i n g a

p o w - w o w , were guests of honor for a

w e s e r v e in .the a r e a a r o u n d A p a c h e ,

wall, p a i n t i n g , i n s t a l l i n g a s c r e e n d o o r ,

N a t i v e A m e r i c a n h y m n s i n g and w e n t

O k l a h o m a , to. the students f r o m your

r e p a i r i n g r a i n t r o u g h s a n d lots of litter

to m u s e u m s of A m e r i c a n I n d i a n and U S

Chapel fellowship who spent their

p i c k u p . T h e y a l s o led s o m e o f o u r p r o -

military history.

S p r i n g B r e a k w i t h u s in f e l l o w s h i p ,

gramming — singing and doing drama

In all y o u r g r o u p d i d , t h e y w e r e e x -

worship and service.

T h a n k y o u to:

for a Sunday evening worship, coordi-

cellent ambassadors of Hope College.

Kelly B a r t o n . A m y K i m , A n n a R e s e l e ,

nating our children's ministry with

M y o n l y r e g r e t w a s t h a t t h e y h a d to

Christine Dykstra, Tracy McArthur,

games, crafts, and Bible lessons, and

l e a v e . W e are p r i v i l e g e d that H o p e C o l -

Matt Russick, T h o m a s Goodhart, Kari

s h a r i n g in o u r y o u t h m i n i s t r y w i t h f e l -

lege i n c l u d e d A p a c h e R e f o r m e d C h u r c h

McCaw, Andee Spaman, Heather

lowship and testimonies. T h e y also

again on the Spring Break Mission Trip

Huizing, Shonda Perdue. Noelle Wood.

s p e n t a f e w h o u r s in c o m p a n i o n s h i p

schedule, and thankful for the great

Christy Kaminskas. Christopher Poest.

m i n i s t r y w i t h s e v e r a l of o u r c h u r c h ' s

g r o u p y o u s e n t to u s .

S i n c e r e t h a n k s a l s o to t h e C h a p l a i n ' s

elderly members.

O f f i c e a n d all o t h e r s u p p o r t i n g p r o -

W h e n t h e y w e r e n o t i n v o l v e d in ser-

g r a m s a n d p e r s o n n e l w h o h e l p e d to

vice p r o j e c t s or p r o g r a m s , t h e g r o u p had

m a k e t h i s trip p o s s i b l e f o r t h e s e s t u -

an o p p o r t u n i t y to t o u r the a r e a a n d to

Rev. G e o r g e M o n t a n a r i

Student defends condom distributor/AIDS Dear Editor,

'

m a r r i a g e . B u t not e v e r y o n e w i l l f o l l o w

educator

e a s e s . I t h i n k he w a s t o o q u i c k to j u m p

- ^ t h a t . B d W h e p e r s o n GtiWHtifrjttdge aft- >C&Jbe c o n c f a u i o n that all r e l a t i o n s h i p s a m w r i t i n f f i h ' f t s p o r l s ^ f o " S 1 e t t e r in " oWTer f W t B e T r c h o i c e s , J : : R c r m f f e ^ " h 5 w '^TFTaffiave pi^ffl^rital s e x d o n o t last a n d l e a v e b r o k e n h e a r t s ; e v e r y s i t u a t i o n is the A p r i l 2 i s s u e o f The Anchor w r i t t e n i m m o r a l they are c o n s i d e r e d to be. ^

b y D a v i d S c h o u t in r e g a r d s to t h e ar-

C o n d o m s are p r o t e c t i o n — a l b e i t n o t

ticle a b o u t C r a i g T o m m o l a . Mr. S c h o u t

the best — f r o m u n w a n t e d pregnancy

different. Mr. S c h o u t ' s c l o s i n g s e n t e n c e w a s "If

criticized a n d r i d i c u l e d C r a i g a n d h i s

and d i s e a s e s . T h e r e is a l w a y s risk —

M r . T o m m o l a r e a l l y w a n t s to m a k e a

purpose for distributing free condoms.

t h e r e a l w a y s w i l l b e . a n d a b s t i n e n c e is

d i f f e r e n c e , h e s h o u l d c i r c u l a t e f r e e 'true

That infuriated me.

t h e o n l y w a y to stay r i s k - f r e e . I a g r e e

l o v e will w a i t ' c a r d s . " Well, M r . S c h o u t ,

I think Craig should be admired for

w i t h all t h e s e i s s u e s M r . S c h o u t w r o t e

w h a t r ig h t h a v e y o u t o s a y t h a t ? W h e r e

his bravery, caring and concern for oth-

are your cards? Craig T o m m o l a shows

ers. W o u l d y o u b e w i l l i n g to a d v e r t i s e

about. W h a t I d o not a g r e e w i t h is h i s a r g u -

condoms from your dorm window?

ment against Craig T o m m o l a ' s actions

through his efforts of distributing free

Would you be willing to distribute

and d e c i s i o n s . Mr. S c h o u t h a s no r i g h t

c o n d o m s . H e has n o t a s k e d f o r atten-

them? D o you even have strong feel-

to j u d g e C r a i g , o r o t h e r s that w i s h to

tion t h r o u g h h i s a c t i o n s , o n l y that o t h -

ings about A I D S and other S T D s ? I

h a v e premarital sex. I think he w a s r u d e ,

e r s b e s a f e . U n til y o u m a k e a n e f f o r t to

a d m i r e C r a i g f o r t h e s e q u e s t i o n s that

illogical and c o n d e s c e n d i n g in his r e -

m a k e a difference. Mr. Schout. don't

h e c a n a n s w e r " y e s " to.

m a r k s . I h a v e not seen Mr. S c h o u t

j u d g e other people for theirs.

M r . S c h o u t w a s ri ght — t h e o n l y t r u e

w o r k i n g to try to m a k e a d i f f e r e n c e in

w a y to h a v e s a f e sex is a b s t i n e n c e until

t h e fi g h t a g a i n s t A I D S a n d o t h e r d i s -

Comptroller

a great deal of compassion for others

C i n d i K n i g h t TOO)

responds to budget criticism

Dear Editor,

the c o u r s e of a year, a n d s o t h e c o m -

four m e m b e r s . As a representative com-

m i t t e e c a n n o t j u s t i f y f u n d i n g s u c h large

mittee w e would be doing students a

increases. Requests such as these are

d i s s e r v i c e by f u l l y f u n d i n g t h e s e s p e a k -

questions regarding the Student Activ-

u n r e a l i s t i c , a n d w h e n t h e y a r e not a d -

ity F e e ( S A F ) a l l o c a t i o n . I w o u l d like

e q u a t e l y d e f e n d e d in d e l i b e r a t i o n s a n

ers. In c l o s i n g . I ' d like to m e n t i o n a f e w

to a d d r e s s a f e w p o i n t s w h i c h a r e i m -

e c o n o m i c i m m a t u r i t y is r e f l e c t e d u p o n

statements regarding student involve-

p o r t a n t to t h e f u t u r e s u c c e s s of t h e p r o -

the g r o u p a s a w h o l e . A s a c o m m i t t e e

m e n t : i t ' s t o o e a s y to sit o u t s i d e t h e

cess. T o b e g i n , the b u d g e t i n g p r o c e s s will

w e lake f a c t o r s s u c h a s g r o w t h and po-

a r e n a a n d p r o t e s t w h a t is g o i n g on in

tential a c c o r d i n g to e a c h g r o u p ' s o w n

an organization such as the appropria-

n e v e r b e p e r f e c t . A c o m m i t t e e o f six

g u i d e l i n e s into a c c o u n t in o r d e r to al-

t i o n s c o m m i t t e e . T h i s l a c k a d a i s i c a l ap-

p e o p l e b e s i d e s m y s e l f and an a d v i s o r

locate the S A F as judiciously as pos-

p r o a c h e x p r e s s e d by m o s t c o n c e r n e d

a l l o c a t e m o n e y a m o n g r e c o g n i z e d stu-

sible. O n e f i n a l n o t e on t h i s point is that

s t u d e n t s is n o t l i k e l y to u l t i m a t e l y

d e n t o r g a n i z a t i o n s in w a y s w h i c h are

t h e S A F d o e s not g r o w e a c h year, and

c h a n g e a system. The best way to

a s j u d i c i o u s a s t h e p e o p l e m a k i n g the

s o n e i t h e r can t h e b u d g e t s a s a w h o l e .

c h a n g e a s y s t e m is f r o m w i t h i n . B y be-

d e c i s i o n s . T r u t h f u l l y , it has s u r p r i s e d

H e n c e , g r o u p s are f o r c e d to c o m p e t e for

c o m i n g a m e m b e r of the i n f l u e n t i a l or-

m e o v e r m y three y e a r s of e x p e r i e n c e

a p o r t i o n of t h e S A F . B y n o t e x c e l l i n g

g a n i z a t i o n o r s i m p l y g e t t i n g to k n o w

h o w f a i r a n d t h o u g h t f u l s t u d e n t s are

in their a r e a , the c o m m i t t e e is f o r c e d to

t h o s e w h o y o u try to i n f l u e n c e , b e n e f i t s

w i t h e a c h c u t . T h i s is n o e a s y t a s k at

fund other groups with greater growth

are to b e g a i n e d — b o t h in the p r o f e s -

t w o in t h e m o r n i n g w h e n bed s e e m s

potential a c c o r d i n g to c a m p u s n e e d s .

sional world and on c a m p u s . A p p r o p r i a -

Recently I have been asked many

more interesting than budgets, but

E s p e c i a l l y o v e r t h e last t w o y e a r s , it

tions c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s , a s f a r a s I ' m

s o m e h o w everyone examines issues

s e e m s that e a c h o r g a n i z a t i o n h a s spe-

c o n c e r n e d , h a v e s h o w n t h e c o u r a g e to d o s t u d e n t s a h u g e s e r v i c e by i n v o l v -

f r o m all a n g l e s in o r d e r to m a k e g o o d

cial s p e a k e r s they w o u l d like b r i n g to

d e c i s i o n s f o r the b e n e f i t of the s t u d e n t

c a m p u s . If e v e r y s p e a k e r w a s f u n d e d

ing t h e m s e l v e s in a s y s t e m that w o u l d

body. In r e s p o n s e to t h e c r i t i c i s m of h u g e

f r o m the 1 9 9 7 - 9 8 r e q u e s t s , the a m o u n t

o t h e r w i s e be left u p to the a d m i n i s t r a -

w o u l d total well o v e r S 4 0 . 0 0 0 ! D e c i -

t i o n . I a m p r o u d of e a c h of t h e m , and

c u t s , o r g a n i z a t i o n s h a v e c o m e to t h e

s i o n s n e e d to be m a d e a b o u t i m p a c t

w o u l d l i k e to p u b l i c l y t h a n k G r e g .

Appropriations c o m m i t t e e with enor-

each speaker would bring versus other

K a t i e . D a n . D a n a . Paul and J e s s i c a f o r

m o u s r e q u e s t s — s o m e t i m e ten t i m e s

c a m p u s events or e q u i p m e n t w h i c h m a y

their s e r v i c e t o H o p e C o l l e g e .

w h a t they w e r e g i v e n the p r e v i o u s year.

be w o r t h w h i l e . O n e o r g a n i z a t i o n re-

N e v e r h a v e I c o n c u r r e n t l y s e e n the im-

q u e s t e d r o u g h l y $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 w o r t h of

Tyler Smith

pact of a g r o u p i n c r e a s e t e n f o l d o v e r

s p e a k e r s , but c u r r e n t l y they o n l y h a v e

Student Congress Comptroller


April.

16

1997

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Elections fotS day and t o m r troduced las over t w o da^ t h e opportu Katy Whitfie d valid I.D. Presidential Congress m initiating po tioning as th body. Respoi coordinatin votes at m e writing and utes, and pr dent is abse

ongr ampaign

Wednesday, A

Presidential Candidates

10 a.m. I to 4 p. 4:30 to 6:

James H i l m e r t ('99)

Thursday, April i 0 a.m.

I am James Hilmert, a sophomore here at Hope, and a candidate f o r Student Congress President. Several factors have inspired m e to seek office, but my foremost concern is the lack of any sort of political activity on campus. Less than 4 0 0 people voted in student elections at this time last year, a n u m b e r which accounted for less than 15% of the student population. With the exception of Oliver North, there has not been a well-known, noteworthy speaker since I have been at Hope. T h e reason why political interest is negligible is because Student Congress is faltering. The truth is that Student Congress needs a leader and a bullwhip to accomplish something, so that it exists in action as well as in name. If I am elected president, I would seek a re-evaluation of social policy by a student referendum. To refer the issue to the student body would not only create student interest, but also call into question the relevance of dated policies to which students have long submitted — issues like parietals, r o o m searches, off-campus housing. But to bring about change, I require your vote this Wednesday or Thursday.

I to 4 p.r 4:30 to 6 .

r-V;

Meredith A r w ; " W h e r e d o y o u f i n d the t i m e ? ! ? " 1 h a s b e e n r a i s e d to m e n u m e r o u s t i m e s C o l l e g e . I t h r i v e on i n v o l v e m e n t , anc in m a n y a c t i v i t i e s o n this c a m p u s — i n t r a m u r a l s p o r t s , C A S A t u t o r i n g , va tions. P C S . and n u m e r o u s musical c Meredith Arwady. and I am a freshm; I a m a s t r o n g a n d d e d i c a t e d leac

Dana M a r o l t ('99) I am running for the position of Student Congress president. My name is Dana Marolt and this is why you need to vote for me: I am the candidate with the most leadership experience. As an active member of Student Congress for the past two years, I have sat on various committees like the Committee on Multicultural Affairs, Committee on Women Studies, the Cultural Affairs Committee, and the Student Standing and Appeals Board. I took on a heavy leadership role this year as the chairperson of the H.A.N.D. Task Force, through which events like the Thanksgiving food drive, Hope Gospel Choir caroling in Holland Hospital, the upcoming Ice Cream Social, and our proudest event, speaker James Malinchak's visit to Hope. As part of Greek life, I have been appointed to the Greek Judicial Board. I have worked many times with the administration and other students to achieve goals to benefit this institution. If elected I will tackle issues such as the housing and parking crisis on campus, smoking, the lack of cultural diversity, the importance of Greek life, and the ever-increasing tuition. I am prepared to take on the role and responsibility as President of Student Congress, and lead Hope College into further success next year.

Paul L o o d e e n (*99) Dear Students, , • • • *n ^ n I, Paul Loodeen. am running f o r Student Congress to meet your needs and your demands. I wish to make the administration of Hope College more responsive to the changing views of the student population. Also, to do my best to ensure that the Hope College experience is a good one because we each pay a huge sum of money to go here and it should service us the best it can. I have the necessary qualifications to do this. T h e leadership skills, the organizational skills, and time management skills to do the j o b and to do it well. 1 he skills have been developed through involvment here at Hope. Student Congress. Hope Hockey team, and being a residential assistant have all contributed to the skills above. . , , . . ,, ... I want to be Student Congress President to work hard for the students and make Hope College a better place to go to school. I care about the college and the students that go here. That's why I am running for Student Congress president.

r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of the c l a s s of 2 0 0 0 . 1 • est t o p r e s e n t o u r c o n c e r n s a n d q u e s t P e r s o n a l l y . I a m in f a v o r o f ex the t i c k e t i n g s y s t e m , d o n ' t f e e l the p t a k e n a w a y , a n d d o n ' t a p p r o v e of the lions a s the O P U S V i s i t i n g W r i t e r ' s S t u d e n t O r g a n i z a t i o n . I f e e l t h a t it is i on this c a m p u s , a n d if e l e c t e d , I w i l l ' enthusiasm. Support Meredith Arwad;

Lindsay Etherh A s a third g e n e r a t i o n s t u d e n t of H o | w a y s b e e n e x c i t e d a n d i n t e r e s t e d in b e e in c o l l e g e a n d s t u d e n t life. It is i m p o r t c l a s s is well r e p r e s e n t e d in S t u d e n t C g o a l s are m e t d u r i n g t h e r e s t of o u r y e to s e e all a s p e c t s of c o l l e g e l i f e g r o w n e e d t o c o n t i n u e the e m p h a s i s on a c e C h r i s t i a n e n v i r o n m e n t . T h i s is a g r e a t b e a part of m a k i n g it b e t t e r f o r the cli

Brad H e r r e m a O v e r the past e i g h t m o n t h s I h a v e have met here. Being elected to repres o p p o r t u n i t y t o give s o m e t h i n g b a c k . I students, because when you think a b a nity of s t u d e n t s . I feel that I c a n b r i n g a p o s i t i v e nev\ c h a n g e that will p o s i t i v e l y a f f e c t the P l e a s e v o t e o n A p r i l 16 and 17.

Lisa Jutte ( ' 9 8 ) H i . m y n a m e is L i s a J u t t e a n d I a m c u r r e n t l y on S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s a n d se committees. 1 am well-organized, e x p P l e a s e vote f o r m e , a n d w r i t e in am A p r i l 16 a n d 17.


tudent Congress will take place tor o w via the roving voting booth in^ear.The elections will take place t o help insure t h a t all students have ty t o vote, according t o current V.P. I.To vote, students must present a isponsibilities include presiding over itings, covering the weekly agenda, y f r o m student concerns and funcchief representative of the student ibilities of the vice president involve :ampus elections, polls, recording ings. Student Congress publicity, stributing Student Congress miniding over sessions when the Presi-

V.P. C a N o r m M c C u n e ('99) It is lime for the students of Hope College to find out the truth. T h e truth is that the student body has serious problems, and for that the students need serious people. That is why I am running for Vice President of Student Congress. Time and time again there have been complaints concerning the student's standing in the Hope College community, but the complaints must slop here and the solutions must begin. The largest dilemma that we face now is the lack of funding for student organizations. These organizations, including SAC. W T H S . The Anchor. Opus, and the Milestone are receiving less and less money each year f r o m the Student Activities Fee for one reason, and that simply is because there is not enough money to go around. The total amount of money used for student organizations has not changed since I came to Hope College, but the number and size of many student organizations has. It could make you wonder why we are paying five hundred extra dollars a year in tuition raises. It is lime for the Hope College administration acknowledge the fact that these organizations are a learning tool for the students and that tuition money should also support the Student

m

—.

"

-v

Activities Fee. That is my goal, and with your support we can show Hope College that w e are serious people with serious solutions. T h e time for change is now. Cast your vole for a serious person, cast your vole for Norm.

ng Booth Schedule I#.

16

p.m.: Pine Grove, by the Chapel Library l p.m.: Phelps, Gilmore side p.m.: Pine Grove, by the Chapel Library ) p.m.: Phelps, Maas side

C h a d Joldersma ('99) Why Chad Joldersma for Vice President of Student Congress? As Vice President of the Student Congress 1 will be able to represent the student body. 1 feel that this an essential aspect that everyone serving on congress should strive to achieve. Student congress has one major purpose. This role is to emulate the thoughts and feelings of the student body. Therefore, my first priority as Vice President is to do just that. 1 know I have the responsibility, drive, and leadership qualities to help run this congress to its full potential. 1 also feel that experience vital to running congress. This organization runs in such a way that lack of experience will be detrimental. Running this organization takes a lot of time. I intend to dedicate my time to this position without accepting any other managerial positions. President and Vice President play an important role in congress. If they lack the knowledge and experience needed to run student congress the student body will not be represented. Being Vice President is very important to me. Therefore, I will have the drive to run congress better than it has ever been run before.

ly COO) is a q u e s t i o n t h a t e a r r i v i n g at H o p e ivc b e e n i n v o l v e d

With these new positions, you can vote for two representatives for your class.The Reps will assist the Vice President in coordinating Fall general elections and will attend early agendasetting committee meetings.

uding varsity and is t h e a t e r p r o d u c :erts. M y n a m e is rom Kalamazoo.

Clinton Randall ('00) S o y o u ask y o u r s e l f , " W h o d o I . w a n t t o r e p r e s e n t m y

Tawny Brinson (*00) W h e n I w a s e l e c t e d t o b e o n e of the D y k s t r a Hall R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s this p a s t fall, I h a d n o i d e a w h a t b e i n g o n C o n g r e s s m e a n t . S i n c e then I h a v e l e a r n e d m o r e a b o u t the c a m p u s g o v e r n a n c e s y s t e m , m y s e l f , and m u c h m o r e t h a n I e v e r could have imagined. To m e . C o n g r e s s m e a n s m o r e t h a n w i n n i n g an e l e c t i o n o r h a v i n g f u n . Il is an e n o r m o u s responsibility, and a g r e a t l e a r n i n g e x p e r i e n c e . A f t e r m y first y e a r on C o n g r e s s , I u n d e r s t a n d

a n d if e l e c t e d as a

class; t h e C l a s s of 2 0 0 0 ? " You m a y h a v e n o t i c e d t h a t t h e r e

ild w o r k m y h a r d -

a r e n u m e r o u s c a n d i d a t e s r u n n i n g f o r the t w o S t u d e n t C o n -

what team work, leadership, accountability, and dedication t r u l y m e a n . S e r v i n g o n the A s s e s s m e n t , R e l i g i o u s L i f e , a n d R e s i d e n t i a l L i f e C o m m i t -

i t o the c o l l e g e . ded p a r k i n g lots a n d a m a j o r r e v a m p i n g of

g r e s s s e a t s that a r e n e e d i n g t o b e filled. W h y are there s o m a n y r u n n i n g ? M a y b e b e c a u s e t h e y t h i n k it w o u l d b e c o o l ,

t e e s g a v e m e k n o w l e d g e a b o u t the w o r k i n g s of the c o l l e g e , a n d a n u m b e r of a d m i n i s -

lege of s m o k i n g in d o r m r o o m s s h o u l d b e tting of f u n d s f o r s u c h i m p o r t a n t o r g a n i z a -

o r l o o k g o o d on a r e s u m e . Granted, these are reasons to run for Student Congress,

i e s . the B l a c k C o a l i t i o n , a n d the H i s p a n i c

but t h e y are not t h e b e s t o n e s . L e t m e tell y o u w h y I a m

Drtant that the v o i c e of the s t u d e n t s b e h e a r d

running for 2000 Class representative. I will h e l p the C l a s s of 2 0 0 0 by h o l d i n g t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n r e s p o n s i b l e f o r their p o l i c i e s , h e l p i n g to e l i m i n a t e the p a r k i n g p r o b l e m on c a m -

k hard to represent m y class with vigor and the v o i c e of 2 0 0 0 .

p u s . a n d w o r k i n g t o l o w e r t h e c o s t of b o o k s f o r c l a s s e s . B y l i s t e n i n g to w h a t m y

?e ('00) College. I h a v e al-

c o n s t i t u e n c y b e l i e v e s in a n d s u p p o r t i n g t h e m . I will unite the C l a s s of 2 0 0 0 .

ing more involved

It is i m p o r t a n t t h a t a c a n d i d a t e h a s l e a d e r s h i p e x p e r i e n c e , s o c i a l skills, a n d b e a b l e to w o r k o n e - o n - o n e with o t h e r s , w i t h o u t c o n f l i c t , in o r d e r t o r e a c h a u n i t e d d e c i s i o n .

t o e n s u r e that o u r

I, C l i n t o n R a n d a l l , h a v e g a i n e d t h e s e e x p e r i e n c e s a n d s k i l l s w h i l e w o r k i n g in the

;ress. a n d that o u r

church and c o m m u n i t y helping others. A P R I L 16,17 V O T E C L I N T O N R A N D A L L

here. I w o u l d like d be enriched. We

2000 REPRESENTATIVE. DEDICATED. HONEST, AND H A R D - W O R K I N G FOR

mic s u c c e s s a n d a liege a n d I h o p e t o of 2 0 0 0 .

COO)

YOU!

A m y Sue W e s t ('00)

a p p r e c i a t e d the o p p o r t u n i t y to r e p r e s e n t the v o i c e s of the w o m e n of D y k s t r a H a l l , a n d I h o p e that m y y e a r l o n g d e d i c a t i o n w i l l e a r n m e the o p p o r t u n i t y to r e p r e s e n t the v o i c e s of the C l a s s o f 2 0 0 0 .

M a t t Fretz (*99) W h e n a s k e d w h y I ' m r u n n i n g f o r C l a s s of ' 9 9 R e p r e s e n t a t i v e 1 g i v e a s i m p l e a n s w e r : the s t u d e n t s n e e d a v o i c e . I h a v e s e r v e d on S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s f o r the last t w o y e a r s , a n d h a v e r e a l i z e d that there is n o t h i n g m o r e h a r m f u l t o s t u d e n t interest t h a n a p a t h y . A p a t h y is w i d e s p r e a d o n this c a m p u s , and w h a t the s t u d e n t s w a n t is o f t e n hurt b e c a u s e of it. T h e b o o k s t o r e is a rip o f f , p a r k i n g is terrible, and n o o n e k n o w s h o w S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s a p p r o p r i a t e d the S t u d e n t A c t i v i t i e s F e e . It s e e m s that w e c o m p l a i n a lot to o u r f r i e n d s w h i l e

p o s e s . I a m r u n n i n g b e c a u s e I w o u l d like t o b e a b l e t o v o i c e

silting in P h e l p s , p l a y i n g cards, o r t h r o w i n g a round of f r i s b e e g o l f . B u t this c o m p l a i n i n g d o e s n ' t d o a n y t h i n g . S t u d e n t s n e e d to get i n v o l v e d . You

nt t o m a k e this c o l l e g e a b e l t e r p l a c e f o r the

o n l y r e s p o n s i b i l i t y . I d o n ' t think l h a l it is r i g h t t o state m y

it. l h a l is w h a t a c o l l e g e r e a l l y is: a c o m m u -

o p i n i o n s on s u b j e c t s a n d t h e n h o p e that o t h e r s w i l l think the

m a i n i n g c o l l e g e c a r e e r s of m y c l a s s m a t e s .

p h o n e s u r v e y s , a n d s p e n t m a n y e x t r a h o u r s w o r k i n g in the C o n g r e s s o f f i c e . I h a v e

a m not r u n n i n g f o r c l a s s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e f o r p e r s o n a l p u r t h e o p i n i o n s of m y c l a s s m e m b e r s . I t h i n k t h a t as a c l a s s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e t h i s w o u l d b e m y

j l l o o k to S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s , a n d b r i n g a b o u t

t a t i v e p o s i t i o n s . I w o r k e d e x t e n s i v e l y on the b o t h i h t O l i v e r N o r t h and s m o k i n g p o l i c y

First of all, I w o u l d like the c l a s s of 2 0 0 0 t o k n o w that I

the m e m b e r s of m y c l a s s w o u l d g i v e m e an

) w n t o l o v e H o p e C o l l e g e a n d the p e o p l e I

trative c o n t a c t s . T h i s y e a r on C o n g r e s s I w a s a l s o o n the task f o r c e that c r e a t e d the C l a s s R e p r e s e n -

n e e d to get out a n d vote on W e d n e s d a y a n d T h u r s d a y . I ' m c a p a b l e of b e i n g a s t r o n g v o i c e f o r the c l a s s of ' 9 9 . but w i t h o u t g o o d t u r n o u t at the p o l l s I m i g h t as w e l l b e

s a m e w a y a n d v o t e f o r m e . To m e , this is the s a m e as s a y i n g

"Kelli Bitterburg ('99)

that I d o n ' t c a r e w h a t m y c l a s s h a s t o say. S e c o n d l y . I w o u l d like y o u to k n o w that 1 h a v e e x p e r i -

write-in c a n d i d a t e f o r ' 9 9 C l a s s R e p r e s e n t a t i v e . I a m a h a r d -

Hi, m y n a m e is Kelli B i t t e r b u r g a n d I am r u n n i n g as a

e n c e . I w a s V i c e P r e s i d e n t of P r o p s f o r a y e a r a n d a s e m e s ter f o r the Z e e l a n d H i g h P l a y e r s . A s V P of P r o p s I w o r k e d a lot o n d i f f e r e n t b o a r d c o m m i t t e e s . I s p e n t a lot of t i m e t a l k i n g to m e m b e r s , i r y i n g t o f i x the p r o b l e m s that

w o r k i n g , d e d i c a t e d student i n v o l v e d in c a m p u s political life,

n n i n g f o r C l a s s of 1998 r e p r e s e n t a t i v e . I a m

w e r e g o i n g on w i t h i n the P l a y e r s and a d d i n g n e w i d e a s t o m e e t i n g a g e n d a s , w h i l e a l s o

j on the R e s i d e n t i a l L i f e a n d R e l i g i o u s L i f e

s e a r c h i n g f o r the p e r f e c t set p i e c e s . II l o o k a lot of t i m e , h a r d w o r k a n d d e d i c a t i o n , all of w h i c h I a m w i l l i n g lo u s e if 1

t o e x t e n d this to r e p r e s e n t i n g m y p e e r s . I a m a l w a y s o p e n t o i d e a s a n d c o m m e n t s , a n d if e l e c t e d will a l w a y s h a v e an o p e n

snced candidate. e t e x p e r i e n c e d c a n d i d a t e G r e g V l e t r s l r a , on

am chosen a class represeniative .

along with c o m m u n i t y and academic organizations. M y outgoing, honest attitude has gotten m e far and I a m hoping

d o o r . S o r e m e m b e r , w h e n y o u v o t e , w r i t e in K E L L I BITTERBURG FOR 99 CLASS REPRESENTATIVE.


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N O SMOKE f r o m had to vote against the ban. T h e r e were the 14 against, 8 for, and 2 abstentions in the C o n g r e s s vote that sealed the direction of C o n g r e s s ' position against a ban on March 31. Congress had hastily voted nine f o r and seven against the ban b e f o r e a decision was m a d e to re-vote after taking time to discuss the issue with constituents, take a phone survey and allow f o r more m e m b e r s to be in attendance. T h e issue has been an o n g o i n g one for the past ten years, with the three m o s t r e c e n t y e a r s m a k i n g progress towards eliminating smoking across c a m p u s . In the fall of 1994, the Residential Life C o m m i t t e e asked Student Congress to look at the option of smoking in residence halls, which Congress did through talking with constituents. T h e y then sent back

p u r s u e the issue until it c a m e up again at the beginning of this semester, with focus sharpening over the past month. S m o k i n g was banned in the Kletz this past fall. Student C o n g r e s s m e m b e r s on the Residential Life Board introduced a formal proposal three weeks a g o to ban s m o k i n g in all college residential facilities beginning next fall. T h e vote passed the committee by a vote of 3-2, with all Student C o n gress m e m b e r s in attendance voting for the ban, while D e r e k Emerson, Director of Housing and Judicial Affairs, and M a r k Christel, librarian with a rank of assistant professor, w e r e against i m p o s i n g

support of a ban. Residential Life voted on the issue in March of 1995, but f o u n d no c l e a r r a t i o n a l e f o r passing the decision to e l i m i n a t e smoking in c a m p u s housing. T h e fall of 1995 had the issue back on the a g e n d a w h e n C o n g r e s s conducted t w o surveys that s h o w e d student opinion no longer supported

this ban on students. T h e resolution then m a d e its appearance on the C a m p u s Life Board agenda, and w a s tabled at the April 1 meeting so more time could be s p e n t on d i s c u s s i o n . Half of the meeting w a s devoted to a discussion on the rights and wrongs of the issue. T h e debate boiled d o w n to health concerns and a student's right to do what they want in their o w n room within reason. A possible p h a s e - i n p r o c e s s of o n l y c e r t a i n

the ban. Residential L i f e did not

halls, apartments and cottages be-

c o m i n g s m o k e - f r e e gradually w a s suggested, but it was an all or nothing issue. " N o matter when it passes, those w h o s m o k e will have problems that no length of time will take care of," said A n n e Bakker-Gras, Director of Student Activities and C a m p u s Life Board member. T h e vote w a s conducted by se-

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cret ballot. Heated debate continued after the vote, with Student Congress representative Matt Fretz ( ' 9 9 ) unhappy about the outcome. "It's unfortunate that the students' opinions are left out of the decisions," he said. If the ban slicks, there will be no facility on c a m p u s

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gry, some that d o n ' t care, and s o m e that are happy," he said.

FORUM f r o m 2 the diversity of Christian life on

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m p u s l the C h a p l a i n ' s O f f i c e ' s role in reaching students, and the concerns of non-Christian students at Hope. Student Congress representatives

cellation of the f o r u m , but have no intentions to reschedule. T h o u g h interest w a s expressed, w h e n it c a m e right d o w n to it nobody wanted to c o m e , Fretz said.

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where students can light up. T h e resolution now goes to President John Jacobson, who can c h o o s e to overturn the decision, or the faculty m a y p a ss a resolution asking the Board to reconsider the ban. President Jacobson is out of town and could not be reached for comment. Frost feels that student response will be split o n this issue. " S o m e students will be very an-

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April

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Intermission

Shakespeare play targets today's college kid M. H E R W A L D X intermission editor

The Hope College theatre d e p a r t m e n l ' s p r e s e n t a t i o n of Shakespeare's " C o m e d y of Errors" smells distinctly of teen spirit. T h e play, w h i c h will be perf o r m e d in the P h y s i c a l P l a n t on April 17, 19, 25, and 26 at 8 p.m., b r i n g s the a u d i e n c e a c a s t c o m prised almost completely of freshmen. Not only is the cast young, but the c o - d i r e c t o r is D a n i e l H o a g (•97). Between H o a g and the stage manager Kristin T h o m a s ( ' 9 7 ) , this Shakespeare comedy about t w o sets of twins has been reworked to c o n tain several m o d e m twists. T h e dialogue, however, has not been t a m p e r e d with, a n d is presented in its entirety along with the f a m i l i a r S h a k e s p e a r e d e v i c e s of

Great Performance Series to feature Theresa Santiago

mistaken identity and romantic mishap. Todd Sessoms ('00), who plays " D r o m i o of S y r a c u s e , " believes that the play is very accessible. "The pre-show music is very contemporary, and everybody will recognize it," he said. " W e ' v e also incorporated comedic bits of 'Star Wars,' ' F a r g o , ' and o t h e r m o v i e s into the play." E v e n the c o s t u m e s w e r e des i g n e d by a s t u d e n t , s e n i o r S u e Checklick. " T h e m a t u r e faculty admitted that they w e r e n ' t as hip," T h o m a s said, " S o they g a v e us an e n o r m o u s

C O M EDY: Actor Todd Sessoms COO) and co-director Dan Hoag ('97) talk shop after "Comedy of Errors" rehearsal

a m o u n t of f r e e d o m . " T h e cast and crew of " C o m e d y of E r r o r s " w e r e f o r c e d to w o r k within the often frustrating confines of the physical plant, m a d e especially frustrating by the pole in the

center of the space that runs f r o m the ceiling to the floor. " W e wanted to use the space in a different w a y than w e had before," H o a g said. " A n d so w e decided to use theatre-in-the-round.

/Anchor p h o t o by J o s h N e u c k s

T h e play also requires a lot of entrances and exits. S o m e o n e will be running here w h i l e s o m e o n e else will be running there. T h e p r o b l e m is that there is a pole in the middle

T h e Great P e r f o r m a n c e Series at Hope College will close its 199697 season with a concert by soprano

Ghapel. Santiago w o n the 1994 International N a u m b e r g Vocal C o m p e tition in Concert Repertoire and the 1993 D'Angelo Competition. Other honors include second prize in the Licia Albanese-Puccini Foundation c o m p e t i t i o n , a n d being n a m e d a 1994 Metropolitan O p e r a National Council finalist. Her numerous recitals and concerts i n c l u d e Lincoln C e n t e r a n d J u i l l i a r d , as well as N e w Y o r k ' s A l i c e Tully Hall, the H o l l y w o o d Bowl in L o s A n g e l e s , Calif., the K e n n e d y C e n t e r in W a s h i n g t o n D.C., and London's W i g m o r e Hall. She has performed around the country, f r o m Seattle, Wash., to Naples, Fla; from Boston, Mass., to Hawaii; and at points in between. S a n t i a g o is a n a t i v e N e w Yorker, and holds her bachelor's and master's degrees f r o m T h e Juilliard S c h o o l , w h e r e she s t u d i e d w i t h Daniel Ferro. —Hope

College News Service

C o m e see t h e b a n d on its " E s cape f r o m New Y o r k " tour. F r i . , A p r . 18, a f t e r 9 p . m . - T H E G O O D E A R T H . $2 donation. Sat., A p r . 19, 8 p . m - - C a l v i n , m G e z o n Hall. $8 for nonCalvinites.

A n g e l s

Dancing Before the Sun. 15th Century.

responsibilites have grown and I've learned a tremendous amount. N o w my interest in visual art is quite informed and g e n u i n e , " she said. Her new book was c o m m i s s i o n e d by a f o r m e r H o p e art student whom Carrey had befriended. Laura Wyss ('91). an art researcher f o r a N e w York publishing c o m p a n y , remembered Carrey's writing status and ^ c a l l e d her. ^ 'She and I had

JACQUELINE CARREY mmm

^

erature. S h e found herself more thrilled by the prospect of the world at large Writers aren't always found than the world of graduate school. in the expected places. "I lived in London and worked On a college campus, its easy at a bookstore f o r half a year, and to forget that English professors traveled through Europe f o r several are not the only ones w h o pub- m o n t h s , " Carrey said. lish work, not the only ones who She returned to West Michigan go home and conceptualize meta- with empty pockets in need of some phors with their d o g s at their fefet. financial padding. Jacqueline Carrey, the secre" W h e n I returned to this area, tary f o r the Hope Art Department I needed a j o b , " Carrey said. " A t and the DePree Gallery A d m i n - the exact same time, the art departistrative Assistant, is o n e of the ment lost their office manager, and "other" writers. they w e r e anxious to find a n e w H e r f i r s t b o o k , " A n g e l s , " one. S o m e o n e referred m e to them, will be out in the Fall. It is her and the rest is history." first foray into publishing, despite It was then that Carrey began an amassed bod y of work span- to p u r s u e h e r writing f u l l - f o r c e , ning two unpublished novels and working 4 0 hours a week at DePree m a n y short stories. and going h o m e to spend several Although she pays close at- hours reading and writing. tention to her craft and has dedi"I write fiction in a pretty broad cated m a n y years to sharpening spectrum of styles and genres," she it, Carrey is not a writer to emerge said. " A friend of mine j o k e s that I f r o m the walls of academia. put myself through my own grad Carrey is a self-taught writer. school program. 1 naturally lend to "1 had started writing in my love language and luxuriant elaboteens, but h a d n ' t considered it as rate prose. I had to teach myself to a career until m u c h later," she write clean, spare prose. And I never said. "I put off graduate school cared for writing in the first person, because I realized that specializa- so I made myself write in it. And I tion can be a wonderful thing, but r o t a t e d b e t w e e n p a s t t e n s e and it can also narrow your field of present tense, and I wrote on eveinterest in t e r m s the a m o u n t of nings and weekends. And I read and mental energy you can give when I liked what I read I analyzed things." it and patterned my writing after it." After having grown up Carrey's employment as art des p e n d i n g h e r s u m m e r s in partment secretary expanded to galSaugatack, where her parents ran lery adminsitrative assistant. a small art gallery, she graduated " W h e n I started at Depree my f r o m Lake Forest College in Illi- j o b description was somewhat narnois with a degree in English lit- r o w e r . O v e r t h e y e a r s the M. H E R W A L D X intermission editor

b e t w e e n their e x a m s , sit d o w n , and take it f o r w h a t it is: a play f o r laughter."

of the space."

THE S E L F - T A U G H T W R I T E R ' S M I N D OF

Theresa Santiago on Saturday, April 19, at 8 p.m in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l

T h e ingenuity of set designer Richard Smith, along with the cast and crew, c a m e u p with a solution to the problem. " W e ' r e using it as a sun-dial," H o a g s a i d . # ' A n d we actually shine a spotlight on it so it indicates the correct time — sort of correct." Setting the play u p as a theatrein-the-round, Hoag said, d e m a n d s exact physical precision on the part of the actors. T h e audience can see every side of the actor. T h e best part of the reworked Shakespeare. S e s s o m s said, is that the audience is immediately a part of the theatre experience. "This isn't H a m l e t , " he said. "It's one of Shakespeare's first comedies, and students can just walk in

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been working together on an alumni show in the fall," she said. " W h e n the company, w h i c h basically produces coffee table books, was brainstorming ideas for books, she t h o u g h t of m e . W h e n I t o l d my m o t h e r she said, ' A n g e l s are so trendy n o w a d a y s . I bet t h e y ' d like you to write a book on angels, that would sell.'" Years ago, Carrey might not have accepted the call to write. " A c o u p l e years ago I might

der the spectrum of stuff that interests me, under mythology and religion. All the work I had done in art and writing came into play. I s t u d i e d the w a y t h a t a n g e l s have been depicted in art for centuries. T h e n I divided the rest of the book into three sections, h e a v e n , earth and hell. I went as far back in source material as I c o u l d . " T h e book will be illustrated by about 100 works of a x v For f u t u r e writers, she stresses that there are pros and cons to being a self-taught writer. "I think the main advantage is that y o u r w o r k is far m o r e likely to be original, and you rea l l y d o d e v e l o p an individual vision," Carrey said. "The downside is that you d o n ' t get advice on h o w to develop a career. You d o n ' t h a v e c o n t a c t s o r an inf o r m e d g r o u p of readers to give you f e e d b a c k . " L o o k i n g back on her considerable experience, Carrey w o u l d a d v i s e , " N e v e r turning a w a y any kind of k n o w l e d g e , any skill that is available to you. You never know when you will incorporate it."

have just shrugged and walked away f r o m this opportunity," she said. "But I didn't and I ' m very glad. I ' v e c o m e to the realization that if I do want a writing career I h a v e to work on the c a r e e r part. I h a v e to deal with the commercial part of it. I need to be querying agents, querying publishers, and convincing people." W h i l e

Carrey admits that, "the world of the c o f f e e table book is not the ideal f o r a writer," she also c o n c e d e s that, "the s u b j e c t of angels falls un-

/ ^ o t o courtesy of J a c q u e l i n e Carrey

C O F F E E IIM T H E C L O I S TERS: Jacqueline Carrey, art department secretary, has written a book on angels that draws on her travels, her love of art and the mystical This picture was taken in Aix-enProvence, and is representative of her writing, in its combination of the sacred and mundane.


theAnchor

Spotlight

SHEDDING

N SOME LIGHT

ON

The word on the street Hope dance majors are emerging spotlight editor as well-rounded graduates of a lib——-x Since attending Dance 23 is re- eral arts education. A n d more of quired for your IDS class, you find them are graduating each year. Now yourself sitting in the Knick, watch- that Hope is the only private fouring these Hope students glide, j u m p , year college in the nation to be acand squirm across the stage. What credited in all four of the arts (music, theater, art, and d a n c e ) , the exactly is happening up there? You head to the Dow one night word is getting out about the dance to ride the bike, your World Lit text- department. " T h e n u m b e r of a p p l i c a t i o n s book in hand. Those people are always hanging around upstairs, in f r o m potential d a n c e m a j o r s has leotards and weird bits of clothing, been increasing over the last five stretching their legs. Dance majors. years," said Gary C a m p ('78), admissions counselor. "We get calls Must be nice, you think. Never havabout the department from people ing any homework. What do dance in places like New York, Colorado, majors do all day, anyway? The majority of students at Hope and Maryland, who hear of Hope have virtually no knowledge about because of our dance program." Ellen T o m e r ( ' 9 7 ) is one such the life of a dance major. It seems easy enough — dance all day, come dance major, hailing f r o m Rocheshome at night to an evening free of ter, New York. " M y college choice Van Wylen visits, blue computer was between Penn State, which had screens, and massive reading as- a dance minor, and Hope, which had signments. Sure, they need at least the major," she said. "I received the Distinguished 57 credits to earn Artist Scholara degree in dance, ship from Hope, but those a r e all I c h a l l e n g e a n y o n e and that decided just...dance it." classes, right? t o spend t h e day T h e dance maWrong. d o i n g w h a t I do. jor and French "Oh, they have P e o p l e t h i n k t h i s is minor spent last h o m e w o r k , " said semester in Paris, Steven lannacone, just a feel-good where she took dance professor. m a j o r , n o t as t a x i n g classes towards "They have homeas o t h e r s . her minor and work f r o m t h e i r — M . A I t o b e l l i ('98) danced at a stutheory classes. d a n c e m a j o r d i o o n her o w n T h e y h a v e retime. She had a search, repertory work, lab and studio time. T h e y col- tighl-knirgrdup of f r i e n d s waiting lect data, they look for material for for her when she returned. " M y closest friends are dancers. their choreography. And they have I ' m always around the same group rehearsals all year, at all hours." Dancers h a v e a schedule that, of people," Tomer said. " W e ' r e alwhile comprising n u m e r o u s one- ways at the Dow, day and night." M e r e d i t h A k i n s COO) a g r e e d . credit dance technique classes (a " M y only real friends are the people typical day consists of 6 - 8 class hours), also includes Dance History, I live with, and dancers. I know zero Anatomical Kinesiology, Accompa- guys here because of dance," she niment for Dance, and Labanotation said. A m a j o r c h a n g e in d i r e c t i o n (which teaches the universal system Two male dance majors will be of symbols for dance). g r a d u a t i n g this May. N a t h a n a e l Each class is a requirement for Buckley ( ' 9 7 ) arrived at Hope as a graduation, as well as is the core curriculum all Hope students fol- f r e s h m a n primed to go pre-med. Four years later, he's preparing to low. A. SXR ASS B U R G E R

April

iTHEHSECRET E I R WORLD'

I 6,

I 997

OF DANCE MAJORS

head for New York C i t y and pursue a career in dance performance. " S e c o n d sem e s t e r of my freshman year, I took a ballet class," Buckley said. "I had heard ballet was really d i f f i c u l t to do well in. I had heard some football players were taking it. I j u s t wanted to see what it was like." Buckley's initial curiosity eventually led to a c h a n g e in majors. It also affected his experience at Hope in a unique way. SI i W i B " T h e r e are lots of misconm-fk* ceptions about artists in general," Buckley said. " P e o p l e think w e ' r e Anchor photo by N. D e C h e l b o e r not r e s p o n T H I S I S X H E LIFE: Erin Daly ('98) takes a breather in between sible or orgaclasses, while Lara Bremer ('98) stretches at the barre. nized." "It's a given that p e o p l e will a s s u m e a m a l e raphy and independent study re- y o u ' v e got, but to worship with the dancer is h o m o s e x u a l / ' he said. "L quirements-,- a n d t h e i r a c a d e m i c congregation. I .feel J?le^sed to exexpect them to think it. That's just credits, plus performing, I just don't tend G o d ' s word in that way." Making the department more visknow how they do it," lannacone a barrier I have to deal with." ible o n c a m p u s (as with Sacred Akins has dealt with misconcep- said. "It takes a lot of dedication." D a n c e ) has a l w a y s been one of Branching out tions as well. The freshman has had M e l i s s a A l t o b e l l i ( ' 9 8 ) is no l a n n a c o n e ' s " p e t p r o j e c t s . " C o a different time adjusting to college life compared to the average ' 0 0 stranger to the word. "I challenge t e a c h i n g IDS c l a s s e s is a n o t h e r student, thanks to her major. "Ev- anyone with another major to spend method of achieving this. "We want to show other students eryone says to me 'You must be stu- a day doing what I do," she said. that w e ' r e part of the school," he "People think this is just a 'feelpid, you c a n ' t m a j o r in anything said. " D a n c e r s a r e n ' t getting an g o o d ' major, that it's not as taxing else,' and 'A dance major...what are easier ride." Increasing the number you gonna do with thatT And I ' m as others." of performances f r o m three to five Altobelli, who also has a religion not really sure yet." per year, as well as using non-danc" T h a t ' s the scariest thing about minor, recently added another dibeing a dancer," Akins said. "You mension to her life as a Hope dancer ers in these productions, is also input in so much time and you never — S a c r e d D a n c e . D a n c i n g in c r e a s i n g r e c o g n i t i o n . T e c h n i q u e know what'11 happen after college." Chapel and in area churches is un- classes aren't restricted to just malike anything Altobelli has ever ex- j o r s — a n y o n e w h o ' s interested W h a t c a n you d o with a dance may take a dance class. lannacone perienced. major? "With Sacred, you switch perfor- says some students try dance for The shakiness of a career in dance m a n c e with w o r s h i p , " she said. pure enjoyment. was also mentioned by Mandy Fry

('98), a dance major with a minor in art. "If you want a career in performance, your prime isn't going to last that long," she said. "You can't dance forever for a living." Fry f e e l s s a f e r k n o w i n g that Hope's dance department offers a variety of different options for majors to pursue. The major includes four areas of concentration: Perform a n c e and Choreography. Dance Education, Dance Therapy (a dance and psychology dual major), and D a n c e M e d i c i n e and Science (a dance and biology, chemistry, and/ or engineering dual major). Fry is interested in pursuing dance photography after graduation. l a n n a c o n e h a s n o t i c e d an "evening out" between the concentrations in the last few years, especially in therapy and medicine. He Anchor p\r\oXo by N. D e C h e l b o e r has also noticed an increase in other A L L I N A DAY'S W O R K : Jonathan Fly ('97), dual m a j o r s in t h e d e p a r t m e n t . one of few male dance majors, shows his stuff in Technique IV "With their dance major, choreog-

"You d o n ' t d a n c e to show what

m o r e DANCERS on

H u n g r y p e o p l e s t u r g g i e d a i l y all o v e r the w o r l d . T h e y walk for food....for water....for survival.

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Join the H E A R T AND S O L E S of the Holland and Zeeland Community and WALK BECAUSE THEY WALK" at the

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April

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strictlyl classified. A B C : You w e r e great last night. D o n ' t ever stop (singing to) me. I'll throw more sharp objects at you if you do. 1 promise...Glyn If you have any extra indoor c o m m e n c e m e n t t i c k e t s , I ' d be m o r e than willing to buy them f r o m you. Please call Jenn at x4830. A t t e n t i o n : We have current information regarding abortion, assisted suicide, adoption, and Crisis pregnancy centers. Contact: Right to Life of Holland. 100 S. Waverly Rd. H o l l a n d 4 9 4 2 3 P h o n e - 3 9 6 1037. w e b site:http:/www.rtl.org or E-mail: info@rtl.org Stallion: You're a natural Fred Astaire. T h a n k s f o r dinner. Chachi F o r S a l e : R C A Washer Standard Capacity and G E T w o C y c l e Dryer Large Capacity. $ 1 8 0 for both. Call Sue at 395-4902 I would like to see vegan f o r president or at least see him once a week. What a treat for the visit. I love you. thanks you....i love early m o r n i n g drives, buger king and super size cokes...don't forget smokes R e m e m b e r to give the cheese forever and always. I love you my little buddies. 1 will give everything to you. E v e n the fire. F M : Two m o r e to go...the finale is on me. All I ask f o r is no Martha or Stephanie, lil angel T P G : And you think gail will be intimidating, eh. I tell you, she knows her stuff. I d o n ' t even have to tell you w h o I admire over there. 2TPG(ained) Do you h a v e an interesting, exotic, exciting summer plans? T h e Anchor wants to k n o w ! Call x7877 and ask fdr A m y i W t l ' c l V a t . '

B e f f - "Shock me, shock me, shock m e with that deviant behavior!" We need to go to a movie. L o v e , M e

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"They initiated support," he said, " a n d n o w t h e y ' r e j u s t t a k i n g it away." Ridl also f i n d s it ironic that part of the c o m m i t t e e ' s justification for the cuts is that the series is not wholly f o r students, because community m e m b e r s are allowed to attend it for free. "The series is all about students," he said. "I do s o m e of the nittygritty work, but students pick u p the writers f r o m tfie airport, students introduce them at the readings, and s t u d e n t s h a v e d i n n e r with t h e m . E v e n student j a z z musicians play at the event." Derek Z o e t e w e y ( ' 9 7 ) , current editor of O P U S , echoes Ridl on this point. " A person only needs to go o n c e to realize that m o s t of the Knickerbocker Theatre is full at any of our r e a d i n g s and most of the people are students." He estimates that two-thirds to three-fourths of the average c r o w d is comprised of

to English m a j o r s . " Jesse Koskey ('98), an art major, contradicts this belief. H e regularly attends the readings, and stated: "All I have to say is that they should f u n d it." Laura Myers ('98), a sociology/ e n v i r o n m e n t a l studies c o m p o s i t e major, agreed. "We go to a liberal arts college. T h e point is to immerse yourself in lots of things, not to be strictly focused and partake of only one thing. People of lots of different majors attend these things." M i k e T h e u n e , a part-time faculty m e m b e r of the English Department, said the series has a valuable reputation that shouldn't be tampered with. " H o p e provides o n e of the best writers' series in the nation. Students should take pride in this." O P U S asked f o r $24,100 and was granted $ 7 , 1 5 0 for the Visiting W r i t e r s S e r i e s . W i t h o u t the b u d geted f u n d s , Ridl sees the series s h r i n k i n g in size a n d b e c o m i n g m o r e localized, instead of b e i n g able to bring in writers f r o m all over the nation. Currently there are about three readings per semester; Ridl sees this decreasing to three readings per year. He also believes the diversity component would suffer. "We just w o n ' t be able to bring

students. However, Tyler Smith, Student C o n g r e s s C o m p t r o l l e r and chairperson of the Appropriations C o m mittee, cites the necessity of keeping student activity fee f u n d s relegated to distinctly student activities. " T h e r e ' s just not enough m o n e y , " he said. S u e Frost, faculty advisor to the Appropriations Committee, aff i r m e d this. " T h e c o m m i t t e e received lots of requests f o r speakers, and they allocated [to O P U S ] what they could," she said. A l s o at issue is the c o m m i t t e e ' s belief that the series is geared only f o r English^maj'ofs'. 'Smlth'stared: " A vast majority of the students at these events are either people w h o h a v e to be there f o r a class o r English majors. It's mainly beneficial

in the stature or diversity that w e can now," he said. Provost J a c o b N y e n h u i s slated that a D e a n ' s f u n d h a s s e c u r e d $5,000 for writer Joyce Carol Oates' appearance next fall, but after that " w e will have to investigate each situation." "It's not that w e don't think the ^eri&? is worth funding," Smith s^id' "It's just that w e can't give student activity fee f u n d s to it. W h a t if every department wanted to host series like this? We just c a n ' t do it."

DANCERS from 10 With the department growing as it is, space is also an issue. " W e ' r e waiting f o r the m o n e y f o r a n e w d a n c e b u i l d i n g , " Fry said. "The amount of dancers in my f r e s h m a n class doubled the next year, and w e still have only o n e main studio. Classes can be packed, and dancers need r o o m . " l a n n a c o n e k n o w s where Fry is c o m i n g f r o m . ' T h e administration is behind us 100 percent," he said. "They are completely backing us in finding the department its right

dedicated. "Dancing your best is always a b e g i n n i n g p o i n t , " he said. " Y o u need the confidence, the boldness to m a k e a statement about yourself. Talent is important in certain areas, but it's not everything." " D a n c e majors c a n ' t c o m e here pre-set in their w a y s , " l a n n a c o n e said. "This is the beginning of the process. Dancers leave here with choices...with a direction." Editor's note: The spring Student Dance Concert will be held Tuesday, April 22. and Wednesday, April, 23 at 8 p.m. in the Knickerbocker. All pieces are student choreographed. Admission is free.

home." Not everyone is cut out for the life of a dance major. lannacone des c r i b e s the ideal d a n c e r as o n e w h o ' s prepared to be 150 percent

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April

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1997

Flying Dutchmen sweep weekend double dip MIKE Z U I D E M A staff r e p o r t e r

MacDoniels, on the other hand, is 8-6 on the season and has a 34-24 career record. Rahimi struggled slightly against Bluffton as he won 6 - 1 , 7 - 5 but then beat Cornerstone easily 6-2, 6-0. MacDoniels barely broke a sweat over the w e e k e n d as he blanked Cornerstone 6-0, 6-0 and defeated Bluffton 6 - 0 , 6 -

After fighting through the toughest part of their schedule, the m e n ' s tennis team swept a double-header and earned their ninth and tenth victories of the season last weekend. Every member of the team had an opportunity to 1. play as the Flying Head coach Dutchmen only Steve Gorno W e have played a dropped one match also had praise the entire day. The tough schedule, and for third singles victories brought I have p u t a l o t of Paul Lillie the team's overall p h y s i c a l p r e s s u r e ('00), who had record to 10-8, the a pair of victothird year in a row and mental ries 6-2, 6-1 and in which the team pressure on t h e m . 6-4, 6-1. has had d o u b l e —Steve Gorno "(Lillie) has digit victories. Men's tennis coach been a big surHope blanked prise. He has B l u f f t o n 9 - 0 and beat Cornerstone 8-1. T h e wins also played incredibly tough. Normally put the team on pace to break the as a freshman there is a learning previous Hope record of 11 victo- c u r v e , but h e h a s r e a l l y c o m e through," G o r n o said. ries in a season. Lillie has the most victories of Notching a trio of victories were top ranked players second singles anyone on the team, as his record Saum Rahimi ('97) and first singles is currently 12-5 overall. T h e team will begin their conferJeff MacDoniels ('98), w h o has recovered from an early season injury. ence schedule this Saturday, April 19, w i t h a m a t c h a g a i n s t rival Rahimi's pair of wins improved C a l v i n . H o p e has p l a y e d the his season record to 10-6, with a tougher part of the schedule early gajeex record of 48-32.

Sports Briefs •Baseball- The Flying Dutchmen baseball team (12-9,7-0) §wept three games from Calvin College on Monday afternoon. Hope won the first game 10-3, which had been suspended Friday afternoon due to rain, and then won the next two 4-3. •Men's Basketball- Hope College guard Joel Holstege ( ' 9 8 ) added to his awards and accomplishments last week by being named to the Basketball Times First team All-America.

Vnesenga's wins help Hope baseball t e a m 1994. " T h e talent in the league is very spread out," Vriesenga said. Flying Dutchmen baseball player "(Head baseball coach Stu) Fritz Matt Vriesenga (*99) doesn't have has told the team that w e should a commanding repertoire of pilches. win." The attitude on this year's team Instead, he uses oustanding pitch is also something that Vriesenga p l a c e m e n t as his key to success looks to as a catalyst to success, while on the mound. S u c c e s s is an u n d e r s t a t e m e n t . compared to last year's 10-21 seaVriesenga has pitched his way to a son. "Last year w e were split as a 4-0 record this season, following up t e a m , " Vriesenga last year's 5 - 4 record said. "This year I and 1.93 earned run don't think there is average. The 6 ' 5 " single a person on right-hander has the t e a m that rehelped H o p e to an ally dislikes someundefeated 7-0 one else." Michigan IntercolleVriesenga was giate record. forced to miss this Vriesenga came to y e a r ' s spring trip Hope from Grand to Florida due to Rapids Christian d i s c i p l i n a r y reaHigh School, where sons. he honed his pitching MattVriesenga (,99) 441 feel bad about skills and pitched to not going on the current catcher Mike trip," Vriesenga said. "But the guys Meeuwsen ('98). He has had expeon the team never really looked rience playing s h o r t s t o p in high down on me for the situation." school, but his niche came in being His being on the team is a defiHope's number one starting pitcher. nite boost. Without h i m on the "I really don't feel like I am the spring trip, the Flying Dutchmen only good pitcher on the t e a m / ' Vriesenga said. "Our pitching suc- f o u n d t h e m s e l v e s m i r e d with losses and came back north with a c e s s c o m e s in t h e d e p t h of o u r 4-8 record. staff." Not all of these losses stemmed Vriesenga feels that this year's team, although very young, has a from the lack of pitching, but with chance to make a run for the M I A A Vriesenga's arm back in the rotation it is a definite plus. ^dhhmploftship, w h i c h they w o n DAVE GABRlELSE staff r e p o r t e r

in the season, and Gorno hopes for a season-end push. " S p r i n g Break w a s really t h e m e a t of o u r s c h e d u l e , w i t h Wheaton," Gorno said. "We're hoping to take care of business this coming week. "Aquinas and Calvin have been big obstacles we have had to overc o m e , and we have to o v e r c o m e those obstacles first to build mom e n t u m , " Gorno said. While Gorno has been pleased with the performance of his singles p l a y e r s , h e is l o o k i n g f o r t h e doubles teams to step up to another level of play. Not i n c l u d i n g last w e e k e n d ' s matches, the Flying Dutchmen are 55-42 in singles and 53-46 overall in doubles in individual matches this season. "We have done as we have expected, but I ' m a little disappointed in the doubles. They have not done as well as expected," Gorno said. G o m o has been very pleased with the performance of his team against the strong c o m p e t i t i o n that they have played so far this season. "We have played a tough schedule, and I have put a lot of physical pressure and mental pressure on them, playing up to the competition day a f t e r day, but they have responded a w e s o m e , " G o m o said.

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photo by Zach Johnson

N I C E F O R E H A N D : Flying Dutchmen tennis team co-captain Bret Cook ('97) returns a shot down the line.

Track t e a m s endure long season GLYM W I L L I A M S sports e d i t o r

Hope College men's and w o m e n ' s track teams have a long season behind them, and it isn't half over. The Flying Dutchmen have suffered through flu season, unnaturally cold weather, and a javelin accident to piece together an exceptional season, which has been recently capped off by a s u c c e s s f u l f i n i s h at t h e Washington University Invitational in St. Louis, Mo. Hope's m e n ' s team finished sixth in a field of 17. "There were s o m e tough teams c o m p e t i n g there." said M a r k Northuis, head coach of the m e n ' s team. "There were some NAIA and Division II teams there and we are working through some injuries and w e had some people miss the meet with research reports." Jeremy Bogard ( ' 9 8 ) led the field of Dutchmen with a second place finish in the 800-meter and a fourth place finish in the 100-meter hurdles.

He completed the hurdles in a time of j u s t o v e r 15 s e c o n d s . P a u l Ballard ( ' 9 8 ) finished third in the hammer throw, Dan Bannink ('97) finished fourth in the 5,000- meter r u n . and J a s o n Haid ( ' 0 0 ) took fourth in the high j u m p and sixth in the long jump. Amy Cook ('99) led the Flying Dutch to fourth place with her first place finish in the long j u m p , third place finish in the triple j u m p , and fourth place finish in the 100-meter hurdles. Justin Albertson ('98) is currently recovering f r o m a javelin accident that took place Thursday, April 3. While standing on the side waiting for his turn to practice throwing, Ballard accidentally threw the javelin in the direction of Albertson, who had his back turned, and nicked him just below his calf on the left leg. "It just missed his achilles and we hope he can c o m p e t e this weeke n d , " N o r t h u i s said. "If he was

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standing a little bit closer or if it were thrown harder things would have been very bad." T h u s f a r in t h e s e a s o n , o n l y Bannink has qualified for Nationals for the men, while no members of the w o m e n ' s team have qualified. Bannink qualified for Nationals in the 5,000-meter at the Auburn Invitational on March 15. Both teams will compete this Saturday, April 19, in a dual m e e t a g a i n s t C a l v i n and A d r i a n . T h e home track meet will take place at the Ekdal J. Buys Athletic Field anf starts at 12:30 p.m. Alma was the favorite to win the league, but they lost to Calvin last weekend and thus the Knights are now in the league lead. " C a l v i n is w e l l - b a l a n c e d and v e r y s t r o n g in t h e t h r o w s a n d j u m p s , " Northuis said. "We can make up for it in our sprints and relays and hope to hold even in the distances. We just have to hope for our chances." 1 2 = "

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