04-09-1997

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H o p e C o l l e g e • H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n • A n i n d e p e n d e n t n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • S e r v i n g t h e H o p e C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r I 10 y e a r s

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N o r t h brings message of activism STACYBOGARD campusbeat editor

Billy Crockett holds impromtu concert* Religion, page 7.

Vegetarians thrive on Hope's campus. Spotlight, page 9.

Images 97 a t the Knick this weekend. Campusbeat, page 2.

Student organization budgets c o m e o u t for t h e n e x t year. InFocus, page 6.

Baseball undefeated in M I A A play. Sports, page 12.

Standing behind a w o o d e n pod i u m on the Knickerbocker Theatre stage in a crispNvhite shirt and black pinstripe suit. Oliver North finally h a d his c h a n c e to take H o p e by ^torm last night. North discussed "Faith under Fire, C o n s e r v a t i s m on C a m p u s " with over 500 students, faculty and c o m m u n i t y m e m b e r s d u r i n g an 8 : 3 0 p . m . s p e e c h f o l l o w e d by a question and answer session. Although he is not an expert on the topics. North stated his qualifications on the subjects w a s built through experience as a husband, father of four children, a small businessman inventing life-saving equipment for law e n f o r c e m e n t officials, 22 years as a United States Marine and as "a person w h o has traveled extensively in this c o u n try." W h i l e most of the controversy surrounding North's presence on c a m p u s w a s f o c u s e d on his past involvement with the Iran/Contra affair, only o n e question f r o m the audience c o n f r o n t e d this issue. Most w e r e i n t e r e s t e d in N o r t h ' s o p i n i o n on the c u r r e n t f i n a n c i a l controversy facing President Bill Clinton, and the continuing sexual

harassment problems surrounding the A r m e d F o r c e s . He said that Clinton will be forced to step down b e f o r e f i n i s h i n g out his s e c o n d term. In response to the Iran/Contra question. North stated that he was never even charged with lying to Congress, so he obviously could not have been convicted, but "the criticism will never go away." Frequently interspersing "that's my humble opinion, other than that I d o n ' t f e e l s t r o n g l y a b o u t it," among his articulate, strongly opinionated responses. North answered approximately ten questions f r o m the audience. Many questions dealt with issues N o r t h m e n t i o n e d in his l e c t u r e ranging f r o m the importance and p o w e r of the Constitution to his opposition to curfews for teenagers. "I thought it w a s a very interesting speech, especially his points on the individual's responsibility and that w e as citizens should get involved. I was very m u c h in favor of him coming in the first place," said D o u g Roberts ( ' 9 7 ) . North challenged the people in the a u d i e n c e to p a r t i c i p a t e and m a k e c h a n g e s n o w so that their ideal future can be met. more NORTH on I O

>Anc/7or p h o t o by J o s h N e u c k s

• W E T H E P E O P L E . . . * Oliver North uses the Constitution to emphasize a point during last night's speech.

Isn't it Iranic? ^Pure coincidence brings a journalist involved in exposing the Iran/Contra scandal to campus at the same time as Oliver North. DAVE GABRIELSE staff r e p o r t e r

This week Hope College students have the to opportunity to listen to a man who has been in the heart of j o u r n a l i s m f o r the past 2 0 years. John Wallach, foreign editor of Hearst Newspapers for almost three decades, has c o m e to speak as part of the W o o d r o w W i l s o n Visiting Fellows program through the Business and E c o n o m i c Department. Wallach's visit has s o m e unintended irony. W a l l a c h w a s o n e of the m a i n journalists w h o exposed the Iran/ Contra scandal, and in an unrelated visit Oliver North spoke on campus at the same time. ' T h e two of us being here w a s completely coincidental," Wallach said. " I w a s b o o k e d to c o m e to Hope about a year ago." N o r t h ' s visit w a s d e c i d e d and p l a n n e d this s e m e s t e r , w i t h no knowledge of Wallach's impending stay. T h e Visiting F e l l o w s Program brings leaders in certain fields to the c a m p u s e s of small liberal arts colleges f o r a week of lecture, discussion, and a n s w e r i n g s o m e of the current problems in the world, as well as those of the past. One of the small lectures given by Wallach look place yesterday afternoon discussing the Iran/ Contra affair, a talk he usually gives to most of the c a m p u s e s he visits. "The real tragedy is that one human being w a s able to subvert the m o r e W A L L A C H on I I

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p h o t o by Z a c h J o h n s o n

L I N E D O ^ V N : A sudden cold front last Sunday brought in winds that reached up to 70 miles per hour, causing power outages throughout the lower half of the state. There was also damage done to area houses, including a tree falling on a 13th Street house and damage done in front of the French House on the corner of 14th Street and Columbia Avenue. Large tree branches brought down a power line and littered the house's front lawn until Monday afternoon

R e v a m p e d c o r e expands o p t i o n s LAURA MIMAILOFF staff r e p o r t e r

T h e Spanish department is proposing a n e w way to broaden students' horizons and increase cultural diversity as part of the Hope experience. A team of dedicated faculty and staff have been working together to create what will be Hope's first independent overseas study program in Qucretaro, Mexico. Other programs that send students to travel in Europe, Asia and Africa, for example, are all programs that Hope has entered with another university or organization. T h i s time H o p e will go it alone. Neal Sobania, Director of International Education and professor of

history and A l f r e d o Gonzales, Assistant Provost h a v e been working on the project for several years so first and second year Hope students can travel to Queretaro next fall. T h e purpose behind this program is that it offers an opportunity for students with less Spanish speaking background to learn the language in a natural and more intensive setting. "We are offering the program in Queretaro as a painless way for students to acquire language skills in a w a y that is better than [what 1 call) 'seat time,*" S o b a n i a said. "Naturally, living and speaking in a foreign country, students will experience more of the Spanish language in o n e day than they would in an entire week in the classroom

[at Hope]," he said. "The program allows students to c o m p l e t e 16 credit hours toward core, their Spanish m a j o r or minor, and/or any department based on the independent study project a student chooses to do. Students can earn valuable pre-medicine or political science experience during their independent study, for example," said Dr. Hersilia AIvarez-Ruf, Associate Professor of Spanish, who will travel with students to Mexico to help ihem orient to the atmosphere before flying back to Holland for fall semester courses. She will return at the p r o g r a ms end in order to evaluate the students' progress and escort them home. A difference in the program is the more COURSES on 8


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C a m p u s Beat

Getting cultured

campus briefs S A C 1997-98 l e a d e r s h i p c h o s e n T h e a p p o i n t m e n t s f o r the t w o most p o w e r f u l student positions on S A C were m a d e last week. Joy G r e e n ( ' 9 8 ) , next y e a r ' s A s sociate Director and M a r y L u c a s ( ' 9 8 ) were appointed after a applic a t i o n a n d i n t e r v i e w p r o c e s s in front of t w o different panels. T h e Associate Director position deals with the S A C ' s $ 8 6 thousand budget, which holds a majority of the m o n e y distributed through the student activities fee.

"1 work in the outside world doing the actual p r o g r a m b o o k i n g , while Mary works with the students on the 'inside' world," G r e e n said. Lucas will fill the Student Director position to run c o m m i t t e e meetings and work within the c o m m i t tee to plan and cover events. Both Lucas and Green are excited f o r the coming year. "It's going to very challenging, fun and exciting next year," Green said.

C o n g r e s s f o r u m t o b e h e l d A p r i l 14 Student C o n g r e s s will o f f e r its third f o r u m this Monday, April 14. "Christian A t m o s p h e r e at H o p e " will be the f o c u s of the 9 p.m. forum in the Kletz. Panel members, w h o have not yet

c o n f i r m e d their attendance will respond to questions presented in the s a m e open m i k e f o r m a t that w a s used f o r the past t w o f o r u m s on the b u d g e t i n g of f u n d s a n d O l i v e r North Congress has presented.

G r e e k l e t t e r s lifted f r o m t w o houses T h e usual f u n and games associated with the swiping of items f r o m Greek o r g a n i z a t i o n s ' has taken a serious turn with the disappearance of t h e E m e r s o n i a n a n d A l p h a G a m m a Phi letters. T h e letters were taken off both of the 13th Street h o u s e s on M a r c h 2 2 during the last w e e k e n d of spring break. T h e incidents were reported to Public Safety, which has no leads as to the culprit. M e m b e r s of both organizations

are upset with the occurrence and do not expect their letters to return. " T h a t ' s our identity nailed on the front of the house," said Troy Davis, Resident Assistant of the Emersonian Cottage. Alpha Phi's also expressed distaste with the culprit's motives. " T h e r e ' s really no point to it, and w h o e v e r ' s d o n e it, I just w o n d e r what they w e r e trying to p r o v e , " said B l y t h e Siddall ( ' 9 7 ) , A l p h a

A p r i l 9, I 9 9 7

Saturday's Images to show Hope's diversity N B D bank lobby next door to the Knick. T h e bazaar will feature culstaff r e p o r t e r tural exhibits on the participating Hope will celebrate diversity this countries, which are from four c o n tinents. Saturday with dramatizations, T h e variety show will begin at 8 dances, songs and poetry in Images: p.m. Events will include J a p a n e s e Reflections of Cultures. T h e f r e e p e r f o r m a n c e will be at cheerleading, a Z a m b i a n w e d d i n g dance, and a the Knickerbocker French skit. T h e a t r e beginning Acts from at 6 p.m. ApproxiBulgaria, India, Images has its own m a t e l y 100 stuKorea, Peru, Sadents will represent spirit and m o a and Spain 16 of the countries transcends o u r will present that H o p e ' s interdifferences. It's a dances, while national students Korea, Bulgaria call h o m e . celebration of life. and G e r m a n y According to Im— L a u r i e Engle wil h a v e songs. ages Coordinator Images Coordinator Japan, India, Laurie Engle, ImK e n y a , N o r w a y , Palestine, Spain ages "has its o w n spirit and tranand Z a m b i a will participate in a scends our differences. It's a celfashion show. ebration of life." "Each presentation will be alive T h e r e will be an i n t e r n a t i o n a l bazaar f r o m 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the with emotion, and these emotions D A N

M C C U E

m a y r a n g e f r o m j o y and pride to sorrow and c o n f u s i o n , " Engle said. E n g l e s t r e s s e d that I m a g e s is about c e le b r a tin g cultural differences in A m e r i c a and abroad. Fried Center Special P r o g r a m s C o o r d i n a t o r A m y Otis ( ' 9 6 ) added, "As Americans, w e ' r e afraid to ask questions, and this is a time f o r (international students) to share...who they are." Images began in 1994 when international students wanted to expand their fashion show. "We wanted to do something that featured songs, plays, dances, and p o e m s — s o m e t h i n g m o r e than a fashion show," according to Images participant Sheryl Gabriel ( ' 9 7 ) . T h e revamped 1994 fashion show ran in the Kletz. Due to high attendance, Images was held in Phelps in 1995. T h i s will be the second year that it will be in the Knick. Last year's s h o w w a s a full house.

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G a m m a Phi president.

M o r t a r Board juniors selected Mortar Board announced its n e w junior class m e m b e r s last w e e k that w i l l aid the c o m m u n i t y in a n d around H o p e through "leadership, s e r v i c e and s c h o l a r s h i p , " the society's motto. T h e g r o u p c o n s i s t s entirely of seniors, and participates in service projects in and around campus. H o p e ' s M o r t a r Board national honor society w a s established in 1961 and holds traditional events like "Wearing of the Blue," a breakfast for freshmen and s o p h o m o r e s on the D e a n ' s list, and they count the ballots f o r the H o p e Professor of the Year award. Each year the m e m b e r s also decide on what f o c u s they w o u l d like to take in the other activities they conduct. Next y e a r ' s m e m b e r s f r o m the

class of 1998 are: Ann Barry, David Brzezinski, Stacy Jo B r o w n , Anthony Bull, Sarah Catros, Jacqueline Chapman, Jonathan Charnin, Kimberly Collins, Gabriela Deckinga, Angela deForest, •Steven DeVrieze, Katherine Drake, Elizabeth Freem a n , M i r i a m G a r c e l l a n o , Jessica Grevenstuk, Jeanna Keinath, Valerie K l e i n h e k s e l , Lisa Knott, Melissa Krolik, Mary Lucas, Carrie M a i n e s , R e b e c c a M a i t n e r , Miluska Monroy, Susan Palleschi, Karen Paradis, Brian Petroelje, Jill P o h l m a n , E l a y n e P r o v o s t , Erin Schiller, David Schrier, Ellen Schultz, Kevin Serra, Jason Shattock, A m y Strassburger, Scott V a n d e r W a l , A n i t a Van E n g e n , MaryEllen Walter, Jamie Williams, Noelle Wood and Kristin Zimdahl.

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c a m pus b e a t e d i t o r

C o n c e r n e d f a c u l t y m e t last Thursday, April 3, to discuss the issue of diversity on c a m p u s and what initiatives must be taken to improve this situation. The Professional Interests Committee held the f o r u m to look at ways to bring m o r e faculty and student diversity to a comfortable environment on campus. A resolution had already been compiled for later presentation to the entire faculty, but the committee wanted more input on the wording and content. " W e arc bringing c o m m e n t s to the table and the goal of our resolution is eventually to bring it to a faculty m e e t i n g , " said M i k e Jipping, chair of PIC and associate p r o f e s s o r of c o m p u t e r science.

A report on the diversity situation on c a m p u s in the late 1980s s t r o n g l y stated that " t h e c u r r e n t multi-cultural condition of the Hope College c o m m u n i t y constitutes and educational failure of considerable p r o p o r t i o n s . T h e r e is a d e e p e r f a i l u r e . . . O u r ethnic h o m o g e n e i t y threatens the credibility of our witness to the culturally diverse character of the kingdom of God. (Acts 2)." Approximately 30 faculty turned out to o f f e r their opinions and comments. Jack Holmes, professor of political science, o p e n e d the discussion by suggesting the system used at Calvin College, where qualified minorities are hired early for positions that will eventually be open. " W e have to get a w a y from the P.C.," he said. Holmes, along with other professors was against the issue of estab-

by Zach Johnson

S I M G - A - L O M G : Members of the community, including David and Caitlyn Lilly, turned out for the Bily Crockett concert last Sunday night at The Gathering, but Crockett hyk unavoidably delayed. "It was wonderful anyways," Lilly said. See full story on page 7.

Faculty forum discusses diversity initiative STACY

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lishing timetables because w h e n they are not met it is looked at as a failure even if they have brought in a substantial n u m b e r of nonCaucasian faculty and students. A n o t h e r s u g g e s t i o n that w a s offered up for consideration was that of a "plus one goal," where the faculty will strive to add one more non-Caucasian m e m b e r to the staff than they had the previous year. T h e forum also looked at what changes are necessary in the c a m pus environment so that everyone w o u l d feel c o m f o r t a b l e in this setting. T h e faculty m e m b e r s focused on restructuring the document in a way that was agreeable to all. "I think it would be very regrettable for a vote to c o m e up in a faculty meeting and have it voted d o w n , " said Carol Simon, associate professor of philosophy.

Frosh n o t t o be t i c k e t e d f o r p a r k i n g in o t h e r lots STACY B O G A R D campusbeat editor

Public Safety is attempting to alleviate the freshmen parking problem by issuing fewer tickets to those not parked in designated lots. Freshmen are assigned to lots F, Q, S, V and W usually situated farther away from their living quarters then they are happy with, but the problem recently is that there are no spaces even available to any cars in t h e s e lots. F r e s h m e n h a v e b e e n forced to park elsewhere, decreasing the n u m b e r of spaces available to upperclassmen. "We are c a r e f u l as to what w e ticket because a lot of students bring their c a r s u p as they p r e p a r e to leave. We can't in good conscience go out and write tickets for spaces they parked in since no others were

a v a i l a b l e , " said D u a n e Terpstra, Director of Public Safety. Freshmen cars h a v e consistently m a d e u p almost o n e - t h i r d of permits issued to students in the past few years, even though it is not encouraged for frosh to even have a vehicle on c a m p u s in their first year. Public Safety issued 238 freshmen passes and 9 4 4 u p p e r c l a s s m e n p a s s e s last s c h o o l year, and 247 f r o s h passes to 863 upperclassmen in ' 9 4 - ' 9 5 . Public Safety will look at ways to alleviate this problem over the s u m m e r by visiting other colleges to see h o w they go about administrating their restricted parking areas. " W e are trying to c o m e up with a plan to try and alleviate the problem here," Terpstra said. " W e are s e e i n g this y e a r that more PARKING on I I


A p r i l 9, I 9 9 7

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C a m p u s Beat GET F U N K Y : Members of Qube 1 "funked it up"for the crowd at the Knickerbocker last Saturday night. The group took first place honors for their original "Jazz Compiliation." Pat Blake COO) on bass. Matt Baumann C00) on drums, and Josh Wheeler C00) on saxophone use improvy rock and funk influence to compile the music for their one-month-old band.

Strutting their stuff Talent Jam '91 rocks the Knickerbocker N O E L L E W O O D staff r e p o r t e r

Talent Jam ' 9 7 , a light-hearted cousin to All C o l l e g e Sing, g a v e creative H o p e College students a chance to show off their talents last Saturday night at the Knickerbocker Theatre. T h e S A C - s p o n s o r e d event was known in past years as Air Jam, and included only lip syncing acts. Last year's move to the Talent Jam format has allowed for a greater variety of H o p e ' s talents to grace the stage. Most acts consisted of students performing their o w n original compositions, while others were renditions of well-known songs and Broadway pieces. First, second and third place prizes and trophies were distributed to the winners at the end of the three hour show. T h i s y e a r ' s s h o w o p e n e d with Hope College's o w n paisley dAve. T h e s i x - m o n t h - o l d band is c o m prised of Josh S c h i c k e r ( ' 9 9 ) on vocals and guitar, Ben L a p p e n g a ( ' 9 9 ) on electric guitar and vocals. Matt Youngberg ( ' 9 9 ) on bass, and Dan Patterson ( ' 9 9 ) on drums, w o n

the group category of All College Sing last fall. The group played their o w n original music, some of which can be found on their new 5-track demo CD. E m c e e Mike R a y b u m , a musician-comedian w h o has been part of the S A C series for the past three years, opened the competition. He entertained the audience before, and between each act with his wit and fancy finger work on the acoustic guitar. In his introduction, R a y b u m described Qube, a j a z z g r o u p consisting of M a t t B a u m a n n ( ' 0 0 ) on drums. Josh Wheeler ('00) on saxophone, and Pat Blake ( ' 0 0 ) on bass, as a group that "likes to f u n k it up." Q u b e , which as existed for only a month, took first place with their original j a z z compilation. "1 w a s really surprised to win w i t h all the o t h e r g o o d acts involved. It was a really great experience," B a u m a n n said. S e c o n d place w a s captured by R e b e c c a DeVries ('00), w h o perf o r m e d , "I C a n ' t Say N o ! " f r o m Rogers and H a m m e r s t e i n ' s Oklahoma in a brown calico dress f r o m frontier-era times. DeVries enter-

tained the a u d i e n c e in this flirty song of a girl's trouble in denying the wishes of randy young "fellers." The indescribable Awesomes t o o k t h i r d p l a c e w i t h their lipsyncing "Jungle Boogie" act. Seven students dressed in the jungle regalia of Tarzan, Jane, a witch doctor, a monkey, two zebras and a lion perf o r m e d their unique and h u m o r o u s original compilation that included "Guitarzan." "We made them laugh; w e made them cry; w e gave them a monkey. W h a t m o r e could you ask for? It was the best time of my life," said Rob Brandt ('99), T h e A w e s o m e s ' witch doctor. Although these three acts were the ones to capture the prizes, the remaining five acts were anything but ordinary. Jenny Pierce ( ' 0 0 ) performed a piano solo of "If You Believe" by Jim Brickman, while Megan Hicks ( ' 9 9 ) w a n d e r e d the stage with a towel on her head, green gook on her face, and a toothbrush in her m o u t h d u r i n g a p e r f o r m a n c e of "Hello. Hello" by Menotti. Jaded Gray, with what they demoreTALEMX on

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* M E J A N E ' : The Awesomes jumped into third place with their "Jungle Boogie" provided a witch doctor, Tarzan, Jane, a lion, monkey and two zebras as entertainment.

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p h o t o s by Josh N e u c k s S W E E T S O N G : (Above) Rebecca DeVries C00) grabbed second place with her entertaining rendition of "I Can't Say No!" from Oklahoma. (Left) Josh Schicker ( f99) sang lead vocals for Hope's own paisley dAve, who opened the show with a half hour set. The group introduced songs on their new demo CD.


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Opinion

our voice.

A p r i l 9. I 9 9 7

your voice.

Spaced out

Student objects to conservatives' Dear Editor,

defense of North

N o r t h f o u r m o n t h s later. T h e o u t p o u r -

s p e a k at H o p e ? R e a l l y n o w . w h o w o u l d

ing of support for a m a n w h o s e actions,

w a n t t o listen to a stupid liberal s p e a k ,

Being one of an under-represented

h o w e v e r i l l e g a l , r e s u l t e d in w h o k n o w s

a s t h e r e is n o t h i n g w e c a n learn f r o m

minority on H o p e ' s c a m p u s is o f t e n dis-

h o w m a n y d e a t h s is appalling. President

her diverse experiences?

h e a r t e n i n g a n d f r i g h t e n i n g . It i s a m a z -

Clinton, w h o admittedly should b e ac-

A s for N o r t h ' s visit, I d o n ' t really

ing to m e to meet people every day with

countable as an elected official, has

care about the details. T h e controversy

what appears to be the s a m e cookie-cut-

b e e n a c c u s e d of n o t h i n g c l o s e to inno-

s u r r o u n d i n g h i s v i s i t is f a r m o r e f a s c i -

t e r i d e a l s a s m o s t in W e s t M i c h i g a n . M y

cent civilian death. North's actions of

nating to me. I don't m i n d bringing a

a b j e c t l i b e r a l i s m is n o t o n l y r a r e h e r e ,

a i d i n g in the illegal and e x p r e s s l y for-

conservative speaker to c a m p u s —

but o f t e n directly countered with attacks

b i d d e n act of s e l l i n g a r m s m o s t cer-

L i d d y D o l e w a s a g r e a t addition to

o n m y c r e d i b i l i t y a n d i n t e l l i g e n c e . It i s

t a i n l y r e s u l t e d in d e a t h s t h a t o t h e r w i s e

H o p e ' s culture. I understand that m a n y

off lots are full. Is it fair to penalize f r e s h m e n parked in the only spaces they can find? Nope. Is it fair to upperclassmen w h o can't find spots in their lots thanks to frosh cars now parking there? Nope

f r o m this e m b a t t l e d viewpoint that I

would have been prevented.

conservatives on c a m p u s desire to per-

again. H o w a b o u t f o r t h o s e f a c u l t y that d r i v e a r o u n d searching in vain f o r open spaces to hold their wheels? It isn't fair for them, either. The problem only w o r s e n s with the addition of the Haworth C o n f e r e n c e Center, which needs a larger lot of its own. Parking problems are nothing new to students and staff. But instead of shrugging shoulders and holding up their hands at a loss, administation and Public Safety

Faced with j u s t plain too m a n y c a r s f o r H o p e ' s congested lots. Public Safety has had to switch their ticketing policy midstream. Now frosh, w h o traditionally are left to park in lots with names like "Siberia" and " T h e Yukon" to reflect their distance f r o m residences, will not b e penalized for parking in other lots, provided that their o w n far-

needs to take real action. There are alternatives to ticketing the dickens out of a parking-permitted public with no place to put the car. If new lots are deemed not cost efficient, perhaps it's time to consider a m i n i m u m credit hour requirement to get permits. Every year Public Safety evaluates parking availibility and decides h o w many permits to issue. So why the crunch? Public Safety will study the parking situation yet again this summer, but the studying needs to be made concrete. Because Hope College has too little of it.

Some North supporters immediately

p e t u a t e o n l y t h a t k i n d o f t h i n k i n g at t h i s

pipe up with the notion that h e w a s sim-

institution — fine; I can deal with be-

I u n d e r s t o o d b a c k in N o v e m b e r w h e n

ply " f o l l o w i n g orders." I hesitate to

ing in the minority.

President Clinton w a s assailed with

c o m p a r e North with the N a z i ' s w h o j u s t

W h a t I d o n ' t like is t h e p r e s i d e n t o f

questions about his integrity —

I loo

"followed orders" because their crime,

H o p e College actively supporting a

s u s p e c t C l i n t o n is less t h a n a p e r f e c t

a l t h o u g h similar in o u t c o m e , w a s m o -

lawbreaker with his presence and with

president. I question his morals, his

tivated by a m u c h m o r e sinister evil.

h i s d o l l a r s . T h a t is n o t w h a t H o p e C o l -

j u d g m e n t , a n d h i s e f f i c a c y as a w o r l d

T h e biggest difference, h o w e v e r , is

l e g e s t a n d s f o r , a n d t h a t is n o t w h a t a

leader. W h e n the c o n s e r v a t i v e s felt j u s -

t h e y w e r e p u n i s h e d at N u r e m b u r g , a n d

Christian College should emulate.

t i f i e d in n a m e - c a l l i n g , p a r t o f m e s y m -

N o r t h w a l k e d a w a y f r o m h i s trial w i t h

Christ also tells us that "pay Caesar

pathized and even agreed with them.

an o v e r t u r n e d c o n v i c t i o n .

w h a t is d u e C a e s a r " in t h e N e w T e s t a -

have been eagerly watching the debate over Oliver North unfold.

W h a t I d o not u n d e r s t a n d is h o w

I find this c o n t r a d i c t o r y s u p p o r t of

t h e s e s a m e p e o p l e w h o h a r a n g u e d a sit-

Oliver North not only disheartening, but

ting president, w h o h a s not been c o n -

d a n g e r o u s . If N o r t h , a c t i n g in t h e s a m e

victed o r e v e n indicted, c o u l d so fer-

fashion, h a d b e e n a liberal black f e m a l e

vently support a criminal such as Mr.

(gasp!) w o u l d she h a v e been invited to

Mental

Greg Folkert is interim associate director for the Social Activities Committee (SAC). This information was incorrectly reported in the April 2 Anchor.

meet the press editor-in-chief operation manager campusbeat editor spotlight editor religion editor intermission editor sports editor production editor photo editors

Jodi Mc Far land Arin Neucks Stacy Bogard Amy Strassburger Kirn Powell Melissa Herwaldt Glyn Williams Amy-Lynn Halverson

Josh Neucks Zach Johnson copy editors Matt Sterenherg

business mgr./ad rep page designers ad designer cartoonist

J e f f Crouch Michelle Piel Dave Schrier Jessica Mc Combs Jermey Monty Tammy Bouwens

faculty advisor Tim Boudreau

staff r e p o r t e r s Dan Cwik • Heidi Huebner • David Gabrielse • Jesse Koskey Jessica Nelson* Noelle Wood • Mike Zuidema • Melissa Ooms

staff p h o t o g r a p h e r s Jess Grevenstuk

• Matthew Schollens

m

The Anchor is a pmducl of sludeni effort and is funded through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor ore encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. One-year subscriptions tit the Anchor are available for SI I. We reserve the right tit accept or reject any advertising

V o l . I 10, i s s u e 21

^ A n c h o r

W h y d o e s our president say the o p posite?

Marcia M. Ziegler ('97)

Illness left out of Disability Awareness Week

Dear Editor,

a n d b i - p o l a r ( m a n i c d e p r e s s i o n ) are the

of this illness. Including M I in Disabili-

three m a j o r f o r m s of m e n t a l illness. I

t i e s A w a r e n e s s W e e k is t h e least w e

T h i s l e t t e r i s in r e s p o n s e t o D i s a b i l i -

know a number of professors and doz-

s h o u l d b e d o i n g in t h i s a r e a .

ties A w a r e n e s s W e e k . W h i l e I a p p l a u d

e n s of students w h o h a v e o r are e x p e r i -

I w o u l d s u g g e s t t h a t at l e a s t o n e p e r -

the efforts on c a m p u s regarding dis-

e n c i n g the d i s a b l i n g e f f e c t s of M I , per-

son w h o has s o m e e x p e r i e n c e with or

abilities, I a m d i s a p p o i n t e d that one of

sonally or through a family m e m b e r or

k n o w l e d g e of M I b e i n c l u d e d in the

the most disabling illnesses has once

f r i e n d . O n e o u t o f f o u r f a m i l i e s is af-

p l a n n i n g of n e x t y e a r ' s D i s a b i l i t i e s

again been excluded: mental illness.

f e c t e d b y m e n i a l i l l n e s s , a n d y e t o f all

A w a r e n e s s W e e k to m a k e sure this ma-

T h e n u m b e r of p e o p l e struggling with

t h e d i s a b i l i t i e s , it is l e a s t u n d e r s t o o d a n d

j o r d i s a b i l i t y is m e a n i n g f u l l y r e p r e -

c h r o n i c m e n i a l i l l n e s s in A m e r i c a o u t -

m o s t f e a r e d . If H o p e is t o d o a c r e d i b l e

s e n t e d . A f t e r all, a liberal arts h i g h e r

n u m b e r s all o t h e r d i s a b i l i t i e s . I s u s p e c t

j o b in r a i s i n g a w a r e n e s s o f d i s a b i l i t i e s

e d u c a t i o n institution like H o p e C o l l e g e

t h e s a m e is t r u e o n t h i s c a m p u s . I h o p e d

it m u s t i n c l u d e m e n t a l i l l n e s s .

s h o u l d b e a t t h e f o r e f r o n t o f fighting t h e

t h a t it w o u l d h a v e a t l e a s t b e e n i n c l u d e d

A n o t h e r i m p o r t a n t f a c t — m e n t a l ill-

k i n d o f i g n o r a n c e a n d p r e j u d i c e t h a t , in spile of scientific b r e a k t h r o u g h s , k e e p s

in t h e " h i d d e n d i s a b i l i t i e s , " b u t a p p a r -

n e s s o f t e n strikes in the late t e e n s and

ently w e are c o n t i n u i n g to perpetuate

early twenties (college age!) Early de-

m e n t a l i l l n e s s in t h e c l o s e t - h i d d e n e v e n

the m y t h s and s t i g m a s associated with

tection can significantly impact the se-

during Disabilities Awareness Week.

it b y i g n o r i n g a n d / o r h i d i n g i t e v e n

r i o u s n e s s of this disability, a n d early

d e e p e r than other hidden disabilities.

d e t e c t i o n is d i r e c t l y r e l a t e d to t h e

Chronic depression, schizophrenia

k n o w l e d g e and understanding one has

Judyth Thomas Theatre Dept. Office Manager

Les/Bi/Gay Student Union posts faculty contacts Dear Editor,

correction.

ment.

the faculty/staff m e m b e r s listed below. T h e y w i l l l i s t e n to y o u r c o n c e r n s a n d

T h i s letter is written to i n f o r m H o p e

will, in turn, direct you to our t w o stu-

students about the Les/Bi/Gay Student

d e n t leaders. T h i s p r o c e d u r e is used s o

Union, and give those w h o have ques-

t h a t if y o u a r e u n c o m f o r t a b l e o r u n s u r e ,

tions, or s i m p l y want to n e t w o r k a n d

y o u will not h a v e to risk n e g a t i v e r e a c -

find support with other lesbian, bi-

tions, a n d so o u r m e e t i n g s will r e m a i n

s e x u a l , o r g a y s t u d e n t s , t h e n e e d e d in-

c o n f i d e n t i a l , e n s u r i n g p r i v a c y of o u r

f o r m a t i o n t o g e t in t o u c h w i t h u s .

m e m b e r s . A l t h o u g h this m a y s o u n d like

We are principally a support-oriented

a bit o f w o r k to g o t h r o u g h , w e e n c o u r -

g r o u p d e s i g n e d to d i s c u s s the issue of

age those of y o u w h o m a y h a v e s e r i o u s

h o m o s e x u a l i t y a n d h o w it p l a y s a r o l e

questions concerning you sexuality and

in o u r o w n l i v e s . W e s t r e s s c o n f i d e n t i -

w o u l d like to m e e t o t h e r les/bi/gay stu-

a l i t y . If y o u h a v e c o n c e r n s a b o u t w h a t

d e n t s o n c a m p u s . W e are h e r e to s u p -

people will think o r h o w they will re-

p o r t y o u — s t r e n g t h in n u m b e r s .

act, w e c a n p r o m i s e a p l a c e of s e c u r i t y

T h e faculty contacts are as follows: Hersilia A l v a r c z - R u f . Maria Andre. C h a r l e s

to a s k q u e s t i o n s o r v o i c e o p i n i o n s . B e c a u s e of the confidentiality factor, w e a s k that y o u w o u l d contact o n e o f

Aschbrenner. Priscilla Atkins. Ellen Awad. J a n e B a c h . W e s Ball, M i c h e l l e B o m b e .

Student AIDS educator Dear Editor,

T a m a r a G e o r g e . Janis G i b b s . Julie Goebel. Kristen Gray. Brigiite Hamm-Porter. Steven l a n n a c o n e . Lynn J a p p i n g a . L o m a J a r v i s . Steve Bouma-Prediger. David Jensen. Jackie Bartley. D e i r d r e J o h n s t o n , M y l e n e Catel. M a r g a r e t Kasimatis. C o l l e e n Conway. J.M. D e U ' O l i o , J a n e Dickie. D o n n a Eaton. Robert E l d e r s . D e r e k E m e r s o n . J i m G e n t i l e . Perry L a n d e s . D o n L u i d e n s . Billy Mayer. Holly M c K e e , K i m M e n d e l s . Jim M o t i f f . Judith M o t i f f . Diane Mulroney. Phil M u n o a . Dave Myers. Nancy Nicodemus. Courtney P e n n . Tim P e n n i n g s . J a m e s Piers. Rich Ray. M a u r a Reynolds. Jack Ridl. Daina Robbins. Pal Roehling. Heather Sellers. Marcia Smits. Joanne Stewart. Linda Strouf. Debra S w a n s o n . Leonard V a n W y k . Allen Verhey. M a r y Ann P e r m e s a n g . Leslie Wessman. B o y d Wilson

The Les/Bi/Gay Student Union

knows condoms aren't failsafe

t e c t i o n . If p e o p l e m a k e t h e d e c i s i o n t o

m e a n t to. T h a t i s a n o t h e r t o p i c t h a t w e

h a v e sex. they should take any m e a n s

n e e d not g e t i n t o at this t i m e .

I w o u l d like to r e s p o n d to the letter

they s e e n e c e s s a r y to protect t h e m -

A b s t i n e n c e i s in f a c t t h e s a f e s t " s e x "

t o t h e e d i t o r in t h e l as t Anchor w r i t t e n

selves. and 1 strongly urge them to d o

k n o w n . I d o n o t c h a l l e n g e t h a t . B u t . if

by D a v i d S c h o u t . I w o u l d like to e m -

s o . T r y l o o k i n g at a c o n d o m a s a b u l l e t

p e o p l e are g o i n g to h a v e sex. I believe

p h a s i z e t h e f a c t t h a t t h e a r t i c l e in t h e

proof vest. E v e n though police o f f i c e r s

t h a t it s h o u l d b e w i d e l y a v a i l a b l e f o r

F e b . 12 e d i t i o n o f The Anchor w a s n o t

c a n g e t s h o t in t h e h e a d a n d k i l l e d , t h e y

t h e m to h a v e s a f e r sex (i.e. c o n d o m s . ) I

a b o u t m e . It w a s a b o u t t h e f a c t t h a t I

still w e a r t h e m b e c a u s e it i n c r e a s e s t h e

t h i n k it i s n o t o n l y p o i n t l e s s t o d e g r a d e

provide informative classes, pamphlets,

c h a n c e of survival.

individuals' decisions, but defeats our

and protection to r e d u c e the s p r e a d of

Il is t h e c o n s c i o u s d e c i s i o n o f e a c h

c o m m o n goals of lowering unwanted

H I V / A I D S . I w o u l d like to add to w h a t

individual w h e t h e r or not he o r s h e will

p r e g n a n c i e s and d e c r e a s i n g the spread

Mr. S c h o u t said.

b e sexually active. I a m not p r o m o t i n g

of sexually transmitted diseases. I think

N o . I n e v e r did say that c o n d o m s

s e x , I a m p r o m o t i n g p r o t e c t i o n . It i s a l s o

people should have their o w n opinions,

w e r e f o o l p r o o f . T h a t is part of m y pur-

e a c h individuals c h o i c e w h e t h e r o r not

but such d i v i s i o n s o f p e o p l e with c o m -

pose.

t h e y take a d v a n t a g e of the protection

m o n g o a l s m a k e s u s c r u m b l e a s a vi-

of

a n d i n f o r m a t i o n a v a i l a b l e . E v e n if a

able f o r c e against that w h i c h w e a i m to

w h e t h e r t h e y a r e s e x u a l l y a c t i v e at t h e

p e r s o n is n o t s e x u a l l y a c t i v e . I s t i l l

defeat.

lime, w e will not h a v e to be as con-

stress that they s h o u l d be a w a r e o f t h e

Mr. Schout. I personally invite you.

c e r n e d a b o u t the fact that they are not

necessary precautions available, not

or a n y o n e , t o c o m e visit m y r o o m a n d I

foolproof. T h e people w o u l d be a r m e d

o n l y for t h e m s e l v e s , but s o t h e y m a y

will b e m o r e than glad to d i s c u s s the

f o r t h e s i t u a t i o n if it w e r e t o a r i s e . I

be able to help a friend as well. I want

m a t t e r s at h a n d a n d a l s o let y o u h a v e

k n o w that o n e c a n n o t gel p r e g n a n t or

the k n o w l e d g e about the d i s e a s e to

s o m e of the m a n y a b s t i n e n c e p a m p h l e t s

c o n t r a c t a n S T D if o n e a b s t a i n s f r o m

spread faster than the d i s e a s e itself. T h a t

posted around my room. I also encour-

sexual acliviiies, a.k.a. risky behaviors.

is h o w w e w i l l s t o p it.

a g e y o u to h a n d o u t t h e " t r u e l o v e c a n

If p e o p l e k n o w

condoms

properly,

how

to use

regardless

I must completely disagree with the

I in n o w a y a g r e e t h a t c o n d o m s d o in

u s e of

fact prevent the e m o t i o n a l stress c a u s e d

c o n d o m s an " i l l o g i c a l " m e a n s o f pro-

by sexual relationships, nor were they

fact that

Schout

calls

the

w a i t " c a r d s that y o u m e n t i o n e d .

Craig Tommola (*00)


^Anchor

A p r i l 9, I 9 9 7

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^Anchor

In F o c u s

A p r i l 9, I 9 9 7

W h e r e the Dough Goes Organizations S. B O G A R D & M. T H O M P S O N c a m pus b e a t e d i t o r and

staff r e p o r t e r

Each student on c a m p u s contributes $90 a year to the student activity fee, adding up to a total of $228,590 to be allocated a m o n g Hope's 27 student organizations. Seven members of the Student Congress Appropriations Committee decided their fates just before Spring Break. R e c o m m e n d a t i o n s made by the committee were approved by f u l l C o n g r e s s last Wednesday. "We are rational people and we want to give money to all groups, but the needs must be justified, and there is only so much money to go around," said Tyler Smith ( ' 9 7 ) , Student Congress Comptroller. But displeasure with budgets has prompted some student organizations to criticize the budgeting process and the justification behind some organizations receiving thousands of dollars and others only receiving a f e w hundred. F o u r c r i t e r i a a r e l o o k e d at when a p p r o p r i a t i n g m o n e y : the number of students in each group,

take an in-depth

h o w well they fulfill the college mission, how well they fulfill their own mission, and how wisely they use their student money, according to Smith. " T h e system is fair, and the process works," he said. Staci Richards ('97), Habitat for Humanity's director, disagrees. t4 If H o p e C o l l e g e w a n t s to bridge the gap between the college and the c o m m u n i t y then they should seriously look at supporting the organizations that work with the nity," she co m m u -

" Approt i o n s should look at different several when allocriteria d e n t money. eating stuThey should address the issues that students are interested in and go in that order." In 1996 Habitat received $67 of the requested $4,283. Black Coalition (BC) received $2,869 of a requested $42,405. Both groups report they have c o n s i s t e n t l y not r e c e i v e d the a m o u n t of m o n e y they r e q u e s t , making it harder for them to plan

Speechless

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'

Amt. Requested

Ami. Funded

Hispanic Student Organization Speakers Lt. Col. Kickbush EI Ballet Foikorico Estudiantil Luis Gutierrez Victor Villasenior Prof, f r o m G L C A school OPUS Speakers Joyce Carol Gates Lorrie Moore M a x i n e Clair Jesse L e e Kercheval Julia Alvarez Naomi Shihab N y e Student Congress Speakers Funding for SC Series Black C o a l i t i o n Speakers Sisters Acting Troupe Andrew Williams Joe Feagin James Cone Marian Wright Eldelman

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events to attract more student involvement. Many of the cuts made were in the areas of visiting speakers that are open to the c o m m u n i t y at no cost, and c o n f e r e n c e travel e x penses for organizations. Small groups struggle with the process, said Ntsiki Sisulu ('97) of BC. "Appropriations is always concerned about how m a n y m e m b e r s attended. We are a small organization on campus and we also cater to a small group. Our numbers can't compare to the larger organizations. This issue alone makes the process seem questionable." Comptroller Smith said budgeting should not be a rigid process. "All organizations have their own reasons f o r existing on this campus," he said. "There can't be one set of criteria of how to allodent activicate the stustead more ties f e e . Inp r o a c h than one apused in orn e e d s to b e tee a m o r e der to guaranfair and thorough process." " T h e present system works, and the c o m m i t t e e d o e s a pretty good j o b with the responsibility of allocating the f u n d s , " said A n n e Bakker-Gras, Director of Student Activities and last year's committee advisor. "Plus, appropriations has a set criteria. They are out to serve the whole student body." Smith understands some organizations are unhappy with the system, but blames some of this on the groups themselves. "Some organizations don't fully disclose what they are doing with the s t u d e n t m o n e y , " Smith

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said. ' T h i s includes not being honest about their income levels or their c a l c u l a t i o n s of how much things cost. Other groups d o n ' t stick very close to the b u d g e t they presented to appropriations. Instead some g r o u p s spend their money on things other than what they proposed. " T h i s year S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s tried to get to know each student organization better. In a pilot effort to understand the group's and their n e e d s , o n e m e m b e r f r o m appropriations was to meet with every group course during the of the year. w

This

a s

one of t h e ^ ^ l f ^ H m a j o r disgruntleI ments that O P U S I I had with the d i s t r i b u t i o n of their budget, since they were not visited by a Student Congress representative, according to Derek Zoetewey ('98), O P U S editor. "We didn't feel that as an organization in the eyes of the committee, we were worth anything " he said. O P U S p r e s e n t s a nationally recognized writers series that strives to bring "people of diverse backgrounds to campus," according to Zoetewey. They were asked to justify the use of the student activities fee towards these events since the presentations are free and open to the public. T h e c o m m i t t e e s u g gested that O P U S look to the English department for funding, since

budgets

it consists primarily of people in that field, but Zoetewey disagrees. " I ' m a psychology major, for goodness sake. People from all different types of majors attend these readings. It is not solely English majors," he said. W h i l e a c k n o w l e d g i n g that there are problems with every system, overall "the present system works well," Smith said. In agreement, Richards said "this new process might help us. In the past I i i d o n ' t think Appropriations understood w h e r e all o u r money went

" •^ mI w groups are Other unhappy be- • ' c a u s e they feel they have been micromanaged and that appropriations is too intrusive, Bakker-Gras said. Groups feel this way because they have to educate the emmittee about their activities, and this can be difficult. O v e r a l l , s t u d e n t s allocating student money is a great idea, she said. " T h e a l l o c a t i o n of s t u d e n t money is an educational process for everyone — not many schools allow the students this opportunity. It puts a responsibility on the students' shoulders to make the process work. Plus, it is an excellent opportunity for students to learn how to budget $300,000, hear arguments, and decide for the student b o d y h o w t h e i r m o n e y will b e spent," she said. Editor's Note: We at The Anchor recognize that we are also a part of the budgeting process described above. We fully disclose our own financial information in the table below.

1997-98 B u d g e t s

$0

$3,000

look at the '97-98

Organization

Requested

Granted

Percentage*

Social Activities Committee The Milestone The Anchor Appropriations WTHS Capital Requests OPUS Student Congress Nykerk Black Coalition Ice Hockey Club Fellowship of Christian Students Alcohol Issues Matter Women's Issues Organization Hispanic Student Organ. International Relations Club Environmental Issues Org. Habitat for Humanity Men's Volleyball Pull (Even) Pull (Odd) Union of Catholic Stud. Hope Republicans Hope Democrats Amnesty International Partners In Promise Lacrosse Club

$122,798 $ 50,219 $ 29,642 $ 18,179 $ 29,511 $ 15,000 $ 18,155 $ 7,252 $ 4,665 $4,468 $ 12,852 $ 3,433 $ 3,410 $ 1,438 $ 13,170 $1,840 $ 2,358 $ 1,738 $875 $799 $972 $ 842 $ 2,200 $ 1,198 $760 $ 604 $ 4,018

$86,604 $ 30,774 $ 20,625 $ 18,179 $ 16,131 $15,000 $ 11,355 $ 7,252 $ 4,565 $ 3,968 $ 3,192 $ 2,238 $ 1,750 $ 1,203 $ 1,045 $ 1,030 $ 1,023 $908 $702 $696 $646 $547 $518 $313 $260 $240 $0

37.529% 13336% 8.938% 7.878% 6.990% 6.500% 4.921% 3.143% 1.978% 1.720% 1.383% 0.970% 0.758% 0.521% 0.453% 0.446% 0.443% 0.393% 0.304% 0.302% 0.280% 0.237% 0.224% 0.136% 0.113% 0.104% 0.000%

• P e r c e n t a g e of tota l S t u d e n t Activities fee


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A p r i l 9. I 9 9 7

Religion

Meeting at the Crossroads Bilingual church offers services for English and Spanish speakers Fierro chooses to wear a clerical collar for those looking for a religion e d i t o r church leader in the community, but Regardless of where you live, as soon as he takes u p the guitar and starts taking song requests, Sunday mornings at 11 a.m. is still the most s e g r e g a t e d h o u r of the parishoners know t h e y ' v e entered a different kind of church. week. " I t ' s not typically R e f o r m e d , To meet the needs of the dibut in the true sense it is reformed verse Holland because it is not community Crossdictated by traroads Church prodition," Fierro vides a service that I hear a lot of racist said. mixes the tradiReaching tional and non-traviews f r o m s o m e of out to all c o m ditional, young t h e leaders in t h e munities regardand old, and E n c o m m u n i t y . Asians less of ethnicity glish and Spanish. is hard for some and Hispanics are T h e congregation m e m b e r s of the meets every Sunn o t p a r t of the c o m m u n i t y to day at II a.m. at KIM P O W E L L

church leadership in

understand. Western TheologiHolland. "I run into cal Seminary. people w h o say — JeffTyler T h e 50 perraces d o n ' t mix cent hispanic and Religion Professor well." Tyler 5 0 percent bilinsaid. "1 hear a lot of racist views gual church has established a c o m f r o m s o m e of the l e a d e r s in the munity of believers that seeks recc ommunity. It's pretty awful. onciliation between people and with Asians and Hispanics are not part God. of the c h u r c h l e a d e r s h i p in HolCrossroads Pastor Andy Fierro ( ' 7 9 ) looks at these statistics and knows there is still a lot of work to be done in uniting the church. "Reconciliation has to start in the church,'* F i e r r o said. " I t ' s a shame that the church isn't at the forefront." Religion professor Jeff Tyler attends Crossroads because it is a church that's ethnically and racially diverse. "It's not a Hispanic ministry, it's a bilingual, multi-cultural ministry even though the two dominant races are caucasian and hispanic," Tyler said. "It's a meeting place to understand each other." Though Crossroads reaches out to a part of the c o m m u n i t y that other churches don't reach, it is still misunderstood. "The community doesn't know what to do w i t h it," T y l e r s a i d . "They think it is cute and interesting, but they d o n ' t want to be apart of it." Fierro believes that it's not the f o r m of the church that matters as much as the function.

land." T h e r e m a y be p e o p l e in the c o m m u n i t y that think Crossroads is a mistake, Tyler said, but the church continues to g r o w f r o m about 30 m e m b e r s in the '80s to a n y w h e r e f r o m 8 0 to 140 people today. M i c h e l l e Haidi^c ( ' 9 9 ) , w h o has been attending Crossroads faithfully for the past school year, is used to attending n o n - E n g l i s h church services. Her parents were b o m in Romania and Haiduc's church at h o m e is in R o m a n i a n only. "It's not like a normal church service " Haiduc said. "It's so down to earth that it reaches out to large groups of people." The small, intimate atmosphere of Crossroads and the genuine caring and sincerity that Haiduc witnessed f r o m Fierro and the c o n gregation is what keeps her c o m ing back, even though she d o e s n ' t speak a word of Spanish. T h e service is set u p so that the songs are sung in both English and Spanish and the sermon is preached

by Fierro in both languages as well. " A n d y does a great job of making you think of something, dropping it off to l e t ^ o u think about it [while he translates] and then starling u p again," Haiduc said. Joy Green ( ' 9 8 ) goes to Cross-

epOADQ

\

roads to maintain her Spanish. "I love to speak Spanish and worship with Hispanic people," G r e e n said. "I really like C r o s s roads. T h e people are so g e n u i n e . " F i e r r o b e g a n p a s t o r i n g at Crossroads after attending Hope and Western Theological Seminary. He describes Hope then. " H o p e was diverse," he said. "I had a lot of international friends. Hope w a s a good experience." Fierro w a s n ' t what s t u d e n t s n o w w o u l d c o n s i d e r the typical Hope student. T h e son of migrant w o r k e r s that decided to settle in West Michigan, Fierro experienced his fair share of p r o b l e m s in elementary and high school. H e w a s told not to speak with a Spanish accent to not being able to date the "white girls." Because of his o w n upbringing in the Holland c o m m u n i t y Fierro feels that he is able to understand the cross-cultural questions youth are dealing with today. "The youth right now are fighting for their identity," Fierro said. H e also sees a lot of hope for the future generations. " O u r kids right now are growing u p with d i v e r s i t y . " he s a i d . " T h e y ' r e either g o i n g to h a v e to learn to get along or they'll be at war with each other." In spite of the s l o w - m o v i n g process of teaching people to use words that are inclusive. Fierro believes that the non-traditional Ref o r m e d church will provide a place w h e r e the c o m m u n i t y and students can learn h o w to communicate with each other. C r o s s r o a d s e n j o y s the attendance of Hope students. Fierro said. " P e o p l e t h a t c o m e in f r o m H o p e and m a k e Crossroads their h o m e , that is success," he said as he remembers students like Shannon Moses ( ' 9 5 ) . who is now a missionary in Mexico.

Anchor

p h o t o by Z a c h J o h n s o n

A N Y R E Q U E S T S : Crossroads Pastor Andy Fierro takes song requests as he leads the music portion of the service in Spanish and English. Crossroads is only one church in the Holland area that offers services in S p a n i s h . St. F r a n c i s de Sales Catholic C h u r c h has had a Spanish mass every Sunday for as long as organizer Pal L a m b can remember. T h e y have also held services in Vietnamese twice a month until just a few moths ago. w h e n they had trouble finding a priest that could speak the language. L a m b also helps to organize Saturday night masses f o r the migrant c o m m u n i t y in the s u m m e r months. T h e migrant worker's service is a regular service Spanish, she said. Fierro encourages students that are looking f o r diversity in

Holland to give a place like Crossroads a try. " W h y I like college students c o m i n g is they are pushing their limits," he said. "If their experience at H o p e i s n ' t as d i v e r s e as they would like it to be then they shoirfd go out and search." I n s t e a d of b u i l d i n g f a i t h around security they should build it around courage, he said. A c c o r d i n g to Fierro. p l a c e s like Crossroads reach a unique secl i o n o f t h e c o m m u n i t y t h a t is searching for something that the traditional church c a n ' t give them. "It raises h o p e s that p e o p l e can get together." Fierro said. "It is possible. You just have to work at it."

Christian musician performs against the odds KIM P O W E L L religion e d i t o r

Christian singer songwriter Billy Crockett performed an unscheduled concert Monday night after canceling his performance at S u n d a y ' s Gathering d u e to flight delays. D u r i n g the a f t e r n o o n C h a p e l s e r v i c e Crockett sang and announced an impromptu concert that would be held Monday night. In spite of the concert's short notice, between 150 and 200 students and c o m m u n i t y m e m b e r s gathered to hear Crockett sing in Dimnent. The 4 0 - s o m e t h i n g musician wrote several of the songs sung in Chapel including "Love Carrier," "Here's Another Picture," and

/Anc/7or photo by Z a c h J o h n s o n

S O L I D A S A R O C K : Singer Billy Crockett performs in Dimnent for the Chapel service Mo day.

"Build us a House." Affectionately referring to his songs as his "kids" Crockett smiled as students sang along through portions of the concert. "The thrill of songwriting is seeing a song take on a life of its own in the lives of

other people," he said. U n a b l e to r e m e m b e r a time w h e n he didn't want to sing, Crockett describes his music as something that possessed him. " I t ' s a l a n g u a g e that s p e a k s to m e , " Crockett said. " M u s i c that has a mystical power to wake people up is Christian music. It has authenticity." G r o w i n g u p in the c h u r c h e x p o s e d Crockett to Christianity early in life. "I grew up on Bible stories and h y m n s , " Crockett told his audience. "I gave my heart to God as a little boy." Crockett believes the gospel is about "great hope," and strives to produce music that reflects that hope. He comes up with his music moslly from conversations, whether they are with really good friends or with himself. Once an idea and title c o m e to mind, the rest is easy, he said. Listening to Crockett's music, it is clear that he writes about real people, real situa-

tions and the God that is real to him. Since b e c o m i n g involved in the music industry about 15 years ago, Crockett has been on the production side as well as performing. After graduating f r o m college with a degree in m u s i c , he did p r o d u c t i o n work in Nashville, Tennessee. "I put d o w n my d r e a m of songwriter, but then eventually c a m e back to it," he said. Deciding to test out his new "instincts," Crockett said he called all his youth pastor friends and asked them if he could c o m e and play for their groups. Crockett now has people to set up his p e r f o r m a n c e schedule f o r him. And he travels from his home in Texas and his w i f e of two years to sing. Crockett ended the concert with a song about being thankful and expressed his appreciation to the Hope c o m m u n i t y for inviting him here. Students were invited to meet Crockett in the lobby after the concert.


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Intermission

A p r i l 9. I 9 9 7

A L L A B O U T ART Melissa Herwaldt A d d t o y o u r labor, m a k e y o u r o w n 'zine W h e n I w a s sixteen. I w a s bored. 1 w a s sleepy. I w a s doing nothing but listening to Bad Brains and watching General Hospital. My friend Ann was an artist, likewise caught in her o w n teenage slump, spinning an endless w e b of techno and skate culture in her mint green b e d r o o m . Once she had d r a w n a portrait of her b o y f r i e n d ' s dead dog, and inadvertently found herself in the business of drawing the n e i g h b o r h o o d ' s mangy curs rigor mortis f o r pocket change. Both of us were ink brats, meaning w e loved the written word, and sketching. Like typical Jersey girls, w e had strong wills, she f r o m her Asian mother and I f r o m my minister father. Our suburban upbringing had m a d e us very a w a r e of City chic, and the fact that w e did not have it. With a copy of Factsheet Five, the godfather of ' z i n e s in I our grubby hands, w e decided to pool our b r a i n p o w e r and artistic talents. A s for the fringe culture that usually a c c o m p a n i e s 'zines, we w o u l d f a k e it. A s for the usual theme that a c c o m p a n i e s many 'zines, w e would ignore it. ' Z i n e s are part of the "small press" o r underground world of the media, publications that deal with countless subcultures and issues. Usually published by small groups of people or even one person, ' z i n e s usually have no commercial value and are made simply for the j o y of creating an amateur publication and spouting o n e ' s opinion about anything f r o m Barbies to music culture to Armadillos. M a n y 'zine publishers are anti-corporate and stress the raw look of a 'zine, c o m p l e t e with xerox c o p y i n g and uneven staple jobs. Others are slick with glossy paper and advertisements. A n n and I titled our 'zine "Jazzy Stab" not for any particular reason other than that it sounded cool. Other possibilities were " T h e Cold E q u i n o x " and "Ipwergis P u d d i n g . " T h e basic rule for a 'zine title is. A ) It should sound cool and even maybe B) m e a n something to you or the t h e m e of your 'zine. Maximum Rock V Roll is a punk ' z i n e that has been around for nearly fifteen years. Mondo 2000 is a mega-zine that covers ontological anarchy and the international rave scene. Which brings about perhaps the most important guideline for creating your o w n 'zine. H a v e something to say. I hesitate to throw out any further rules about the writing than that, because the nature of the 'zine is that it d o e s n ' t have to follow the rules of mainstream media. After grinding out "Jazzy S t a b " for a thankless year, I realized that

A n n and I were a m o n g countless bored suburban kids across A m e r i c a w h o were publishing 'zines. 'Zinecullure has grown and developed so much thai it has n o w b e c o m e a cultural phenomena. "Jazzy S t a b " covered fashion, music, and our opinions about our experiences with the N e w York City c l u b and rave scene. We also published literature and art. Let m e break d o w n the content of "Jazzy S t a b " even more honestly. "Jazzy S t a b " published my poetry, her cartooning, my idea of fashion advice (dye your nose hair green, w e a r barbecue tongs in your afro), and her critique of Eastern A m e r i c a ' s rave culture. Beginning ' z i n e publishers usually work with little or no money. You'll need to brainstorm c h e a p w a y s to print. D o n ' t print hundreds of copies. Start with ten, find an audience, and begin to enlarge the volume gradually. A n n and 1 got away with p h o t o c o p y i n g "Jazzy Stab" on the photocopier in her m o t h e r ' s office. We had no printing cost. T h e most time-consuming event w a s the stapling. Many of the issues were pretty mediocre. Our 'zine had no set schedule. We wrote and drew and published when w e had the time. Usually "Jazzy S t a b " c a m e out bi-monthly. We distributed "Jazzy S t a b " in Washington Square Park in N e w York City, giving them to a n y o n e w h o w o u l d take one. Although w e listed an address for submissions and reactions, w e never got any. W h i c h was probably lucky; listing that kind of information is dangerous. As a student, you h a v e access to more sophisticated equipment: computers, a scanner, specialized desktop publishing programs like Pagemaker. Ideally, depending on h o w m u c h work you were willing to put into it, your 'zine could be much more elegant than our c r a p p y issues of "Jazzy Stab." Although the messy, antic o m m e r c i a l ' z i n e is still perfectly accessible. To check out other ' z i n e s around the country, get on the internet and find Factsheet Five's e-zine. It will review other ' z i n e s as well as give mail order addresses for ' z i n e catalogs. Speaking of e - ' z i n e s (electronic zines), w h y not publish your 'zine on the Web? S o m e publishers, instead of asking for money, are willing to trade 'zines. Be very careful about sending money or your 'zine through the mail. Send the 'zine publisher a postcard first, they reply, they can be trusted. You could start today. G o crazy. Put your name on it s o m e w h e r e , make it a buck a p o p and call your creation a literary bargain.

/Anchor p h o t o by Z a c h J o h h s o n

S E N I O R

A R T

S H O

W

S H I N E S :

The senior

artwork

displayed

in DePree

Art

Gallery was debuted to a crowd of several hundred people last Friday night. Lami (Brian Grant) fs sculpture and Nate Greenwood's paintings (above) are among the artwork featured.

Conference to bring in children's author M.

HERWALDT

intermission editor

Six h u n d r e d s c h o o l c h i l d r e n will interact with f a m e d children's author Katherine Paterson during the c o l l e g e ' s 24th a n n u a l Young A u t h o r ' s C o n f e r e n c e April 17. P a t e r s o n , a u t h o r of s u c h c h i l d r e n ' s staples as " B r i d g e to Terabithia" will be presented with a D o c t o r of H u m a n e Letters by Hope College. T h e conference will held in different spots across c a m p u s , including residence hall lounges, the D o w D a n c e Studio, and Maas Auditorium. Richard M e z e s k e , e d u c a t i o n professor and director of the conference for the past five years, said he is thrilled to h a v e such a influential Christian author speaking at the conference. "The way that Katherine Paterson was brought here is an interesting s t o r y , " M e z e s k e said. " T w o Hope students, Seth and Noah Dale, attend the church in Barry. Vermont, where Katherine Paterson's husband preaches. T h e y were telling Katherine about Hope College, and she asked to know more about it. In the fall of '95, they asked me, 4 How w o u l d you feel about Katherine Paterson coming to c a m pus?' And I went crazy!" T h e 6 0 0 elementary students

c o m e f r o m 5 0 area schools, f r o m all of A l l e g a n ' s public schools and as far south as B e n t o n Harbor. T h e conference will be held f r o m 8:30 a.m. to noon. "It is a brief, intense c o n f e r ence," Mezeske said. "The children that have been elected to represent their schools have each written o r illustrated a book. At the conference they are broken up into groups of 10 to 14 kids, and they read their books." The H o p e D a n c e Department will be indirectly involved through the talents of "Strike Time Dance C o m p a n y , " which is D a n c e professor and chair M a x i n e D e B r u y n ' s dance company. " E v e r y y e a r there is an arts connection, and this year it is the d a n c e c o m p a n y . " M e z e s k e said. " S o m e of the dancing will interpret Katherine Paterson's writing." Paterson's publishing career spans three decades, and her m a n y books are primarily for children and adolescents. But her career includes many years of teaching as well as writing. F r o m 1954 to 1955 she taught public school in Virginia. She later e a r n e d an M . A . in Christian Education and spent several years as a missionary in Japan. Paterson went on to earn her M.R.E. from Union Theological Seminary in N e w York City, and taught sacred studies and English

at P e n n i n g t o n School f o r B o y s in N e w Jersey f r o m 1963 to 1965. H e r literary a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s include the National Book Award and N e w b e r y H o n o r s for " T h e Master P u p p e t e e r " in 1977 and f o r " T h e Great Gilly H o p k i n s " in 1979. and " B r i d g e to Terabithia" in 1979. O t h e r a w a r d e d b o o k s include " R e b e l s of the Heavenly K i n g d o m " published in 1983. The Honorary Doctorate, M e z e k s e said, celebrates her contributions to the literary world. "Katherine Paterson is one of the f o r e m o s t c h i l d r e n ' s authors of her generation," he said. T h e Young A u t h o r ' s conference, M e z e s k e said, is a tool to encourage young people to write. "The Young Author's confere n c e is the first lynch pin to get these kids to f o c u s on writing. Our hope is that they continue to have an enthusiasm to read and write when they leave the c o n f e r e n c e , " he said. T h e conference also has turned out to be a heavy recruiting tool f o r the c o lle g e . " O n e of the Hope professors asked the students in his literacy class if any of them had attended the Young A u t h o r ' s C o n f e r e n c e as children. And 75 percent of the students had!" T h e conference is not open to the public but she will be signing books at P o o h ' s C o m e r on eighth Street on Wednesday, April 16, at 7 p.m.

COURSES from I non-credit service c o m p o n e n t . Participating Hope students will work side-by-side with Mexican university students on various projects. "Every national university requires it of their students as a way to be involved with the c o m m u nity," Sobania said. "Also, it's another language opportunity in conversational Spanish language." C l a s s e s will be h e l d on the University of Q u e r e t a r o ' s campus. Hope students will take courses independent of native students, d u e to limited Spanish backgrounds. T h i s fall semester program is a pilot program to send students on an exchange program. " O u r goal is to make this an annual fall semester p r o g r a m , " Alvarez-Ruf said. "I think it's an important step for Hope students, especially because there is such a large M e x i c a n - A m e r i c a n population in Holland." she said.

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A p r i l 9. I 9 9 7

theAnchor

Spotlight

It's not easy bein' green Vegetarians talk about being meatless at Hope and experimenting .

with a stricter lifestyle

any any vegans vegans on on campus campus. Rut he's very VAn; aware QM/arA of of But Hope's strong tribe of vegetarians. " T h e d e m a n d is h i g h , " he said. "Vegetarianism is a hot topic on campuses now." Sheila Kennedy, the registered dietician for C r e a t i v e D i n i n g Serv i c e s , h a s a l s o seen Hope vegetarianism rise. "You find that happening a lot on college c a m p u s e s , " she said. " W h e n you h a v e like people around like people, it really catches on." K e n n e d y also mentioned the fact that the college age group is incredibly fat conscious, w h i c h o f t e n leads to cutting out meat from a diet. B e i n g in t u n e with these sorts of student eating habits is integral to B a l f o u r ' s job. "We try to go above and bey o n d to m e e t t h e i r needs," he said. Anchor photo by J e s s G r e v e n s t u k Although he calls himself a "meat and po- W H E R E ' S X H E B E E F : Hope vegetarian Melissa Ooms t a t o e s " guy, B a l f o u r ('99) displays some of the meatless staples of her daily diet — Grape Nuts, recognizes the wide de- peanut butter, and Pop Tarts, mand for meatless enH O L Y trees in the dining hall. C O W : "Since this is a growing In 1960, an choice for eating, it's a average cow real challenge to cater to produced a wide variety of veg2.5 tons of etarians with a wide vamilk per riety of dishes." year; in Creative Dining Ser1990 she vices provides at least produced 7 tons, A o n e vegetarian entree growth for each meal every day. hormone S e l e c t i o n s run t h e causes the gamut from cream udders to cheese and mushroom enlarge. e n c h i l a d a to a p a s t a • : spring garden salad. T h e long list of entrees photo courtesy of Vegan Outreach is the result of some major strides made by Creative Dinseason, we buy our vegetables lo- let you eat meat," she said. "It just ing Services in the past f e w years. "Last year we introduced the veg- cally. Hope is still the best I ' v e ex- feels better for me." According to Kennedy, people etarian bar as an alternative to just perienced." O o m s agreed. "I k n o w lots of like O o m s have every right to feel a simple salad bar," Balfour said. Students on meal plan recognize the schools don't even offer vegetarian good about their choice."There are bar as the spot for pitas, hummus, m e a l s , " she said. "You h a v e no no real health risks in b e c o m i n g vegetarian," she said. "Of course, vegetables, and different types of choices." you can't just eliminate meat. You No regrets beans. When O o m s was living at home need protein, but you can get it from T h r o u g h his j o b , B a l f o u r has traveled across the country to vari- before college, her parents were the seeds, nuts, beans, and peanut butous other colleges, sampling their ones w h o narrowed her choices. ter. D a i r y p r o d u c t s a r e a g r e a t dining services. He still feels Hope They didn't agree with vegetarian- source of protein as well. T h a t ' s is superior. "We receive fresh pro- ism for their daughter, forcing her w h e r e vegans can run into probduce six days a week. When it's in to slip her dinner meat to the dog, lems." As for H o p e ' s vegetarians, hide it in her pocket, or even bury Balfour and head chef Bob Willey it in the backyard. But O o m s doesn't regret her de- said they are always open to sugvegetarians are in esteemed company... cision to abstain from meat, which gestions, even beyond the standard L. Tolstoy she adapted to gradually, first cut- Phelps comment cards. "Students H. Thoreau ting out red meat, then poultry, and with recipes or suggestions should Socrates G.B. S h a w then, finally, fish. "I feel more in stop in," Willey said. "We're always tune with man's peace with animals, available, and we're always willing to add on to our existing menus." Gandhi with that relationship," she said. Da Vinci Editor's note: To coincide with O o m s cites the Bible as the catalyst that caused her to examine her the upcoming Earth Jam, Phelps T. Edison Voltaire eating habits, but she's quick to will pay tribute to Hope's vegetarcan point out that she doesn't believe ians on April 22. Students R. W. Emerson A. Einstein sample several vegetarian entrees eating meat is a sin. " I ' m not saying that God doesn't as well as a strict vegan meal. Buddha Plato

__ __

sume sume animal animal products products for for survival. survival, All the protein and vitamins ,,'.rmiryr we All need, vegans say, can be found in Most Hope students would per- grains, pastas, breads, potatoes, ceish without pizza. Great Lakes is reals, beans, rice, fruits, and vegonly a phone call away on those late etables. Vegans (and some vegetarstudy nights or when you just d o n ' t ians) also find a strong basis for have the heart to whip up another their beliefs in the Bible. "I was reading my Bible back in gourmet batch of macaroni. A car high school, when I came across c a r r i e s you t o w a r d t h e G o l d e n Arches or takes you on a 2 a.m. this verse that got me thinking," run for the border. Blythe Siddall said Melissa O o m s ( ' 9 9 ) , w h o ' s been a vegetarian (*97) used to be for three and a a self-professed half years. "It said Pizza Hut lover, something like until she c a m e T h e n G o d said,'! G od created home from a give you every seedpeople to eat the Spring Break spent with bearing plant on t h e seeds of the earth. After the Fall, vegans. face of the w h o l e man began to eat "I d i d n ' t feel e a r t h and every meat." like cooking the Most vegans other night and t r e e t h a t has fruit call on this verse f i n a l l y j u s t orw i t h seed in i t . T h e y to prove that usdered a p i z z a , " will be yoursfor ing animal prodshe said. "I ate ucts is unnatural food.' one piece and and wrong. t h a t w a s all I G e n e s i s 1:29 "Before, I could do. I thought vegans couldn't handle were people who the cheese." The cheese? Why would some- just craved all these foods that they one consciously cut dairy foods out denied themselves," Siddall said. of their diet, unless m a y b e they "After spending a week with them, w e r e lactose i n t o l e r a n t ? Siddall I realized that they don't crave these found out over the week of Spring foods at all. It makes them sick to Break, when she stayed^with an old think of eating them." A t o u g h choice t o m a k e friend who has become a vegan. Siddall, who is now highly conW h a t ' s a...vegan? T h e term "vegan" is unfamiliar scious of everything she consumes, to many people; the lifestyle has yet sees herself as an "unwilling conto acquire the popularity of veg- vert." "Before Spring Break, I ate etarianism. But there is a distinct whatever, all the time. Now I think difference between the two. While a b o u t w h a t e v e r g o e s i n t o m y •vegetarians a b s t a i n f r o m m e a t mouth. I can't help it. I don't eat (beef, chicken, pork, etc.), vegans meat anymore, and I think more cut out all animal products f r o m about dairy products," she said. Yet Siddall d o e s n ' t see herself their diets, including eggs, honey, and all dairy products. Some of the "jumping into veganism." "I have more orthodox vegans also avoid no time to cook," she said. Ooms understands the time wearing silk, leather, wool, and fur. c r u n c h . S h e n o t e s the f i n a n c i a l Vegans think most people eat anispect of veganism as well. mal products because t h e y ' v e been "If I wanted to be vegan, it would raised to do so, based on T h e Four F ood G r o u p s " p r o p a g a n d a " and be hard, because I ' m a college stueducation provided by associations dent too," O o m s said. "I don't have such as t h e b e e f i n d u s t r y . But the money to shop for special invegans point out that before man gredients for my meals. If you look learned how to make weapons, he at the labels, there are meat prodhad no natural claws to catch ani- ucts in everything." O o m s believes that a partnership mals or sharp incisor teeth to tear exists between humans and animals animal hides. Instead, God created us with fingers to pick and peel which sanctions the h u m a n consumption of products such as milk. fruits and vegetables. "I do have to think about myself, In t h e b e g i n n i n g Where does the vegan point of too...my health," she said. T h e g r e e n e r side of P h e l p s view c o m e f r o m ? Vegans v e h e The amount of Hope vegetarians mently oppose all cruelty to and exploitation of animals, both for hu- vastly o u t n u m b e r s that of H o p e man consumption and fashion pur- vegans. In fact. Rick Balfour, proposes. They believe it's completely duction manager for Phelps Dining unnecessary for h u m a n s to c o n - Hall, says he has no knowledge of A. S ^ XRASSBURGER spotlight e d i t o r

Meatless W o n d e r s Hope


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A p r i l 9. I 9 9 7

M

NORTH from I " O n e of the best ways to guarantee your future is to decide exactly what 4 We the P e o p l e ' w a n t . . . I ' m suggesting that the future is far too important to leave it in the hands of politicians or to despair over it," he said. Student C o n g r e s s w a s p l e a s e d with the results of the lecture. 4 it turned out better than I thought. T h e auditorium was full and p e o p l e s e e m e d to e n j o y the speech." said Ryan C o o k ( ' 9 7 ) , Student Congress President and one of the organizers of the event. Many of those opposed to North's presence, the faculty, stuck by their resolution that expressed regrets to the invitation of a person of his background to c a m p u s and the use of c a m p u s f u n d s towards his payment. Few faculty attended. North stated that he has faced m o r e o p p o s i t i o n than this w h i l e speaking at colleges around the nation. At the University of Wisconsin a riot took place that left a police officer hospitalized after he was kicked, and it is usually faculty and not students that raise a ruckus.

He c o m m e n d e d students and administration for standing up against some "hostile opposition." Student response was positive in regards to North's presentation. "I w a s skeptical of what he w a s

going to talk about, but I w a s very pleased with what he s a i d , " said Elizabeth Freeman ( ' 9 8 ) . A coincidence to North's visit is the parallel arrival of John Wallach, a journalist/author w h o was nation-

ally honored for his role in breaking the Iran/Contra scandal. North stated that he does not personally know Wallach. W a l l a c h w i l l be o n c a m p u s through Thursday, while North will

leave later today. A small g r o u p discussion involving North was held this morning at 8 : 3 0 a . m . to c o n t i n u e w h e r e the question and answer session left off last night.

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April

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I 997

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A t t e n t i o n : We have current information regarding abortion, assisted suicide, adoption, and Crisis pregnancy centers. Contact: Right to Life of Holland. 100 S. Waverly Rd. H o l l a n d 4 9 4 2 3 P h o n e 3 9 6 1037. web site:http:/www.rtl.org or E-mail: info@rtl.org F o r Sale: R C A Washer Standard Capacity and G E Two Cycle Dryer Large Capacity. $ 180 for both. Call Sue at 395-4902 T P G : D o n ' t mean to invade on your space. Where oh where should that sunny spot be? Strawberries, grapes, apples, man is it going to be good. I don't know why we keep going on like this, but we do. D o n ' t worry, 1 like you! 2TPG H e l p W a n t e d : Professional seeking live-in help at lovely h o m e on L a k e A l l e g a n . F r e e R o o m and Board for very light child care and

cleaning-additional pay available. Very flexible and private-we have references and need yours. Call A R C 686-8900. S a r a h : You are cute. You are drunk. Happy 21st B-day. Love the A n k staff F M : I am completely speechless. O n e day w e will b e t h e l u c k y ones—wail until next fall. I am sad to see the days deplete. Power of more than one person is multiplied by you!—li'l angel D a v e : all you have to do is click and drag, love the Ank staff F O U N D : 1 pair metal sunglasses in Lincoln Park on the concrete pad. Call 392-4756. Mom: T h a n k s for the g o o d advice...not talking to strangers. I look f o w a r d to our next rendezvous.—Your Kid

YOU CHOOSE YOUR STUDENT CONGRESS Come to the President & Vice President Speeches Tuesday, April 15 in Phelps. REMEMBER

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perspective, they are able to find solutions to the problems. Wallach has stepped out of the journalistic limelight for now, and he and his wife Janet occupy their time with writing b o o k s dealing with issues in the Middle East. ' T h e Seeds of Peace project is in its fifth year now, and I am focusing on devoting my life to it," said Wallach of changing avenues. "The project is an effort to do something positive with my life." John Wallach will be on campus throughout the rest of the week, giving speeches on economic development in the Middle East and how peacemaking is accomplished. Wallach will also give a video presentation on his Seeds of Peace program in Winants Auditorium on Thursday at 11 a.m. He encourages all interested in the peacemaking effort to attend.

people are having a difficult time even finding a parking space," he said. T h e problem centers around the fact that the policy on parking has not been revamped for at least 17 years. Even though problems have been increasing throughout the past few years, this year is the pinnacle, according to Terpstra.

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scribed as "a little luck, a little skill, and t w o days of rehearsal," perf o r m e d " H u m m e r " by S m a s h i n g Pumpkins. In the style of All College Sing, Joni Norwood ('00) and Patricia Rhiew ('00) sang a classy rendition of "In His Eyes" from the musical Jekyll and Hyde. Norwood won first place in the All College Sing's best of show and solo, duet, trio categories last fall. Kristen Sitz ('99) and The Jazz E n s e m b l e r o u n d e d out the competition's participants with a mello and j a z z y " A s T i m e G o e s By." S A C was pleased with the results of this year's Talent Jam. "We had a great turnout. A lot of good acts came out and the variety of Hope's talent was shown," said Dave Rohner ('99).

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A n o t h e r issue involved is that faculty are not forced to pay the parking tickets they receive. At the end of the school year Public Safety sends a list of faculty parking tickets to Bill Anderson, Vice President for Business and Finance, and/or Greg Maybury, Director of Operations and Technology for review. They then decide what route will be taken.

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Sports

A p r i l 9, I 9 9 7

H o p e paced by young players CAPTAIN ENFUEGO Glyn Williams IL

Leave t h e game alone T h e biggest and saddest change to M a j o r League Baseball this season is the addition of the travesty called inter-league play, w h i c h is when teams from the two different leagues play against each other. T h e main reason the o w n e r s cited for changing the game is that they want to draw the fans back in. Well, they are mistaken to think that messing with the g a m e will m a k e the f a n s love it again. Instead, the owners are doing precisely what the fans don't want. You d o n ' t mess with the game of baseball. T h e fans want the g a m e to go back to the w a y it started. Let the pitchers battle their way through a game. If the bases are loaded and there are no outs, let the pitcher dig down d e e p and get out of the inning. Inter-league play cuts d o w n the excitement of the g a m e in many ways, especially in the Fall Classic. Part of the reason the World Series was such a classic last year is that the Yankees and the Braves had players on their roster that have never played against each other. Every at-bat w a s brand new. Every time Bernie Williams stepped u p to the plate against Greg M a d d u x you were in suspense because you had no idea w h e t h e r or not he could hit M a d d u x ' s curveball. It w a s a mystery that unfolded before your eyes. Inter-league play takes away f r o m the strategy of the g a m e by partially m a k i n g scouting reports obsolete. Instead of players and coaches spending endless nights watching tapes of

their opponents facing other players they will merely have to think back to earlier in the season w h e n they played each other. Inter-league play is also inconcievable because of t w o nasty little words: designated hitter. T h e American League has it, the National League doesn't. W h e n American League plays at National League parks during the season the designated hitter position is tanked and the ptichers are forced to step to the plate. T h e National League will have the clear upper hand. Example: T h e Seattle Mariners will play a two g a m e series in San Diego on July 2-3. In these two g a m e s the Mariners will either have to let their pitcher bat and sit Edgar Martinez o r play Edgar in the field and sit s o m e o n e else. T h i s is a lose-lose situation f o r the Mariners. T h e pitcher in question would have to bat even though he will only h a v e a handful of at-bats all season and thus no experience. If Edgar sits, you lose his w o n d e r f u l batting skills, but if he plays the outfield he may biff on an easy play d u e to inexperie n c e in the field and cost Seattle the game. T h e s a m e situation will obviously not exist f o r the Padres, as their pitcher will be used to batting and they d o n ' t have to m e s s with the lineups. Baseball is a very simple game. T h e f u n d a m e n t a l s of it h a v e n ' t been altered since its youth. T h e r e is no reason w h y it should be changed now.

The Traveling Dutchmen • W o m e n ' s T e n n i s - T h e Flying D u t c h (10-4) w o n all three of their matches this w e e k e n d at the Great Lakes Colleges Association tournament in DePauw, Indiana. Hope beat Oberlin 8-1, Denison 6-3, and D e P a u w 5-3. • M e n ' s T e n n i s - H o p e ' s m e n ' s tennis ^ success than their female counweekend. After t w o close tournament to D e P a u w 3), the Flying D u t c h m e n

team (8-8) had less ^terparts did over the losses in the G L C A (5-2) and Wooster (4w o n their last match 7 - 0

over O h i o Wesleyan. •Men's & W o m e n ' s T r a c k - Both Hope track teams lost to A l m a over the weekend but at the s a m e time defeated Olivet handily. Amy C o o k ( ' 9 9 ) won both the long j u m p and 4 0 0 meter hurdles, while Jason Haid ( ' 0 0 ) won the long j u m p and high j u m p .

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GLYN WILLIAMS sports editor

This year's Flying Dutchmen baseball team is dominated mostly by underclassmen, with only five s e n i o r s and f o u r j u n i o r s on the squad. However, the young D u t c h m e n are playing far beyond their years right now, with a 9-9 overall record and at 4 - 0 lead the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association. "This is the quickest w e ' v e ever reached .500 after the Spring Trip since I ' v e been a coach here," said head coach Stu Fritz. Fritz guided the Flying D u t c h m e n to a league c h a m p i o n s h i p in 1994. Hope started their season shakily but h a v e really c o m e a r o u n d since opening their season losing nine of their first 13 g a m e s . T h e Flying D u t c h m e n have won five in a row since then and the young team is maturing before Fritz's eyes. "We're a very young team and w e are suffering through s o m e growing pains," Fritz said. " B u t it's a long season and we have a long way to go." Hope extended their winning streak over the weekend when they snipped Albion 5-1 on Friday, April 4. T h e weekend was originally set as a triple header, with t w o games on Saturday, but the rain forced the

Anchor

p h o t o by J o s h N e u c k s

B R I N G I T : Hope College ace Matt Vriesenga ('99) was the winning pitcher in Friday's 5-1 win over Albion College. The Flying Dutchmen will host Elmhurst College today at 4 p.m. but w e also had s o m e big hits in key moments."

games to be postponed. On Friday the Flying D u t c h m e n w e r e paced by the pitching of Matt Vriesenga ( ' 9 9 ) and the hitting of Dean Esteves ( ' 9 9 ) . Vriesenga pitched a complete g a m e for the win, giving u p only f o u r hits and no walks, while dropping his earned run average to 1.75. T h e win was his third of the season and the right hander has yet to lose

Most of those big hits Fritz was r e f e r r i n g to c a m e off the bat of Esteves, w h o had three of H o p e ' s seven hits in the g a m e and drove in three runs. He had s o m e big plays at shortstop as well, as in the sixth inning w h e n he got his team out of a j a m b y t u r n i n g an u n a s s i s t e d double play. "Dean has really had a hot bat f o r us lately," Fritz said. "He has gone

a game. "There was some outstanding pitching out there today," Fritz said. "Vriesenga definitely c a m e to play.

6 - f o r - l l over the past f e w g a m e s and his 3-for-4 today really got us going and has helped us play with more c o n f i d e n c e . "

Fritz's only complaint regarding Friday's win was H o p e ' s inability to bring h o m e the runners. Through the first three innings alone the Flying D u t c h m e n left eight base runners stranded. " T h a t is s o m e t h i n g t h a t w e s h o u l d n ' t m a k e a habit of doing," he said. "If w e get the runners on base, w e need to bring them home, but in the long run I think w e responded well." T h e Flying Dutchmen ^re scheduled to host Elmhurst College this afternoon at 4 p.m. at the Buys Athletic Field. H o w e v e r , d u e to the weather the game may be cancelled.

D u t c h softball struggling t o repeat MIKE Z U I D E M A staff r e p o r t e r

After a 1-3 league start and an o v e r a l l 10-7 r e c o r d , the F l y i n g Dutch softball team is looking to i m p r o v e and m a k e a run for the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic A s s o c i a t i o n c h a m p i o n s h i p and a bid into the Division III national

" Y o u n g t e a m s will m a k e m i s takes, and w h e n w e eliminate those w e will start to play g o o d b a l l , " Wolters said. Wolters is looking to the co-captains Heather Ozinga ( ' 9 7 ) and Lisa T i m m e r ( ' 9 7 ) to improve on these

young mistakes. O z i n g a and T i m m e r are also a m o n g the league leaders in hitting with .417 and .400 batting averages tournament. While last y e a r ' s team compiled respectively. Wolters also had high praise for a 29-8 record and a first place finA n gie Barnes ('99) and R e n e e ish in the league, their non-league Carlson ( ' 9 9 ) w h o h a v e stepped u p record kept them out of the tournament. T h i s y e a r ' s team will have to in the face of minor injuries. "We try to make sure we have the try and repeat with a team domib a s e s c o v e r e d with at least t w o n a t e d m o s t l y by f r e s h m e n a n d p e o p l e at every position and w e sophomores. " W e ' r e a young team and some- have had to rely on some people times w e play well, like we did in w h o haven't played much," Wolters F l o r i d a , " said h e a d c o a c h Karla said. To make a run at league leader Wolters. "Then the next week w e ' l l Alma, w h o is 21-3 overall, and a struggle like we did against Grand shot to m a k e the national tournaValley." ment, Wolters is also looking for the Hope lost t w o games to G r a n d Valley by a combined score of 154 on Friday, March 28. Despite a pair of impressive victories against Ferris State on April 1, the largely young team has had to deal with injuries and adverse weather conditions in addition to early season miscues.

pitching to step up. " W e ' r e looking close at the pitche r s to i m p r o v e , " W o l t e r s s a i d . "They have pitched well at times but w e ' r e looking for more consistent performances." Starting pitchers Erin Beckman ( ' 9 9 ) and Lisa Lazelcre ( ' 9 9 ) will

look to duplicate last season's c o m bined 17-5 record. "We're a young, enthusiastic, hard working team that enjoys being together, and those things will start to pay off," Wolters said. H o p e ' s next game will be Thursday, April 10, at St. Mary's, Ind., and then they will play a h o m e doubleheader on Saturday, April 12, a g a i n s t A l b i o n , w h o has a 6 - 1 9 record. -o fS sti2: r2! n £ vj s t

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