Page 1

V O L .

N T C H O R

18

H O P E COLLEGE • H O L L A N D , M I C H I G A N

"SPERA IN D E O "

M A R C H 9. 2011 • SINCE 1887

N O .

124

ARTS

FEATURES

SPORTS

Knick Flick

New Novelists

Hoops Heartbreak

Academy

A f t e r a m o n t h of hard w o r k a n d little sleep. 1 8 new

Both m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s b a s k e t b a l l m a d e it to t h e second r o u n d of NCAA playoffs only to c o m e up short.

Award-nominated

"Another Year" c o m e s to Hope

novelists have finally c o m p l e t e d all 5 0 , 0 0 0 words!

Page 4

PageS

PageS

Library to open hour earlier on Sundays

Model UN encourages political discussion

Dance 37

Madalyn Muncy Jenelle Ranville

CAMPUS N E W S CO-EDITOR

GUEST W R I T E R

busy working toward bettering Hope's c a m p u s this semester by i n t r o d u c i n g i n i t i a t i v e s t h a t directly i m p a c t s t u d e n t s ' a c c e s s i bility t o t h e library, a s well a s t h e c a m p u s ' s ability t o b e c o m e m o r e sustainable. This semester, Congress has been

working

toward

T h e U n i t e d N a t i o n s is a n i m p o r t a n t a s p e c t of i n t e r n a t i o n a l

)i (W

Student Congress has been

relationships,

i

O' A

\

>N

%

U N t h r o u g h simulation exercises, H o p e College's M o d e l U n i t e d Nations

K

P H O T O BY ERIC A L B E R G

D A N C E 3 7 — H o p e ' s a n n u a l m a j o r d a n c e c o n c e r t D a n c e 3 7 o p e n e d Friday a n d c o n t i n u e s a t 8 p.m. M a r c h 1 0 - 1 2 at t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r .

m e m b e r of t h e H o p e L i b r a r y

l i b r a r y a n h o u r earlier o n S u n days was the best extension that could be made. " T h i s is m a i n l y b e c a u s e of c o s t s a n d t r y i n g t o find p e o p l e

Faculty forum addresses discrimination issues Chris R u s s

u t e t i m e limit e a c h t i m e a s p e a k -

CAMPUS NEWS CO-EDITGR

e r w a s g i v e n t h e floor. For t w o h o u r s p r o f e s s o r s

t o w o r k d u r i n g late h o u r s , " A a r d e m a s a i d of t h e r e a s o n s f o r o n l y t h e S u n d a y c h a n g e of h o u r s .

O n Feb. 24, for t w o h o u r s b e t w e e n 5 a n d 7 p . m . in t h e M a a s

Klooster compiled

h i g h s c h o o l s t u d e n t s talk a n d a r g u e a b o u t political issues, a n d

t e r l u n c h i n s t e a d of w a s t i n g a n

w e a r e m o r e d i v e r g e n t in o u r

hour. Graves and other academic buildings are closed o n Sundays,

o p i n i o n s o n s o m e of t h e s e i s s u e s t h a n w e really are. A n d o n c e w e

w e r e a l s o in a t t e n d a n c e . The meeting began with a dis-

around

110 m e m b e r s

of

c u s s i o n of t h e e d u c a t i o n a l e n v i -

p u t o u r s e l v e s t o g e t h e r in a r o o m y o u b e g i n t o see t h e c o m m o n

r o n m e n t at H o p e a n d w h e t h e r or n o t this e n v i r o n m e n t contrib-

ished," said A n n e H a r r i s o n ('13), w h o w o r k s at the main floor

ground, the c o m m o n passion, the c o m m o n commitment to

utes to discrimination. "After t h e s p e c i a l

checkout. H a r r i s o n also said t h a t t h e

our students, to the institution, t h a t w e all c a r e a b o u t t h i s p l a c e

m e e t i n g called a b o u t t h e K K K

s a m e p e o p l e w h o usually o p e n at 1 p m will b e o p e n i n g at 12 p m ,

a n d w e all c a r e a b o u t s t u d e n t s , "

SEE

faculty

flyer i n c i d e n t , it w a s c l e a r t h e faculty h a d m u c h m o r e to talk about relating to discriminat i o n a n d t h e c a m p u s c l i m a t e at Hope," Dr. D a v i d K l o o s t e r of t h e E n g l i s h D e p a r t m e n t said. "At t h a t m e e t i n g , t h e r e h a d

its

responsibilities,"

said. In

that

recently

t h e c o n f e r e n c e itself is always

ing t h e i r o p i n i o n s r e g a r d i n g r a c e a n d e t h n i c i t y as o p p o s e d t o t h e i r

c o o r d i n a t o r for t h e e v e n t . Preparation for the event beg i n s in t h e fall, w i t h p a r t i c i p a n t s

v i e w s r e g a r d i n g sexuality. F a c u l ty m e m b e r s w e r e also f o u n d t o

researching general topics both before and after c o u n t r y assign-

a n i n c i d e n t of racial d i s c r i m i n a tion than reporting an incident

m e n t s a r e d i s t r i b u t e d . E a c h delegate m u s t be knowledgeable

of s e x u a l d i s c r i m i n a t i o n . T h e d a t a w a s c o l l e c t e d last s p r i n g ,

about

through the s u m m e r and during

college. T h e r e w a s n o a g e n d a at the meeting; the only rule was

t h i s p a s t fall. Johnston pointed out that w h i l e m o s t of t h e t i m e at t h e for u m was spent examining issues

that there would be a t w o - m i n -

f o r u m w a s appealing to m e and

of s e x u a l o r i e n t a t i o n , i s s u e s of SEE

3

ARTS

4

FEATURES

5

fun," said J a m e s C o l t e n ('11), w h o is t h e s t u d e n t h i g h s c h o o l

be more comfortable reporting

b e e n only a f e w m i n u t e s availa b l e for f a c u l t y c o n v e r s a t i o n , s o t h e idea of a l o n g e r f a c u l t y

NATIONAL

f o r e v e r y o n e involved, i n c l u d i n g

C a m p u s C l i m a t e survey, J o h n ston said that faculty r e p o r t e d a h i g h e r level of c o m f o r t d i s c u s s -

CONGRESS, PAGE 2

W H A T ' S INSIDE

o f Justice. Though complex, the event is a g r e a t l e a r n i n g e x p e r i e n c e

"This is m y t h i r d y e a r w o r k i n g with Model U N . I enjoy hearing

the faculty were present. Repres e n t a t i v e s of t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n

a s well as t o h e l p H o p e s t u d e n t s make m o r e sustainable choices.

c u r i t y C o u n c i l , E c o n o m i c Social Council and International Court

urgent for the faculty to discuss

ination on Hope's campus. " S o m e t i m e s I t h i n k w e feel

C o m m i t t e e is selling w a t e r b o b bles t o b e n e f i t D a n c e M a r a t h o n ,

several f o r m s of U N simulation i n c l u d i n g G e n e r a l A s s e m b l y , Se-

that

"I a m e x c i t e d t o b e abl e t o h e a d s t r a i g h t t o t h e l i b r a r y af-

Professional Interest C o m m i t t e e w h i c h r e p r e s e n t s t e a c h e r s at t h e

of its k i n d in M i c h i g a n , o f f e r i n g

H o p e students w h o help organize a n d m o n i t o r m e e t i n g s .

H o p e College faculty m e m b e r s m e t t o d i s c u s s i s s u e s of d i s c r i m -

T h e e v e n t w a s a n o p e n for u m a n d w a s o r g a n i z e d by t h e

simulated proceedings. Hope's v e r s i o n is t h e l a r g e s t c o n f e r e n c e

c h a n g e d their ideas o n the subject m a t t e r . J o h n s t o n e s t i m a t e d

ees.

about the h o u r increase. In a d d i t i o n t o n e w l i b r a r y h o u r s , S t u d e n t Congress' Sustainability

s i t u a t i o n at t h e c o l l e g e a n d t h e

for high school students, w h o p r a c t i c e b e i n g U N d e l e g a t e s in

of t h e C a m p u s C l i m a t e s u r v e y w e r e r e l e a s e d , it w a s e v e n m o r e

f o r s t u d e n t s b u t also for e m p l o y -

said Dr. D e i r d r e J o h n s t o n of t h e communications department.

to m a n y colleagues as a c h a n c e to understand and process our

r u n by H o p e C o l l e g e s t u d e n t s

r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s w e h a v e a s faculty m e m b e r s . A f t e r the results

C o n f e r e n c e R o o m , a g r o u p of

a n d t h e y also s e e m t o b e h a p p y

d a y a n d Friday. M o d e l U N is b a s e d o n t h e

passed a microphone around a r o o m of t h e i r p e e r s a n d ex-

N o t o n l y is t h i s g o o d n e w s

so 1 always h e a d t o t h e l i b r a r y t o get s t u d y i n g a n d h o m e w o r k fin-

27 d i f f e r e n t h i g h s c h o o l s a c r o s s M i c h i g a n for M o d e l U N T h u r s -

s t r u c t u r e of t h e U n i t e d N a t i o n s b a s e d in N e w York City. It is

C o m m i t t e e , w a s t h e first t o b r i n g up the concern. The commit-

t o 11 a . m . H o w e v e r , o p e n i n g t h e

school

to 700 high school s t u d e n t s f r o m

b u t h a s b e e n m o v e d t o 12 p . m . t o give s t u d e n t s a n o t h e r i m p o r -

u p changing weekday closings t o 2 a.m., a n d S u n d a y o p e n i n g s

high

here on Hope's campus. H o p e C o l l e g e will h o s t c l o s e

t i m e o n S u n d a y s w a s at 1 p.m.,

beneficial times for the library to be o p e n . A a r d e m a b r o u g h t

provides

s t u d e n t s with the o p p o r t u n i t y to try solving world p r o b l e m s right

chang-

t e e a t t e m p t e d t o find t h e m o s t

in-

c o m m u n i t y . Teaching about the

ing Van W y l e n Library's Sunday hours. The previous opening

t a n t h o u r of s t u d y i n g t i m e . Christina Aardema (13), a

becoming

c r e a s i n g l y s i g n i f i c a n t in light of t h e g r o w i n g global e c o n o m y a n d

VOICES

6

Got a story idea? Let us know a t anchor@hope.edu. or call us at 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 .

FORUM, PAGE 2

SPORTS

8

their

country's

foreign

policy, a s well a s o t h e r c o u n t r i e s t h a t t h e y will b e i n t e r a c t i n g with. Hope student leaders choose certain issues for consideration prior to the event. For e x a m p l e , t h i s year, t h e SEE

CONFERENCE, PAGE 2


2

CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Wednesday

March 9

Dance M a r a t h o n Date Auction 9 p.m.. Kletz. 1 2 t h S t r e e t H a r m o n y will p e r f o r m f r o m 9 - 9 : 4 5 p.m.

Thursday

March 10

MARCH 9 , 2 0 1 1

Professors plan next step after Congress supports Dance Marathon with self-filtering water bottle sales productive Faculty Forum CONGRESS, from page 1

• FORUM, from page 1 racial e q u a l i t y a r e still a p r i m a r y f o c u s t o t h e m e m b e r s of H o p e ' s

w a s e n g a g e d in h o n e s t , r e s p e c t -

emphasized

f u l c o n v e r s a t i o n f o r t h e first t i m e in a l o n g t i m e . O u r m o n t h l y fac-

that there n e e d s to be a discuss i o n o f racial a n d e t h n i c a l dis-

u l t y m e e t i n g s a r e relatively b r i e f , a n d t h e y usually h a v e a c a r e f u l l y

c r i m i n a t i o n o n c a m p u s as well. The reaction f r o m faculty

p l a n n e d agenda of p r e s e n t a t i o n s a n d reports. W e rarely have time

M o d e l United Nations

members

the

t o talk w i t h o n e a n o t h e r w i t h o u t

water tastes wa-

Conference

event was generally a positive

a set a g e n d a . T h i s m e e t i n g felt

one. "1 a t t e n d e d t h e f a c u l t y f o r u m

healthy, p r o d u c t i v e a n d neces-

ter bottle fresh. The sustain-

History M a j o r / M i n o r Informational Meeting

community.

1 1 a.m., M a a s Conference R o o m . Learn a b o u t s u m m e r courses, fall a n d s p r i n g courses, Internships a n d o f f - c a m p u s study o p p o r t u n i t i e s .

3 p.m. - 1 1 p.m.. Campus-wide.

Dance 3 7

who

attended

b e c a u s e 1 w a n t e d t o h e a r m y colleagues speak o n the issue a n d t o

8 p.m.. K n i c k e r b o c k e r Theater. T i c k e t s are $ 1 0 for adults. $ 7 for f a c u l t y / s e n i o r citizens, a n d $ 5 for students.

Friday

She

March 1 1

Dance M a r a t h o n 5 p.m., c o n t i n u i n g to 5 p.m. Saturday. Dow Center.

sary. " M a n y p e o p l e at t h e f o r u m

t h e y filter t h e water w h e n you drink so that the

ability c o m m i t tee noticed that many students

have t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to explore

expressed a desire to c o n t i n u e the conversation, and I agree

w a y s of i m p r o v i n g t h e c l i m a t e at

t h a t w e n e e d m o r e c h a n c e s like

H o p e , " H o p e D i r e c t o r of T h e a t r e

this to u n d e r s t a n d o n e a n o t h e r

M i c h e l l e B o m b e said. "It w a s r e ally e n c o u r a g i n g t o see t h e f a c -

a n d to w o r k together to address t h e i s s u e s of t h e c a m p u s c l i m a t e

is

ulty discuss these difficult issues

a t H o p e " K l o o s t e r said.

w a s t e d plastic; this way b o t h

.

w i t h civility, h u m i l i t y a n d g r a c e .

Dance 37

The best aspect of t h e s e w a t e r b o b b l e s is t h a t

In c o n s i d e r i n g w h a t t h e n e x t

buy

disposable

water bottles, a n d t h e i r goal to

the

of

money and the

T i c k e t s are $ 1 0 for adults. $ 7 for

s t e p is f o l l o w i n g this m e e t i n g , Johnston said that she saw t w o

f a c u l t y / s e n i o r citizens a n d $ 5 for

c o m m i t m e n t of t h e f a c u l t y t o t h e

m a j o r and feasible goals for t h e

students.

students and the effort to create the best possible e n v i r o n m e n t

college t o w o r k t o w a r d . First, is a n I n c l u s i v e N o n - D i s -

saved. "I b e l i e v e it

f o r o u r s t u d e n t s , " B o m b e said.

crimination

"Just a s w e t e a c h in o u r c l a s s e s , t h e first s t e p t o w a r d s o l v i n g a n y

e n s u r e e q u a l i t y f o r s t u d e n t s in

SAC W e e k e n d Movie "Tangled" 8 p.m., 1 0 : 3 0 p.m.. VanderWerf 102.

SAC presents We Know Jackson

i s s u e is e d u c a t i o n , a n d I t h i n k

9 p.m., Dow Center.

t h e f o r u m w a s a g r e a t first s t e p in h e l p i n g t o e d u c a t e a b o u t h o w

Saturday

March 12

SAC presents Jared M a h o n e SAC W e e k e n d Movie 8 p.m., 1 0 : 3 0 p.m., VanderWerf 1 0 2 .

M

can

I

be

important P H O T O BY JENELLE H A N V I L L E

Policy t h a t w o u l d

t h e c l a s s r o o m , in a d m i s s i o n s a n d in a t h l e t i c s , r e g a r d l e s s of sexual orientation. Second, s h e said t h e college

to

start

mak-

tainable

life

VAN W Y L E N HOURS E X T E N D E D - Anne ing m o r e suschoices now. This way you a r e m o r e likely

Harrison ('13) not only enjoys w o r k i n g at t h e

c i r c u l a t i o n d e s k b u t f r e q u e n t l y u s e s t h e lib r a r y for s t u d y i n g . S h e ' s e x c i t e d t o use t h e e x t r a h o u r in t h e l i b r a r y o n S u n d a y s .

t o live a m o r e s u s t a i n a b l e life later. T h e s e little

student body. Student Congress

terials, t o e x p l a i n w h a t t h e col-

by

lege e x p e c t s of its s t u d e n t s a n d

steps m a k e a large difference later," said A s h l e y Fraley ('14),

is s p o n s o r i n g a n o t h e r " W h a t D o You W a n t W e d n e s d a y " a c r o s s

Klooster. "To m e it felt like t h e f a c u l t y

t o s t a t e t h a t e v e r y o n e is t r e a t e d

a m e m b e r of t h e S u s t a i n a b i l i t y

c a m p u s . S t o p b y t a b l e s in D e -

well a n d e q u a l l y at H o p e .

committee that organized

the

W i t t and Phelps to make your

fundraiser. W a t e r b o b b l e s a r e available

voice heard. " T h i s u p c o m i n g s u r v e y will

at t h e s t u d e n t c o n g r e s s office,

focus o n community and trying to gauge how students view the

the

"Tangled"

I

should m a k e an effort, o n Hope's w e b s i t e a n d in a d m i s s i o n s m a -

d i s c r i m i n a t i o n is m a n i f e s t e d o n our campus." A s i m i l a r p o s i t i v e r e v i e w of

1 0 a . m . , D o w Center.

planet

is

H

decrease

amount

People talked, people listened. I was most impressed with the

8 p . m . . K n i c k e r b o c k e r Theater.

I f j

forum

was

expressed

OUR SAUCES WILL GET YOUR TASTE

a n d s t u d e n t s c a n s t o p b y at a n y t i m e t o p i c k o n e up; t h e y a r e also being sold d u r i n g the a f t e r n o o n t h i s w e e k in D e W i t t . N o t o n l y is t h e s u s t a i n a b i l ity c o m m i t t e e w o r k i n g t o w a r d s fewer plastic w a t e r bottles o n c a m p u s , t h e t e a m is also t r y i n g t o i n t r o d u c e a b e t t e r p l a n for r e c y c l i n g at H o p e . " T h e c o m m i t t e e is w o r k i n g

Take any one of our

18 S i g n a t u r e Sauces a n d Seasonings for a test flight today!

H o p e C o m m u n i t y . A n u m b e r of our student congress reps have had s o m e questions/ideas concerning the community, and we w a n t e d to see h o w t o best focus o u r efforts and what areas are a priority," said M i c h a e l

Parrish

(11).

S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s is always l o o k i n g for i d e a s a n d o p i n i o n s

on evaluating the residential recycling p r o g r a m a n d suggesting

of t h e s t u d e n t s t h e y r e p r e s e n t . If

changes for the next a c a d e m i c

congress@hope.edu.

you have a concern, please email

year. W e a r e also t r y i n g t o s t a r t a c o m p o s t i n g p r o g r a m in t h e cott a g e s for n e x t year. W e ' r e g e t t i n g s t a r t e d o n t h e p l a n n i n g for E a r t h Jam with o t h e r s t u d e n t groups," said M a r c T o r i ('12). Lastly, a s p a r t of e f f o r t s t o c o n t i n u e to c o n n e c t with the

High school students debate world problems at Hope's Model UN • CONFERENCE, from page 1 G e n e r a l A s s e m b l y is l o o k i n g at

e x c e l l e n c e will b e a w a r d e d . T h e

e n d a n g e r e d s p e c i e s a n d t h e loss of b i o d i v e r s i t y , a s well a s t h e

t o p t h r e e d e l e g a t i o n s will b e rec-

international drug trade.

Del-

e g a t e s will r e s e a r c h t h e s e i s s u e s and t h e n create a resolution to

BUFFALO W I L D W I N G S GRILL & B A R Y O U H A V E TO BE HERE

submit to the General Council. O t h e r issues that M o d e l U N p a r t i c i p a n t s will c o n f r o n t include the Internet and human r i g h t s , global c u r r e n c y , h u m a n

2 8 9 9 W . S H O R E DR.

HOLLAND 616.399.9461 i, facebook.com/bwwholland

r i g h t s of m i g r a n t s , global v a c c i n a t i o n a n d s e c u r i t y in t h e M e x i c a n d r u g war, K a s h m i r a n d t h e G a z a Strip, as well a s oil spills. Delegates w h o demonstrate

ognized based on representation of t h e i r r e s p e c t i v e c o u n t r i e s a n d t h e q u a l i t y of t h e i r p a r t i c i p a tion. Students organizing Model U N are looking forward to the d e b a t e s a n d s o l u t i o n s t h a t dele g a t e s p o s e at t h e c o n f e r e n c e .


MARCH 9 . 2 0 1 1

NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

3

In China: Could jasmine go jade? ^sKto Letter prompts Chinese officials to pre-emptively crack down on potential revolution

pyj^jQ f0ars A f t a n Snyder

CO-NATIONAL EDITOR

Recent protest m o v e m e n t s across the Arab region, increasingly referred to as t h e Jasmine Revolution, may have sparked revolution in C h i n a . However, t h e C h i n e s e g o v e r n m e n t initiated a severe ; and pre-emptive crackdown 1 m e a n t to p r e v e n t any such movement. The c r a c k d o w n c a m e barely a week after a letter was published anonymously on the Chinese website Boxun.com. The letter, published Feb. 19 and a d d r e s s e d to the National Peoples Congress, asked C h i n e s e citizens t o participate in weekly Sunday protests d e m a n d i n g increased equality, public oversight of g o v e r n m e n t a l p r o c e d u r e s and lessened c o r r u p t i o n . "We do not necessarily have t o o v e r t h r o w t h e c u r r e n t government," a p o r t i o n of t h e letter reads, translated t o English by H u m a n Rights In China, "but we ,are resolute in asking t h e g o v e r n m e n t and t h e officials t o accept t h e supervision of o r d i n a r y C h i n e s e people, a n d w e m u s t have an i n d e p e n d e n t judiciary/This is o u r f u n d a m e n t a l demand." The letter w e n t o n to list rallying p o i n t s a r o u n d C h i n a , asking citizens t o "stroll, watch, or even just p r e t e n d t o pass by. As long as you a r e present, t h e a u t h o r i t a r i a n g o v e r n m e n t will b e shaking with fear." The letter also firmly stated t h e a u t h o r s ' c o m m i t m e n t to "non-violent

*

•HjL

4

^

i

>

*

CO-NATIONAL EDITOR

i

i

P H O T O COURTESY OF ASSOCIATED P R E S S

P R E V E N T I O N — Chinese p o l i c e s w a r m a s t r e e t In f r o n t of a M c D o n a l d ' s In B e i j i n g on Feb. 2 0 . The area was a p l a n n e d p r o t e s t s i t e for a Chinese version of t h e "Jasmine Revolution." non-cooperation. The letter quickly spread across Twitter, p r o m p t i n g t h e Chinese government to ban the search w o r d "jasmine" - a w o r d that symbolizes M i d d l e Eastern uprisings - f r o m all search engines and microblogging services. The g o v e r n m e n t also initiated a r r e s t s of a n y o n e w h o r e - p o s t e d t h e letter. Despite a lack of demonstrators and protest signs, o n t h e first S u n d a y of protest t h e g o v e r n m e n t flooded t h e m e e t i n g p o i n t in W a n g f u j i n g with plainclothes police officers

and security t e a m s , interrogating s o m e and checking t h e ID badges of o t h e r s . T h r e e p e o p l e w e r e d e t a i n e d at t h e Shanghai m e e t i n g point. As the second Sunday a p p r o a c h e d , C h i n e s e officials assaulted and d e t a i n e d multiple lawyers, journalists, a n d o t h e r activists, including BBC r e p o r t e r Damian Grammaticas. "My hair was g r a b b e d . . . t h e y tried t o pick m e up and t h r o w me bodily i n t o |a] van," G r a m m a t i c a s r e c o u n t e d to PBS. "1 f o u n d myself lying o n t h e floor as they repeatedly s l a m m e d t h e

d o o r o n my leg." Despite t h e swiftness and ferocity of t h e g o v e r n m e n t c r a c k d o w n , visible protest in C h i n a h a s yet to materialize. It a p p e a r s that t h e following s t a t e m e n t m a d e in t h e protest letter will r e m a i n unfulfilled: "China belongs to every C h i n e s e person, not t o any political party. China's f u t u r e will b e d e c i d e d by every person." A full version of the letter can be found at www.hrichina.org/ public/contents/press?revision_ id=192612&item id=192610

Despite t h e fact that Libya holds only 2 p e r c e n t of t h e world's oil supply, gas prices c o n t i n u e to climb. According to experts, r e p o r t s Time magazine, the c u r r e n t price of oil - $116 dollars per barrel - is about $20 higher than it should be. W h y ? The largest reason, writes Time magazine contributor Rana Foroohar, is fear. "[Oil] is necessary t o our survival," she writes in the M a r c h 4 edition of Time. " W h e n we fear t h a t o u r ability to heat o u r h o m e s and fuel o u r cars might s o m e h o w be in danger, we panic...it is o f t e n fear r a t h e r t h a n reality that drives oil prices." F o r o o h a r also n o t e s t h a t m o r e speculation in energy m a r k e t s may drive u p prices. Investors increasingly see oil as a m e d i u m of trade a n d income. A rising energy d e m a n d also p r o m p t s scares of an oil shortage. According to Foroohar, W e s t e r n c o m p a n i e s have access to only 25 p e r c e n t of t h e world's oil supply. The rest lies with companies throughout the M i d d l e East, Africa and Asia, in c o u n t r i e s that are increasingly seeing a t r e n d toward what she calls "oil nationalism." Oil nationalism is intimately c o n n e c t e d to t h e domestic politics of oil-bearing countries. This m a k e s t h e oil business uncertain. Unfortunately, an u n c e r t a i n oil business causes fear, and fear a b o u t oil m e a n s we pay m o r e at the pump.

P ERSPECTIVES

Collective bargaining does not belong in government M a t t Lee CO-NATIONAL EDITOR

Editor's note: This perspectives column is a response to a letter on page 7 entitled "Collective bargaining is democracy" H o w is fleeing t h e state and leaving your job you w e r e elected to d e m o c r a t i c ? I u n d e r s t a n d t h a t you feel this w a s an a t t e m p t for t h e m to make s u r e t h e p r o t e s t s were h e a r d b u t they d o not just r e p r e s e n t those protestors; they represent every p e r s o n in Wisconsin and it is their d u t y to d o so. They t o o k an oath to serve a n d it is t h e i r d u t y and obligation t o b e in a t t e n d a n c e . To reiterate t h e q u o t e I originally used f r o m FDR, "The process of collective bargaining, as usually u n d e r s t o o d , c a n n o t be t r a n s p l a n t e d into t h e public service... A strike of public e m p l o y e e s manifests n o t h i n g less t h a n an intent o n their part t o p r e v e n t or o b s t r u c t t h e o p e r a t i o n s of Government." To address your second point, private sector e m p l o y e e s d o not make a "great" deal m o r e , in fact

they don't m a k e m o r e m o n e y at all. A recent article in USA Today pointed out that Wisconsin is o n e of 41 states w h e r e t h e public s e c t o r e m p l o y e e s o n average e a r n m o r e t h a n private s e c t o r employees. " W i s c o n s i n is typical," writes D e n n i s C a u c h o n of USA Today. "State, city and school district w o r k e r s e a r n e d an average of $50,774 in wages and benefits in 2009, a b o u t $1,800 m o r e t h a n in t h e private sector." Now, this analysis did n o t take into a c c o u n t specific jobs, age, e d u c a t i o n o r experience. A n earlier j o b - t o - j o b analysis c o n d u c t e d by USA Today did and they f o u n d that, w h e n taking these factors into account, public sector and private s e c t o r employees earn relatively t h e s a m e salary b u t w h e n adding in overall benefits public sector e m p l o y e e s still e a r n m o r e o n average. Wisconsin is n o t t h e only state w h e r e this is t h e case. In Michigan public sector employees earn an average of $58,801 a year w h i c h is $6,436 m o r e t h a n t h e average private s e c t o r employees.

I also fail t o see h o w you d o n o t find t h e s t a t e m e n t of FDR relevant. FDR is t h e f a t h e r of m o d e r n u n i o n i s m ; u n i o n s exist today b e c a u s e of his policies. Therefore if u n i o n s are still relevant today w h a t FDR had to say o n t h e m a t t e r is as well. If 66 years after his presidency things fail to be relevant in today's politics t h e n forget r e f o r m i n g Social Security and welfare (both of w h i c h w e r e also c r e a t e d u n d e r FDR's N e w Deal) lets just get rid of t h e m b e c a u s e apparently they are n o longer relevant. Collective bargaining h a s n o place in g o v e r n m e n t b e c a u s e in g o v e r n m e n t there is n o c o m p e t i t i o n . It w o r k s great in t h e private sector b e c a u s e private-sector unions have c o m p e t i t o r s a n d bargain over profits they help create. The g o v e r n m e n t relies solely o n taxes. They have no profit. T h e r e are also n o c o m p e t i t o r s for g o v e r n m e n t u n i o n s so they have a m o n o p o l y . This m e a n s that t h e representatives w e send t o office must agree o n tax and s p e n d i n g decisions with union representatives. H o w is that

d e m o c r a t i c ? My voice is n o t being r e p r e s e n t e d there. U n i o n s w e r e first established to ensure quality working environments during the industrial revolution and later saw a b o o m in m e m b e r s h i p d u r i n g t h e 1950s following FDR's policies and legal w o r k . It was a way t o prevent e m p l o y e e s f r o m being exploited. That w a s in t h e private sector though; government workers have n o such fear t h a n k s to civil service laws yet they still have unions. A n d since there are no c o m p e t i t o r s or profits in g o v e r n m e n t u n i o n s t h e tax payers shoulder t h e cost of their inflating d e m a n d s . To address the c o m p a r i s o n to Egypt, d o we really w a n t to c h e a p e n that revolution by c o m p a r i n g it to a budget battle in a state t h a t faces a p r o j e c t e d $3.6 billion shortfall? I find it ironic h o w a year ago w h e n Republicans w e r e protesting t h e health care legislation the p r o t e s t o r s w e r e called "UnA m e r i c a n " and selfish, pretty m u c h every t e r m available, but n o w that t h e tide has t u r n e d

p e o p l e are using t h e great revolution in Egypt t o inspire p r o t e s t s over s p e n d i n g cuts. N o t h i n g that these public s e c t o r e m p l o y e e s are being s u b j e c t e d t o is a n y w h e r e n e a r t h e kind of oppression the p e o p l e of Egypt experienced. Budget c u t s are just a part of being a public employee. It is part of t h e risk of w o r k i n g for t h e g o v e r n m e n t . Military personnel have recently had their pay f r o z e n for three years and their pay is already significantly lower, but no soldiers have g o n e o n strike b e c a u s e they realize w h a t they are in t h e job for. Collective bargaining strikes d o not affect t h e private sector b e c a u s e there are plenty of o t h e r goods and services to c h o o s e f r o m . A strike by United A u t o W o r k e r s against Ford m e a n s c o n s u m e r s will t u r n to Chrysler or General M o t o r s . But that luxury d o e s not exist in g o v e r n m e n t . W e can't buy o t h e r teachers, legislators or police officers. The fact is t h e state of W i s c o n s i n and m o s t o t h e r states right n o w face huge budget s h o r t falls and b u d g e t c u t s have to happen.


4

ARTS

THE ANCHOR

THIS WEEK

IN A R T March 9

Wednesday SAC Coffeehouse

MARCH 9 , 2 0 1 1

British dramedy 'Another Year' comes to Knick Katie Schewe

9 - 1 1 p.m. In t h e Kletz

C O - A R T S EDITOR

Friday

March 1 1

S y m p h o n e t t e Concert D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel

Knickerbocker

Film

r u n s u n t i l M a r c h 19 w i t h s h o w s

7 : 3 0 p.m.. f r e e a d m i s s i o n

Saturday

The

S e r i e s is o p e n i n g its n e x t show, " A n o t h e r Year", o n M a r c h 14. It

March 12

High School Honors B a n d D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel

at 7:30 p . m . e a c h n i g h t . T h e s y n o p s i s t h e K n i c k gives f o r t h e film is "A m a r r i e d c o u p l e w h o have m a n a g e d to r e m a i n

s e a s o n s of o n e a v e r a g e y e a r b y

"Life

is

friends, colleagues and family w h o all s e e m t o s u f f e r s o m e

"Career

Sweet"

(1990),

Girls"

(1997),

d e g r e e of u n h a p p i n e s s . " " A n o t h e r Year" is a British

G i l b e r t a n d Sullivan b i o p i c " T o p s y T u r v y " (1999), a n d "All of N o t h i n g " (2002).

d r a m a , written a n d directed by

But his works that received

M i k e L e i g h . Leigh is a d i r e c t o r of b o t h films a n d t h e a t e r . L e i g h

the most praise included: "Naked" (1993), which

s t a r t e d off a s a t h e a t e r d i r e c t o r

w o n h i m t h e Best D i r e c t o r

a n d p l a y w r i g h t in t h e m i d '60s. It w a s in t h e 7 0 s a n d '80s t h a t his

A w a r d at t h e C a n n e s Film

7 : 3 0 p.m.. f r e e a d m i s s i o n

Festival, " S e c r e t s a n d Lies" (1996) w h i c h w a s n o m i n a t e d for a n O s c a r , a n d lastly

Thurs.-Sat.

March 10-12

"Vera Drake" (2004), w i n n e r of

Dance 3 7 K n i c k e r b o c k e r Theatre

the G o l d e n Lion. " A n o t h e r

8 p.m., $ 1 0 . $ 7 . a n d $ 5 a d m i s s i o n

Year" actors Frl.-Sat.

March 11-12

Jim Ruth

SAC W e e k e n d Movie -Tangled." VanderWerf 1 0 2 $ 2 a d m i s s i o n , 8 p.m. and 1 0 : 3 0 p . m .

IN BRIEE

IDTTG PERFORM AFTER SPRING BREAK

H 0 T 0 COUHTCS*

A N O T H E R D R I N K — Peter W r i g h t and Lesley M a n v l l l e ( m a i n charact e r s M a r y a n d Tom) c o p e w i t h t h e i r u n h a p p i n e s s by r e s o r t i n g t o v i c e s .

InSync

Dance

The-

atre r e p e r t o r y company, bett e r k n o w n as I D T , will p e r f o r m A p r i l 1 - 2 at 8 p . m . e a c h n i g h t at

the

Knickerbocker

Theatre

downtown. F o u n d e d in 1 9 9 5 by D a w n Mcllhargey-Wigert a n d Terri Filips, I D T

is a

at t h e C a n n e s Film Festival. Yet it

of t h e a c t o r s in t h e film h a d w o r k e d w i t h

d i d play at t h e 54 , h L o n d o n Film Festival b e f o r e its official r e l e a s e

Leigh

Much

in F r a n c e . It c a m e t o t h e U.S. in

collaboration into building

went the

S e p t e m b e r at t h e T e l l u r i d e F i l m Festival. T h e film w a s n o m i n a t e d

characters and

before.

world

this year for an A c a d e m y Award

of t h e film. A g r e a t deal o f i m p r o v i s a t i o n

for b e s t o r i g i n a l s c r e e n p l a y . D o n ' t m i s s y o u r c h a n c e t o see

occurs on the actors'

this A c a d e m y A w a r d - n o m i n a t e d

p a r t , a s p a r t of t h e p r o c e s s of b u i l d i n g

film M a r c h 1 4 - 1 9 at t h e K n i c k a t

their

work transferred from theater to film. O t h e r films of Leigh's i n c l u d e :

a m i x of c o m e d y a n d d r a m a .

happy

into

"Another

Year"

7:30 p . m .

w a s first

WTHS: new and notable albums Hear t h e reviewers' radio shows! Paul Rice: Mondays, 1 0 p.m.

semi-profes-

sional jazz c o m p a n y

r e l e a s e d in F r a n c e in M a y of 2 0 1 0

Lesley M a n v i l l e . M o s t

years are s u r r o u n d e d t h e c o u r s e of t h e f o u r

autumn over

as

Broadbent, Sheen and

t h e final s c r i p t . " A n o t h e r Year" is

blissfully The

includes such

Laura Helderop: Thursdays. 8 p.m.

affiliated

Radiohead "The King of Limbs"

with H o p e College. T h e c u r r e n t f a c u l t y c o o r d i n a t o r is A m a n d a

Ever s i n c e R a d i o h e a d g a i n e d a r e p u -

Smith-Heynen. The group performs

tation

t h e i r style w i t h a l b u m s like "OK C o m p u t e r " a n d "Kid A," t h e y ' v e b e e n r e i n -

each

year to resident and guest c h o r e o g r a p h e d tap and jazz pieces.

for c o m p l e t e l y r e c o n s t r u c t i n g

Daniel Martin M o o r e "In the Cool of the D a y "

v e n t i n g t h e m s e l v e s less a n d less. 2007's "In R a i n b o w s " s o u n d e d like R a d i o h e a d relaxing, n o t taking themselves too se-

According to their website, t h e c o m p a n y is " c o m m i t t e d t o

ASOBI SEKSU

Daniel M a r t i n M o o r e was just a regular

s h a r i n g t h e d i v e r s e - v o i c e of t a p

"Flourescence"

old s i n g e r / s o n g w r i t e r with a guitar a n d

riously. But t h i s a b r u p t l y r e l e a s e d n e w " n e w s p a p e r a l b u m " s o u n d s n o t h i n g like

e r n a u d i e n c e s . It is a n e s t a b lished e n s e m b l e t h a t s h a r e s t h e

I n 2009, A s o b i S e k s u p u t o u t "Rewolf,"

a s o f t v o i c e o n his last a l b u m , "Stray Age." For h i s n e w a l b u m , h e t h r e w o u t

a n a l b u m o f a c o u s t i c t a k e s of s o n g s

his old a p p r o a c h and r e c o r d e d an as-

"In R a i n b o w s . " T h e y s o u n d e v e n less like a n o r m a l r o c k b a n d t h a n u s u a l a s

artistry of t h e s e d a n c e f o r m s

f r o m t h e i r p r e v i o u s a l b u m s . It w a s w e i r d . D r e a m p o p is d e f i n i t e l y A s o b i

s o r t m e n t of o l d h y m n s a n d s p i r i t u a l s ,

t h e o p e n i n g s o n g s s k i t t e r by, p r o p e l l e d

m i x i n g in s o m e t h e m a t i c a l l y c o n s i s t e n t s o n g s of h i s o w n . T u r n s o u t h i s c o v e r s

by c l a s h i n g r h y t h m s a n d a n x i o u s , jerky

and jazz d a n c e with mid-west-

with audiences f r o m Michigan

b u m they r e t u r n to their s t r e n g t h s . T h e s i n g e r ' s h i g h - p i t c h e d voice, s i m i l a r t o

h a v e a lot m o r e c h a r a c t e r t h a n his o r i g -

m e l o d i e s . C a l m b e a u t y u n f o l d s as t h e a l b u m settles into s o m e t h i n g m o r e

inals. R e c r u i t i n g a v a r i e t y o f m u s i c i a n s

s l o w a n d s u b t l e . T h e n it e n d s - it's t h e i r

t h r o u g h the ticket office locate d in D e V o s F i e l d h o u s e o n 2 2 2

t h a t of K a z u M a k i n o of B l o n d e R e d -

( i n c l u d i n g Jim J a m e s of M y M o r n i n g Jacket) t o v a r y his s o u n d , h e s w i n g s

shortest a l b u m to date, u n d e r 40 m i n u t e s . L a c k i n g in f a m i l i a r s o u n d s a n d

Fairbanks. Call t o o r d e r y o u r t i c k e t s at

of l o u d g u i t a r in t h e b a c k g r o u n d . T h e s o n g s a r e all a b o u t t e x t u r e m o r e t h a n

and

fun hymns

s t r u c t u r e s , T h e K i n g of L i m b s m i g h t b e

(616) 3 9 5 - 7 8 9 0 . A d u l t t i c k e t s c o s t $10, s e n i o r s c o s t $7, a n d

h o o k s , c r e a t e d by t h e b a l a n c e b e t w e e n

a n d gives s t a r t l i n g d e p t h t o t h e s o l e m n o n e s . A n y o n e l o o k i n g for f o l k s y h y m n s

t h e least a c c e s s i b l e R a d i o h e a d a l b u m yet, b u t a n y f a n will b e glad t o h e a r it.

h e r l o u d yet s o f t v o c a l s a n d t h e g u i t a r

w i t h a r t i s t i c integrity:, look n o f u r t h e r !

S e k s u ' s m u s i c a l f o r t e , a n d o n t h i s al-

a n d s u r r o u n d i n g states." Tickets for April's formance

may

be

per-

purchased

h e a d , b l e n d s in p e r f e c t l y w i t h t h e w a v e s

romps

through

the

and keyboards.

s t u d e n t s c o s t $5.

GPS PRESENTS ROSE ENSEMBLE The

internationally

known

R o s e E n s e m b l e will p e r f o r m in D i m n e n t C h a p e l at 7 : 3 0 p . m . o n M a r c h 31. Individual tickets are $18 for r e g u l a r a d m i s s i o n , $ 1 3 for sen i o r c i t i z e n s , a n d $6 for c h i l d r e n 18 a n d u n d e r . F o u n d e d in M i n n e a p o l i s in 1996, t h e 1 3 - m e m b e r b a n d s p e cializes music.

in

vocalized

classical

N e w f a n s , b e w a r y . T h i s a l b u m is r e w a r d i n g , b u t it's a c h a l l e n g e .

DANIEL MARTIN MOORE


THE ANCHOR

M ARCH 9 , 2 0 1 1

§M1M

f i n b u - n now no* »-

s

A

, t . t"

- t S i '

'

"

*

1 ;

0

M

^

' "

S

. « Sa?«

* r >i "

m •

• 'Ik,

5

s

! i

f ' J j Vk* li / i ..

*Mr »....i

^ ^

^ It F r o m left to right, f r o n t row: Wyatt Baldwin ('11), Sarah Baar ('04), Liz G e r o m e t t a ('13), Ashley Tufnell ('12), Colleen Kolba (•12), Cara Haley £13) Madalyn M u n c y ('13), Sarah Flinker n 2 ) . From left to n g h t , back row: C o u r t n e y K. BlackweU ('11), Kristen C r a y , Lucia Martis ('11), Emily Henry ('12), Kate S c h r a m p f e r (12), Melody H u g h e s (13), A m a n d a C e m e n t z , (11), Leigh Clouse ( 13), A n d r e w Jager ('13).

John Rebhan FEATURES CO-EDITOR

"Congratulations! You've accomplished w h a t 97 percent of people never do w h e n they say they w a n t to write a novel!" Pretty stunning statistic! It is w h a t Professor Elizabeth Trembley says to her students after 28 days of furious novel-writing. The truth is this: Writing a novel is incredibly difficult. The class's goal is to write 50,000 w o r d s in one month. Most students faint at the thought of writing a 10 to 20-page research paper. N o w multiply that by 100, and you've got the typical page count for a novel f r o m this class! And since the novel writing usually takes place in February, the n u m b e r of days decreases by two. Twenty-eight days is all they had, and they did it. Everyone's methods are different for tackling this monstrous task. For me, w h e n I took the class one year ago, it w a s "simple." The word count per day is around 1,700, so I took it a day at a time. 1 devoted a

" I t u

w

i c e n e i

p c U n f u l to-

w r i t e '

' c j u i c h a r u i c U t i y . '

T h e ' l u i U M y o f t u n e s c U d wUrit

in- t h i s

c o u l d n ' t

p r o c e t y , / w o o y

WOl'dfr."

M e l o d y

H u t f K e s

50-1

with

vurt

large section of the day for writing, typically in the morning after I woke up. The first few sentences were never coherent, but the idea of the class is not for the novel to make any sense. More on that later. My classmates had different methods. One actually finished in only 10 days. Others took weekly word counts and, depending on their schedules, took huge chunks out on one day and only a page or two on others. David Caplan ('11) had one of the more interesting (and hair-pulling) methods. H e pushed everything to the last minute. I checked in with him w h e n w e had only three days left, and he had just over 20,000 w o r d s to go. The amazing thing is that he pulled it off! By midnight on our last day, he had turned it all in and finished, along with everyone else in the class. So how does this whole class work? It starts in January. Right off the bat, students are told they will have no life at all outside of this novel writing process in February. They are given the basics in novel writing and story structure until Feb. 1. Then, it's all u p to them. The idea is not to have a coherent story line f r o m beginning to end; rather, it is to finish the first draft of a story that you can then go back and revise. If you were writing and you wanted to change Fred's name to George, you would mark down where you are making the change (page 100), go to a separate document, and

make a note of what you have done. You would then go on with the rest of the story as if George was his name all along. After the month of writing, the students gather their stories together and go through an entire workshop together. They prepare a pitch, a 10-second synopsis, and the first 20 pages of the story. Twenty might not seem like that much since you have a 50,000-word story, but it is w h a t publishers typically want from potential authors. So how did this year's group of novelists feel about the whole writing process? Melody Huges ('11) recalls how different it w a s than writing a typical short story. "It w a s painful to write scenes 'quick and dirty.' The luxury of time did not exist in this process, so I couldn't get fancy with words." When asked about the revisioning process, she said: "I agree wholeheartedly with author James Michener w h o said, T a m not a very good writer, but I'm an excellent rewriter.' After completing editorial re-constructive surgery on m y first draft, I hope to end u p with a novel that I am really proud of." Elizabeth Gerometta ('13) said she is excited to get feedback f r o m the other novelists. "I a m a little apprehensive about giving my work to other readers, because it will be rough, even after revision work, but it is worth it to listen to both sides of constructive criticism. It will be great to see my story through the my classmates' perspectives." Another big congratulations to everyone. We hope to see all your novels on the New York Times bestseller list soon.


MARCH 9, 2 0 1 1 6

^ H E ANCHOR

^

O

I

C

E

S

Paradoxical perspectives

Senior moment

Three little words

Free cash

Karen Patterson

Charlie Walter

Co-Editor-in-Chief

Columnist

O

Ring by spring. T h e r e is s o m e t h i n g a b o u t those three w o r d s consecutively m a r r i e d within o n e year of g r a d u a t i o n w r i t t e n together that causes a p a r t of m e is far lower t h a n t h e r u m o r s would lead to cringe. Yet, as a s e n i o r at H o p e Colyou to believe; it's kind of like t h a t rulege it's a p h r a s e I've b e e n unable t o o u t m o r w h e r e all Pull moralers and pullers r u n t h e last t w o years. Regardless of o u r get m a r r i e d — t r u s t me, t h a t one's c o m feelings o n the topic, for better or worse pletely false. (pun intended). Ring By Spring is a t r e n d So then, if far fewer H o p e s t u d e n t s that influences this c a m p u s . Here's w h a t get m a r r i e d t h a n we're led t o believe and I w a n t t o know, t h o u g h : W h a t is it a b o u t statistically n o b o d y is getting m a r r i e d g r a d u a t i n g college t h a t leads to p e o p l e for a while, w h y o n earth do w e feel this either getting engaged or w o r r y i n g if ridiculous p r e s s u r e to give or receive a they're single? ring by spring? T h e r e are so m a n y great Now, I'm not a scientist b u t I d o t h i n g s a b o u t being single. Yes, it's nice k n o w t h a t correlation d o e s n o t equal to always have s o m e o n e a r o u n d , but causation. T h a t being said, I s e n s e t h a t there's also an incredible o p p o r t u n i t y for s t u d e n t s o n this c a m p u s feel pressure t o be in a relationship d u r i n g college and if p e r s o n a l g r o w t h w h e n you're n o t e m o tionally c o m m i t t i n g a p a r t of yourself t o t h a t relationship h a s b e e n going s t r o n g another person. for at least a year a n d a half at t h e e n d Being in a relationship is a w e s o m e of j u n i o r year, t o get engaged. M a y b e I'm a n d w o n d e r f u l . Being single is a w e s o m e completely w r o n g , m a y b e I'm not. and w o n d e r f u l . So s t u d e n t s of H o p e A s s t u d e n t s at H o p e , we are called College, I e n c o u r a g e you t o take a d e e p t o excel academically while living lives b r e a t h a n d ignore t h a t pressure to be in of faith and m e a n i n g . You can certainly a relationship b e f o r e April of your gradachieve b o t h of t h o s e things while datuation year. If you're getting m a r r i e d in ing s o m e o n e , b u t t h e urge t o b e in a siga f e w m o n t h s , I sincerely offer m y c o n nificant relationship doesn't necessarily have t o be a p a r t of t h e e q u a t i o n . T h e r e is gratulations. I recognize that while I a m not m a t u r e e n o u g h t o m a k e t h a t s o r t of an absolutely fantastic YouTube video of a c o m m i t m e n t , s o m e p e o p l e are. So w h e r 5-year-old saying, "I don't w a n t to m a r r y ever you are in life, enjoy it! Single, taken you before I have a job." My h o u s e m a t e s or s o m e w h e r e in b e t w e e n — d o n ' t stress and I think it's hilarious b u t we also agree it. We have t o o m a n y things going for us that she's o n t o something. to let ourselves b e d e f i n e d by o u r relaDid you k n o w t h a t in a 2007 c e n s u s tionship status. poll, r e s e a r c h e r s f o u n d t h a t t h e average A m e r i c a n m a n gets m a r r i e d at 27 years Karen thinks Facebook should get rid old and t h e average A m e r i c a n w o m a n of the "Relationship Status" button. It m a r r i e s at 2 5 years? I realize t h a t t h e accauses unnecessary drama. tual n u m b e r of H o p e s t u d e n t s t h a t get-

1 look up. The w o m e n , h e r p u r s e I a m sitting in t h e w i n d o w of Crane's slung over her shoulder, enters a coffee o n Eighth Street. It's s u n n y a n d t h e s h o p d o w n at t h e street corner. I was s n o w is sweating. A n A m e r i c a n flag h o p i n g she h a d d i s a p p e a r e d . waves outside, over t h e store. Across t h e Too late, I could say. street, I watch a w o m a n , w h o steps away W h e r e ' d she go? I could say. I don't f r o m t h e street-side A T M . She w a l k s in know. f r o n t of t h e long stretch of w i n d o w s of I don't r e m e m b e r what she looks like. Teerman's, Teerman's, Teerman's, TeerBut I k n o w w h e r e she is. I h a n g m y man's. As she stuffs her things back into head and jog. She is n e a r and close and her purse, t w o pieces of p a p e r d r o p t o t h e m o n e y belongs to her, and I k n o w t h e sidewalk. She k e e p s walking. w h e r e s h e is.... I sit up straight, put my h a n d t o t h e 1 e n t e r t h e frosted d o o r of t h e cofglass. I imagine she h a s d r o p p e d a bank fee shop. C a f ^ Konditorei. Alpen Rose. card. Her b a n k s t a t e m e n t . H e r social Four-dollar b r o w n i e s and c h o c o l a t e security card. frosted scones. The w o m a n is at t h e This is serious. This could be t h e becounter, p o i n t i n g a finger at t h e glass ginnings of identity theft. case of pastries. I d o n o t k n o w exactly what s h e h a s I t a p h e r o n t h e shoulder. I hold t h e d r o p p e d , b u t I c a n n o t b e a r that she h a s t w o bills o u t to her. "You d r o p p e d this; left s o m e t h i n g behind, a n d it could b e a it's yours," I say. p i c t u r e of her g r a n d d a u g h t e r or a letter She stares at t h e bills, t h e n u p at me. t o her son. She o p e n s her h a n d . "Thank you," she A n d she is still walking. says. I slide o u t of m y seat a n d walk o u t "It's n o problem," I say. I exit, listent h e door. I jog across t h e street, thinking for her, for s o m e t h i n g f r o m her, b u t ing that I a m d o i n g a very g o o d thing for s h e says n o t h i n g m o r e . this w o m a n . That I a m a good m a n . I jog back across t h e street. I sit back I b e n d over t o pick up t h e left-bed o w n and dig for t w o q u a r t e r s o u t of hinds. It is two $1 bills. my pocket. For a refill. I pull o u t a d i m e I hold t h e money. Feel t h e r u b bea n d a quarter, 15 cents s h o r t . I search tween my fingers, t h e rub, t h e weight t h r o u g h m y backpack, pulling o u t m y of m o n e y t h a t is so different f r o m a reblue cap a n d gown t o look in t h e very ceipt or n o t e b o o k paper. Real m o n e y b o t t o m of t h e bag. h a s weight. It's thicker. Denser. But the q u a r t e r and dime. It is all I I think of a 4 7 c e n t refill with 3 cents have. I have n o o t h e r change. of tax at Crane's. Maybe a day-old m u f A n d I w o n d e r if I've m a d e t h e w r o n g fin at LJs. I could get t h e m b o t h and choice. have m o n e y left over.

JogginLthe globe : the abroad column Whitney Askew ('12), studying in: Santa Domingo, Dominican Republic

"Oye Oye, D u a r t e Duarte," t h e b u s fare collector s c r e a m s as h e h a n g s o u t s i d e t h e m o v i n g vehicle. I signal t h e bus, k n o w n as una guagua, t o s t o p and c l a m b e r o n as t h e driver r u s h e s off t o pick u p m o r e c u s t o m e r s . This is w h a t I go t h r o u g h every m o r n i n g t o get t o class. Each day in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic is exciting because you never k n o w what to expect: t h e guagua can break d o w n in the middle of a downpour, forcing t h e passengers t o push; there could be a bus strike preventing you to go to class, but also forcing the bus fare to increase; a professor can show up 20 minutes late or just cancel class, even though you made the long trek to class; did I mention everyone runs the red lights? Everything is fair game in the D.R. Besides the daily adventures, the culture is very rich as well; everyone is friendly and actually wants to get to know you. Every class, 1 a m greeted by the Latin American cheek kiss. If I'm eating outside, passer-bys say, "Buen provecho," meaning "have a good meal." O n every corner, you see an intense dominoes game going down, where the players slam their dominoes on a professional, green velvet table. The popular music that fills t h e streets consists of meringue, bachata, salsa and Dembow, which is a very popular type of Dominican music. You of course hear the big hits f r o m the U.S., as well. W h e n meringue or salsa is t u r n e d on, magically people start to dance like professionals spinning and twirling their partner like there is no tomorrow. I would love t o move like them; it is so colorful and lively

_ANCHOflL_ K a r e n P a t t e r s o n CO-EDITOR-IS-CHIEI J a m e s N i c h o l s Co-EmoR-is-Cniif A n n M a l o n e PWDUCTIOS MASAGEA C h r i s Russ CAMPUS NLHS CO-EOIWK M a d a l y n M u n c y Cufff/s NEIVS CO-EDITOR

2011

Aftan Snyder M a t t Lee Katie S c h e w e Caitlin Klask Maggie Almdale

NATIONAL NATIOS.M

NEHS NEWS

A M

CO-EDITOR

ARTS

CO-EDITOR

VOICES

EDITOR

CO-EDITOR CO-EDITOR

and free-spirited! This beautiful country is filled with gorgeous beaches, palm trees, caves and mountains. My most recent excursion was to Cano Hondo.* We visited La Cueva de las Maravillas, t h e Cave of W o n ders, This cave contains m o r e than 500 pre-Columbian pictographs painted by the Tainos onto the cave walls using charcoal and animal fat. Their painting skills are better than I ever could paint! It was also amazing to see what the stalagmites and stalactites formed. There were formations of a heart, a turtle, and even the Nativity scene for the birth of Christ. The other part of t h e excursion consisted of whale watching—not just any whales, but h u m p b a c k whales. D u r i n g the winter season, the whales migrate to the tropical weather, so we were able to see a m o t h e r and her young show off their tails and blow holes w h e n they came up for air. I have never been so up-close to a humpback whale, so this was an incredible experience! My next adventure will be in La Vega, where they have the largest annual Carnaval in the country, celebrated for the entire m o n t h of February. Each weekend, every town has their own parades and festivals with colorful costumes and masks. Carnaval climaxes on February 27, t h e Dominican Independence Day. It is sad to think I have only two m o n t h s left in this beautiful country, but I a m looking forward to learning more about the culture and the language, and also learning some dance moves!

S P R I N G S E M E S T E R STAFF

John Rebhan Alyssa B a r i g i a n Jolene Jeske C h a r l o t t e Park Kathy N a t h a n

FEATORES

CO-EDITOR

FUTURES SPORTS ASST.

CO-EDITOR EDITOR

SPORTS

STAFFADHSOR

EDITOR

Emily D a m m e r Shelby W y a n t Mike Connelly Holly Evenhouse Annelise Belmonte

GMPHICS ADS

BUSINESS PHOTO COPY

EDITOR

MASTER MASACER EDITOR EDITOR

Raina K h a t r i Brooke McDonald

ASST.

COPY

EDITOR

ASST.

COPY

EDITOR


VOICES

MARCH 9 , 2 0 1 1

&

From the inside out Business as usual Madalyn Muncy C o - C a m p u s N e w s Editor

T H E ANCHOR

7

Letters to the Editors Poster perpetrator owned up to mistakes I w a s a t t h e library t h e o t h e r night, a n d I f o u n d a c o p y of t h e S t a n d U p e d i t i o n of T h e A n c h o r . T h e first t h i n g t h a t c a u g h t m y eye w a s t h e i n t e r v i e w w i t h t h e p e r p e t r a t o r of t h e c o n t r o v e r s i a l p o s t e r s , a n d as I r e a d it, I c o u l d n ' t h e l p b u t t h i n k t h a t this w a s t h e m o s t h u m b l e , s i n c e r e a p o l o g y I h a v e ever read. I h o p e t h a t e v e r y o n e o n c a m p u s w h o w a s r e a d y t o lock t h i s g u y u p a n d t h r o w away t h e key g e t s t h e c h a n c e to read this, too, a n d g e t s t h e c h a n c e to realize t h a t n o m a t t e r h o w a n g r y s o m e t h i n g like t h i s m a k e s us, a n d r e g a r d l e s s of h o w s t upi d

A b o u t a m o n t h ago, I unwillingly W h e n t h e l a u g h t e r d i e d d o w n , o n e of t u r n e d 20. N e v e r h a d a b i r t h d a y s c a r e d m y friends made the observation that I m e so m u c h . T w e n t y m e a n t t h a t I wasn't a k n e w e v e r y o n e w a s t h i n k i n g . "This m a k e s t e e n a g e r a n y m o r e . T w e n t y m e a n t t h a t next m e kind of sad," s h e said. "It's like w e ' r e reyear I c o u l d legally b u y alcohol. T w e n t y ally g r o w i n g up." m e a n t t h a t I w a s really g r o w i n g u p . N o o n e w a n t e d to t h i n k it, say it o r acIf w e r e w o u n d a n d a s k e d t h e 10-year- . k n o w l e d g e it, b u t t h e r e it was, s t a r i n g u s old m e w h a t I w a s m o s t e x c i t e d for, I w o u l d in t h e face in t h e f o r m of a b u s i n e s s suit: have a n s w e r e d "to g r o w up." H o w silly I a d u l t h o o d . O r at least, t h i n g s t h a t lead t o was, t h i n k i n g t h a t life w o u l d get so m u c h such. Internships. |obs. Careers. Things easier w i t h o u t p a r e n t s to a n s w e r to a n d a t h a t s e e m e d so f a r away w h e n w e w e r e y o u n g e r sister b u g g i n g m e all t h e t i m e . f r e s h m e n last y e a r a n d a r e c r e e p i n g u p o n All of this g r o w i n g u p b u s i n e s s t h a t u s as a l m o s t - j u n i o r s . h a s b e e n floating a r o u n d m y m i n d t h i s T h e b u s i n e s s suit is still h a n g i n g u p in p a s t m o n t h w a s r e c e n t l y e m b o d i e d in o u r closet d o o r w a y , so as n o t t o w r i n k l e in t h e s t r a n g e s t of f o r m s . M y r o o m m a t e h a s o u r p a c k e d m o u n t a i n of c l o t h e s a n d bins, b e e n actively p u r s u i n g a n i n t e r n s h i p , g e t r e m i n d i n g m e of w h a t lies a h e a d . W h o t i n g h e r r e s u m e ready, n e t w o r k i n g w i t h k n e w t h a t a f e w s e w n - t o g e t h e r p i e c e s of potential employers and going to practice f a b r i c c o u l d s y m b o l i z e so m u c h ? i n t e r v i e w s . All of t h i s w a s just talk to m e , I've d e c l a r e d m y m a j o r , finished a m i n o r , 1 n e v e r t h o u g h t a b o u t w h a t it all m e a n t , a n d t a k e n m a n y i n t e r e s t i n g classes h e r e at other than something to do this summer. H o p e ; h o w e v e r , I a m n o closer to finding Last w e e k , however, s h e c a m e in c a r r y my niche than I was w h e n I stepped o n ing a d a r k g a r m e n t b a g f r o m N o r d s t r o m c a m p u s f o r t h e first t i m e . D e s p i t e all of t h e Rack. T h i n k i n g t h a t it w a s a n e w d r e s s a n x i e t y I'm feeling a b o u t s u m m e r r e s e a r c h or just s o m e t h i n g she was bringing back a n d i n t e r n s h i p s , as well as c a r e e r c h o i c e s , f r o m h o m e , I d i d n ' t t h i n k m u c h of it. U n t i l a n d as m u c h as I w o u l d like to t o s s m y I c a m e b a c k f r o m w o r k t h e n e x t day a n d a r o o m m a t e ' s suit o u t t h e w i n d o w , I t h i n k p r e s s e d black b u s i n e s s s u i t w a s h a n g i n g in t h a t m a y b e floating a b o u t c o n f u s e d for a o u r closet d o o r w a y . while m i g h t lead m e in t h e r i g h t d i r e c t i o n . A f t e r a s k i n g w h a t it w a s for, I f o u n d I c o n t i n u e t o r e m i n d myself t h a t I'm 2 0 o u t t h a t s h e h a d b o u g h t it in p r e p a r a t i o n for i n t e r n s h i p i n t e r v i e w s . "They told m e I y e a r s y o u n g a n d t h a t p i n n i n g myself d o w n

his m i s t a k e w a s , we're still dealing w i t h a p e r s o n here. W h i l e I c e r t a i n l y t h i n k it's v e r y i m p o r t a n t t h a t w e at H o p e g r o w in o u r racial a w a r e n e s s a n d sensitivity a f t e r t h i s e v e n t , I t h i n k it's e v e n m o r e i m p o r t a n t t h a t w e learn to t a k e issues a n d e v e n t s f o r w h a t they are, a n d n o t h i n g m o r e . Yes, it w a s a n u n a c c e p t a b l e , insensitive act, a n d it s h o u l d b e p u n i s h e d . But if you r e a d t h e i n t e r v i e w in t h e A n c h o r , y o u k n o w t h a t this s t u d e n t realizes this m o r e t h a n anyone. If I c o u l d h a v e o n e w i s h for H o p e College, it w o u l d b e f o r us t o just t a k e t i m e to listen a n d figure o u t w h y p e o p l e did w h a t they did or said w h a t t h e y said bef o r e w e a c t a n d s p e a k rashly. W h i l e it w a s great t o see positive s t u d e n t r e s p o n s e a n d solidarity, I p e r s o n a l l y w a s d i s a p p o i n t e d in a n u m b e r of s t u d e n t s a n d faculty w h o I felt w e r e u s i n g this i n c i d e n t negatively, as a kind of fuel for t h e i r fire, so t h a t t h e y c o u l d k e e p p o i n t i n g t h e i r finger at t h e H o p e C o l l e g e c o m m u n i t y t o say s o m e t h i n g a l o n g t h e lines of, "See? H o p e C o l l e g e is racist." I t h i n k , in reality, if you a t t e n d H o p e C o l l e g e w i t h an o p e n h e a r t i n s t e a d of a political a g e n d a , you will n o t i c e t h a t t h e r e is a great d e a l of h a r m o n y b e t w e e n a lot of d i f f e r e n t k i n d s of p e o p l e a n d d i f f e r e n t g r o u p s of p e o p l e , a n d you'll realize t h a t t h e f u t u r e is n o t q u i t e so bleak as c e r t a i n o u t s p o k e n m e m b e r s of t h e c o m m u n i t y w o u l d have u s believe. I'm w r i t i n g this l e t t e r b e c a u s e I t h i n k it n e e d s t o b e said by s o m e o n e . T h e s t u d e n t r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the p o s t e r t h a t h a s c a u s e d s u c h a n u p r o a r o n c a m p u s r e s p o n d e d in t h e b e s t possible w a y h e c o u l d have, a n d if n o t h i n g else, h e h a s m y r e s p e c t for o w n i n g u p to his m i s t a k e s a n d b e i n g c o m p l e t e l y r e a d y a n d willing to a c c e p t t h e full f o r c e of his p u n i s h m e n t . T h e r e are a lot of l e s s o n s l personally h o p e to learn f r o m this s i t u a t i o n , b u t t h a t a t t i t u d e is r i g h t u p t h e r e for m e as t h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t l e s s o n of all. Mike Debowski (12)

n e e d to look m o r e professional," s h e said. B e f o r e 1 k n e w it, m y g r o u p of f r i e n d s h a d g a t h e r e d in o n e r o o m t o w a t c h a p r o fessional b u s i n e s s f a s h i o n show, t r y i n g t o decide what b u t t o n - d o w n was m o r e app r o p r i a t e , t h e s t r i p e d o r solid? W e l a u g h e d as o u r m o d e l p o s e d , p r o u d of h e r n e w look, f r e s h a n d r e a d y to s h o w t h o s e engi-

n o w means nothing. If y o u have a plan, great, m o r e p o w e r t o you. But if you d o n ' t , so b e it. It's a d a n g e r o u s t h i n g t o b e so c e r t a i n of t h i n g s a n y h o w . H e c k , w h o c o u l d possibly have a life view at this p o i n t ? A s f o r m e , I'm going t o actively w o r k a g a i n s t t h e cycle, a n d m e a n d e r a r o u n d . Life will figure itself o u t

n e e r s w h a t s h e w a s m a d e of.

eventually.

YOUR THREE LETTERS OF

RECOMMENDATION

MEA

'Collective bargaining IS democracy' T h e Feb. 2 3 article o n t h e p r o t e s t s in W i s c o n s i n (which have since s p r e a d t o I n d i a n a a n d O h i o a n d p r o b a b l y m o r e t o c o m e ) w a s u n f a i r a n d offensive. Mr. L e e a r g u e s t h a t t h e d e m o c r a t s fleeing t h e state to p u r p o s e l y d o d g e a v o t e t h a t w o u l d kill collective b a r g a i n i n g for t e a c h e r s isn't d e m o c r a t i c . But, h o w is t h a t n o t d e m o c r a t i c ? T h e W i s c o n s i n (and I n d i a n a ) d e m o c r a t s fled t o allow public w o r k e r s , specifically t e a c h e r s , to m a k e t h e i r collective voice h e a r d . T h e y are w o r k i n g in solidarity w i t h t h e t e a c h e r s . Mr. Lee says t h e t e a c h e r s "act c o w a r d l y a n d selfish" and t h e n b l a m e s t h e d e m o c r a t s in office. T h e real s t o r y is n o t a b o u t t h e d e m o c r a t s fleeing office, it is a b o u t t h e t e a c h e r s S T A N D I N G U P f o r t h e i r h u m a n rights, a n d t h e i r right to u n i o n i z e . A n d t h a t is purely d e m o cratic. T h a t is w h a t t h e E g y p t i a n p e o p l e f o u g h t F O R M E R P r e s i d e n t M u b a r a k for a n d t h a t is w h a t e v e r y A m e r i c a n d e d i c a t e d t o d e m o c r a c y s h o u l d S T A N D U P to. Mr. Lee writes that state employees are being asked to pay extra portions of their pensions and health premiums. H e then compares their proposed $200 share to a private sector employee's $330 share. H o w can an average state employee b e c o m p a r e d to the average private sector employee by financial means? N o doubt, private

I n t r o d u c i n g the GVSU Full-Time Integrated M.B.A. (FIMBA) P r o g r a m .

employees m a k e a great deal m o r e than public employees, on average. Mr. Lee states, " T h e s i t u a t i o n in W i s c o n s i n serves as a p e r f e c t e x a m p l e of w h y g o v e r n m e n t e m p l o y e e s s h o u l d n o t have a collective b a r g a i n i n g a g r e e m e n t " a n d t h e n b a c k s t h a t u p w i t h e v i d e n c e of Franklin D e l a n o Roosevelt n e v e r i n t e n d i n g for p u b l i c e m p l o y e e u n i o n s t o b e c r e a t e d . N o t only is it e x t r e m e l y h a r d t o s e e r e l e v a n c e in 8 0 - y e a r - o l d politics, b u t FDR is t h e s a m e p r e s i d e n t t h a t s e n t c o u n t l e s s J a p a n e s e

C P T T M I F XV

A m e r i c a n s to i n t e r n m e n t c a m p s . IS T H A T D E M O C R A T I C ? Mr. Lee e n d s his article " W i t h u n e m p l o y m e n t at 9 p e r c e n t , t h e public h a s bigger p r o b l e m s t h a n to feel s y m p a t h e t i c f o r s o m e c o w a r d l y p u b l i c s e c t o r employees." The m e n a n d w o m e n p r o t e s t i n g in W i s c o n s i n a n d I n d i a n a , a n d s o o n to b e o t h e r states, are in n o way cowardly. T h e y are fighting. They are diligent. T h e y have b e e n u n d e r a p p r e c i a t e d f o r t o o long, a n d r e f u s e to give u p t h e i r collective b a r g a i n i n g r i g h t s . Collective b a r g a i n i n g IS d e m o c r a c y . It allows t h e P E O P L E to d e c i d e i n s t e a d of o n e c o n f u s e d G o v e r n o r . If we, as p e e r s a n d n e i g h b o r s of t h e s e p r o t e s t o r s , are going to r e f u s e to a c k n o w l e d g e t h e i r plight and fight,

G R A N D V \ L L E Y S T A T E U N I V E R S I T Y .

Good things come to those who don't wait. GVSU's accelerated 14-month M.B.A. program is now available to recent business grads. Students receive a well-paid fellowship and opportunities to study in Washington. D.C., and abroad. Apply by April 15. Call 6 1 6 . 3 3 1 . 7 4 0 0 or visit gvsu.edu/grad/fimba for more info.

w e m a y as well call M u b a r a k a n d ask h i m to r u n as t h e R e p u b l i c a n C a n d i d a t e in 2012. Sam Hirt (12) serves

the

H o p e College a n d t h e H o l l a n d c o m m u n i t y . W e h o p e t o a m p l i f y a w a r e n e s s a n d

tacks

or

p r o m o t e d i a l o g u e t h r o u g h fair, o b j e c t i v e j o u r n a l i s m a n d a v i b r a n t Voices sec-

pie

Our M i s s i o n : The Anchor

strives to c o m m u n i c a t e c a m p u s e v e n t s t h r o u g h o u t

tion. D i s c l a i m e r : The Anchor

is a p r o d u c t of s t u d e n t e f f o r t a n d is f u n d e d t h r o u g h

will

right other

be

to

edit

due

editorial

taken.

No

to

space

considerations.

anonymous

letters

constraints, A will

personal

representative be

printed

atsam-.

unless

a n d t y p o g r a p h i c a l e r r o r s . However, if s u c h m i s t a k e s o c c u r , t h i s n e w s p a p e r m a y c a n c e l i t s c h a r g e s for t h e p o r t i o n o f t h e a d if, in t h e p u b l i s h e r ' s r e a s o n a b l e j u d g m e n t , t h e a d h a s b e e n r e n d e r e d v a l u e l e s s by t h e m i s t a k e .

d i s c u s s e d w i t h Editor-in-Chief. P l e a s e l i m i t l e t t e r s t o 5 0 0 w o r d s .

A d v e r t i s e m e n t D e a d l i n e s : All a d a n d classified requests m u s t b e s u b m i t t e d

M a l l l e t t e r s t o The Anchor

by 5 p . m . M o n d a y , p r i o r t o W e d n e s d a y d i s t r i b u t i o n .

c/o

H o p e C o l l e g e , d r o p t h e m o f f a t t h e An-

the Hope College Student Activities Fund. The opinions expressed o n t h e

c h o r o f f i c e ( l o c a t e d in t h e

Voices page a r e solely t h o s e of t h e a u t h o r a n d d o not r e p r e s e n t t h e views of

a n c h o r @ h o p e . e d u by M o n d a y a t 5 p . m . t o a p p e a r in W e d n e s d a y ' s i s s u e .

or o t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n , c o n t a c t o u r Ads R e p r e s e n t a t i v e a t a n c h o r a d s @ h o p e .

The Anchor.

A d v e r t i s i n g P o l i c i e s . All a d v e r t i s i n g i s s u b j e c t t o t h e r a t e s , c o n d i t i o n s , s t a n -

e d u . To c o n t a c t o u r o f f i c e , c a l l o u r o f f i c e a t ( 6 1 6 ) 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 .

O n e - y e a r s u b s c r i p t i o n s t o The Anchor

a r e a v a i l a b l e for $ 4 4 . The

Anchor

r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o accep.t o r r e j e c t a n y a d v e r t i s i n g .

Letter

Guidelines;

The

Anchor

welcomes

all

letters. ' T h e

Martha

Miller Center

d a r d s , t e r m s a n d p o l i c i e s s t a t e d i n The Anchor's staff

re-

The Anchor

1 5 1 ) o r e - m a i l u s at

C o n t a c t I n f o r m a t i o n : To s u b m i t a n a d or a c l a s s i f i e d , or to r e q u e s t a b r o c h u r e

advertisement brochure.

will m a k e c o n t i n u o u s e f f o r t s t o a v o i d w r o n g i n s e r t i o n s , o m i s s i o n s

C

H

O

R


8

THE ANCHOR

SPORTS

MARCH 9. 2011

The victorious road comes to an end Men's basketball

Women's basketball

^ H O T O B Y JENELLE R A N D V I L L E

D O W N A N D R E A D Y — M a d d i e B u r n e t t ( ' 1 2 ) g e t s d o w n In defensive p o s i t i o n o n Friday's first round g a m e a g a i n s t DePauw. The Dutch ended up l o s i n g t o W a s h i n g t o n University (Mo.) 5 6 - 5 2 on Saturday, e n d i n g t h e i r season. Charlotte Park Ass.

SPORTS EDITOR

The Flying D u t c h played t h e i r last g a m e of t h e s e a s o n at t h e DeVos Fieldhouse o n Saturday night, b o w i n g t o last season's national c h a m p i o n s W a s h i n g t o n St-Louis 52-56. The loss b r o k e a 7 7 - g a m e w i n n i n g streak for t h e w o m e n , w h o finished their season with a 2 7 - 3 record. The first half consisted of n o n - s t o p fights for possession, with H o p e trailing just o n e p o i n t at t h e buzzer, 26-27. The D u t c h s c r a m b l e d late in t h e s e c o n d half, soaring t h e Bears t o a 9 - p o i n t lead 55-46 with t w o m i n u t e s t o spare. W h i l e AilA m e r i c a n Carrie Snikkers m a n a g e d t o sneak a 3 - p o i n t e r in with seven s e c o n d s left o n t h e clock, it just wasn't e n o u g h for the Dutch. Snikkers e n d e d t h e g a m e with d o u b l e digits, 2 3 p o i n t s and n i n e r e b o u n d s . T h e g a m e was t h e last for five seniors; Snikkers, L a u r e n Geers, Erika Bruinsma, M i r a n d a D e K u i p e r and Rachel Kutney, w h o s e record d u r i n g their four years was an a s t o u n d i n g 117-8. " W e have a great g r o u p of players w h o left their m a r k in m a n y years b o t h o n a n d

off t h e court," said C o a c h Brian M o r e house. The w o m e n claimed a 77-65 victory over D e P a u w (Ind.) Friday night in f r o n t of their o r a n g e and blue fans. "We w e r e blessed to be able to play in f r o n t of t h e fans we have at Hope," M o r e h o u s e said. "The s t u d e n t s are fantastic and so w e r e all t h e o t h e r f a n s w h o s u p p o r t e d o u r team." H o p e led by six p o i n t s at halftime, 39-33. W h i l e D e P a u w did score t h e first t w o points of t h e s e c o n d half, H o p e c a m e back, a c c u m u l a t i n g a 2 1 - p o i n t lead, 58-37 a m e r e six m i n u t e s into t h e second half. The Flying D u t c h shot 54 p e r c e n t overall with t h e ir final 30 points c o m i n g solely f r o m t h r e e p o i n t range. Snikkers o n c e again led t h e D u t c h with 21 p o i n t s overall, while Liz Ellis ('11) a d d e d 16, a n d Bruins m a 12. W h i l e t h e D u t c h u n f o r t u n a t e l y didn't snatch t h e national title this season, three players have received all-conference h o n o r s f r o m t h e league's coaches. Snikkers a n d Bruinsma are first t e a m h o n o r e e s while Ellis is a s e c o n d t e a m h o n o r e e in addition t o being n a m e d t h e league's d e fensive player of t h e year.

All C o n f e r e n c e H o n o r s WOMEN'S First Team: Carrie Snikkers ('11) Erika Bruinsma ('11) Second Team: Liz Ellis ('13)

^ \ \ o o

MEN'S First Team: Will Bowser ('11) Second Team: David Krombeen ('12)

odoH 0 0 0 6 - ^ t 6 t IW 'aNvnoH

DLVD a f o s o j

s n

pDJJOSOJJ

0006 xog O d

J-S HJ-H 3 I H yOHDNV

iyojd-aoN 3031*103

3 D 0

H

HOTO

QURTESY OF

F I G H T I N G H A R D — David Krombeen (*12) f i g h t s for possession In Saturday's g a m e a g a i n s t Augustana In Rock Island, III. The D u t c h m e n f o u g h t hard but c a m e up s h o r t , l o s i n g to t h e V i k i n g s 8 8 - 8 0 in o v e r t i m e . Jolene Jeske S P O R T S EDITOR

The N C A A t o u r n a m e n t in Rock Island, III. s e e m e d p r o m i s i n g in t h e first r o u n d for the H o p e College FlyingD u t c h m e n o n Friday. The Dutchmen defeated Hanover College (Ind.) 73-70, and advanced to t h e s e c o n d r o u n d against t h e host, Aug u s t a n a College. The D u t c h m e n ' s tough d e f e n s e and quick scoring f r o m c h a n g e of possession gave t h e m an a d v a n t a g e in t h e first r o u n d game. The P a n t h e r s trailed t h e D u t c h m e n t h e entire g a m e , only tying t h e g a m e once, 15 m i n u t e s into t h e first half, while keeping within a five-point margin t o w a r d s t h e e n d of t h e first half. The second half proved p r o m i s i n g for t h e D u t c h m e n as they p u s h e d their lead to 10 points. That lead was quickly slashed w h e n M i k e C a s e for t h e P a n t h e r s hit t w o j u m p e r s and t w o free t h r o w s within 21 s e c o n d s , r e d u c i n g t h e score to 68-64 with only 3:09 remaining. T h e D u t c h m e n kicked it into gear, b u t t h e m a r g i n kept r e d u c i n g . W i t h seven s e c o n d s left, D r a k e H e n d r i c k s for t h e P a n t h e r s hit t w o free throws, closing t h e gap t o 70-68. But t h e free t h r o w m a t c h was o n w h e n C o l t o n O v e r w a y ( 1 3 ) sank t w o and David K r o m b e e n ('12) sank one, e n d i n g t h e g a m e with a final score of 7370 over t h e P a n t h e r s . The D u t c h m e n advanced t o t h e seco n d r o u n d game, c o m i n g into c o m p e t i tion Saturday with A u g u s t a n a , w h o held a 2 4 - 3 record. Kicking off t h e s e c o n d r o u n d g a m e w a s Bowser, hitting a 3 - p o i n t e r eight s e c o n d s into t h e first half. The g a m e looked good until t h e Vikings pulled t h r e e s h o t s in a r o w over t h e D u t c h m e n with 15 m i n u t e s left in t h e first half. T h e r e was a 10-point deficit f r o m t h e n on, resulting in a 4 0 - 3 0 Vikings lead at t h e half. The D u t c h m e n c a m e out firing in t h e s e c o n d half. Bowser hit a 3 - p o i n t e r six m i n u t e s in, r e d u c i n g t h e Vikings lead to one, 47-46. H o p e c a m e alive again, tying t h e Vikings halfway into t h e second half w h e n Logan Neil ( 1 2 ) hit a j u m p e r . The lead went back and f o r t h as b o t h t e a m s fought for a shot. W i t h only 14 s e c o n d s left. Bowser hit o n e of two f r e e throws, p u t t i n g t h e score at 74-71, t h e

D u t c h were leading. The u n e x p e c t e d h a p p e n e d with five s e c o n d s left in play; Vikings guard Brian D e S i m o n e hit a 3-pointer, tying the g a m e 74-74, forcing t h e g a m e into overtime. The D u t c h m e n s e e m e d to lose their fire in overtime, as t h e Vikings led for all five m i n u t e s . The baskets were n o t falling for t h e Dutch, resulting in a final loss of 88-80 t o t h e Vikings. " W e missed s o m e shots a n d we fouled t h e m . T h e y m a d e their f r e e t h r o w s w h e n they had to and that created t h e gap in overtime," coach M a t t Neil said. The road to victory might have been over for t h e N C A A t o u r n a m e n t , but it's not over for t h e men's basketball program. Neil led t h e D u t c h m e n into t h e N C A A t o u r n a m e n t in his first year as head coach and added t o f o r m e r coach G l e n n Van W i e r e n s five straight years in the tournament. T h e end of this season d o e s not mark t h e end of success for H o p e basketball; rather it defines t h e success of H o p e basketball a n d t h e success of a first-time head coach. "I a m completely h o n o r e d to be able to have these m e n call m e 'coach.' W e end u r e d a lot of e m o t i o n a l u p s a n d d o w n s this season, and o u r m e n discovered t h a t mental t o u g h n e s s is necessary t o be successful, n o m a t t e r t h e endeavor," Neil said. Neil also expressed his appreciation for t h e c o m m u n i t y and fans. " O u r basketball p r o g r a m would like t o t h a n k t h e entire H o p e College c o m m u n i t y for t h e s u p p o r t and encouragem e n t d u r i n g t h e season. W e a i m t o serve our college in a way t h a t r e p r e s e n t s t h e loyalty of our f a n s a n d wish to thank t h e D e w C r e w for setting t h e tone," Neil said. As for t h e seniors, they had a great year. Special recognition goes t o Will Bowser, A n d y Venema, Ty Tanis and A d a m Dickerson for their c o n t r i b u t i o n s t o H o p e men's basketball. O t h e r r e c o g n i t i o n s include Bowser m a k i n g M I A A first t e a m honors, as well as t e a m m a t e David K r o m b e e n ( 1 2 ) m a k i n g M I A A second t e a m h o n o r s .

03-09-2011