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The Hope College Anchor Volume 99 Number 1 5 Vital Role Seen

for Mrs. Jacobso by S a r a h E b e r h a r d — N e w s Editor Dr. J e a n n e J a c o b s o n , as wife of the new p r e s i d e n t - e l e c t Dr J o h n J a c o b s o n , will p l a y a vital role in the y e a r s a h e a d at Hope a n d b r i n g s with h e r a rich educational and personal b a c k g r o u n d to h e l p h e r in t h a t role. She is a g r a d u a t e of S w a r t h m o r e College with a B.A. in E n g l i s h L i t e r a t u r e , r e c e i v e d h e r M.S. d e g r e e f r o m the S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y College of B r o c k p o r t , N.Y. in r e a d i n g e d u c a t i o n and e a r n e d h e r P h . D . f r o m the S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y of New York in Albany in e d u c a t i o n a l psychology. C u r r e n t l y s e r v i n g as principal of g e n e r a l s t u d i e s of the H e b r e w A c a d e m y of the C a p i t a l District, she also holds the position of a d j u n c t p r o f e s s o r in t h e g r a d u a t e p r o g r a m s of SUNY at Albany and t h e college of St. R o s e . S p e c i a l i z i n g in t h e e d u c a t i o n of g i f t e d c h i l d r e n , she edits a m o n t h l y m a g a z i n e in this field. B e s i d e s h e r e d u c a t i o n a l b a c k g r o u n d , D r . J a c o b s o n and her h u s b a n d r a i s e d f o u r c h i l d r e n who r e s i d e in S w a r t h m o r e , PA, G a n s e v o o r t , NY, a n d Boston, MA. She h a s also b e e n a c t i v e in the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i c a s e r v i n g as an e l d e r a n d in o t h e r capacities. Her wide v a r i e t y of a r e a s of l e a r n i n g and i n t e r e s t s will aid Dr. J a c o b s o n a s s h e t a l k s with the m a n y g u e s t s a n d visitors that s h e a n d D r . J a c o b s o n will e n t e r t a i n e a c h y e a r . S o m e of the d i f f e r e n t t y p e s of e n t e r t a i n i n g which s h e m i g h t do could be s i m i l a r to those t h a t the Van Wylens do such a s h a v i n g f a c u l t y m e m b e r s o v e r for lunch or dinner, hosting l u n c h e o n s b e f o r e football g a m e s for 50 to 60 g u e s t s who a r e p a r e n t s of p l a y e r s or f r i e n d s of Hope, h a v i n g s e v e r a l s t u d e n t s o v e r for S u n d a y d i n n e r , inviting the s t u d e n t s from n e a r b y d o r m s and c o t t a g e s o v e r for an ice c r e a m social, h a v i n g people over for d i n n e r in the s u m m e r t i m e and then attending Hope's S u m m e r Repertory T h e a t r e plays, m e e t i n g visiting guests of v a r i o u s d e p a r t m e n t s for lunch or d i n n e r , and h o s t i n g the t r a d i t i o n a l C h r i s t m a s c o f f e e for all the e m p l o y e e s of Hope. Other a r e a s in which Dr. J a c o b s o n could be involved and will use h e r t a l e n t s include m a n y functions that she and her h u s b a n d will b e invited to a t t e n d , including f u n d r a i s e r s in G r a n d R a p i d s and K a l a m a z o o . Also, a s she helps t h e W o m e n ' s L e a g u e for Hope by a t t e n d i n g p l a n n i n g m e e t i n g s a n d h a v i n g a n open house t h e night b e f o r e a n d the day of the Village S q u a r e , D r . J a c o b s o n will be a b l e to s h o w the v i s i t o r s to H o p e t h e t r u l y g r a c i o u s and w a r m l a d y t h a t s h e is.

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February 4, 1987

Jacobson Selected President Action )y S a r a h E b e r h a r d — N e w s Editor On F r i d a y , J a n u a r y 30, at 11 a . m . a t a special convocation, )r. John Jacobson was i n t r o d u c e d to Hope College as its new p r e s i d e n t . A f t e r 15 m o n t h s of s e a r c h i n g , he P r e s i d e n t i a l Search Committee and the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s chose t h e m a n they )elieve will best s e r v e H o p e a s its tenth p r e s i d e n t . Dr. J a c o b s o n was s e l e c t e d b e c a u s e the B o a r d eels he best f i t s t h e s e v e n qualifications w h i c h they d e s i r e in a p r e s i d e n t . T h e q u a l i f i c a t i o n s are: 1) C o m m i t m e n t to t h e L o r d s h i p of J e s u s Christ 2) S t r o n g academic b a c k g r o u n d with an e a r n e d Ph.D. and a distinguished record 3) Ability to a d m i n i s t e r a

liberal a r t s college p r o g r a m in a c o n s i s t e n t w a y with e x p e r i e n c e being p r e f e r r e d 4) C o m m i t m e n t to a l i b e r a l a r t s e d u c a t i o n , e s p e c i a l l y the r o l e of a n u n d e r g r a d u a t e p r o g r a m in a C h r i s t i a n c o n t e x t 5) Ability to c o m m u n i c a t e e f f e c t i v e l y to a d i v e r s e constituency 6) Good g r a s p of f i n a n c e s and the ability to develop a n d maintain a strong financial base 7) Ability to lead and i n s p i r e others Dr. J a c o b s o n will b e l e a v i n g his position as p r o v o s t a n d vicep r e s i d e n t for a c a d e m i c a f f a i r s of E m p i r e S t a t e C o l l e g e in S a r a t o g a S p r i n g s , N . Y . to officially being as p r e s i d e n t on J u l y 1,1987. As p r e s i d e n t . D r . J a c o b s o n feels t h a t his g r e a t e s t c h a l l e n g e

will be identifying, a r t i c u l a t i n g , and c o m m u n i c a t i n g the mission of Hope in c o n j u n c t i o n with the d i v e r s i f i e d c o n s t i t u e n c i e s of Hope. He w a n t s to f r a m e a strategic planning process m a d e through dialogue with all those c o n n e c t e d to Hope. T h r o u g h this p r o c e s s , he w a n t s to develop the goals of his a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . T h e goals t h a t Dr. J a c o b s o n would like to s e e i m p l e m e n t e d are: 1) E x t e n s i o n of H o p e ' s reputation and fame even farther. 2) C a r e a b o u t s a l a r i e s and f i n a n c i a l a s p e c t . He w a n t s to i n c r e a s e the s a l a r i e s of f a c u l t y and s t a f f , m a i n t a i n s c h o l a r s h i p s for s t u d e n t s , a n d keep tuition down. 3) Clear t h e p e r s p e c t i v e of H o p e ' s mission. In o r d e r to develop a n d d e c i d e on the goals for the f u t u r e . Dr. J a c o b s o n s t r e s s e s t e a m building and t e a m work. H e b e l i e v e s t h a t t h e r e is an i m p o r t a n t p l a c e for Hope with its liberal a r t s e x c e l l e n c e in t h e context of the C h r i s t i a n faith a n d w a n t s to work t o g e t h e r with the students, faculty, a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , and other constituencies in continuing to m a k e Hope a f o r c e in our society.

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Dr. John Jacobsen

was named Hope's

10th Presidentlast

Friday.

Dr. J a c o b s o n w a n t s to get to know the s t u d e n t s of Hope since he c o n s i d e r s t h e i r input to his a d m i n i s t r a t i o n vital. He p l a n s on d i s c u s s i n g with P r e s i d e n t Van Wylen s o m e of his p l a n s on m e e t i n g s t u d e n t s to s e e w h a t would be the m o s t e f f e c t i v e . Both he and his wife would like to h a v e Hope known for t h e good c o m m u n i c a t i o n b e t w e e n the p r e s i d e n t and the s t u d e n t s . During the t r a n s i t i o n period in the next few m o n t h s . D r . Van Wylen has p r o m i s e d Dr. J a c o b s o n his full s u p p o r t , kiddingly a d d i n g that he would ' ' h a n d l e all the e a s y and p l e a s a n t situations in t h e next m o n t h s and defer problems for Dr. Jacobson."

Cap on tuition Increase Proposed by K a r l Ochs II At t h e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s m e e t i n g last T h u r s d a y night, the tuition i n c r e a s e w a s d i s c u s s e d . M a r k McDowell r e p o r t e d t h a t the p r o p o s e d i n c r e a s e would be 8.14 p e r c e n t . L a r r y W a g e n a a r h a s e x p r e s s e d his c o n c e r n on this m a t t e r to P r e s i d e n t Van Wylen. , In his l e t t e r which will be sent to the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s , L a r r y h a s p r o p o s e d a c a p on the tuition i n c r e a s e of 5 p e r c e n t . This could be possible t h r o u g h f u n d - r a i s i n g activities and by i n c r e a s i n g t h e s t u d e n t to f a c u l t y r a t i o f r o m 13.8 to 1, to 15 to 1.

T h e tuition i c r e a s e is to a d j u s t faculty salaries. Larry W a g e n a a r noted t h a t a l m o s t half of the o p e r a t i n g H o p e College b u d g e t is for f a c u l t y s a l a r i e s . He m e n t i o n e d t h a t the f a c u l t y a r e c u r r e n t l y at t h e b o t t o m e n d of the pay s c a l e ; t h e i r p a y r a n k s 21 out of 25 GLAC schools. A m o t i o n w a s m a d e to a m e n d t h e p a r i e t a l s s t a t e m e n t by r e t r a c t i n g the p a r a g r a p h which had set aside D y k s t r a and V o o r h e e s Halls as p l a c e s w h e r e the g u e s t h o u r s would r e m a i n t h e s a m e . T h e i n t e n t i o n of the

s t a t e m e n t w a s to give the s t u d e n t s a choice on w h a t the guest h o u r s should be. T h e motion failed, but the R e s i d e n t i a l Life C o m m i t t e e will m e e t T h u r s d a y to d i s c u s s t h e p r o p o s a l for c h a n g i n g t h e guest h o u r s . Bruce Brown reported that P r o v o s t N y e n h u i s h a s sent a l e t t e r to t h e f a c u l t y a b o u t revising the c o r e c u r r i c u l u m . T h e provost felt the need for a m a j o r review a n d for a r e q u i r e d s o p h o m o r e colloquium on l i b e r a l (lontinned on Page 8

Taken By Board Besides picking a new p r e s i d e n t , the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s a c t e d on s e v e r a l other m a t t e r s d u r i n g t h e i r m e e t i n g last w e e k . The B o a r d a p p r o v e d a 7.4 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in t u i t i o n , b r i n g i n g t h e cost up to $7,242, a c l i m b of $500 f r o m l a s t y e a r . T h e r e w a s also a 4.0 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in b o a r d ( f r o m $1,696 to $1,764) a n d a 4.1 p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e in r o o m (up to $1,270 f r o m $1,220). Overall, it will cost 6.4 p e r c e n t m o r e for s t u d e n t s to a t t e n d Hope next y e a r . (See " L e f t of C e n t e r " for c o m m e n t . ) T h e B o a r d also g a v e its O.K. to obtain a r c h i t e c t u r a l p l a n s a n d costs for the r e n o v a t i o n of Van Zoeren a n d the c o n s t u c t i o n of a c o n n e c t i n g link b e t w e e n Van Zoeren a n d V a n d e r Werf. The p r o j e c t , which is roughly e s t i m a t e d to cost $3 million ( m o n e y which still h a s to b e r a i s e d ) , will house C o m p u t e r Services, the A c a d e m i c S u p p o r t Center, a s well a s the e d u c a t i o n and sociology d e p a r t m e n t s . Additional c l a s s r o o m s a n d s p a c e for the p h y s i c s a n d m a t h d e p a r t m e n t s will also b e c r e a t e d . When asked about the u n a p p e a l i n g looks of t h e two buildings. P r e s i d e n t V a n Wylen s t a t e d t h a t " w e ' r e going to t r y and make the p r o j e c t architecturally pleasing without s p e n d i n g an u n d u e a m o u n t of money." In o t h e r c o n s t r u c t i o n n e w s , plans a r e still being finalized for a new a d m i s s i o n s building. Van Wylen said t h a t the t e n t a t i v e plan is to p u r c h a s e and m o v e the a p a r t m e n t building l o c a t e d on the c o r n e r of College a n d T e n t h and c o n s t u c t a new building on that location. T h e m o v i n g — p r o b a b l y to th^ e a s t e n d of S i b e r i a — a n d s u b s e q u e n t c o n s t r u c t i o n is e s t i m a t e d to cost $500,000 to $600,000.

It w a s found that m o v i n g and building s o m e t h i n g new w a s " m o r e economical" than renovating the e x i s t i n g a p a r t m e n t . T h e a p a r t m e n t s will p r o b a b l y continue to be r e n t e d to anyone i n t e r e s t e d since they a r e not c o n d u c i v e f o r s t u d e n t o c c u p a n c y d u e to t h e i r s m a l l size. With c o n s t r u c t i o n s l a t e d for this s u m m e r , the h o u s e s the a d m i s s i o n s staff is u s i n g p r e s e n t l y will p r o b a b l y b e ( r e ) t u r n e d to c o t t a g e s . Van Wylen also s a i d that the C a m p a i g n for Hope h a s topped $28.7 million a n d is still c l i m b i n g while t h e a n n u a l f u n d is 70 p e r c e n t to its goal of $1.67 million. T h e a n n u a l f u n d is used for o p e r a t i n g e x p e n s e s of t h e college.


Left of Center

What's Two Bucks?! Student Congress will meet soon to discuss (among other things) the recent proposal to raise the Student Activities fee. The proposed increase is approximately two dollars a year, up from $38 that each student currently pays. While no one likes to see things such as tution raises, inflation, or higher taxes, these increases are more often becoming necessary. Basically, they've become a fact of life. The main point, however, is, "Are these increases worthwhile?" The Anchor's view is a definite "yes". Anyone who attended Winter Fantasia, listens to WTHS or reads the Anchor, realizes how important this increase can be. While Winter Fantasia costs $32 a couple, the price would undoubtedly be much higher if not subsidized by funds from S.A.C. which directly is funded by the Student Activities fee. Likewise, the money raised by advertising at WTHS and the Anchor cannot solely support the transmission and publication costs of each respectively. The Student Activities fee provides much more than just what is mentioned above. Those three, S.A.C ($33,125), WTHS ($8,400), and the Anchor ($7,725) are just merely three of the four largest. Diverse organizations and activites such as the Black Coalition, Nykerk, Ski Club, Women's Week, May Day, Opus, Pull, and the Inklings are also funded by the same monetary fund. In order to provide these activities and organizations in times of inflation calls for an increase. One could go on and on about the increase costs of paper, or food, or other things, but we're sure you get the picture. Let's hope Congress makes the right decision and goes for the increase. Two bucks doesn't hurt anyone's pocket books as much as $500, the increase of tuition next year. Either way we'll end up paying for it. The old commercial goes, "You can pay me now, or you can pay me (more) later."

Inside the Beltway Platoon:

byDanStid In addition to creating a frenzy at the box office, Oliver Stone's Platoon is causing quite a political stir. The stunning account of an infantry platoon caught up in the maelstrom of Vietnam has drawn sharp criticism from observers who feel the film is anti-veteran and anti-American. That Mr. Stone served as a foot soldier in the war and emerged from it decorated for valor and twice wounded make such charges all the more interesting. Platoon is indeed gritty and uncompromising in its realism; however, veterans of the Vietnam War and the country which they served both stand to benefit from the m e s s a g e that the film so powerfully conveys. Much of the criticism stems from the graphic depictions of drug use, atrocities, incompetent leadership, and fratricidal violence on the part of American troops. Some feel that Platoon is merely an encapsulation of all the negative stereotypes that h a v e b e e n a p p l i e d to the i n f a n t r y m e n _ w h o fought in

Remembering

Vietnam. While such instances may not have been typical in all combat units, or even most, they did occur. Stone presents them in raw form neither to incriminate nor to imply that they were r o u t i n e , but r a t h e r to realistically portray the Vietnam experience as he suffered it. The p o r t r a y a l itself emphasizes what military psychologists have been saying for years: when confronted by the inhumanity of war, some men will resort to honor, others to vengeance, but most will wander in a nebulous void, wavering between courage and c o w a r d i c e , c o m p a s s i o n and brutality. In this respect the men who fought at l a Drang and Khe Sanh were no different than those w h o f o u g h t a t I n c h o n or Bastogne. Insofar as Vietnam veterans' r e a c t i o n s to c o m b a t w e r e different, causality can be found both in the nature of the war and in the political and social context in which America w a g e s it. Stone and his comrades fought an implacable e n e m y in wretched conditions under the auspices of an incomprehensible strategy, and they did so knowing that when they returned to America they would be welcomed by a government that w a n t e d to forget them and by a society that would shower them with spittle—not ticker tape. B y recording the natural reactions of men suddenly thrust into the midst of such an environment, Stone reveals soldiers who are

Hell

not inhuman but quintessentially human. This revelation allows Stone to poignantly illustrate the sheer inhumanity of war itself. A recent spate of war movies m a d e by the likes of Sylvester Stallone (who, interestingly enough, w a s teaching gymnastics to Swiss schoolgirls when he could have been serving in Southeast Asia) and others would lead one to believe that war is a terribly romantic activity, one closely associated with the highest r e a l i z a t i o n of A m e r i c a n manhood. Platoon establishes quickly and consistently that war is u l t i m a t e l y a b o u t d e a t h . Audiences learn that American soldiers can stop a bullet just like communists soldiers can, and when this happens they often die the s a m e writhing, pitiful deaths that h e r e t o f o r e h a v e b e e n reserved only for victims of Rambo. Vietnam has long been a festereing sore on the American psyche. Those who have sought to d i s p l a c e o u r s o c i e t y ' s collective responsibility for the war by condemning those who w e sent to fight it h a v e worsened the infection. So have those who continue to refight the Vietnam conflict in comic book fashion, trivializing the devastation inherent in war. By making Platoon, Oliver Stone has taken a brush and soap to this sore and s t a r t e d s c r u b b i n g . It is a heartwrenching process, but a wound must be cleansed before it can heal.

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Tuition a Small Victory

1 The tuition issue has been a topic that has been discussed for some time now. The Board of Trustees met last week and, a l t h o u g h e c l i p s e d by t h e confirmation and presentation of a new p r e s i d e n t , voted to increase tuition 7.4 percent instead of the 8.13 requested in Dr. Van Wylen's proposal. It is a small victory, one that reflects how the board felt about keeping the operating expenses of the new library out of the burden being asked of student this coming year. However, they did not agree with the letter presented to them by the student congress which requested an increase cap of 5 percent, more in line with the 1.8 percent inflation spiral. Overall, costs will go up in the neighborhood of 6.4 percent somewhat less than what w e all experienced last year (7.14 percent) although not r e f l e c t i n g r e a l i s t i c a l l y the growth of income of the current student. There appears to be derision on the board in respect to tuition, I don't think the student body need be fully convinced that every member of the board wants to

continue the high increases that have brought us where w e are. There are a l t e r n a t i v e s like looking at the fundraising for the operating budget or w a y s to adjust s o m e of the m a j o r expenses in the budget, hopefully progress on other solutions will be made as a result of the discussions in c o m m i t t e e and on the board last week. A new president will be installed next year, it m a y be a good time to express—early on in his tenure—the strain being put on the students now at Hope. He may have a sympathetic ear and look for ways to keep the rates in line with our ability to raise the needed funds. It's a pickle of a situation for any president, I can empathize with Dr. Van Wylen. It appears to me that if students are serious about keeping Hope tuition down they n e e d to v o i c e t h e m s e l v e s — a n d p r o v e that there is financial hardship going on. Before pointing the finger at large increases we need to see that our own house is in order. E x t r a v a g a n t e x p e n s e s and summers at the beach don't go over well when complaining about an increase in tuition. However, for most of us $500 will mean working an extra three weeks at our s u m m e r jobs, or loaning more money or maybe even dropping out of Hope for some other place. For m e it is graduate school—and it looks like it will be less expensive than where I am now. When you or your parents struggle with how to pay the bill n e x t s e m e s t e r it m a y be worthwhile to write a letter to the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n — e s p e c i a l l y if you're barely squeaking by. If no one talks...no one listens

|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiif Published weekly throughout the Hope College school year, except during exam periods and college vacations, and when nothing happens by and for the students of Hope College, Holland, Michigan, under the authority of the Student Communications Media Committee. Subscription price $12 per year (what a deal). Office located on the first level of the DeWitt Center, back in a corner of the Student Office A r e a . Hot tubs coming soon. Telephone 394-6578 The opinions on these pages are not necessarily those of the student body, faculty, or administration of Hope College. The Hope College Anchor Typists: Dotty St. Amand, Judy Belles Cartoonist Mike Kossen Copy Editor K.L. Harter Advertising Manager Jon Vander Velde Business Manager Katey Vierkorn Contributing Editor Larry Wagenaar, Amy Ellis, Dan Stid, Scott Carpenter, Theresa McPherson Production Manager Kathy Kar Photo Editor Paul Chamness Entertainment Editor Linda Ruiter Sports Editor Ben Hanneman News Editor Sarah Eberhard Associate Editor Brian Breen Court Jester ..'..Phil Tanis Editor-in-Chief Whitney Leigh POSTMASTER: Send address, changes to Hope College Anchor, Hope College. Holland, Ml USPS No. 542110.

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Funding for this activity is provided by the Student Activity Fee through the Student Congress Appropriations Comm'* tee. Are w e having fun yet?

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TiiO HOT s t o r y of the week is not that w e ' v e got a new p r e s i d e n t . It's not t h a t tuition h a s s u r g e d ahead for t h e 200th y e a r in a row. NO! We h a v e discovered the L I N G E R I E S E C R E T S of Mrs. ^ \ an Wylen!... YES! Can you believe it?... Well, actually, it w a s n ' t us.... It w a s the G r a n d R a p i d s P r e s s . . . BUT—it's N E W S nonetheless... When a s k e d " D o you h a v e any special s e c r e t s for keeping w a r m (iuring the w i n t e r ? " Mrs. Van Wylen replied: "I don't h a v e any secrets. J u s t LONG W I N T E R U N D E R W E A R , t h a t ' s all."...

6/q Brother

I can tell y o u ' r e thrilled with t h a t revelation. S n e a k y how the GR P r e s s discovered this with an indirect question... L e t ' s see. W a g e n a a r ' s t a k i n g c a r e of tuition and its inside, behind the s c e n e s s t o r y . . . D a n ' s j u m p e d on the hottest film of the y e a r (PLATOON, for those of you who a r e slow)...so w h a t does that leave m e with?.... Not much.... Can you see I ' m r e a c h i n g for stuff to write h e r e ? . . . O.K. O.K. I'll do it! F i r s t , go r e a d the article on J a c o b s o n . . .

Done? O.K. Did you recognize any similarities b e t w e e n w h a t he was s a y i n g about i n c r e a s i n g s a l a r i e s a n d s c h o l a r s h i p s while keeping tuition down a n d w h a t a certain p r o m i n e n t politician has said when a t t e m p t i n g to b a l a n c e his budget?... Need I mention I ' m r e f e r r i n g to Reagan? Yes? And his increasing defense spending while cutting taxes? Hmmmmmmm Any of you who w e r e n ' t "at the Women of the C a l a b a s h mis s ed THE event of the y e a r at Hope. As before, they w e r e stupendous,

of the game Daniel Stid H o p e College • 2nd Team Football • History/Political Science • 3.91 CPA • Senior • Hometown: Mason, Ml •

Tim Chase H o p e College • 1st Team Football • Chemistry* 3,80 CPA • Senior •

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Hometown: Howard City, Ml •

. / / /• . • • • • 4 . . '

••

They are the leaders of the team. But what makes them even more special is their outstanding academic records. They are the GTE Academic All-Americans, selected by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) for being high achievers-in the game as well as the classroom. GTE is proud to be the official sponsor of this 35-year-old program and congratulates these student-athletes on their Academic Ail-American achievements. v

GTE ACADEMIC ALL AMERICA TEAM E

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probably will be... W h a t ' s this I h e a r about a c e r t a i n a d m i n i s t r a t i o n official taking the pencil of the student who w a s hit by a c a r last week? Anybody got any details? The s t u d e n t is doing well, by the way, and m a y even be back this semester... Word from i n f o r m a n t No. 1 is that a new radio station is being planned in S a u g a t u c k . P l a n s call for the station to go on the air around late s u m m e r , e a r l y fall. Call n u m b e r s a r e proposed a s WEVS on f r e q u e n c y 92.7 FM... Well, t h a t ' s about it for this week. P L E A S E , send m e your gossip, news, and a n y t h i n g else you w a n t a s long a s it isn't too gross.... I m a y know e v e r y t h i n g , but I ' m not going to w r i t e it unless you tell me....

smccHus on Campus

by H e a t h e r J a c o b Do you r e m e m b e r the Alcohol A w a r e n e s s Week we h a d on c a m p u s in the F a l l ? How about those g r e a t , " T h i s B.U.D.'s F o r Y o u , " b u t t o n s ? ! M a y b e you r e m e m b e r those i n f o r m a t i o n t a b l e s outside of P h e l p s t h a t w e r e m a n n e d buy w o m e n ? Or p e r h a p s , hopefully, the keynote s p e a k e r , Ron Gaetano, w a s the one to c h a l l a n g e your decisions to drink or not. W h a t e v e r it w a s t h a t you r e m e m b e r about A. A. week, BACCHUS hopes it m a d e it to long-term m e m o r y ! BACCHUS, which m e a n s Boost Alcohol Consciousness C o n c e r n i n g t h e H e a l t h of University Students, is a national organization, with a c h a p t e r e s t a b l i s h e d h e r e on H o p e ' s c a m p u s . T h e p u r p o s e of B A C C H U S i s to p r o m o t e responsible drinking decisions by college and university students. B A C C H U S ' g o a l s a r e to e n c o u r a g e responsible drinking behavior within the c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y ; work to alleviate p r o b l e m s of alcohol a b u s e on c a m p u s ; e d u c a t e and inform students, faculty, a d m i n i s t r a t o r s and staff about alcohol use and a b u s e ; facilitate alcohol related r e s e a r c h ; i n c r e a s e a w a r e n e s s of healthy a l t e r n a t i v e s to alcohol a b u s e , and e n h a n c e c o m m u n i c a t i o n within the c o m m u n i t y r e g a r d i n g alcohol 1

related matters. The BACCHUS philosophy: -Keep in mind t h a t drinking should not be the p r i m a r y focus of any activity. -Recognize a n o t h e r ' s rights to drink or not to drink. -Avoid e n c o u r a g i n g or reinforcing irresponsible behavior. - R e m e m b e r t h a t the right to drink is limited by society through laws governing drinking and driving, the m i n i m u m drinking age, etc., a n d r e s p e c t these laws. BACCHUS m e m b e r s h a v e j o i n e d t o g e t h e r to p r o m o t e responsible decisions about t h e use a n d nonuse of alcohol a m o n g themselves, their friends, a n d their college c o m m u n i t y . If you b e l i e v e in t h e B A C C H U S philosophy and would like to t a k e an active p a r t in seeing to it t h a t their goals a r e achieved, b e c o m e a m e m b e r ! A membership drive is getting u n d e r w a y this v e r y m o m e n t — even a s you r e a d ! You will be r e c e i v i n g a m e m b e r s h i p c a r d in y o u r mailbox. If you believe in t h e philosophy p r i n t e d on the c a r d , sign it and send it to the BACCHUS p r e s i d e n t , J e n n y Phelps. BACCHUS believes in Hope s t u d e n t s ; show you believe too — support this new, s t u d e n t organization. T h a n k s !

From the Prez

Congratulations to the GTE Academic All-Americans.®

S

w o n d e r f u l , f a n t a s t i c , and incredible.... AND YOU MISSED IT! HA!... How DID W o m e n ' s Week go in g e n e r a l ? S e e m s to m e t h a t the typical and traditional Hope student a p a t h y set in. But for those who a t t e n d e d any of the events, I ' m s u r e t h e y ' r e m u c h enlightened... The story behind the lack of p e r s o n a l s - c l a s s i f i e d s in t h e a n c h o r : they either h a v e n ' t gotten typed or h a v e n ' t fit. Anchor policy is that t h e y ' r e not as i m p o r t a n t a s m e so they get cut first.... I get cut second... However, they will get printed eventually... One lucky Anchor staff person m i g h t be h e a d e d for New York City in M a r c h . However, the trip is t e r m e d business and d u e to the fact hp—^hp will he going alone it

C o S I D A Kalf'"' Jind

To the E d i t o r : Most of us, if not all, will a g r e e t h a t the conduct of s o m e of the fans, p l a y e r s and coaches at the r e c e n t Calvin-Hope b a s k e t b a l l g a m e w a s not becoming to either college. While there is some profit in looking back to see how things might h a v e been handled better, the i m p o r t a n t thing for us at Hope is to plan now to m a k e the next Calvin-Hope g a m e , which we will host at the Civic Center on Feb. 21, an occasion of which we can all be proud. Those in our Hope c o m m u n i t y who h a v e

special responsibilities for t h i s event a r e a l r e a d y working to provide the l e a d e r s h i p to m a k e this happen. I u r g e all of us, individually and in w h a t e v e r g r o u p s we a r e m e m b e r s , to p r e p a r e now to d e m o n s t r a t e in all our r e m a i n i n g g a m e s , and p a r t i c u l a r l y at the Calvin g a m e , t h e s p o r t s m a n s h i p and courtesy which h a v e m a r k e d our f a n s and our athletic p r o g r a m s over the y a r s . With the cooperation of all of us, this will certainly h a p p e n . Gordon J . Van Wylen


Page 4

Lambert Responds

by David L a m b e r t Last week, Mr. Harry Coffill criticized m y ability as a critic. Mr. Coffill w a s absolutely right. Criticism is not m y strongest point. He w a s correct in s a y i n g that a subject should be v i e w e d and researched from all angles before one criticizes it. Unfortunately, c r i t i c i s m is subjective. This is because the audience and the critic do not s e e the work that goes into the film, only the finished product. It doesn't m a t t e r how much m o n e y and effort went into m a k i n g Heaven's Gate if it w a s a lousy movie. Since I, and most other critics had no idea what Frank Oz's objectives were in the making of Little Shop of Horrors, w e can only critique the result. For me, the result of Mr. Oz's labor w a s a wonderfully klunky movie. As I said in the review, everything and everybody in the movie looked fake, but for s o m e reason it worked. In other words, I LOVED LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS! Though I did not use these p r e c i s e words, I did sprinkle praise for the m o v i e throughout the review. I said that the actor's p e r f o r m a n c e s w e r e fantastic, that it w a s a well p a c e d comedy, that it had a great sountrack, and that I liked s e e i n g it the second time better than the first. The fact that many people thought the review w a s n e g a t i v e was due m o r e to time constraints than anything else. I wrote the review on a Sunday afternoon in two hours or less. My reason for writing it w a s basically to fill space in The Anchor, b e c a u s e Whitney told m e they needed material badly. Therefore, it could be e x p e c t e d that the result

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would not be the Mona Lisa of movie reviewing. Similar constraints were at work in the Inklings article which contained the review of Cotton P a t c h Gospel. I wrote the article b e c a u s e it w a s time for m e to write one. I had nothing pressing on my mind to write about, so I wrote (ironically,) about p e o p l e ' s t e n d e n c y to diminish other people's e n j o y m e n t of e x p e r i e n c e s through critiquing the hell out of what another person enjoyed. I thought that Cotton Patch Gospel w a s a perfect e x a m p l e of this. I had seen the show OffBroadway, and thus had some idea of what the playwright's intent had been. The play w a s written a s an intimate one man show, with a little help from on s t a g e m u s i c i a n s . To be absolutely fair to the theater department, the roles of the man and musicians w e r e far too demanding for anyone likely to be alive on this campus. The man who p l a y e d the role OffB r o a d w a y w a s s o a k e d with s w e a t b y the e n d of the performance. The lead role is p r o b a b l y one of the m o s t physically demanding roles in theater. For this reason, the theater department decided to split the lead role into m a n y parts. The result of this decision w a s that it l i m i t e d t h e p o w e r of t h e production. When the production is done a s a one m a n show, this power is just incredible. When the part is broken up, no actor has much chance at building up a full head of steam in just a few lines. As for the set, it reflected the

theater department's usual razzle-dazzle, knock 'em off their seats with color approach. This approach has worked in the past, but it failed in a show that should have a set that looks more like something out of Hee-Haw than something off of T i m e s Square. The end result w a s panned by one of m y profs a s being "neither southern, nor gospel." However, for a person who had not seen the play before, the show w a s just fine. The point that I w a s making in m y article w a s that I w a s e a g e r to criticize Cotten P a t c h becaust I wanted to look sophisticated, not for aestetic reasons. In f a i r n e s s to t h e t h e a t e r department, I liked The Fantasticks better on Hope's stage than I did in New York. I h a v e also enjoyed The Shadow Box, No Exit, and Bus Stop. All of the above is in answer to a letter which probably did not deserve an answer. The reason is that while Mr. Coffill chastised m e for not knowing enough about that which I critiqued, he did not read the articles which he wrote about carefully before he wrote his letter. If he had, he would h a v e read past m y criticisms of Little Shop to discover that I really liked it. He would have discovered that the t h e m e of the Inklings article w a s that overcriticism is not a good idea. Finally, he would h a v e noticed that the Anchor article he praised (The Case For A Christian P e r s p e c t i v e , ) w a s semi-incoherent due to a layout mistake which s c r a m b l e d the paragraphs. The editorial w a s supposed to read a s it will if you read the f i r s t ' p a r a g r a p h ,

TheOtherSide of Prejudice To the Editor: To David Lambert and all prejudiced persons at Hope C o l l e g e , whether white, black or otherwise. I can only start by saying, "I love you/' First as h u m a n b e i n g s and secondly just because you are. I have no man to thank for my feelings and for my u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h o s e feelings but I do thank an all knowing and all loving God. When I was a little girl my father joined the U.S. Army and our large family went from the f a m i l i a r suuuoundings of an all black n e i g h b o r h o o d (not the g h e t t o ) , to a m i x e d community on a military base. All of a sudden the — — followed by p a r t a g r a p h s 5 , 4 , 6 , 3 , 2 7 an c 8 'I ' J l ;.

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In addition to admission to the ranks of hypocrites, (join the rest of us, Mr. Coffill,) Mr. Coffill s letter betrayed him a s a m e m b e r of the ranks of writers. A few people who mentioned the letter to m e said that the letter showed considerable writing talent. I agree, and would suggest that

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'white people" I'd o n l y known from a distance w o r e now sitting beside m e in school, sharing g y m lockers with me and and of all thim s eating their meals at {lie same table in t h e school cafeteria. Even m y girl scout troop was integrated. We r e talking the early 50s here if you're wondering w h a t w a s so unusual about it. As kids, b l a c k s and w h i t e s , w e adjusted quite well and w e really didn't care w h a t the rest of the world w a s doin,^ We were having fun. Y o u r a r t i c l e , in th( Inklings, stirred t h e sarn» compassion in my h e a r t that i felt when one of our nev neighbors, a young w h i t e g i r f r o m G e o r g i a , c a m e knockW at the door of my p a r e n t home to say that the babv ( s h e W a S expecting) w a s coming and would they tak*1 her to the hospital. p She'didn own a car but it my m o m and dad had assured the young couple that when t h e t i m e came they would be t h e r e fo them. My dad went to the young man's unit to h a v e him excus e d from duty in t h e fieir a n d

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lanpnapp f^r nf spital. I am the oldest o ' nguage for purposes of 0i0Yen children s o t h i s publication. I would be just as n o t new to me As I sa in thr happy is only m y best writings

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Continued on " a g e 5

What one thing would you like to see the new President do for Hope?

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J a n i c e Brown: I hope that the president will appropriate funds f o r w o m e n ' s s t u d i e s . In p a r t i c u l a r , I'd like to s e e w o m e n ' s i s s u e s integrated into the present curriculum.

Dr. E a r l Curry: I would hope that he would get together with faculty to enliven and enrich the intellectual life of the c a m p u s . The e m p h a s i s of the last few years has been towards a conformity that I would like to s e e Hope shed—to tend toward a m o r e intellectual and cultural diversity. Second, I'd like to s e e him get (the faculty) m u c h m o r e money.

P a u l ' T m a talker not a doer" Roe: I hope that the president cuts the d e f e n s e budget and s e e k s funds to e n s u r e the s u c c e s s of Hope's Barbell Clubs...

Steve Stroessner: I would hope that the new president will continue to build the quality and reputation of Hope's a c a d e m i c s .


P a g e 5= Continued from Page 4

and she was afraid because this was her first babv. This was a real human being. Long before anyone told me black folks and white folks were suppose to hate each other I'd been taught to love. I, Some years later, in the 60s, R? as a young army wife myself I was waiting for the return of my husband from Vietnam. I purchased a mobile home for myself and three pre-school c h i l d r e n in C o l u m b u s , Georgia. I learned after buying the home there were no black trailer parks in that Georgia town. I parked that home in an all white trailer park and was honored with a burning cross at the entrance 1J of that park. I was terrified and suffered a nervous 'T! breakdown. We had had no previous, trouble with the residence of the park and my If children played together and swam together in the pool there. But this was during a time when acid was being ,

poured into pools at some white motels if black people were allowed to check in. My husband was sent home on an emergency leave of absence from the war and it was nine years before I stopped havin nightmares. Still, I canno give in to hate. Twenty years have passed and seven years ago I suffered a greater hurt in my life than the Ku Klux Klan had accomplished. Ironically this was done by a black, and I was given a helping hand in recovering by a community of all whites where I was the only black living there. What a switch, huh? We are funny creatures. I don't know you from Adam but you sound like a hurting human being, who walks, talks, and feels pain just as I am capable of feeling. I really don't care that you are predjudiced except that it may hurt you and not me in the long run. I have a lust for life that starts my day and

BLOOM COUNTY T /mo, MAR FUJM.

HI. FMEMM HOW W SftlP wv NewjtewMK UeTOM?'

when I pass students on campus I speak and past that energy alone if they don't speak back I haven't lost a thing. Know one makes or breaks my day. If you are sincere about wanting to work at solutions to grow out of your prejudice then as a non-traditional student I feel just as responsible in helping meet your needs culturally as the administration of Hope College should feel. I am r e a d y to i n s p i r e a n d encourage you and any student here who has a desire to lam about and experience my culture. As future leaders in society you don't need to take your predjudice with you. My home is open to any and all Hope college students. You don't have to go to New York to "rap." I have students who come for some good old home cooking and I nave two sons, 12 and 13 who will give you an intellectual challenge. The only fighting they do is on our home

by Berke Breathed

WUi, inrtisikpflmi MUNNO... M CALUNG IT 'smi somm IN en/e: me Aim'

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mftTW m wm * THe Htmsm. HONEST OPINION:'. ITHftS PBSTKOVEP sentRneN -THAN I.

computer, at which they enjoy beating anyone older than they are. We don't ALL live in the ghetto. Welkom to Holland. Yes, when in Rome I do as the roman's do. This is my home now. When I l i v e d in Germany I danced a decent Polka, for three years, while in England I stopped for two o'clock tea for three more years. I stayed up all night in the citv ligl city of lights", and sat on tthe floor in Japan. When in Jap; Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee and the Carolinas I could ask, "Ya'll to come and see us," just like the rest of the natives. Have someone point me out to you on campus and walk up and say, hello." I am loved by the greatest love the world has ever known and I can risk loving you. And please forgive me for saying this but h o n e y . I ' m b l a c k and I wouldn't be dumb enough to walk through a ghetto.

Commenting an the Computers To the editor: I would like to m a k e comment on Computer Service's plan to use microcomputers more extensively on campus. We have had 5 IBM terminals for about a y e a r now, but for the las s e m e s t e r 2 have been broken leaving 3 working terminals. A this rate of failure, w e will no even have a working microcomputer three y e a r s from now. As for the Zenith computers, there are complaints, such as the fact tha t h e y h a v e no g r a p h i c capabilities (Hope decided to s a v e money by not includin graphics boards), that all eigh Zeniths are connected to a single printer (again to s a v e money but also so students can w a s t e time loading paper), and that the fan in a Zenith is loud enough to resemble a small jet engine While I can s e e the need fo micros to run certain program (such a s Lotus), the equipmen w e have and the s e r v i c e that ha been provided with it show tha any switch to micros will save money in the short run at the expense of future repair c o s t and future lack of quality. Hope is a quality school; let us try tc maintain quality computing a well.

Respectfully submitted, Carol Johnson

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&

George Schutt

COBBLESTONE CRAFTS & HOBBIES BROWNSTONE ALLEY 396-3029

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Page 6

•1 • I •

PROGRAM GUIDE

WTHS flADVQ

SUNDAY

MONDAY NEW WAVE OMLETTE JENNI GUNN

18

IG TIME MIKE WILL 112

1

THE FIKSE BROS PART II

R

HANDFUL OF JAZZ STUART SHARP

5

REV. FINSTERS NEW MUSIC BANDWAON JON HOP P

I

R/P

YA CAN'T BOWL THERE COFFILL OR ECKERT R

GOOD CLEAD SHELLY KR/ LISA BERGI

MONTAGE WOODY PUSHTWANGER

CHEEZ WHIZ LAURA PERMESANG

PHILLER PHIL TANI

DISGUSTINGLY FOLKED UP DAVE LAMBERT F

MOUNTAIN MUSIC DAVE GIBSON JON RIEKSE

BLUE ESCAI PAUL SEARI

FROM GENESIS TO REVELATION PETE MYERS

THE PLAYBOY CLUB ERNIE BLEUER

POWER LIGF DAVE LAMBI

R/P

'^HE FIKSE BROTHERS PAUL FIKSE JONATHON FIKSE P

THE TRILATERAL COMM. STEVE STROESSNER PHIL TANIS R/P

INDUSTRIAI -AMY COOK

WAKE UP! HOPE COLLEGE BRIAN BARTLES MICHEAL RAY R

R/P

THE NEXT SHOW DAVE KINGMA MIKE GIBSON

SOCIAL LOAFING DAVE MOLDAL BECKY CARR

8 EAT AT PHELPS CUZ

WONDERFUL WORLD OF DIZZY LINDQUIST & JOSEPH

WED

TUESDAY

8

11

FREE NELSON MANDELA C. FORREST HOOVER P/R b

R

R/P

PERVATING ATTITUDES KIM KINGSCOTT KIRSTEN BESONSON P

FUTURE PILLOW LIZARDS ROBERT VAN RENTERGHEM SCOTT SKIPWORTH P

HUMPDAY HA STAGEY WIL LAURA SKIN

RAMONES DEN RAMONE GARCIA

IMMORAL MINORITY KAREN BRAKE KELLY ROWLAND

P

SMUT PEDDL JON HOP BRYAN EYTC

DADDY, TELL ME ABOU' YfiUR REGGAE DAN "'O'NEILL RG

INCREDULOUS BLUES DEREK EMERSON B

HOMEBOYS JIM MICHOS CAL WARREN

NO POP AND PROUD BRIAN HAUGER RON KRAGT

WE'LL GET THERE WHEN WE GET THERE G & WEANO P

LET'S PART STYLE BILL TRIP?

THE JUNGLE LARRY SHOW MARK "E. LARSON P

HOLLOWEEN WILLIAMAEROTIC PQK

R

DEAD AIR CANADA HOUSE O/P


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B- BLUES

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HEAVY

C- COUNTRY

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JAZZ

CH- C H R I S T I A N

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CL- C L A S S I C A L

P-PROGRESSIVE

METAL

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ROCK&ROLL REGGAE

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E5DAY I THURSDAY POISE

FUN WITH 12" TERRY AYRAULT KIRK HILBELINK

IFUN ;E 1EYER R/0

SNOW BUNNIES MELISSA TENHAVE R/DI BRENDA HOFFMAN

THE EAST SIDE TOM ..AVOILIO R

BONUS BRUNCH DON KENT R/P I CLAUDINE WAGENAAR

B

FWDAY

ANOTHER TIME ANOTHER PLACE 0/ P/Crf HARKIN & VANDERVEEN

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BEHIND THE WALL OF SLEEP BOB WUERFUL R/P

VIDA LATINA CLAUDIA RUE YOLANDA DECEON

RHYTHM CONNECTION PHIL O'BRIEN

PSYCHEDIC BRUNCH MICHELLE VANDER VELDE R/0 SARAH JONES

P

MASTERPIECE THEATRE BRYAN EYTCHESON TIM KLEYLA CL

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Calabash Captivating; Highlights Women's Week by Julie Cataldo From their opening number, the Women of the Calabash c a p t i v a t e d the a u d i e n c e ' s attention Friday night in DeWitt T h e a t e r . Wearing big print cotton outfits presumably worn in the African culture, the four women entered the s t a g e singing and chanting. Following this, they sang to the audience 44I don't know why you c o m e here" and laughter rippled through the theater. The women of the Calabash featured a variety of songs and instrumental pieces native to countries in Africa. Almost every song held a story behind it. One from Angola, Zair is sung by women at festival time. The audience was told to "feel the party spirit" as it gradually would sneak upon them. All songs w e r e accompanied by natural instruments from the respective countries. Clapping two "bamboo stamping tubes" (from Ghana) together, a lively rhythmic piece c a m e forth. The women explained their main instrument, the calabash, was found in West Africa and was similar to the gourd. After it was hollowed out and dried, a net

of beads w a s placed on the outside. As it w a s patted while held against the s t o m a c h or tossed into the air, the beads created a soft beat. Though e x c i t e m e n t from the audience filled the theater during the entire concert, one of the last pieces, featuring the calabash, was the audience's favorite. Each of the four w o m e n had a turn at an individual rhythm d e m o n s t r a t i o n w h i l e the remaining three d r u m m e d a steady beat. As the soloist tossed the calabash into the air and behind her back, she oohed and a a h e d her a u d i e n c e and rightfully won their enthusiastic applause The audience's enjoyment was obvious throughout the concert. Sitting passively w a s not their style, for the entire audience participated in one w a y or another. While adults s w a y e d their heads to the beat, kids jumped and danced in the aisles. Not surprisingly, the Women of the Calabash w e r e asked back on stage for an encore. Indeed, for two hours African culture w a s brought to Hope—and offered their appreciation in return.

Continued f r o m Page 11 arts a p p r e c i a t i o n . The colloquium is to inform students about the liberal arts. This issue w a s debated for .several minutes. Student Congress m e m b e r s felt that s o m e c l a s s e s could be dropped from the core curriculum, and ' that there should be an option of making the additional course a core elective.

Larry Wagenaar reported that President Van Wylen has sent a m e m o to the faculty concerning the sexual h a r a s s m e n t policy. He r e c o m m e n d e d that a similar m e m o be sent to all students to make them a w a r e of the policy and its guidelines. The Student Congress has approved a motion to send L a r r y ' s r e q u e s t to President Van Wylen.

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Attitudes stereotype pregnancy; stifle women from being themselves... The images w e perceive are as varied and uniquely different as w e are. They combine to form the fabric of public opinion and social climate of our day, and have strong effects on all of us as individuals. For a pregnant woman, today's popular opinions sometimes have a demoralizing influence. She is commonly identified with an interrupted schooling or career, broken dreams, or a restricted lifestyle; and too often afforded more pity than the acknowledgment — of uniqueness and worth we all need as individuals. Though pity may be well intentioned, this lack of acknowledgment causes the expectant mother to be viewed more as a 'social problem' than a person, and a myopic resentment grows for her and her child Today's children too easily invoke thoughts of'unwanted', abused, underprivileged, or inconvenient 'problems' as well, and suffer the same subtle, far-reaching effects of not being recognized as contributing members of ^ur society. We at BIRTHRIGHT . emphasize that expectant mothers are "people" in the most dynamic sense. They are engaged in a real assertion of themselves; of the value of our humanity and of their ability to love and care for the new life within them. They do not need our pity, but rather our support and respect... sometimes our help. It takes involvement this way; as does iife itself. If you're pregnant and worried, give us a call... We listen. We help. We Care About You. Free pregnancy

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Platoon: A review by Scott Carpenter With the r e c e n t s p a t e of Rambo-like m o v i e s , e a c h attempting to white-wash our collective m e m o r y of a w a r w e would rather f o r g e t , c o m e s Oliver Stone's PLATOON w h i c h in cinematic brilliance de pi c t s the pain, the death, the hell of the reality that w a s the V i e t n a m war. No film h a s a f f e c t e d m e more. Set in 1968, Stone, who h i m s e l f served in Vietnam and w h o s e personal e x p e r i e n c e s m a k e up a large part of the f i l m ' s script, m a n a g e s to capture both the brotherhood and betrayal w h i c h was born in a w a r that no one understood, least of all those w h o fought and died in it. In brief, (and without giving anything away) PLATOON recounts the story of Chris Taylor (Charlie Sheen), a naive, idealistic college drop-out, who from the day he enters "the N a m " to the day he leaves, a t t e m p t s to r e c o n c i l e the c o r r e s p o n d i n g i m p u l s e s for b r u t a l i t y a n d compassion that a r i s e within h i m as he confronts the hell that s u r r o u n d s him. Stone p e r s o n i f i e s both impulses in two s e r g e a n t s . Sergeant Barnes, (Tom Berenger) the psychotic, soulless representation of a m a n w h o r e a c t s to a inhuman situation with a total lack of h u m a n i t y , and in the m e s s i a n i c S e r g e a n t Elias, (Willem D e F o e ) w h o w h i l e under the s a m e strain m a i n t a i n s an animalistic, c o m p a s s i o n a t e manner. The two, w h o s e performances a r e outstanding, act as Chris's w a r t i m e f a t h e r s and in Chris's words, w a g e " a battle for m y soul." The fundamental question that the film s e e m s to ask is w h o w i n s

HOPE ^ COLLEGE

that battle. The answer: s e e the movie, look d e e p inside yourself, and decide. T h e a r t i s t i c b r i l l i a n c e of PLATOON is to be found within its realism, and although Chris in his lefters to his Grandmother s e r v e s a s narrator his words s e e m wasted a s they add little to the cinematography which has already e x p r e s s e d what no words could. Death b e c o m e s especially tangible a s Stone c r e a t e s in the viewer a tenseness, a dread that can be seen in e v e r y face that has been thrown up onto the screen. The d i s t a n c e b e t w e e n the v i e w e r a n d the c h a r a c t e r s increasingly diminishes to the point that one can feel the heat a s well a s the emotion which burns within and about the characters. The experience l e a v e s the viewer emotionally spent; leaving i m a g e s and ideas that will be hard to repress. P e r h a p s that is Stone's goal: to allow the viewer to experience a splinter of the horror that is war. It is the actors who portray the men who had to live that the horror that m a k e s PLATOON so different from other m o v i e s m a d e about Vietnam. In F r a n c i s Ford Coppola's APOCALYPSE NOW, for i n s t a n c e , the characters s e e m e d surrealistic, almost incomprehensible. In PLATOON, however, a cast of c o m p a r a b l y unknown a c t o r s m a n a g e s to recreate the tension that occured when a cross section of our society w a s thrown t o g e t h e r to f i g h t a w a r . Startlingly realistic, the actors capture e v e r y sentiment, or in certain c a s e s the lack thereof, m a k e them palpable and, for perhaps the first time.

A

Great* Performance Series 1986-1987

Grand Rapids Symphony and

Symphonic Choir Anton Armstrong, conductor

understandable. The r a c i s m felt by the blacks; the hatred which contributes to the p l a t o o n ' s division; the brotherhood that evolves with a puff of hashish; the bloodlust and the desire to e s c a p e reality- each indicates realistic, individual human responses to unique personal perceptions of what w a r w a s about. No other war m o v i e I've seen h a s e v e r s u c c e e d e d at creating this level of r e a l i s m ; so personal, so up close. However, if r e a l i s m is PLATOON'S strong point m a n y would say that it is also its weakness. Having been criticized for displaying too many of the negative s t e r e o t y p e s of soldiers in Vietnam, the film had been said to have taken all that w a s bad in Vietnam and included it in one f i l m . In o b j e c t i n g to this a s p e c t , * however, critics m a k e the mistake of believing that Stone a s s u m e s his m o v i e to be the definitive account of the war. It is not; it is solely his reflections on it. Yet, PLATOON h a s started the catharsis that our collective experience and responsibility warrants. In fact, perhaps now that Stone h a s m a d e V i e t n a m a subject for serious exploration the p r o c e s s for true healing can begin. Whatever PLATOON'S political implications (and I believe that Stone has transcended politics), it is a phenomenal film that e v e r y o n e should see, especially those of u s at Hope who r e m a i n c o m f o r t a b l e in our cloistered, s e c u r e way of life, indifferent to the realities that others a r e living and h a v e lived. I d e o l o g y or p h i l o s o p h y notwithstanding this film will penetrate a part of the v i e w e r conceivably never touched before, and there is m o r e than a chance that we too will be scarred a s a result of our vicarious experience in a w a r that ended when most of us w e r e under ten y e a r s old. The scars, however, need not go to waste. As PLATOON ended, my first response w a s to w e e p ; my second, to celebrate the life and the youth that are mine.Both r e s p o n s e s a c k n o w l e d g e the power and effect of Oliver Stone's PLATOON. The m e s s a g e of PLATOON, like the Vietnam War itself, should not be forgotten...

New Play Opening Soon The c a s t of c h a r a c t e r s for Hope's upcoming theatre production, based on the play Hamlet from a bewildered viewpoint, features a c o l l e g e professor and s e v e r a l Hope theatre student veterans. Rosencrantz and Guildenstein Are Dead, a c o m e d y by Tom Stoppard, will be presented Feb. 20-21 and F e b . 25-28 at 8 p . m . in the DeWitt Center Theatre. F r o l i c i n g triviality and confusion a w a i t Rosencrantz and Guildenstein as they blunder their way through S h a k e s p e a r e ' s tragedy, Hamlet. Stoppard e x a m i n e s t h e p u r p o s e of Rosencrantz and Guildenstein at King Claudius' court in a darkly c o m i c light. Directing the production is John K.V. T a m m i , director of theatre. Assisting T a m m i is

visiting Yugoslavian professor Nlckola Kolljevlc a s dramaturge and Srdjln Kolljevlc a s assistant to the director. The play's c a s t Includes T o m Sorenson a s Rosencrantz, B. Weller a s Guildenstein, professor Jack Rldl a s The Player, J i m Kuiper a s Fortlnbeas, Scott Manclnelll and Chip Duford a s the T r a g e d i a n s , Michael Chapman a s the d r u m m e r , P a u l Nicholas a s Hamlet, Rlchele Krause as Ophelia, Scott B u h r m a s t e r a s Claudius, Debbie Schnaldt a s Gertrude, David Ropa as Horatio, and Trlsha Westing and Christine Phillips a s the L a d l e s In Waiting. Tickets for the play will go on sale Friday, Feb.6 In the ticket office b e t w e e n 10-5. Cost Is $5 for adults, $4 for Senior Citizens, and $3 for students.

Dead Milkmen Coming by L i n d a R u i t e r — Entertainment Editor "In the suburbs when I w a s a kid, m i l k m e n b e c a m e extinct," recalled Philadelphia native Joe Jack T a l c u m , one of the four musicians who collectively call themselves Dead Milkmen. "They just disappeared and, for s o m e s t r a n g e reason, I've never been able to forget that." Phllly's D e a d Milkmen, who will perform at the Holland Theatre Monday, m a y deliver quarts of clean, hardcore humor, but d r u m m e r D e a n Clean (not his real n a m e ) considers the band as " s i m p l y a pop group with a bad attitude." The band's debut album "Big Lizard in m v B a c k y a r d " was quite a spool on A m e r i c a n pop culture. P e r h a p s the q u a r t e t ' s hit "Bitchin' C a m e r o , " a s o n g of adolescence, irresponsibility and life at the beach, is most familiar. Less f a m i l i a r but equally amusing is a song such as 4t L a u n d r o m a t S o n g " about falling in love in a laundromat ("My m i n d grows dirty a s my clothes get clean.")

T h e band—which also Includes Rodney A n o n y m o u s on vocals, and D a v e Blood on bass—writes Its songs collectively and brings a n u m b e r of Influences to Its music. Their s e c o n d album " E a t Ydur P a i s l e y , " Is m o r e focused on the 60s, a p p a r e n t l y t h e i r l e a s t favorite era. The song "The Thing That Only E a t s Hippies" recounts how "It ate Stills and N a s h before they could shout-' Then It c h e w e d on David CrosbyBut It spit him out." Other songs Include " B e a c h P a r t y V i e t n a m " about "cookln' hot dogs with n a p a l m , " and Air Crash Museum, about putting the r e m a i n s of Ricky Nelson, Buddy Holly et al. on display. The D e a d Milkmen are m u s i c a l l y m o r e a mixture of funk and rock than punk. So, If you are willing to risk a few d o l l a r s on a group y o u ' v e probably n e v e r heard before, or you've been curious about "punk," this Is the concert to s e e . Tickets are $6.50 and available at the WTHS station and B e l i e v e in Music. Concert starts at 8 p . m .

present

Mendelssohn's

ELIJAH Monday, February 9 Eight O'clock Dimnent Memorial Chapel 12th Street & College Avenue Holland, Michigan

Adults $7

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All seats general admission Senior Citizens $6 Students $3

Tickets may be purchased in advance from Hope C 0 ' 1 ®^ 0 ^ of Public Relations. DeWitt Center or reserved bycaUmg 3%69%. Tickets will be held until 15 minutes before performance.

by Berke Breathed

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Black Contributions to Our SoCiŠty

A Series coordinated w i t h

the Office of Multi-Cultural Affairs In World War II, England suffered heavy casualties and called upon Dr. Drew to initiate its military blood bank program. It was there that he introduced preserved blood plasma on the battlefield. This system worked so well that the British asked him to organize the world's first m a s s blood bank project. Dr. Drew also became the first Director of the American Red Cross Blood Bank. During the 1940s, Dr. Drew received scores of awards and honors, and was recognized as one of the world's leading physicians. In 1941, Dr. Drew resigned his position after the War Department sent out a directive stating that blood taken from white donors should not be mixed with that of black donors. This issue caused widespread controversy. Drew called the order a "stupid blunder." He further stated that "the blood of individual human beings may differ by blood groupings, but there is absolutely no scientific basis to indicate any difference in human blood from race to race." He returned to Howard University to teach surgery at its medical school. Dr. Drew was killed in an automobile accident while on a trip to a medical meeting at Tuskegee Institute in 1950. The tragedy of his death is that his life may have been saved if he had received immediate medical attention following the accident. Due to discrimination, nearby white hospitals did not avail him the blood transfusions needed to save his life. Every blood bank in the world is a living memorial to the genius of Dr. Charles Richard Drew. His n^me will live on into posterity. S c h o o l s and h e a l t h c l i n i c s throughout the United States have been named in honor of Drew and his generous gift to mankind.

Dr. Charles Richard Drew was a world renown surgeon, medical scientist, educator and authority on the preservation of blood. He was the pioneer of blood plasma preservation, leaving mankind an important legacy—the Blood Bank. Born in 1904, in Washington, D.C., he was the eldest of five children born to Charles and Nora D r e w . He . w a s an outstanding athlete. Graduating from Dunbar High School in 1922, he e x c e l l e d in f o o t b a l l , toashetball, swimming and track with much acclaim. At Amherst College in Massachusetts, he was an achiever in both sports and academics, graduating in 1926 with high honors. He went on to become an instructor of biology and chemistry and Director of A t h l e t i c s at M o r g a n S t a t e College in Baltimore, Maryland. . Charles Drew loved sports and was a tough competitor. He could have become a professional athlete or coach, but his desire to become a doctor w a s stronger. In 1928, Drew e n t e r e d McGill University Medical School in Montreal, Canada and won m e m b e r s h i p in its Medical Honorary Society. It was at McGill that he became interested in blood research. He received his Master of Surgery and Doctor of Medicine degrees in 1933. After internships at the Royal V i c t o r i a H o s p i t a l and t h e Montreal General Hospital in Canada, he taught at Howard University's Medical School. A f t e r w a r d s , at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, in New York City, he researched a process for blood preservation. D u r i n g h i s t w o y e a r s at C o l u m b i a , he d e v e l o p e d a technique for the long-term preservation of blood plasma. He earned the degree of Doctor of Science in Medicine, in 1940, with a dissertation on the subject of "Banked Blood."

Contrasts" at Depree

by Adriana McCalees You don't have to be a mostly to admire how me iwo connoisseur of the arts to artists have transformed e n j o y the D e P r e e Art common material into art. Center's current display, Bob Williams uses plywood "Contrasts." This display is doors as his painting canvas, free of charge ana runs but you wouldn't suspect it throough Feb. 15. It features from looking at the final vivid, abstract paintings by product. Michel explained Bob Williams and artii Eistic, that "He (Williams) keeps colorful photographs by Pam manipulating until he feels he DeMarris. I saw the display arrives at what he wants." So with fellow Hope students as don't be startled if you glance part of a class assignment upward and see a twisted and I feel that all college triangular mass jutting from s t u d e n t s s h o u l d t a k e the wall; "All at Once" is advantage of the opportunity lighter than it looks and won't to attencT fall on you, though it appears Make a point to notice the to defy the laws of gravity. tone and combinations of Pam DeMarris defies the c o l o r s W i l l i a m s a n d laws of rationality in her D e M a r r i s u s e . D e l b e r t photos where images are Michel, a Hope professor of distorted and discolored. An art who addressed our group, average Joe with curly blue explained that coloration is hair appears to be three t h e m o s t p r o m i n e n t hundred pounds from the similarity in the two artists' angle at which we see the works. Both use color to add "Green Meany." Dolls, flags, that touch that makes the flowers, and shapes are just a good better. William's large few of the props DeMarris painting entitled "Love uses in her pictures to delight Song" is a long and winding the observer. While moving piece of acrylic plywood from frame to frame it's painted a bright yellow-red difficult not to wonder how from which lines and shpaes she did such interesting pop out from their lively things with a camera. background. Pam DeMarris Since the c o l l e g e shows night and day in her consistently brings in quality piece "Smile Pretty Boy" artists, I think students where shades of purple should make an attempt to i m p o s e the b o y ' s f a c e appreciate their efforts. You contrasting the sunny pool may likely find it a more scene around him. . enriching experience than The display is worth seeing you expected.

Anchor Files by Greg Olgers 20 years ago. February 24,1967 "F irs t s e m e s t e r s t a t i s t i c s show that 40 percent of the men of the freshman class achieved a grade point average of less than 2.0 while the 170 coeds of Phelps Hall were amassing an average of 2.8...

"Most of the frosh m e n attributed the disparity between grades of men and women to the rules imposed on women. T h e y had to be in the dorms at 10 p.m.

during the week, and were supposed to have lights out at 11 p.m.,' one freshman with a 1.8 grade point noted." 50 years ago. February 17,1937 Carnegie gymnasium will be the scene, and 7:30 p.m., Feb. 24 will be the time, of the second annual Nykerk cup contest between the F r e s h m a n and Sophomore girls. "The tall silver trophy, now engraved with the date '39, will be awarded to the class which, in the opinion of the judges, gives

BLOOM COUNTY

GR Symphony Next for GPS The H o p e C o l l e g e G r e a t Performance Series will present the Grand Rapids Symphony Orchestra and Symphonic Choir in a performance of the Feliz Mendelssohn oratorio Elijah on Monday, Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. In conjunction with the orchestra is the St. Celilia Music Society Treble Chorus. Interestingly enough, Elijah was the last piece composed by Mendelssohn before his death in 1847. " E l i j a h is a d r a m a t i c masterpiece that holds the place, in Mendelssohn's works, of the great opera that he never wrote, and it may even be thought of as a sacred opera for concert performance, " according to reviewer Leonard Burkat. The conductor will by Anton A r m s t r o n g who has been director of the Grand Rapids Symphonic Choir since 1982. Guests soloists will include soprana Jean Herzberg, tenor Carl Kaiser, mezzosoprano Linn Maxwell, and baritone Julian Patrick. Tickets are available in the Office of Public Relations in the DeWitt Center. They will also be sold at the door. Cost is $7 for adults, $6 for Senior Citizens, and $3 for students. Look for m o r e G r e a t Performance Series events in March!!

the best performance of its dramatic, musical and oratorical numbers." 90 years ago. February, 1897. "W.D. Hopkins, Photographer, Holland, Mich. First class work of all kinds. Reference College classes of '95 and '96." "Houseman & Jones Clothing Col., Grand Rapids, Are the Leading Clothiers of Western Michigan. The largest stock and cheapest prices. We make a s p e c i a l t y of M e r c h a n t Tailoring."

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Mixed Results for Dutch Cagers by Pete Schultz Calvin and Alma College confronted the Hope w o m e n ' s basketball t e a m this p a s t week, with the Dutch pounding Calvin 65-48, but losing to mighty A l m a , 73-65. In the first g a m e , Hope c a m e back f r o m a 31-30 h a l f t i m e deficit to o v e r p o w e r the visiting Knights with the 17 point final score, including a blitzing offensive run in the final 10 m i n u t e s .

the lead and never giving it up. The g a m e s e e m e d to be called closely by the r e f e r e e s . Knoll fouled out, B u i k e m a had 4 fouls, and Dodd picked up 3. T h r e e Scots h a d 4 fouls each. " T h e g a m e was called well," said M c F a r l a n d . No technical fouls w e r e called a g a i n s t either coach or any players. Alma was led by senior Kris Johnson with 29 points. 18 of 'horn coming in the 1st half. T e a m m a t e Mary Duff added 23,

nailing 5 three-point shots. Knoll led the Dutch with 15 points. Dodd finished with 12, and Buikema 11. "We played well," said M c F a r l a n d . " T h e i r shooting won the g a m e for t h e m . " H o p e w e n t to 5-2 in t h e c o n f e r e n c e and 11-8 overall. Alma i m p r o v e d its MIAA n u m b e r s to 6-1,16-2 overall. The Dutch will try to rebound tonight on the road a g a i n s t a tough Olivet club, which has a 9-3 record.

Coach T e r r i M c F a r l a n d w a s pleased with h e r t e a m ' s e f f o r t . " T h i s w a s our best g a m e of the y e a r , " she said. "We needed this win. It g a v e us confidence, along with playing at h o m e . " The Dutch constantly plagued Calvin with a full court p r e s s through the whole g a m e . M c F a r l a n d said the d e f e n s e w a s excellent.

Hope Downs Calvin&Alma by Ben Hanneman — Sports Editor The intensity t h a t Hope basketball coach Glenn Van Wieren s a y s is c r u c i a l to the success of the D u t c h m e n was in a b u n d a n c e Wednesday night a s Hope d e f e a t e d the K n i g h t s 69-66 at the Calvin Fieldhouse. Coming off of a loss to Albion at home, combined with a Calvin win over Adrian last week, the D u t c h m e n looked to even the score on the road and s t a y in the r u n n i n g for the league championship. The first half shooting w a s fairly even, but Hope held a slight a d v a n t a g e . 54 p e r c e n t c o m p a r e d to 50 p e r c e n t for the Knights. At the half Hope led by four. 35-31. Calvin chipped a w a y at the lead in the second half and eventually w e n t a h e a d . Then the Hope d e f e n s e s t i f f e n e d a n d

slowed the Calvin a t t a c k . Todd M a r s m a n led the D u t c h m e n with nine defensive r e b o u n d s . On o f f e n s e M a t t S t r o n g continued his hot s t r e a k a s Hope's leading s c o r e r with 20 points. Strong has been a v e r a g i n g over 18 points p e r g a m e . J i m Klunder, with an a v e r a g e of over 14 points p e r g a m e , threw in 18. T h e win puts Hope in a tie with the Knights, e a c h with a 5-1 r e c o r d in t h e M I A A . T h e D u t c h m e n h a b e only lost t h r e e t i m e s this y e a r , while Calvin h a s only bowed twice. The nationally ranked D u t c h m e n took on Alma on t h e road S a t u r d a y afternoon a n d b e a t them 74-73 when A l m a ' s Mark Bussell mis s ed two f r e e throws with two seconds left. Strong scored 18 and Klunder had 15 for the D u t c h m e n .

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" T h e p r e s s did a lot of good things for us " All t h e H o p e p l a y e r s contributed offensively and defensively. Pointwise, DeeAnn Knoll had her best scoring g a m e uf the season with 19 points. Sue Buikema w a s also in double figures with 12 points. A m a n d a Dodd chipped in 11. "We put p l a y e r s in the g a m e who could s c o r e , " said McFarland. Calvin p l a y e r s P a m B a k e r and Sally H u y s e r led the visitors with 10 points e a c h . Their record fell to 2-4 in the c o n f e r e n c e . 6-8 overall.

12

With the T u e s d a y win, Hope had to battle powerful Alma on S a t u r d a y . The Scots had a 5-1 MIAA r e c o r d a f t e r an upset loss to Olivet. Hope was 5-1 coming into this contest. The winner would h a v e sole possession of 1st place in MIAA. Hope s t r u g g l e d with Alma the whole forty m i n u t e s . The senior d o m i n a t e d Scots blistered the nets with a 65 p e r c e n t field goal average.

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Anderson's Performance a Highlight

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by David Hepenstal Thursday, Jan. 29 of Women's Week, Candace Anderson p e r f o r m e d before a s p a r s e audience on an appropriately wintery evening. Singing folk songs about Michigan women to the ripe pickings of her guitar and dulcimer, Anderson brought to life admirable, interesting women characters in Michigan history that she had come across in her study of diaries, published letters, and her own family's earlier generations. Each colorful and story-like song spoke of woman and the strength of her nature as exemplified by such characters as a hearty cook in an e a r l y M i c h i g a n lumbercamp, a * strong-minded young woman who b e c a m e the University of Michigan's first coed, a reminiscent, elderly, white haired mother of 13 children (with 52 grandchildren — one of which is Anderson

herself), and a robust woman, the backbone of her family, w h o s e drive and spirit persevered through the blowing, white winters of the late 1800s to finally see the day in which her pioneering efforts had finally created what she could call a home deep in the Michigan woodlands where perhaps someday her children's children would thrive. Softly lit by the yellow glow cast from antique lamps (electric however), dressed in a full-length, corseted, black c o s t u m e d r e s s , and hair c o n s e r v a t i v e l y p i n n e d up, Anderson w a s most successful in c r e a t i n g an a u t h e n t i c 19th century atmosphere which effectively complemented the material in the performance. Anderson was refreshingly original in the way she combined

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her love of history and music into an entertaining whole with a pertinent m e s s a g e underlying all. Her songs and stories beamed with pride the e s s e n c e of womanhood. The m e s s a g e woven into Anderson's music managed in some way, be it subtle or not so subtle, to register a pleasing sort of internal impact absorbed and f e l t by a n y l i s t e n e r w h o r e w a r d e d their s e n s e s this unusual treat last Thursday evening. Candace Anderson's "A Sampler of Michigan Women in History" w a s indeed a highlight for Women's Week. Her gentle but resonant voice, brilliantly creative mind, and e a s e in ability to strike up vivid images and emotions by way of her music made for a thoroughly enjoyable, if not heartwarming experience.

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02-04-1987  
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