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Eggs-cellent brunch

Chef Belinda’s recipes for her favorite meal of the week

CHANGEOUT

OCTOBER 2020

SC TR AVE LS

A tunnel in time HUMOR ME

Survival of the fattest


WEAR YOUR FACE MASK.

scdhec.gov/COVID19 FIGHT THE SPREAD. CR-012796

8/20


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 74 • NUMBER 10 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240)

Read in more than 615,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org

2020 |oct 13 Get cracking Easy egg recipes from Let’s Brunch, Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s newest cookbook. Plus: Your chance to win one of a dozen autographed copies.

FIELD EDITOR

Josh Crotzer

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler

4 CO-OP NEWS

COPY EDITORS

Trevor Bauknight, Jennifer Jas, Jim Poindexter CONTRIBUTORS

Abby Berry, Mike Couick, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Patrick Keegan, Sydney Patterson, Jenna Schiferl, Cele & Lynn Seldon, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen PUBLISHER

Lou Green

ADVERTISING

Updates from your cooperative

6 AGENDA

With the holidays just around the corner, you’ll be spending even more time in the kitchen. Follow these steps to whip up energy savings along with great meals.

8 DIALOGUE The cooperative way

When hurricanes devastated the Gulf Coast earlier this year, linemen from South Carolina’s electric cooperatives offered hope and a helping hand to restore power in Alabama and Louisiana.

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (512) 441‑5200 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor.

Save energy and enjoy more year-round comfort when you give these forgotten spaces a little TLC.

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices.

12 SC STORIES Sing it, sisters

Take a stroll through the Great American Songbook with Gracie and Lacy Miller, Charleston’s very own song-anddance sister act.

© COPYRIGHT 2020. The Electric Cooperatives

of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

$8 nonmembers

18 CALENDAR OF EVENTS 19 MARKETPLACE 20 SC TRAVELS A tunnel in time

Explore the natural beauty and curious history of Oconee County’s Stumphouse Tunnel Park.

$5.72 members,

22

22

HUMOR ME

Survival of the fattest

Taking a cue from the bears of Alaska, our humor columnist has her Halloween costume all planned out. Eggs-cellent brunch Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses SC TR AVE LS OCTOBER 2020

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

20

10 ENERGY Q&A Better basements and crawl spaces

FRO M TO P : B ELCH O N OCK / DEP OS ITPH OTOS; KE ITH PH I LLI P S; JA N A . IGO E

A tunnel in time HUMOR ME

Survival of the fattest

Chef Belinda’s recipes for her favorite meal of the week

Enjoy Chef Belinda SmithSullivan’s recipe for scrambled eggs on Texas toast, one of the easy and elegant dishes in her new cookbook, Let’s Brunch. Photo by Susan Barnson Hayward.


SC | agenda TO CELEBRATE NATIONAL CO-OP MONTH, we asked readers across

South Carolina to tell us what they love most about their local electric cooperative. Here is one of our favorites.

We first joined Mid-Carolina Electric Cooperative 25 years ago. What a blessing this turned out to be! Our first outage happened when an unsuspecting squirrel stepped on the wrong wire and blew out the transformer. We called MCEC and within a few minutes they came to our rescue. They fixed the transformer, buried the squirrel and gave tender consideration to the flower garden planted near the pole. At the time, I taught customer service classes, so I recognized the “over and above, knock your socks off” service. I used this example in many of my classes. MCEC, you are the BEST! —CAROL RAGON YOUR TURN Tell us what you love about your local electric cooperative at SCLiving.coop/love. Or mail your story to: Love my co-op, C/o Lyssa Nelson, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033.

A DR I O N B ELL

SUSA N BA RNSO N H AY WA RD

ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

Three ways to save energy in the kitchen

Ah, the kitchen. It’s where we gather with family and friends for our favorite meals. It’s also a room full of potential energy savings if you follow these tips. COOK WITH SMALLER APPLIANCES. Smaller kitchen appliances like slow cookers, toaster ovens and convection ovens are more energy efficient than using your large stove or oven. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a toaster or convection oven uses one-third to one-half as much energy as a full-sized oven. UNPLUG APPLIANCES THAT DRAW PHANTOM ENERGY LOADS. Many appliances—like coffee makers, microwaves and toaster ovens— draw energy even when they’re not in use. DOE estimates these “energy vampires” use up to $100 to $200 in wasted electricity each year. Unplug them when they’re not in use or use a power strip for convenient control.

Eggs-tra recipes

USE YOUR DISHWASHER EFFICIENTLY. Only run full loads and avoid using the “rinse hold” function on your machine for just a few dirty dishes; it uses 3–7 gallons of hot water each use. You can also save energy by letting your dishes air dry. If your dishwasher doesn’t have an automatic air-dry switch, simply turn it off after the final rinse and prop the door open so the dishes will dry faster. —ABBY BERRY

Flipping over omelets

GONE FISHIN’

If Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s brunch-ready egg recipes (see Page 13) have you hungry for more, like this spinach chorizo frittata, visit SCLiving.coop/food/recipes for additional ways to get cracking!

Let our resident chef show you how to flip or fold your way to perfect omelets every time in this how-to video at SCLiving.coop/food/ chefbelinda.

Register to win

Celebrate fall with some extra spending money. Sign up today for our October Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. One lucky winner will be drawn from all entries received by Oct. 31. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

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Smaller appliances like slow cookers use less energy than a full-size oven.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

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SCOT T VA N OS DO L

I ♥ my co-op


|

SC   dialogue

The cooperative way the cooperative way of doing things. Often, the term refers to the work local cooperatives are doing in their community—supporting a charity, boosting economic development, or generally improving the quality of life for their members. But one of the best displays of it is when linemen leave their families to help a community hundreds of miles away. Damage from Hurricanes Laura and Sally devastated cooperative systems in Louisiana and Alabama. Hurricane Laura ripped through Louisiana’s gulf coast region on Aug. 27, reducing a small cooperative to the point of needing a complete rebuild. Accounts from linemen who were there describe a landscape that looked “like a big landfill” or “like a bomb went off.” On Sept. 16, Hurricane Sally wreaked similar destruction to a larger cooperative on Alabama’s gulf coast, leaving only a small percentage of their 80,000 members with power. It’s the cooperative way to monitor the movement of major storms and be ready for their potential impact. This preparedness doesn’t just happen in places where the storms are ­destined. All the states in our region are looking out for one another, reaching out to cooperatives who are willing to send crews to help. That’s what happened leading up to both hurricanes’ landfall. By the time Laura’s winds had moved inland, crews from Berkeley Electric, Newberry Electric, Santee Electric, Fairfield Electric, Horry Electric and Blue Ridge Electric were getting their trucks equipped and their bags packed for the 18-hour journey to Louisiana. The same can be said for Black River Electric, Laurens Electric, York Electric and Newberry Electric (again) as they responded to the call to action a few days after Hurricane Sally came through. It’s the cooperative way for linemen to be willing—to even want—to help restore power in service territories outside their co-op’s. They work on strange systems, battle the obstacles that nature has wrought and sleep in “tent cities” where they are exposed to elements that are often unkind. In 2020, they faced these challenges along with the added risks and responsibilities of COVID-19. Despite the snakes, gators and mosquitoes—which I am told were plentiful and big—the extreme humidity and the sometimes primitive lodging, the greatest burden to bear was being so far away from their families, uncertain as to exactly when they would be headed back home. But this is the cooperative way and so all linemen know that their cooperatives have also benefitted from this spirit of ­sacrifice and generosity, and they will again. Just in the last few years, South Carolina cooperatives have gratefully welcomed assistance from across the Southeast after Hurricanes Matthew, ON THESE PAGES, WE SOMETIMES TALK ABOUT

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

LENDING A HAND Roger Boyd, a Santee Electric Cooperative lineman, relocates a baby alligator from a worksite in Louisiana. South Carolina crews volunteered to help with storm restoration in the aftermath of Hurricanes Laura and Sally.

Dorian and Florence and the 1,000-year flood. This mutual aid collaboration goes back decades, evidenced by the help our state received from others following Hurricane Hugo’s devastation. Cooperative linemen, especially those working systems in coastal areas, know that they are just as likely to be hosting ­visiting crews as they are to be a part of one. Motivation also comes from the people they are helping. In Louisiana, a crew from Berkeley Electric was treated to homemade jambalaya for lunch at a home near where they were working. Our linemen returned to their trucks to find snacks and bottles of water left for them on the hood. Instead of asking when their power would be back on, the members of the co-op often thanked them for coming and encouraged them to be safe. There will certainly be more storms, and unfortunately, more destruction to power distribution systems. As this year’s hurricane season comes to a close, I’ll hope for the best, but I’m glad to know that our co-ops and their linemen are prepared for the worst, wherever it might happen. That’s the cooperative way.

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina


Calling Young Authors & Illustrators

4th & 5th Grade Students

Write and illustrate a story for a chance to have your book published! Teachers, showcase your students’ knowledge of electricity in South Carolina by applying skills in creative writing, social studies and art.

Learn more and register online at

www.enlightensc.org by December 4, 2020.

Contest open to individual students and teams of up to four. Cash prizes awarded to winning student(s) and teacher. From - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

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|

SC   energy Q&A

Better basements and crawl spaces BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q

It’s a good idea to solve moisture problems before you make efficiency improvements. duct yourself. Crawl spaces can be muddy or even have standing water in them if gutters or the slope of the landscaping drains in the wrong direction. Once drainage problems are solved, the crawl space should have a ground vapor barrier. If you have a forced-air heating system, carefully inspect the ductwork running through the basement or crawl space. Unless you’re in a newer home or the ductwork has been tested and sealed in the last decade, your system is likely leaking. Sealing these leaks helps your system distribute air more efficiently and should make your home more comfortable. The best way to seal ducts is with duct mastic. Metallic tape is the next best solution, but do not use duct tape. An 10

p KEEP IT COZY Most experts now recommend rigid foam board insulation on foundation walls instead of fiberglass or mineral wool batts. u DEFEAT THE LEAK The best way to seal seams in

ductwork is with duct mastic. Do not use duct tape. Despite its name, it is not effective.

energy auditor or HVAC professional can test your home’s ductwork and identify the best solutions. You’ll find lots of air leaks in basements and crawl spaces, particularly where pipes and wires enter or exit the space. Air often enters the home around the sill plate, which sits on top of the foundation. If you can get to the sill plate, apply caulk around it. You can also increase efficiency by sealing any gaps or leaks around basement windows. Insulation is an effective tool for reducing energy use and improving comfort, but the applications are quite different in basements and crawl spaces. In both cases, the insulation strategy and the installation must be done correctly to prevent mold or exacerbate moisture problems. The place to begin in basements is the rim joist, which is right above the sill plate on top of the foundation wall. Rigid foam board can be carefully fitted between the joists. Insulated basement walls make the room more comfortable. If you’re building a new home, there are advantages to insulating the outside of the foundation wall, but this isn’t practical for most existing homes. You can insulate the inside of

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

M A RCEL A GA R A

A

Yes, basements and crawl spaces can account for a large portion of your home’s energy use, and there are several ways to improve their overall efficiency. Moisture is a common problem in basements and crawl spaces and can lead to mold, rot and lowered effectiveness of insulation. It’s a good idea to solve moisture problems before you make efficiency improvements. Look carefully for signs of water damage or moisture buildup, such as rotting wood, mold, a stain on a wall or floor or a musty smell. Search online for “test basement walls for moisture” and you’ll find a simple test you can con-

STE V EN L A M

I’ve heard that energy can be lost through my home’s basement. Is that true? If so, what can I do to make my basement more efficient?

the foundation wall if you’re sure moisture is not leaking through the wall from the outside. Experts do not recommend fiberglass insulation in contact with the foundation, which was a common practice for decades. Instead, they prefer sprayed-on foam or rigid foam board applied directly to the foundation wall. A wood-framed wall can be butted up against the rigid foam and insulated with fiberglass or mineral wool batts. The bottom plate of the wall, which sits on the concrete floor, should be pressuretreated wood. There are two ways to insulate crawl spaces. The most common approach is to insulate under the floor with fiberglass batts. This allows the crawl space to be vented to the outside, which alleviates any moisture buildup. If all the right moisture control and drainage steps have been taken, the crawl space can be unventilated, and the insulation can be applied to the foundation walls instead of underneath the floor. That said, there are pros and cons to this strategy, so consult with a local expert. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


SC Living.qxp_SC Living 9/3/20 11:09 PM Page 1

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WIN A $100 GIFT CARD

Leap into fall with some extra cash

R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 gift card. Name Address

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Sign up today for our October Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. One lucky winner will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Oct. 31, 2020. Register online at

SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon at right.

By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors: j Historic Camden j Edisto Chamber of Commerce j Old Town Bluffton Merchants Society j Discover Upcountry Carolina Association j South Carolina Living magazine

State/ZIP Email* Phone*

South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by Oct. 31, 2020, to be eligible. *Winner will be contacted to verify mailing address.

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Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply SCLIVING.COOP   | OCTOBER 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

11


|

SC   stories

Sing it, sisters

Gracie & Lacy Miller Emily Grace Miller (Gracie), 35; Lacy Miller, 33. James Island CLAIM TO FAME: Best known as the song-and-dance sister act, Gracie & Lacy (gracieandlacy.com). LACY’S BIG AMBITION: She wants to perform a duet with Josh Groban. She’s even written the song. Your move, Josh. GRACIE’S FAVORITE PASTTIME: Baking. Anything with chocolate and butter. WHAT’S NEXT: Publishing a children’s book called Broadway On the Driveway, due out fall 2020. AGE:

HOME TURF:

12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

It’s not often that children as young as eight and 10 find their calling. But that’s what happened with sisters Gracie (right) and Lacy Miller— St. Louis natives and Charleston transplants— when they launched their Broadway On the Driveway theater series in, where else, the driveway of their parents’ home. Inspired by a live production of Annie, Gracie and Lacy strung a bed sheet curtain across their driveway, cast more than 15 children under the age of 12, and produced and directed the first of many shows, Lacy says. “When we did Fiddler on the Roof in our driveway, we actually had a fiddler on our roof. It was very authentic.” As teenagers, they moved their ambitious productions—sometimes with full orchestras— to a performing arts center. The musicals were free to the community, and thousands of people would attend nightly performances. When people started asking the young ladies to perform at corporate events, their song-anddance sister act was born. Based in Charleston since 2014, Gracie and Lacy typically perform 50 to 75 shows annually at venues along the East Coast and throughout the Midwest. Their themed performances, complete with tap dancing and vintage costumes, focus on the Great American Songbook, but one of their favorites— Legends—includes modern hits as well. “I like to cover popular music through the decades,” says Lacy. The well-versed songwriters and composers have made the most of the COVID-19 shutdown by producing a weekly Facebook Live variety show, Today in Charleston with Gracie and Lacy. They perform original songs, interview other artists, visit Charleston landmarks and share recipes with their fans. “Twenty-five years ago, we got our start in show business performing on our driveway,” says Gracie. “Now it seems we’ve come full circle, as we are now performing shows in front of a glittery backdrop in our living room.” —CELE AND LYNN SELDON | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS


Easy egg recipes from Let’s Brunch, Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s new cookbook RECIPES BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN PHOTOS BY SUSAN BARNSON HAYWARD

A DR I O N B ELL

WHEN IT CAME TIME TO

write her second cookbook, South Carolina Living recipe columnist Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan (left) knew right away what the topic would be. “Brunch has always been my favorite way to entertain,” she says. “I call it ‘entertaining lite’ because it doesn’t require a lot of effort.” In Let’s Brunch: 100 Recipes for the Best Meal of the Week, SmithSullivan covers everything from beverages and breads to casseroles and desserts. For this month’s SC Recipe column, we’ve selected just a few of the book’s delicious egg recipes—and partnered with her publisher, Gibbs Smith, to give away a dozen autographed copies. See Page 16 for details on how to enter our ­eggs‑cellent sweepstakes. Why egg recipes? Because they’re easy to make and enjoy at any time of day. “Eggs are very versatile,” Smith-Sullivan says. “They’re nutritious, they’re inexpensive and you can get them on the table fast.” Enjoy the following recipes and photos from Let’s Brunch provided courtesy of Belinda Smith-Sullivan and Gibbs Smith. For more details on the book, visit gibbs-smith.com. —KEITH PHILLIPS

ITALIAN BAKED EGGS AND SAUSAGE IN MARINARA SAUCE SERVES 4

An easy one-pan meal, great for breakfast, lunch or dinner, that goes from oven to table in less than 30 minutes. 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 pound bulk Italian sausage, or links removed from casing 1 small onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 4 cups marinara sauce (store‑bought or homemade) Pinch, red pepper flakes

1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil, divided ½ cup shredded mozzarella ¼ cup fresh grated parmesan cheese 4 large eggs, room temperature Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400 F. In a cast-iron or oven-proof skillet over medium heat, heat oil. Crumble sausage in skillet and cook, stirring until brown. Make a well in center of skillet and add onion; saute until soft. Add garlic and cook an additional minute. Stir until meat mixture and onions/garlic are well combined. Stir in sauce, pepper flakes and half of basil and bring to a simmer. Top evenly with mozzarella and parmesan cheeses. Make 4 dents in sauce and crack an egg in each dent, leaving space between each egg. Season eggs with salt and pepper. Transfer skillet to oven and bake 15 minutes or until eggs are desired consistency. Remove from oven and garnish with remaining basil and additional parmesan. Serve with lots of crusty bread.

SCLIVING.COOP   | OCTOBER 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

13


GET CRACKING

CROQUE MADAME MAKES 4 SANDWICHES

A croque madame is a hot ham and cheese sandwich topped with a fried egg. Without the egg, it is referred to as croque monsieur. Both of these sandwiches are served warm, dripping with a Gruyere cheese sauce. This sandwich is the perfect choice for a light brunch. 5 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 cup milk, room temperature Kosher salt White pepper Pinch, nutmeg 1 ½ cups grated Gruyere cheese

8 thick slices brioche 4 teaspoons Dijon mustard 12 slices deli ham 4 large eggs Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper

Preheat broiler. In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, melt 2 tablespoons butter. Whisk in flour and cook, stirring constantly, 2–3 minutes. Gradually add milk while whisking and continue whisking until mixture starts to thicken. Reduce heat and let simmer, whisking occasionally, for 4–5 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in salt, pepper, nutmeg and half the cheese. Set aside and let cool slightly. Spray a sheet pan or shallow baking pan with cooking spray and set aside. Spread 4 slices of bread with mustard and top each with 3 slices of ham. Spread top of ham with some of the sauce and top with another slice of bread. In a large skillet, add remaining butter. When hot, brown two sandwiches on both sides—about 2 minutes per side. Place sandwiches on sheet pan and repeat with remaining two sandwiches. Brush the top of sandwiches with the remaining sauce and sprinkle with the remaining cheese. Using the same skillet, wipe out and spray with cooking spray. Over medium-low heat, gently crack the eggs into the pan, without breaking the yolks. Season with salt and pepper. Cook until whites are set and yolk is runny, about 3 minutes. Meanwhile, place sandwiches under the broiler and broil for 2–3 minutes until sauce is bubbly and golden brown. Top each sandwich with an egg and serve immediately.

FLUFFY SCRAMBLED EGGS ON TEXAS TOAST WITH SWISS CHEESE

TEXAS TOAST

1 tablespoon garlic olive oil 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted 2 1-inch slices artisan bread

SERVES 2

This should fill the hunger gap for the vegetarians in your group. Just add fruit. Texas toast can generally be found in supermarket chains, but you can easily make it at home, if you have access to whole artisan bread. 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 4 large eggs 2 tablespoons heavy cream or half-and-half Kosher salt 1 scallion or green onion (white and light green parts), chopped 2 slices Texas toast (store-bought or homemade) 2–4 slices Swiss cheese (depending on size of bread) 1 avocado, halved and sliced (optional) 1 large beefsteak tomato, sliced Fresh ground black pepper

14

Preheat a cast-iron skillet on medium heat. Combine oil and butter; spread on both sides of bread slices. Fry bread until brown on both sides.

In a medium skillet over medium heat, melt butter. In a small bowl, add eggs, cream and salt. Whisk vigorously until yolks and whites are thoroughly combined—eggs will be slightly lighter in color. Add eggs to skillet and lower heat to medium low. Using a rubber spatula, gently push eggs from one side of skillet to the other, scooping and turning as you go. Continue until eggs get fluffy and form large curds. While eggs are still wet, fold in scallions and remove pan from heat. Note that eggs will continue to cook in pan from the residual heat. To assemble, place pieces of toast on serving plates. Follow with cheese slices, avocado slices, tomato slices and top with eggs. Finish with fresh cracked pepper, and garnish with additional scallions, if desired.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


SPINACH AND GOAT CHEESE EGGS FLORENTINE WITH HOLLANDAISE SAUCE SERVES 4

This breakfast classic is a lot easier to prepare than you think. With a few simple steps to master, like poaching the eggs and using a blender to make the hollandaise sauce, this will become one of your new favorites. 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 shallot, thinly sliced 1 pound baby spinach or kale or arugula 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar Kosher salt, to taste Freshly ground black pepper, to taste 4 large very fresh whole eggs 1 tablespoon white distilled vinegar 4 slices thick sourdough bread, toasted Goat cheese, crumbled Easy Hollandaise Sauce (below) Chopped fresh chives EASY HOLLANDAISE SAUCE MAKES 1/3 CUP

For best results, make sauce just before serving.

In a large skillet or saute pan, heat oil over medium heat. Saute shallot until soft, 2–3 minutes. Add spinach and cook until slightly wilted, 1–2 minutes. Add balsamic vinegar and cook, stirring constantly, until most of vinegar has evaporated, about 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside and keep warm. Break each egg into a separate small prep bowl—this decreases the chances of damaging the eggs as you introduce them to the simmering water. In a deep nonstick skillet, add about 2 inches of water and bring to a boil then reduce to simmer. Add distilled vinegar. Slide each egg into the simmering water—clockwise, so you can keep track of how long each egg cooks. Cover and cook approximately 4 minutes, until whites are set but not hard. Remove eggs with a slotted spoon, in order, and drain on a paper towel. To assemble, place a piece of toast on each serving plate. Follow with equal amounts of the spinach mixture, goat cheese, and a poached egg then drizzle with sauce. Garnish with chives.

1 large egg yolk 1 ½ teaspoons fresh-squeezed lemon juice Pinch of cayenne pepper 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and warm Kosher salt, to taste

Into the bowl of a blender, add egg yolk, lemon juice and cayenne. Pulse a few times to combine. Drizzle the butter into the running blender until egg mixture becomes smooth and frothy. If sauce is too thick, add a teaspoon of lukewarm water. Add salt and serve. If not serving immediately keep warm in a heat-proof bowl over hot water.

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop FLIPPING OVER OMELETS Learn the secrets to flipping or folding a perfect omelet in this how-to video at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda BONUS EGG RECIPES If you’re hungry for even more brunch recipes, visit scliving.coop/food/recipes and get cracking!

SCLIVING.COOP   | OCTOBER 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

15


GET CRACKING

Win an autographed copy of Let’s Brunch Register to win an autographed copy of Let’s Brunch, courtesy of Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan and Gibbs Smith, using this mail-in form or the online registration at SCLiving.coop/lets-brunch.

We’ll draw the names of 12 lucky readers from all eligible entries received by Oct. 31. Winners will be contacted by South Carolina Living to verify correct mailing information. Please note that by entering the sweepstakes, you agree to opt-in to the South Carolina Living email newsletter list and may also receive commercial messages from the magazine’s sponsors. For more information on the book, or to order copies, visit gibbs-smith.com.

A N E G G S - C E L L E N T S W E E P S TA K E S

Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/lets-brunch Yes! Enter me in the drawing for an autographed copy of Let’s Brunch by Belinda Smith-Sullivan, published by Gibbs Smith. Name Address City State/ZIP Email* Phone*

*Winners will be contacted to verify correct mailing address. SEND COUPON TO: South Carolina Living, LET’S BRUNCH, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033. Entries must be received by Oct. 31, 2020, to be eligible. 16

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

BREAKFAST STEAK AND EGGS ON ASPARAGUS SPEARS SERVES 2

Whether it’s slices of leftover steak from the night before or a special 5-ounce breakfast cut from the butcher, steak and eggs is a hearty breakfast choice that will get you through the day. And the bonus is that you only need to use one skillet for the entire meal. 2 tablespoons garlic-infused olive oil 1 0–12 asparagus spears, trimmed (about 1 pound) Kosher salt Fresh ground black pepper 2 5-ounce steaks (your favorite cut) Fresh ground Grains of Paradise or favorite steak seasoning 4 large eggs ½ teaspoon fresh chopped chives Dash, Tabasco sauce ½ tablespoon unsalted butter ¼ cup grated cheddar cheese Sliced heirloom tomatoes, for garnish Fresh chopped chives, for garnish

In a cast-iron skillet, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat. Season asparagus with salt and pepper and cook until tender, turning occasionally, 8–10 minutes. Remove to a platter and keep warm. Add remaining olive oil to the same skillet. Season steak with seasoning and cook for approximately 2 minutes on each side to desired doneness. Remove from pan, tent with foil and let rest for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare eggs. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, chives, Tabasco, salt and pepper. Wipe out the same skillet and melt the butter over medium heat. Gently scramble eggs to just under the desired doneness and remove skillet from fire. Fold in cheese. (Suggestion: It’s better to undercook the eggs, as they will continue to cook from the heat of the skillet.) To serve, arrange half the asparagus spears on two individual plates. Place steaks on top of asparagus, followed by eggs on top of the steak. Fan tomato slices on each side of plates and garnish with chives.


|

SC   calendar OCT 15–NOV 15

Upstate O C TO B E R

16–17  Storytelling Festival and Liar’s Competition, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898‑2936. 17  Central Railroad Festival, Main Street, Clemson. (864) 654‑1200 or info@centralrrfestival.com. 20–24  Union County Agricultural Fair, County Fairgrounds, Union. (864) 424‑8272 or unioncofair@gmail.com. 24  Halloween at the Falls, Calhoun Falls State Park, Calhoun Falls. (864) 447‑8267. 24  Komen SC Mountains to Midlands Virtual MORE THAN PINK Walk, virtual, based in Greenville. (864) 234‑5035 or info@komensc.org. 29  Uptown Greenwood Boo Bash, Uptown Market, Greenwood. uptown@gwdcity.com. 30  S’more Social Bonfire, Lake Greenwood State Park, Ninety Six. (864) 543‑3535. 31  Halloween Crafts, Lake Greenwood State Park, Ninety Six. (864) 543‑3535. 31  Halloween Jingo, Lake Greenwood State Park, Ninety Six. (864) 543‑3535. NOVE M BE R

6–7  Pickens Literacy Used Book Sale,

Pickens Presbyterian Church, Pickens. (864) 617‑4237 or pickensliteracy@yahoo.com. 7  Greenville Classical Academy’s Fall Festival and Holiday Market, Woodruff Road Presbyterian Church, Simpsonville. (864) 329‑9884. 7–30  Greenville Open Studios, various studio locations, Greenville and surrounding area. (864) 467‑3132 or mac@greenvillearts.com. 13–14  Campground Cook-Off—Soups and Stews, Calhoun Falls State Park, Calhoun Falls. (864) 447‑8267. 14  Hartness Half Marathon and 5K, Hartness Living, Greenville. jdavis@setupevents.com.

Midlands

SCLiving.coop/calendar

31  Morning History Walks and Talks:

Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending.

NOVEMBER

EDITOR’S NOTE: As this issue went to press, South Carolina was still in the grip of the COVID-19 pandemic, forcing many festivals and events to be canceled or postponed. Please check with organizers if you plan to attend these events and follow current health recommendations to stop the spread of the coronavirus. For updates on the pandemic, visit scdhec.gov/covid19.

23–24  18th Annual Francis Marion Symposium, Central Carolina Technical College–FE Dubose Campus, Manning. gcsummers@ftc-i.net. 24  Trick or Treat in the Park, Kings Mountain State Park, Blacksburg. (803) 222‑3209. 31  Camp-and-Treat, Lee State Park, Bishopville. (803) 428‑5307. NOVE MB E R

7  Springmaid Trail Race, Anne Springs

Close Greenway–Field Trial Barn, Fort Mill. (803) 547‑4575 or info@ascgreenway.org. 7  Watercolors: Beyond the Basics with Marcia Kort Buike, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 323‑1966 or arts@yorkcountyarts.org. 13–15  Craftsmen’s Christmas Classic Art & Craft Festival, Cantey & Goodman Buildings at the SC State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (336) 282‑5550 or contact@gilmoreshows.com. 14  Blackville Music and Arts Festival, Main Street, Blackville. (803) 300‑3486 or blackvillemusicandartfestival@gmail.com. 14  Drawing Animals Exotic and Pets with Brad Sabelli, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 323‑1966 or arts@yorkcountyarts.org. 14  Fall Foliage Paddle, Kings Mountain State Park, Blacksburg. (803) 222‑3209. 14  Trinity Bazaar, Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Columbia. (803) 771‑7300 or trinitybazaar@trinitysc.org.

O C TO B E R

3–31  Virtual Walk for Life and Famously

Hot Pink Half Marathon, 5K + 10K, virtual event, based in Columbia. (803) 434‑2898 or walkforlife@prismahealth.org. 15–16  Dracula 2020, The Etherredge Center at USC–Aiken, Aiken. (803) 641‑3305. 17  Fur Ball Moonlight Gala, Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia. (803) 465‑9170. 17  Ray Tanner Home Run, virtual race, Columbia. raytannerfoundation.org. 17–18, 24–25, 31–Nov. 1  Fall Frolic, Anne Springs Close Greenway – Lake Haigler Entrance, Fort Mill. (803) 547‑4575. 20–21  Drive-Through South Carolina State Fair, State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 799‑3387 or geninfo@scstatefair.org.

18

Lowcountry O C TO B E R

13–17  Eastern Carolina Agricultural Fair, ECA Fairgrounds, Florence. (843) 665‑5173. 15, 22, 29  Morning History Walks and Talks: Lady Lore, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 15–18  Bicycle Across South Carolina, multiple routes, Wedgefield to Awendaw. (843) 937‑5458. 16  The Art of Indigo Dyeing Friday Session, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, Ridgeland. (843) 284‑9227. 16, 23, 30  Morning History Walks and Talks: Charleston Justice Journey, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

16  Photography Walkabout and Workshop, downtown, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 16, 17, 23, 24, 30  Piazzas, Porches, and Gardens Tours, multiple locations, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 16  Surfside Beach Senior Fair, Surfside Beach Fire Department, Surfside Beach. (843) 913‑6111 or dellis@surfsidebeach.org. 16–18  SC Jazz Festival, multiple venues, Cheraw. (843) 537‑8420, ext. 12. 17  Loris Bog-Off Festival, downtown, Loris. (843) 756‑6030. 17, 24  Morning History Walks and Talks: The Amazing Buildings of Charleston, downtown, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 17, 24  Morning History Walks and Talks: Charleston Well Preserved, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 17  Sounds of the Lowcountry, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011 or jazz@charlestonjazz.com. 17–18  Myrtle Beach Mini Marathon, 5K, and Doggie Dash, multiple courses, Myrtle Beach. raceinfo@nspromos.com. 18  Children’s Day Festival, Park West Recreation Complex, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑2528. 20, 27  Morning History Walks and Talks: The Grimke Sisters, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 21, 28  Morning History Walks and Talks: The Mystique of Charleston, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 22  Curated Garden Tour, multiple private gardens, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 22–24  Conway Ghost Walk, downtown, Conway. (843) 248‑6260 or staff@conwayalive.com. 24  Komen Lowcountry Virtual More Than Pink Walk, virtual, based in Charleston. (843) 556‑8011 or info@komensc.org. 24–31  James Island Connector Run: Home Edition, virtual, based in Charleston. info@jicrun.com. 31  BOOtanical Garden, Moore Farms Botanical Garden, Lake City. (843) 210‑7592 or lcollins@moorefarmsbg.org. 31  Halloween Rod Run Car Show, Surfside Drive, Surfside Beach. (843) 913‑6111 or dellis@surfsidebeach.org.

Spooky Halloween, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050.

1  Lagoon Kayaking, Hunting Island State Park, Hunting Island. (843) 838‑7437. 4  Morning History Walks and Talks: The Mystique of Charleston, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 5  Morning History Walks and Talks: Lady Lore, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 6  Morning History Walks and Talks: Charleston Justice Journey, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 6  Photography Walkabout and Workshop, downtown, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 6  Red, White, and Blue Jean Ball, Charles Towne Landing, Charleston. (843) 566‑0072. 7  Harvest Festival, Johns Island County Park, Johns Island. (843) 795‑4386. 7  Lowcountry Walk for Life, Wannamaker County Park, North Charleston. (843) 863‑1510 or info@lpcfriends.com. 7  Morning History Walks and Talks: The Amazing Buildings of Charleston, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 7  Morning History Walks and Talks: Charleston Well Preserved, Washington Park, Charleston. (843) 405‑1050. 11  Surfside Beach Veterans Day Service, Memorial Park, Surfside Beach. (843) 913‑6111 or dellis@surfsidebeach.org. 12–15  Dickens Christmas Show and Festivals, Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (843) 448‑9483. 13–14  YALLFest: Charleston Young Adult Book Festival, various venues, Charleston. (843) 722‑2666 or info@bluebicyclebooks.com. 14  7th Annual Mythical and Medieval Fest, R.H. Acres, Myrtle Beach. (843) 602‑1049 or shelliencaleb@aol.com. 14  Rockabillaque, Park Circle, North Charleston. (310) 801‑2727 or rockabillaque.com. 15  Mi Alma Latina: Nestor Torres, virtual event, based in North Charleston. (843) 641‑0011 or jazz@charlestonjazz.com. 15  Steeplechase of Charleston, The Plantation at Stono Ferry Racetrack, Hollywood. (843) 937‑4831 or info@steeplechaseofcharleston.com. ONGOING

Daily through Dec. 31  Holiday Festival of

Lights, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386 or customerservice@ccprc.com. Tuesdays through October  Surfside Beach Farmers Market, Memorial Park, Surfside Beach. (843) 650‑9548 or dellis@surfsidebeach.org.

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays through November  St. Phillips

Island Excursion with Coastal Expeditions, Hunting Island State Park, Hunting Island. (843) 838‑2011.


|

SC   travels

A tunnel in time BY JENNA SCHIFERL  |  PHOTOS BY MATTHEW FRANKLIN CARTER

DARK GREEN MOSS DRIPS off the jagged base of the mountainside leading to Stumphouse Tunnel. A thick canopy of trees frames the rounded arch of the 25-foot-tall entrance, and a wave of cool, damp mountain air hits you before the abandoned railroad tunnel comes fully into view. Stumphouse Tunnel is a relic of the

DEAD END The tunnel at Stumphouse Park began in 1853 as part of a railroad line to Ohio. The project was abandoned after six years of work.

LOCAL LEGEND Issaqueena Falls was named after a Native American chief’s daughter who leaped in to escape pursuers who disapproved of her relationship with a white settler.

GET THERE Stumphouse Park, including Issaqueena Falls and Stumphouse Mountain Bike Park, is located at Stumphouse Park Road, off Hwy. 28, about six miles north of Walhalla. NORMAL HOURS: Open daily during daylight hours. ADMISSION: Free for Walhalla residents; $5 parking fee for all others. Annual passes can be purchased at Walhalla City Hall for $25 (Oconee County residents) or $35 for all others. DETAILS: (864) 638‑4343; cityofwalhalla.com and visitoconeesc.com/stumphouse-park

20

past, tucked inside Stumphouse Park just north of downtown Walhalla. The tunnel was intended to be part of the Blue Ridge Railroad, a route linking Charleston to Cincinnati, Ohio. Construction began in late 1853, and for six years, a team of 1,500 Irish immigrants used hand drills, chisels, hammers and black powder to drill through a wall of solid blue granite. It was slow and intense labor; at peak manpower, workers were only able to progress around 200 feet a month. The railroad abandoned the tunnel in 1859 when funding ran out. The temperature inside the tunnel remains at a cool 50 degrees with 85% humidity year-round. In the 1940s, a Clemson University professor realized the tunnel’s conditions made it an ideal spot for molding cheese. Thus, Clemson Blue Cheese was born. Production of the cheese continues today, but the tunnel hasn’t been used for that purpose since 1955. Visitors armed with flashlights can explore about 1,600 feet of this curious EDITOR’S NOTE: As this issue went to press, South Carolina was still in the grip of the COVID-19 pandemic. Please check with the City of Walhalla at (864) 638‑4343 before visiting and follow current health recommendations to stop the spread of the coronavirus. For updates on the pandemic, visit scdhec.gov/covid19.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

landmark that has been a local playground for generations, says Walhalla native Misty Price. “My grandpa would take me to the tunnel all the time when I was a kid,” Price says. “We would just run around and have a blast.” The 440-acre Stumphouse Park, operated by the City of Walhalla, is also home to the impressive Issaqueena Falls and newly expanded hiking and mountain biking trails that link to the Upstate portions of the cross-state Palmetto Trail. Local legend says the waterfall was named after Issaqueena, the daughter of a Native American chief. She fell in love with a white settler, and together, the pair fled the persecution of those who did not approve of their relationship. During the pursuit, Issaqueena poised over the falls and leaped into the water to escape her pursuers. The upper observation deck is a short quarter-mile hike down a gently sloping path, and a more strenuous trail leads adventure seekers to the base of the falls. Everyone in town seems to have their own version of the story behind the romantic spot, and even if it’s only a legend, visitors like Jared Ketterman don’t seem to mind. “It’s a living piece of history,” he says of the tunnel and the falls. “We’re lucky to have it in our backyard.”


|

SC   humor me

Survival of the fattest BY JAN A. IGOE

it’s never a good idea to compliment someone on how fat they are. Not only would that be a very rude thing to say, it would also be a foolproof way to find out if they are armed. But for a bear facing winter, fat is a whole different story. Especially in Alaska. Every October, Fat Bear Week at Brooks River in Katmai National Park gives 12 lucky bears the chance to be crowned the fattest. It’s a head-tohead matchup where fans get to vote their pick for the rolypolyest bear in the single elimination tournament. It’s the Alaska version of March Madness. In the human world, excess fat means arthritis, diabetes, heart disease and harsh monologues from your internist, but bears are different. They are wired to sleep the entire winter—doing absolutely nothing for months at a clip—yet lose hundreds of pounds doing it. The more they chow down, the healthier they are. Being a bear sounds like a pretty good gig until you learn how hard they work bulking up enough to hibernate without harmful side effects, such as dying. Between you and me, my body has been equipped to hibernate on several occasions, but bears have to get there without any help from frozen pizza, fast food or an emergency stockpile of Oreos. Hibernation is far less appealing when you realize how many months the bears spend wading in icy water, patiently waiting to catch breakfast, lunch and dinner. And it’s even tougher for mama bears. They have to keep one eye out IN POLITE SOCIETY,

22

Hibernation is far less appealing when you realize how many months the bears spend wading in icy water, patiently waiting to catch breakfast, lunch and dinner. for evasive fish and the other on curious cubs, who are furry magnets for trouble. (Picture yourself trying to work from home while a trio of hyperactive toddlers use your desk as a trampoline.) Despite the deplorable childcare situation, Holly, aka Bear 435, beat out all the boys in 2019. Alaska is no place for wimps. Not bears. Not humans. Not even salmon. Nature didn’t make life easy for those tasty pink fish. When it’s time to mate, they can’t just book a cheap hotel on Kayak. They’ve got to make it upstream,

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING | OCTOBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

not only past hundreds of ravenous bears, but also past combat fisherman. Yes, I said combat. It’s an annual Alaskan event (definitely not for the claustrophobic) where hundreds​ —actually, more like thousands—of eager anglers invade the rivers to catch salmon on their spawning run. It seems you don’t belong in Alaska unless you fish, shoot or trap your own dinner. This year, my money’s on Bear 747. Aptly named, he’s a massive beast weighing around 1,400 pounds. Park rangers say he was already fat enough to start hibernating two months ago, but he kept right on gorging. Bear 747 appears to be a Goodyear blimp with paws, which any overweight bear would consider a compliment. My sentimental favorite is still Holly, who is towing yet another cub around this year. She may not be as plump as she was in her prime, but ­champions never quit. Besides, she inspired my Halloween costume. If you see a woman trick-or-treating in a brown faux fur coat with a #435 sign on her back, please address me as Holly. Visiting Alaska is on JAN IGOE ’s bucket list, although she has a crippling moose phobia. Most of the creatures in Alaska are equipped to eat the tourists or stomp them to paste. It’s a lot like Jurassic Park there, only colder. Hope you all have great socially distant Halloween. Join the fun at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop any time.


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South Carolina Living October 2020  

Get easy egg recipes. Head to Oconee County to explore Stumphouse Tunnel Park and Issaqueena Falls. Get tips to make sure your favorite fall...

South Carolina Living October 2020  

Get easy egg recipes. Head to Oconee County to explore Stumphouse Tunnel Park and Issaqueena Falls. Get tips to make sure your favorite fall...

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