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Explore the past African American history in the Pee Dee


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 74 • NUMBER 5 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 600,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

2020 | may 12 All together now Simple steps your family can take to use less energy—and lower utility bills—when you’re spending more time at home.

EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

Josh Crotzer

17 Saving Jamestown One Pee Dee family keeps a 150-year-old legacy of freedom and self-sufficiency alive with the Jamestown Foundation.

PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins Andrew Chapman

Updates from your cooperative

WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler

6 AGENDA

COPY EDITORS

See how Carolyn Zheng, a fifth grader at Gold Hill Elementary School in Fort Mill, won the 2020 Children’s Book Challenge.

Trevor Bauknight, Jennifer Jas, Jim Poindexter CONTRIBUTORS

April Coker Blake, Mike Couick, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, David Novak, Van O’Cain, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Paul Wesslund, Kathy Witt

8 DIALOGUE Praying for something better With important issues stalled in the General Assembly due to the COVID-19 pandemic, electric cooperatives remain committed to doing what’s best for our members.

PUBLISHER

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (512) 441-5200 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

10 SMART CHOICE Now we’re cooking Have more fun in the kitchen with cooking gadgets that let you chop, blend, fry and bake your way to culinary perfection.

Spend some time in the kitchen with Elise Sammis, a contestant on Season 8 of Food Network’s Kids Baking Championship.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2020. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

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15 SC STORIES Lights, camera, bake!

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

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RECIPE

On the side Summer’s almost here, so use these tasty recipes for delicious sides to complement whatever is sizzling away on the grill.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

26 MARKETPLACE 27 SC HOME Five features homeowners crave Get more joy out of your next home remodeling project with advice from professional renovation experts.

$5.72 members,

$8 nonmembers

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GARDENER

The late show: marvelous moonvine Nighttime is the right time to enjoy the fragrant blooms of this intriguing garden beauty.

30 Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

HUMOR ME

Self-isolation for dummies Have the last laugh at the coronavirus with our humor columnist’s thoughts on the hidden benefits of spending too much time at home. FRO M TO P : COU RTESY O F TOUCHSTON E; A N DRE W H AWORTH; G I N A MOORE

SC SCE NE

Lower your utility bills SC RECIPE

Tasty barbecue sides

MAY 2020

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

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4 CO-OP NEWS

PRODUCTION

Explore the past African American history in the Pee Dee

Michael Crutcher, a Frederick Douglass reenactor, enthralled visitors at the 2019 Celebrate Jamestown Reunion with his stories of the life and times of the passionate abolitionist. Photo by Andrew Haworth.


SC | agenda BY THE NUMBERS

Behind the Energy Star label The Energy Star logo, that little blue (sometimes black) logo with the star inside that you see on all sorts of devices, has changed the way Americans buy appliances and consumer electronics. A joint project of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Energy Star program tests a wide variety of devices to independently verify they meet or exceed federal energy efficiency standards. If the appliance or electronic carries the Energy Star logo, you know it’s among the most energy-efficient products available. —PAUL WESSLUND

$30 billion

Estimated energy-cost savings consumers have enjoyed by using Energy Star-rated products

300 million Number of Energy Star-rated products purchased in 2017 alone

500

Number of testing labs, in 25 countries around the globe, evaluating products against Energy Star standards

1,500

Approximate number of new products tested each year

75%

Percentage of U.S. households that say the Energy Star label influences their purchases

25%

Energy-use reduction that must be proven by lab testing before a computer can earn the Energy Star label 6

Making science fun What happens when you ask fourth and fifth graders across South Carolina to study electricity, then share what they know with other kids by writing and illustrating books on the subject? It turns out you get some very creative ways to teach science and technology. The Children’s Book Challenge—­ sponsored by EnlightenSC, an education­al initiative of the state’s independent, ­consumer-owned electric cooperatives—is an annual competition that asks ­students to explore the impact of electricity on their lives, communities and the state. “South Carolina’s electric cooperatives have been committed to powering rural communities since 1938,” says Lindsey Smith, vice president for education at The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. “This concern for communities, and the future of our youth, has carried forward to today. By inspiring students to learn more about energy in our state, S.C.’s electric co-ops hope to spark a passion for critical thinking in the minds of tomorrow’s leaders.” Carolyn Zheng, a fifth grader at Gold Hill Elementary School in Fort Mill, won the 2020 Children’s Book Challenge (and a $500 cash prize) for her entry, When Wind Meets Windmill. Her book, which explains how windmills generate clean, renewable energy, was selected as a regional winner by her local co-op, York Electric. A panel of judges gave it top honors from a field of eight regional finalists. “The judges were impressed with the quality of both the story and illustrations Carolyn created for her book,” says Porter Gable of York Electric

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Carolyn Zheng, a fifth grader at Gold Hill Elementary School in Fort Mill, won the 2020 Children’s Book Challenge (and a $500 cash prize) for her entry, When Wind Meets Windmill.

Cooperative. “She’s a gifted artist and writer at a young age, and electric co-ops are pleased to be able to recognize and reward her work.” When Wind Meets Windmill will be published and distributed to ­elementary schools throughout the state. During a live video conference announcing her win, Zheng explained her approach to the challenge. “I had in mind to make it a little comic,” she says. “So, I drew these two characters, the windmill and the wind, to make it more fun to read.” GET MORE To read Carolyn Zheng’s winning book, visit SCLiving.coop/book-challenge to download a PDF version of When Wind Meets Windmill. For more information on the Children’s Book Challenge and other educational programs sponsored by South Carolina’s electric ­cooperatives, visit enlightensc.org.


ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

Corn off the cob

HIGHLIGHTS

Let Chef Belinda show you how to perform the oh-so-simple task of removing raw corn kernels from the corn cob. You won’t believe how easy it is! Watch the video at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Crazy about crepes

A N DRE W H AWORTH

M I LTON MORRIS

Elise Sammis, a contestant on Season 8 of Food Network’s Kids Baking Championship, shows us her favorite recipe for homemade crepes. Watch the video at SCLiving.coop/crepes.

Register to win OUT OF THIS WORLD Until the COVID-19 pandemic is over we might not be able to take a journey to the S.C. State Museum, but the museum is making it possible for us to take a journey to the moon, with a 360-degree virtual tour of its popular Apollo 50 exhibit. Point your browser to scmuseum.org/e-learning-museum-resources where you can “walk” the exhibit by panning left and right. Click the onscreen icons to view information and watch videos about the artifacts on display, including the spacesuit and helmet worn by South Carolina astronaut Charles Duke when he became the youngest man to walk on the moon during the Apollo 16 mission.

Like us on Facebook

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

COVID-19 has to end sometime, so start planning now for your Aiken Escape. Register today for our May Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card, a guided Aiken Trolley tour and $75 Downtown Aiken shopping spree—courtesy of City of Aiken Parks, Recreation and Tourism. For details and to register online, visit SCLiving.coop/reader-reply. One lucky winner will be drawn at random from all entries received by May 31.

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If you love living in South Carolina as much as we do, like and follow us on Facebook, where we celebrate all that’s great about the Palmetto State. Join the fun at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

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Home cooling makes up a large portion of your energy bills. Try to keep the difference between the temperature of your thermostat setting and the outside temperature to a minimum. The smaller the difference, the more energy you will save. For additional tips on cutting your utility bills, see “All together now,” starting on Page 12.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   dialogue

Praying for something better I’VE ALWAYS HEARD, IF YOU REALLY WANT TO

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

8

make God laugh, tell him what your plans are. My plans for this spring were to watch my beloved Gamecocks win another women’s basket­ ball national championship, watch my baby daughter Alex graduate from high school, have my right shoulder’s torn rotator cuff repaired, and spend more time with my parents. I also wanted the electric cooperatives to work with the General Assembly on two important objectives: 1) meaningful governance reform of Santee Cooper and 2) deploying broadband (high-speed internet access) to our rural communities. An older acquaintance shared with me a memory from her days as a young student attending a Catholic elementary school. Her friend asked a stern but wise nun whether it was OK to pray for a bicycle for Christmas. In a wonderful moment of teaching from the heart, the nun said it was acceptable to pray for the bicycle as long as the prayer asked for a bicycle or something better. A prayer like that leaves God wide open to teach us what is better. My daughter is not going to have a graduation ceremony, but her school placed a nice yard sign on our front lawn showing how much they value this year’s seniors. During our quarantine, my daughter has gotten to spend a lot of quality time with my wife and me, building relationships that I think are more valuable than a high school graduation ceremony. I can’t have my rotator cuff fixed because it’s an elective surgery, but I’ve found the limitations of my once-dominant side have helped me become more ambidextrous. I’m getting to be as skilled with my left hand as I used to be with my right. During a recent visit to my hometown of Clover, my parents rode in a golf cart while I strolled about 20 feet away. It was the first time I’d been in their presence physically since our quarantine measures had begun six weeks earlier. My mom, who has never engaged with technology, now has an iPhone. She uses it to FaceTime with me every afternoon around 1:30. This is a lady who is 87 years old and is legally blind from macular degeneration, but she’s finally learned FaceTime. Now, she gets to hear reassuring voices and see at least the shadows of friends and family.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

There are huge swaths of this state where working from home and distance education are nearly impossible because broadband internet isn’t available. My Gamecocks looked ready to dominate heading into the NCAA tournament, ending the regular season ranked No. 1 in the nation. With the tournament canceled, they likely will have to settle for an asterisk in the record books. It is disappointing that they did not get to finish their season. Rural broadband is kind of like the ­unfinished business of NCAA basketball. The General Assembly was in the midst of deciding who could offer broadband and where. We’ve learned during this COVID‑19 crisis that broadband is essential to all of our citizens. Yet, there are huge swaths of this state where working from home and distance education are nearly impossible because broadband internet isn’t available. The need for rural broadband won’t be resolved this year, but this will not be the last time rural America will need widespread, highspeed internet access. This pandemic has also stymied the General Assembly’s efforts to reform Santee Cooper. After spending thousands of hours and millions of dollars in its “test the market” process, the General Assembly is left with the unfinished business of whether to sell Santee Cooper, engage in a management agreement with a third-party entity, or reform it. Like broadband and the Gamecocks’ hoped-for national championship, a decision on Santee Cooper isn’t likely to be handled this year, either. What we plan for and what we need to pray for must be two different things. Now that this crisis has put our plans on hold, we need to pray (and work) for something better.


YOUR ENERGY SUPERHEROES

Best in class service is our superpower. We’re a local, not-for-profit electric cooperative. We don’t have customers, we have members. People aren’t just our number one priority, they’re the reason we’re here. To learn more about the power of the cooperative difference, visit TouchstoneEnergy.com

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION.


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SC   smart choice

Now we’re cooking Whether you’re a kitchen pro, or working to develop basic culinary skills, these cooking tools offer enhanced abilities to fry, stir, chop and bake. We’ve even found a device that takes care of the food scraps. BY DAVID NOVAK

BIG MOUTH

PROFESSIONAL GRADE

Countertop cooking appliances are always a great cooking choice because they use less electricity and generate less unwanted heat in the kitchen than their full-sized cousins. With the Wolf Gourmet Countertop Oven Elite, you get all the capabilities of a professional oven (including convection heat) so you can bake, broil, roast, toast and warm your way to great meals any time you like. $680. (877) 812‑6235; williams-sonoma.com.

FRY GUY

Oil is out. Air is in. We’re talking about air frying, of course. The Cosori Smart 5.8-Quart Air Fryer does all the thinking for you with 11 different one-touch options for cooking everything from steak and fries to vegetables and even dessert. It’s also app-enabled so you can start, stop or adjust cooking time and temperature from your mobile device. $120. (888) 402‑1684; cosori.com.

MULTI-TASKER

People love their Instant Pot. Why not? It combines an electric pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker and yogurt maker in one handy unit. The Instant Pot Duo Nova is the latest generation, with upgrades that include a cooking status indicator, easy steam-release button and an easy-seal lid. $80. (800) 828‑7280; instantpot.com.

USEFUL SCRAPS

SMOOTHIE SAILING

The classic blender has been reimagined with millo, a compact, rechargeable smoothie maker with a touch-sensitive base and sensors that stop the device when your blended beverage reaches the perfect consistency. It combines the latest in technology with a classic minimalist design and runs whisper quiet, thanks to a patented brushless magnetic drive. $431. getmillo.com. 10

Food processors give you lots of options to make fresh and creative cuisine. The 14-Cup Hamilton Beach Professional Food Processor takes it up a notch with a variety of stack and snap accessories and cutting blade options. It can handle just about anything—from slender carrots to whole fruits—thanks to the 3-in-1 Big Mouth feed tube. Let’s start chopping! $150. (800) 851‑8900; hamiltonbeach.com.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

This countertop recycler makes it easy to take care of yourself and the planet. Toss fruit cores, vegetable peels and other scraps (including chicken bones) into the Vitamix FoodCycler FC-30, close the lid and push the button. It heats, aerates and pulverizes food scraps, turning them into dry compost in a matter of hours—all without odor, thanks to carbon filters. $300. (440) 235‑4840; vitamix.com.

Tech journalist David Novak is editor of GadgetGram.com. Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.


WIN A $100 GIFT CARD

Dream now. Plan for later.

South Carolina Living and City of Aiken Parks, Recreation and Tourism have joined together to keep us all dreaming of the day when we can get back out and enjoy our beautiful state! Sign up today for our May Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card and a full day of exploring Aiken’s grace, charm and elegance with a guided Aiken Trolley tour and $75 Downtown Aiken shopping spree. One lucky winner will be drawn at random from all the entries received by May 31. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon at right.

R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

Register below, or online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a day escape to Aiken and a $100 gift card. Name Address City

By entering, you may receive information from these great travel and tourism sponsors: j City of Aiken Parks, Recreation and Tourism j Alpine Helen/White County, Ga. j Cheraw Visitors Bureau j Experience Columbia SC CVB j Kings Mountain Little Theatre j South Carolina Living magazine

State/ZIP Email* Phone*

South Carolina Living, RRTS, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by May 31, 2020, to be eligible. *Winner will be contacted to verify mailing address.

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All together  now Simple steps your family can take to use less energy—and lower utility bills—when you’re spending more time at home BY JIM POINDEXTER

Quick—what’s the easiest way to lower your monthly energy bill almost immediately? With more family members spending more time at home due to COVID-19, and the hot summer months ahead, knowing how to manage your energy use—and keep utility bills low—is more important than ever. The place to start, according to energy experts at South Carolina’s not-for-profit electric cooperatives, is with your thermostat. It’s advice you’ve probably heard before, but it’s still the easiest way to lower your bill: Set your thermostat to 78 degrees or higher when the weather gets warm. For every degree you set your thermostat higher than 78, you can save 3% to 5% on your cooling bill. Parrish Neville, marketing manager with Palmetto Electric Cooperative, says even slight adjustments in the temperature setting can make a difference, either in costs or savings. “We tell our members to keep the temperature as close to 78 or above as they can,” says Neville. “That’s the priority. But we know homeowners need a balance between being comfortable and saving energy. Each degree you can set your thermostat higher, and still feel comfortable, will produce the biggest energy savings and lower your bill.” 12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Eddie Plowden, manager of marketing and energy ­services at Berkeley Electric Cooperative, says that if you have a programmable thermostat, it can still help save energy even though you’re spending more time at home. “The benefit of a programmable thermostat is you don’t have to worry about adjusting the temperature yourself,” says Plowden. “You can program the thermostat for a warmer temperature during the day and then have it lower the temperature at night, if you like it a little cooler for sleeping. Keeping a consistent temperature for longer periods of the day saves more energy than constantly moving it up and down.” Another helpful tip is to keep the thermostat fan setting on “auto.” Setting the fan on auto saves energy because the fan will only run during the cooling cycle. Once the desired temperature is reached, the fan shuts off. In addition to keeping your thermostat at 78 degrees or


Turn up the temp For every degree you set your thermostat higher than 78 degrees, you can save 3% to 5% on your cooling bill. higher, you also want to make sure your HVAC system is running as efficiently as possible. This will save energy and help lower your energy bill. Here are a few tips: u Check air filters monthly. Dirty filters cause your cooling system to work harder, which wastes energy. Clean or replace dirty air filters regularly. u Leave interior and hallway doors at least slightly open to allow for adequate air flow. u Don’t close air vents in unoccupied rooms. u Make sure vents aren’t blocked by furniture, rugs or curtains.

Get into energy-saving mode Beyond managing your thermostat, there are many more no-cost, low-cost ways to save energy at home. Mike Smith, vice president for business and technology at The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, says the unique situation of being at home more can provide an opportunity for you to improve your home’s energy efficiency. “You don’t have to do big, expensive projects to make your home more efficient,” says Smith. “You have time to really investigate your home and see where you might need to make repairs or improvements. It could be as simple as trimming the bushes around your HVAC unit. Or you might notice

rotting wood around your gutters. You might need to replace the weather stripping around a door. These types of things can affect the efficiency of your home. It’s a good time to take care of some things that you might have been putting off.” It also might be a good time to change some of your habits. Here are tips that can help you save energy as you go through your daily routine.

Turn off the lights

TURN OFF LIGHTS It’s a simple thing, but leaving lights on not only wastes energy, it produces more heat in your home. How much energy you can save depends on the type of bulbs you’re using. Incandescent bulbs, the least energy efficient, should be turned off anytime you leave a room. With compact fluorescent lightbulbs (CFLs), a general rule is to turn them off if you’ll be out of the room for more than 15 minutes, according to energy.gov. This will extend a CFL’s life, which can be shortened by the number of times it’s switched on and off. Light-emitting diode bulbs (LEDs) don’t have that concern, so turn them off when you leave a room.

Tackle those small tasks

Mind the energy vampires TURN OFF ELECTRONICS Many appliances and electronics draw small amounts of energy even when they’re not in use. Unplugging every device in your home may not be uu SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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practical. But remember to unplug devices such as cell phones, tablets, cordless appliances and other electronics once fully charged. Small savings can add up. Smart power strips are an easy way to cut power to multiple dormant devices and chargers with a push of a single button.

Manage usage with online tools

Fill up the washer

column (Page 10) for advice on energy-saving countertop appliances. Better yet, in the summer months, get out of the kitchen and enjoy grilling outdoors.

WASH FULL LOADS Make sure you have a full load before washing clothes. Your washer will use about the same amount of energy no matter the size of the load. Using warm water instead of hot can cut a load’s energy use in half. Using cold water saves even more. When drying clothes, make sure the load is the right size. If the dryer is too full, it can take longer for clothes to dry. Loads that are too small also take longer, which wastes energy. Remember to clean the lint filter so your dryer runs more efficiently and safely.

Grill out

MANAGE YOUR ENERGY USE ONLINE Many South Carolina electric cooperatives offer online tools such as Smart Hub and My Energy Online to help members track their energy use. Neville, Plowden and Smith encourage members to take advantage of these tools through their local cooperative website, if available. “The online tools can help you check your progress in managing your energy use,” says Neville. “You can view your daily and hourly kilowatt use, compare your usage day-today and year-to-year and see the impact daily weather has on your energy use.” Plowden adds the online tool also can help get kids involved in finding ways to use less energy at home. “Make it a challenge for the whole family to see how much energy you can save each day.”

GET MORE Learn more ways to save energy and cut utility bills with these stories found only at SCLiving.coop/energy.

u Energy-saving tips for renters

Our efficiency experts offer tips for boosting comfort and lowering bills when you don’t own your home.

CAN’T STAND THE HEAT, GET OUT OF THE KITCHEN Cooking in the oven or on the stove not only uses a lot of energy, but also heats up the house. Microwaves or toaster ovens use less electricity to operate and they generate less unwanted heat for the air conditioner to deal with. See this month’s “Smart Choice” 14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

u Keep cool for less

A professional HVAC tuneup can help lower bills and prolong the life of your system.

PI EDM O NT E LEC TRIC COO PER ATI V E

u Your efficiency upgrades checklist Follow this six-step guide if you plan to make efficiency improvements to your home this spring.


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SC   stories

Lights, camera, bake! If not for a hurricane, Elise Sammis might never have made it into reality television baking fame. In September of 2018, with her school closed because of Hurricane Matthew, Elise was at home watching the Kids Baking Championship on television. She was hooked and made an audition tape. Six months later, show executives called. That started a process of interviews and baking challenges that led to her being selected as one of 15 kids to fly to Los Angeles. “They told us 15 would fly out, and 12 would make it on the show,” says Elise. “We packed our bags with a lot of clothes because we didn’t know if we were going to be there for two days or a long time.” A day after the interview, she got the good news—she was on the show and would compete for a $25,000 prize. Filming started immediately. For Elise, the first two challenges were a piece of cake. But the third was not her charm. In that challenge, she had to make a dessert that looked like a sandwich— banh mi—a Vietnamese baguette filled with meats and veggies. “I had never heard of it,” says Elise. “I had never tasted it. I didn’t know what was in it, so I had no idea what to do.” And with that, her time on national TV was over. She didn’t win the top prize, but she says she did win over her fellow contestants— and they’ve all become good friends. “I stay in touch with them just about every day,” she says. “We talk about life—and of course, baking.”

KEEP CALM AND

WASH YOUR HANDS

—VAN O’CAIN | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

Elise Sammis AGE:

11.

Chapin. Contestant on Season 8 of Food Network’s Kids Baking Championship. FAVORITE CHEF: Adriano Zumbo from the Netflix series Zumbo’s Just Desserts. FUTURE CAREER: Culinary producer. HOMETOWN:

CLAIM TO FAME:

WORST BAKING MOMENT:

When she and a friend were making Christmas cookies, they added four cups of oil when the recipe called for ¼ cup. “We spilled it everywhere, and we had to make about five million cookies because the oil proportions were all off.”

GET MORE Crazy

about crepes? Visit scliving.coop/crepes for Elise’s special recipe in our exclusive video.

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KEEP CALM AND

WASH YOUR HANDS CS243041B


Saving

Jamestown LOCATED AT THE END OF A BUMPY, SANDY RIDE DOWN

Jamestown Cemetery Road, about five miles east of Florence, the old house doesn’t look like much. It’s a humble, one-story wooden cabin with a rusting tin roof, falling-in porch and jagged-edge windows, all of it slowly being swallowed by surrounding trees and vegetation. But to African American history buffs and the descendants of a former slave named Ervin James, the cabin and other remnants of a once-thriving agricultural community are an important Pee Dee landmark worth preserving. In 1870, Ervin James enacted a daring plan. He secretly purchased more than 100 acres of land from local white residents to give his family and other freed slaves a legacy beyond sharecropping. In the turbulent era of Reconstruction following the Civil War, it was illegal for whites to sell property to blacks, and had the deal been discovered by the wrong people, the transaction could have been disastrous for all involved. This bold purchase, made on a hope and a dream, laid the groundwork for the modern James family, who still hold the deed to the property. Ervin James and his descendants lived and farmed on the land for more than 70 years. They expanded their uu

One Pee Dee family keeps a 150-year-old legacy of freedom and self-sufficiency alive with the Jamestown Foundation BY APRIL COKER BLAKE | PHOTOS BY ANDREW HAWORTH

EDITOR’S NOTE: As this issue went to press, South Carolina was still in the grip of the COVID-19 pandemic, forcing many events to be canceled or postponed. For the latest updates on the 2020 Celebrate Jamestown Reunion, see the Jamestown Foundation Facebook page or contact Terry James at (843) 661-5679; jamest955@att.net. For current updates on coronavirus health precautions, visit scdhec.gov/covid19.

HISTORY BUFF Celebrate Jamestown organizer Terry James is a descendant of Ervin James and the director of the Jamestown Foundation. His passion for history extends to Civil War reenacting. Here, he is dressed as a soldier of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment. SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


SAVING JAMESTOWN

SACRED GROUND A large, modern stone marks the historic Jamestown Cemetery, which is still in use. The oldest graves date back to the early 1900s.

holdings to more than 240 acres and established a community called Jamestown—22 buildings in all, including a church and cemetery that are still in use. James family members have since spread far and wide throughout the United States, but several still live nearby, including Terry James, head of the Jamestown Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization working to preserve the site. The nonprofit foundation shares the family legacy of freedom and self-sufficiency each summer with the Celebrate Jamestown Reunion, and is actively seeking to raise funds to properly restore the old home as a reminder of a pivotal time in the state’s history.

including wagon tours to really take people back in time to ­experience what life was like for former slaves in the late 1800s. James is always uncovering information about the family’s past through his research, a personal passion. “Ervin signed the deed to the land on January 23, 1871, and gave the people he purchased the land from $400,” says James. “I don’t know how he got it, maybe he had a skill, but in 1872 he gave them another $300 but passed away shortly thereafter.” James doesn’t yet know how Ervin passed away—if the cause of his death was natural or the result of foul play—but seeing the relationships that were formed between the newly freed slaves and white people so that both sides could get things done during reconstruction fascinates James and keeps him impassioned to share this story with his family and the world. He c­ontinues to research and delve into the family’s history and even discovered last year that Ervin was on the registry to vote in Marion County in 1868.

Celebrate Jamestown Reunion

The James family has a three-day reunion celebration each year on the last weekend in July that is open to the public. The Celebrate Jamestown Reunion includes reenactments, traditional storytelling, artisans showing period crafts, a big banquet and a church service to cap off the weekend. “We opened the reunion up to the public in 2013, even though some of the family didn’t like it,” says Terry James. “I told them this story is too great to keep it. It’s like a pearl in an oyster, you have to open it up to see it.” Some of the James family come from far away to enjoy Preserving the past the reunion. “I’m glad to be part of James history,” says Larry James Lassitter, who traveled from New York to attend the In the early 2000s, Terry James says, some family members 2019 event and brought his youngest son. “Every chance I get, wanted to sell the land, but he stood firmly against this idea. I try to come home. I want my kids to know their history and He worked his way to become the head of the Jamestown be proud of the James heritage.” Foundation in 2007 so that he could preserve the cabin and As for this year’s Celebrate Jamestown Reunion, James says the legacy it represents. the focus will be on the African roots of the men and women Small victories on his part included a state-sanctioned hisheld in bondage in South Carolina until emancipation. He torical marker that was put in place in 2006, and recognition hopes to fill the fields near the old cabin with a wider variety from Congressman James Clyburn in 2007. The site is also of activities that showcase African arts and craftsmanship listed on the National Register of Historic Places. But more work is needed to save the cabin, he says. in addition to the usual array of drummers, dancers, story­ James has been pushing for a feasibility study by the South tellers and historical interpreters he has brought to Celebrate Carolina Department of Archives and History, something he Jamestown in the past. says is a long process. “These types of crafts are so fragile, the elders know it “We’ll bring architectural historians out here who can and the young people aren’t as interested, so these crafts are tell us what it would cost to get it done, fading,” he says. then we can begin asking corporations for Preserving the physical legacy of GET THERE The Celebrate Jamestown Reunion funding,” he says. Jamestown—which is 18 years older than is traditionally held on the last weekend in July His initial plan is to restore the house, the formation of Florence County—and with multiple events in and around Florence the smokehouse and the outhouse, and sharing traditions from long ago, can be a and on the Jamestown property. For details ­enhance the security measures already in and updates on the 2020 Celebrate Jamestown lot of work, but James says he finds it replace on the property. Ultimately, he has warding. “It’s like God gives you an assign­ Reunion, visit the Jamestown Foundation big dreams of doing regular historic re‑­ ment and you’ve got to carry it out even Facebook page or contact Terry James at though it’s challenging from time to time.” enactments and ­interpretations on the site, (843) 661-5679; jamest955@att.net. 18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


IRON MAN Gilbert Walker Jr., a blacksmith from Savannah, Georgia, demonstrates his techniques to visitors.

Scenes from

Celebrate Jamestown Photographer Andrew Haworth captured these portraits of participants at the 2019 reunion, the 149th anniversary of the settlement’s founding. Turn the page for more. uu

p WOOD WIZARD Woodworker Robert Watson planes a shingle using the tools and techniques of the late 1800s when Ervin James established Jamestown, an agricultural settlement for freed slaves near Mars Bluff.

SWEETGRASS SUCCESS Mount Pleasant artisan Jery Taylor sells her sweetgrass baskets in the festival’s marketplace.

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


CELEBRATE JAMESTOWN

TOOL TIME Antiques on display at the Jamestown settlement.

“This story is too great to keep it. It’s like a pearl in an oyster, you have to open it up to see it.” —CELEBRATE JAMESTOWN ORGANIZER TERRY JAMES ON THE DECISION TO INVITE THE PUBLIC TO THE FAMILY’S ANNUAL REUNION

p TO DYE FOR Arianne King Comer, an artist and “indigo advocate,” displays the dye she’ll use in her demonstration. Indigo stamps (right) are used for imprinting designs into cloth. t MINSTREL SHOW

Henry Prince, a fiddler originally from New York, performs periodaccurate songs.

20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   recipe

the

On

SIDE

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

We’re all re cooking at home mo D‑19, VI CO to ks than ever than just around and with summer t time to cook ea gr the corner, it’s a e tasty recipes for outdoors. Use thes complement delicious sides to away whatever is sizzling ill. gr e on th

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

K A REN H ERM A N N

BAKED BEANS MEDLEY SERVES 10–12

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 pound ground sausage or ground beef 1 pound thick-sliced bacon, cut into ½-inch pieces 1 large sweet onion, chopped 1 large red bell pepper, chopped 2 large garlic cloves, minced 1 15-oz can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 15-oz can pinto beans, rinsed and drained 1 15-oz can small red or kidney beans, rinsed and drained

1 15-oz can lima or butter beans, rinsed and drained 1 cup chili sauce 1 cup barbecue sauce ½ cup packed brown sugar 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 2 tablespoons molasses ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon blackened or Cajun seasoning G teaspoon fresh-chopped oregano, for garnish G teaspoon fresh-chopped basil, for garnish

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a very large skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat, heat oil and brown sausage. Using a slotted spoon, remove sausage to a paper towel-lined platter. Pour off excess fat. Cook bacon until fat is rendered but still slightly limp. Remove to platter with sausage. Saute onions and bell pepper until onions are translucent, about 2–3 minutes; add garlic and cook an additional minute. Add beans, sausage and bacon. In a medium bowl, combine chili sauce, barbecue sauce, sugar, vinegar, molasses, Worcestershire and seasoning. Pour over beans, mix thoroughly and heat until warm. Pour into a 9-by-13-inch baking dish (or larger if needed) and bake uncovered 30–40 minutes or until bubbly and heated through. Sprinkle with oregano/basil combination. Keep warm until ready to serve. 22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

SPICY TOMATO JALAPENO MAC AND CHEESE SERVES 8

7 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 1 pound mini penne pasta 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour 4 cups milk, room temperature Kosher salt White pepper Pinch nutmeg 1 teaspoon mustard powder 1 teaspoon dried thyme

1 large jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely chopped 1 28-oz can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, well drained 2 cups pepper jack cheese (Monterey Jack, for less heat) 2 cups sharp white cheddar cheese ½ cup seasoned breadcrumbs 1 cup grated parmesan cheese

Preheat oven to 350 F. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with 2 tablespoons butter. Cook pasta according to package instructions until al dente, about 5 minutes. Drain and toss in 1 tablespoon butter, to prevent pasta from drying out and sticking together. In a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium heat, melt remaining butter. Sprinkle with flour and using a flat whisk, stir to combine and cook for 2–3 minutes. Do not let brown. Slowly add milk and whisk continuously until sauce starts to thicken, about 2–3 minutes. Add salt, pepper, nutmeg, mustard, thyme, jalapeno and tomatoes, and cook an additional 2–3 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in cheeses. Pour into baking dish. In a small bowl, combine breadcrumbs and parmesan; sprinkle over top of mac and cheese. Bake 30–35 minutes or until bubbly. Let rest 15 minutes and serve warm.


FRESH CORN AVOCADO SALAD WITH LIME DRESSING SERVES 4–6

G I N A MOORE

1 cup arugula 2 cups fresh corn kernels (2–3 ears) 1 pint grape tomatoes, halved 2 avocados, diced ½ small red onion, sliced ½ cup crumbled feta 2 tablespoons garlic olive oil 2 tablespoons lime juice, freshly squeezed 1 tablespoon cilantro, freshly chopped 1 tablespoon basil, freshly chopped Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground

In a large serving bowl, combine arugula, corn, tomatoes, ­avocados, onion and feta. In a glass measuring cup, mix together oil, lime juice, cilantro, basil, salt and pepper. Pour over the salad and gently mix until well-coated. Keep refrigerated until ready to serve.

CHEF’S TIP

Prevent avocados from turning brown. As soon as avocados are cut or sliced, put in a bowl and sprinkle with freshly squeezed lemon juice. Cover with plastic wrap and store in refrigerator until ready to add to your salad or dish.

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop CORN OFF THE COB Let Chef Belinda show you how to perform the oh-so-simple task of removing raw corn kernels from the corn cob. You won’t believe how easy it is! Watch the video at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda Turn the page for more tasty sides uu

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


|

SC   recipe

G I N A M OO RE

MINI CORNBREAD POPPERS MAKES 24 MINI MUFFINS

K A REN H ERM A N N

Make plenty of these—nobody can eat just one!

Preheat oven to 400 F. Spray a 24-cup mini muffin pan with cooking spray.

1 cup cornmeal 1 cup all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons sugar, optional 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 1 large egg, lightly beaten 1 cup milk G cup canola oil

In a large mixing bowl, combine cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Make a well in the center and add egg, milk and oil. Mix until just combined. Using a small scoop or tablespoon, fill each cup ¾ full. Bake for 12–15 minutes until golden brown. Serve hot or room temperature.

ROASTED MUSTARD BACON POTATO SALAD

GET MORE

SERVES 4

4 slices thick bacon 2 pounds small waxy potatoes (Yukon Gold or red), halved or quartered Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground 1 large clove garlic, minced

2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons honey N cup olive oil 4–5 scallions, sliced diagonally 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped flat

Cooking at home? We can help!

Preheat oven to 400 F. On a parchment or foil-lined rimmed baking sheet, lay bacon slices and bake for 12–15 minutes until crisp. Exact time will vary based on thickness of slices. Move to a paper towel-lined platter; crumble when cool. On same baking sheet with bacon grease, toss potatoes and bake, cut-side down, until just fork tender, 20–25 minutes. Size of potato chunks will determine exact baking time. Remove from oven and place on paper towel, cut-side down, to cool. In a medium measuring cup with a spout, combine salt, pepper, garlic, vinegar, mustard and honey. Using a small whisk, slowly drizzle and whisk in olive oil until emulsified.

Salt to pepper ratios. When seasoning food dishes with salt and pepper, the rule of thumb is a 2-to-1 ratio—meaning twice as much salt as pepper, for attaining a balanced flavor profile. Of course, always let your palate be your guide in seasoning to your taste preferences. CHEF’S TIP

24

A LE X A N DER FOX

In a large serving bowl, add potatoes, bacon, scallions and half of parsley. Toss with enough dressing to desired coverage. Garnish with remaining parsley and serve.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Cooped up all day? Make the best of it (and some memorable meals) with all of Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan’s recipe columns and how-to videos in one place. Go to SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda and let the fun begin. Don’t miss these reader favorites. Cheap eats: meals under $10—Delicious and nutritious meals don’t have to be expensive. These recipes use ingredients that are always in season. Rookie cooking—No more excuses. With Chef Belinda’s menu of delicious starter recipes, anyone can make a satisfying, home-cooked meal. Cool summer salads—Who wants to sweat over a hot stove this summer? Maintain your cool with these light and refreshing entree salads that will satisfy any appetite. Blasts from the past—From chicken Kiev to baked Alaska, Chef Belinda SmithSullivan shares her recipes for classic, home-cooked comfort food, just like Mom used to make.


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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

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SC   home

Five features homeowners crave BY KATHY WITT

To borrow the words of organizational guru Marie Kondo, remodeling sparks joy— and lots of it.

homes. In fact, they love it to the tune of $400 billion annually, according to the 2019 Remodeling Impact Report from the National Association of Realtors Research Group. To borrow the words of organizational guru Marie Kondo, remodeling sparks joy—and lots of it. In 2017, the National Association of Realtors introduced the Joy Score, which ranks home renovations on a 1-to-10 scale according to the happiness they bring homeowners. Before you take on a remodeling project, consider these five upgrades that top the Joy Score ratings and some good advice from top remodeling professionals.

Open-concept kitchens JOY SCORE: Kitchen upgrade 9.7; complete kitchen renovation 10

Houses built in the 1970s and 1980s may have kitchens as dated as the fashions from those decades, says Tim Ellis, president of T.W. Ellis Design/Build/ Remodel in Forest Hills, Maryland. “They were typically boxy—not really functional when it comes to entertaining. People were separated by the walls,” he says. “The kitchen is the heart of the house, where everyone is going to be. We’re designing around that so now it’s open and everyone is part of the conversation.”

Can you say ‘spa-cation’? JOY SCORE: Bathroom upgrade/renovation 9.3; bathroom addition 9.2

Running a close second on homeowner wish lists is creating a haven at home that feels like a luxury spa, says Jessica Lautz, vice president of demographics and behavioral insights at the Realtors association. “Adding or remodeling a bathroom is very popular. People feel happier in their home after they tackle that project.” The possibilities for transforming a

TI M E LLIS/ T.W. E LLIS DES IG N / BU I LD/ REM O DE L

AMERICANS LOVE TO REMODEL THEIR

Removing walls between kitchen and family room and using the same flooring throughout opens up this space, transforming it into the heart of the home.

bathroom into a private spa retreat are endless, from simple options like painting the room in earthy colors and installing dimmer switches, to a full-on remodel that includes radiant heating underfoot and a luxurious rainfall showerhead above.

Storage, storage, storage JOY SCORE:

Closet renovation 10

Storage and finding ways to better organize the house are key concerns among homeowners. There simply is never enough storage space, no matter how big the house is. “This is always on the wish list,” says master certified remodeler Dennis Gehman, owner and founder of Harleysville, Pennsylvania-based Gehman Design Remodeling. “Homeowners really want closets with organizing systems, and storage solutions in the attic and/or basement for off-season items.”

Freshly painted interior JOY SCORE: Individual room 9.7; full interior paint job 9.8

A fresh coat of paint, especially when it is carried through the entire house, can make a home feel brand new. “Having a full interior paint job really brings a lot of happiness to people,” notes Lautz. “The

only two items with a higher Joy Score are a kitchen reno and closet reno.” Painting is one of the least expensive ways to give a home’s interior a facelift and keep it from looking dated, something no homeowner wants. Even targeting specific areas to paint—a single room, doors and trim—makes a difference and contributes to the goal of adding more personality to the home. Currently reigning in ­popularity among homeowners, according to Gehman, is a lighter color palette of light whites, grays and light blues.

Wow-factor floors New wood flooring 9.2; hardwood flooring refinish 9.5

JOY SCORE:

When homeowners set their sights on upgrading their residence, wood floors and luxury vinyl flooring often spring to mind. “Real hardwood flooring has a huge wow factor,” says Lautz. “You notice it right away and it very much appeals to an owner.” Replacing carpeting with wood or vinyl also makes cleaning easier, says Ellis. “People want the lowest maintenance possible, from the flooring on up, and that means no carpet,” he says. “They don’t want to vacuum. They just want to run the Swiffer mop and be done with it.”

SCLIVING.COOP   | MAY 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   gardener

MAY IN THE GARDEN n Weeds are a fact of life in any garden and yanking them out where they aren’t wanted is an easy, chemical-free way to deal with them. The best time to pull weeds is right after a soaking rain has softened the soil. Take care not to step too close to cultivated plants because the wet ground around their root zones can be easily compacted.

n If your lawnmower’s spark plug is more than two years old, head off to the hardware store and buy a new one for easier starts this summer.

L . A . JACKSO N

Fancy peppers Black Pearl and Chilly Chili grow best in full sun.

TIP OF THE MONTH Whether they are hot or sweet, edible or ornamental, peppers grow best in full sun. Mixing in plenty of compost or a commercial soil conditioner into planting holes will help kick-start peppers into a strong growing mode. Resist the urge to apply a high-nitrogen fertilizer because it will stimulate excess foliage at the expense of pepper production. Also, peppers can hold back on forming blooms—future peppers—during extended hot, dry spells, so add two to three inches of mulch to help conserve ground moisture, water weekly when the rains don’t come and occasionally mist the leaves.

28

L . A . JACKSO N

n This month is a good time to start bringing houseplants outdoors for their summer vacation. Set them in areas that receive filtered shade most of the day to prevent sunscald.

The late show: marvelous moonvine BY L.A. JACKSON

WHEN ASKED WHAT MY F ­ AVORITE

garden plants are, my short list is never without moonvine (Ipomoea alba, also called “moonflower vine”), because, in part, it can be counted on to always be fashionably late. Let me explain. Moonvine is an intriguing beauty that skips joining other blooming ornamentals flashing flowers in the shining summer sun to, instead, wait until the end of the day to party. And this lovely is worth the wait because its large, 4- to 5-inch, ghostly white blossoms unfurl in the dying afternoon light, releasing a sweet scent that can cast a spell on any fortunate gardener within sniffing range. While the flowers—and their fabulous fragrance—last but a single evening, swooning in the rising sun of the following day, nightly encores of more hauntingly beautiful blooms can be counted on from mid to late summer. As advertised, moonvine is a vine, easily twisting to 15 feet or more in length with solid masses of large, heartshaped leaves that can doll up a bare trellis or ugly fence. The best locations, however, are the rails that wrap decks, porches or gazebos—those chilltime evening retreats for the weary, where moonvine’s perfumed blooms can blithely glow in the gloaming, and soothe the soul. Moonvine flaunts flowers best when

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

SHORT BUT SWEET Moonvine waits until the late afternoon to start its flower show. Each fragrant blossom lasts but for a single evening.

planted in well-worked, fertile soil. Also, pick a location for this heat-seeker where the sun shines most of the day but is filtered by some shade to deflect the high afternoon heat. While young plants can occasionally be spotted at nurseries for sale in the spring, moonvine seeds are more commonly found—but, being ­slingshot-ammo hard, they can be a bit of a bear to germinate. However, I’ve had repeated success by nicking the tough outer coverings with a metal file, soaking the stubborn seeds in water overnight and then planting them in starter pots or directly to the garden the next day. Although technically a perennial, this Central American native is not winter hardy in South Carolina, so grow it as an annual, but keep in mind the seeds can easily be saved. Simply wait until their pods turn dark brown in the fall and give ’em a shake. If you hear rattling, the dried seeds are ready to be shucked and tucked away from light in an airtight container until next growing season, when, once again, it will be time for the moonvine’s late show to shine. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


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SC   humor me

Self-isolation for dummies BY JAN A. IGOE

WHENEVER A STRANGER

would sneeze in a crowd—long before our world was seized by a microscopic enemy— most people ignored it. A few would duck and cover, but only the true jet-propelled germaphobe would land in the next area code before anybody could bless the sneezer. That would be me, even without a pandemic. Now that my natural inclination has a sophisticated name, I’m feeling rather smug about being a trendy “self-isolator” instead of a mere “crazy dog lady.” Besides, this interruption could turn out to be an opportunity. In the 1600s, when Isaac Newton was avoiding the plague, he stayed home and invented calculus. Some of us have not forgiven him for that, but it was really the plague’s fault. Sadists immediately adopted it into the high school curriculum and the first kid to flunk beaned Newton on the head with an apple. Instead of apologizing, he went and made gravity a law. Before that, it was optional. Self-isolation isn’t an imposition for inventors, writers and artists. This is our wheelhouse. Pretending not to be home, letting voicemail grab calls, ignoring texts or inventing excuses to animal shelter-inplace with pets (instead of prepping for a night out with germ-spewing humans) are talents we refined way before society came to value them. Compared to Christopher Knight, however, we’re all rank amateurs. Knight was 20 when he disappeared into the Maine woods and severed all human contact for almost three decades. 30

In the 1600s, when Isaac Newton was avoiding the plague, he stayed home and invented calculus. Some of us have not forgiven him for that. An adept lock picker, Knight survived on whatever he could appropriate (aka steal) from neighboring cabins that were closed for the season. His survival skills fascinated Michael Finkel, who wrote The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit. Unlike philosophers and prophets throughout history who sought inspiration in seclusion, Knight wasn’t looking for the meaning of life. He simply did not like people, even before they started hoarding Charmin and spreading deadly viruses. With enough creativity, you won’t have to move to Maine just to avoid your

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  MAY 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

fellow humans. There are plenty of ways to get others to do the avoiding for you. For example, you could tattoo your entire body a sparkling turquoise, like a tranquil beach in Aruba. Donnie Snider, a forklift driver from Canada, fell in love with the color and covered every inch of his skin with it. Every inch. I’m guessing the only reason he’s still employed is that whatever he’s forklifting can’t run away. Another idea: Make friends with life-size dolls, like bodybuilder Yuri Tolochko. He plans to tie the knot with Margo, the silicone seductress he started dating last year. Apparently, Tolochko arranged plastic surgery (for his equally plastic fiancee) to bolster her selfimage. Yeah, let’s avoid Yuri until we’re sure crazy isn’t contagious, too. So until the virus passes, we can retreat to the woods, create a master­ piece, adopt more dogs, paint ­ourselves blue or talk to imaginary friends. Maybe get a donkey and a m ­ iniature pony like the furry cuties keeping Arnold Schwarzenegger company. (The Terminator movies will never be the same.) Pretty soon, drones will be able to spot sick people in a crowd. According to mirror.co.uk, they’re testing prototypes that can identify anyone coughing or sneezing from 10 meters away. Amateurs. I can do it from 25. Easy. JAN A. IGOE hopes everyone stays happy and healthy. Maybe the quarantine will be over by the time you read this. Just be well and don’t invent any more math.


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AUTOMATIC x 18" HARDWOOD DOLLY BATTERY FLOAT 30" Customer Rating CHARGER • 1000 lb. capacity

Customer Rating

99

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, power stations, safes, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Atlas, Bauer, Central Machinery, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/12/20.

SUPER COUPON

®

72" x 80" MOVING BLANKET

NOW

MODEL: SW-SWITCH-12/24

Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

PROMIER $ 99

*28434101 * 28434101

Side tray sold separately. Item 56387, 56393, 64096, 56392, 56386, 56394

• Wireless, tool-free and easy installation

COMPARE TO

*28432341 * 28432341

LIMIT 3

99

200 LUMEN LED SUPER BRIGHT FLIP LIGHT

3

ANY SINGLE ITEM*

$ 99

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

$1

1

$ 39

*28432945 * 28432945

$ 99

20% OFF

Customer Rating

YOUR CHOICE

Customer Rating

SAVE 730

HEAVY DUTY BATTERIES AA, AAA - 24 PACK

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 93%

OF 6 COLORS

• 12,600 cu. in. of storage • 580 lb. capacity

$

C

R

SAVE 65%

N

E

P

U

SUPER COUPON YOUR CHOICE

O

O

P

U

3041 SAVE

MODEL: SC1

ITEM 69594/69955/64284/42292 shown

COMPARE TO

19

MODEL: 33700

83%

NOW

1599 $1 1 99 SAVE 39% $

MILWAUKEE $ 97

ITEM 38970/92486/39757/60496/62398/61897 shown

*28435503 * 28435503

*28469943 * 28469943

*28437505 * 28437505

*28481733 * 28481733

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

10" PNEUMATIC TIRE

1 SELLING JACKS IN AMERICA

#

RAPID PUMP 3 TON STEEL HEAVY DUTY LOW PROFILE FLOOR JACK

NOW

$3 6

$ 99

99

AVAIL. IN SM, MED, LG, XL, XXL

• Weighs 78 lbs.

$ 49

SAVE 90 $

8

$99

189

MODEL: T830018Z

MODEL: FR1055

99

$

ITEM 56618/56619/56620/56617 shown

ITEM 69385/62388/62409/62698/30900 shown

$499

COMPARE TO

NOW

COMPARE TO

TEQ CORRECT $ 99

$ 09

COMPARE TO

FARM & RANCH

NOW

5

Customer Rating

SAVE 50%

Customer Rating

MECHANICS GLOVES

®

10999

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

VALEO $ 99

14

Customer Rating

Blade sold separately.

99 28 NOW 99 SAVE $

COMPARE TO

PORTER-CABLE $ 98

SAVE 66%

MODEL: 25521

6AMP VARIABLE SPEED RECIPROCATING SAW

59

ITEM 62434, 62426, 62433, 62432, 62429, 64179, 62428, 64178 shown

$1 9

66%

MODEL: PCE360

ITEM 65570/61884/62370 shown

*28484001 * 28484001

*28437209 * 28437209

*28517565 * 28517565

*28530796 * 28530796

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

SUPER COUPON

2000 WATT SUPER QUIET 1750 PSI ELECTRIC WASHER INVERTER GENERATOR PRESSURE • 1.3 GPM

Customer Rating

• 12 hour run time

NOW

$479

SAVE $ 529 $

NOW

$79

99 $

499

COMPARE TO

ITEM 62523 HONDA

$

1,009

MODEL: EU2000i

99

99

COMPARE TO

130 PIECE TOOL KIT WITH CASE

7AMP ELECTRIC POLE SAW 9.5" BAR

• Adjustable spray nozzle

99

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

99

6F T. t o

NOW

8F T. 1 0"

NOW

9 $599 $7999

Customer Rating Cu

44 SAVE $94 BRIGGS & $ STRATTON MODEL: 20600 ITEM 63255/63254 shown

$

COMPARE TO

174

WORX

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

9998 SAVE $39

COMPARE TO

ANVIL

MODEL: WG309

$

6639 SAVE 54%

MODEL: A137HOS

9 $299 $

ITEM 68998/63248/64080/64263/63091 shown

ITEM 68862/63190/56808/62896 shown

3999

*28458693 * 28458693

*28513407 * 28513407

*28477514 * 28477514

*28519615 * 28519615

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

SUPER COUPON

18" WORKING PLATFORM 24 FT., 18 BULB, 12 SOCKET STEP STOOL OUTDOOR LINKABLE STRING OICE UR CH Customer Rating LIGHTS Customer Rating YO R

300 LB. CAPACITY ATV/LAWN MOWER LIFT

OF COLO

NOW

99

$ Customer Rating

99

99

NOW

SAVE $46

COMPARE TO

MAX LOAD

121

47

MODEL: 38028

ITEM 60395/62325/62493/61523 shown

$21 99

• 350 lb. capacity

$74 $

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

COMPARE TO

$

39

99

NEOCRAFT MODEL: 60635 ITEM 62515/66911 shown

SAVE 50%

$1 999 $

29

*28520816 * 28520816

*28529192 * 28529192

LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

99

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 7/12/20.

$ LINK UP TO 9 STRINGS

BLACK

WHITE

ITEM 64486 ITEM 64739 63483 shown

27

99

SAVE 44% COMPARE TO

$

3998

PORTFOLIO MODEL: SLC12BK

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

20 GALLON, 135 PSI OIL-LUBE AIR COMPRESSOR • Air delivery: 4.0 SCFM @ 90 PSI

$

NOW

18999 $1 6499

COMPARE TO

PORTER-CABLE $ 99

249

MODEL: 118903799

SAVE $ 85

ITEM 56241/64857 shown

*28530012 * 28530012

*28441761 * 28441761

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 7/12/20*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living May 2020  

All together now - Simple steps your family can take to use less energy—and lower utility bills—when you’re spending more time at home. Sav...

South Carolina Living May 2020  

All together now - Simple steps your family can take to use less energy—and lower utility bills—when you’re spending more time at home. Sav...

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