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Design Portfolio Valerie Lysiak Fall 2009 - Fall 2012 Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design


Index Biomimicry Center Fourth Year Studio [Fall 2012] Charles Harker

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Kent State University Pavilion Fourth Year Studio [Fall 2012] Charles Harker

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Beach House Fourth Year Studio [Fall 2012] Charles Harker

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Florence Gastronomy Center Third Year Studio [Spring 2012] Filippo Caprioglio

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Towpath Cafe Third Year Studio [Fall 2011] Kathryn Strand

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Performing Arts Center Second Year Studio [Fall 2010] Andrew McKeown

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San Lorenzo Facade Third Year Studio [Spring 2012] Filippo Caprioglio

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Freehand Sketches Third Year [Spring 2012] Roberto Nesti

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Biomimicry Center Fourth Year Design Studio I Charles Harker Fall 2012

Design Intent The Biomimicry Center works with Kent State University and the Biomimicry Institute to promote education on sustainability. The partnership promoted a need to design a place for people of all ages to learn, practice, and apply sustainable strategies. Throughout the design, a variety of places are created within and around the building to promote people coming together to share ideas and extending learning possibilities beyond the classroom walls. The primary issue of the Biomimicry Center was its close proximity to a wetland, making sustainable design a major concern to minimize the building’s environmental impact and preserve the natural area as much as possible.

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Floor Plans Site Plan

Program Entry/Open Atrium Classrooms/Lecture Rooms 1st Floor : K-12 2nd/3rd Floor : University Research Laboratories Public Spaces Cafe Auditorium Wetland Demonstration Offices/Administration Service/Restroom/Circulation

Second & Third Floor

Site Plan Approach Public Employee Service

B

Site Design Grasscrete, bioswales, rocks, and a green wall are used along pathways and parking lots to filter water before reaching the bog. A roof water collection system was implemented to gather grey water for reuse on site and for laboratory research. Leading down to the bog are pathways made of rock to further enhance the water filtration process. The public and private approaches formed as an extension from the building and were designed to minimize disruption of service activities.

A

First Floor

Site Plan N

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Building Sections Building Elevations Detailed Wall Construction

Section A: Natural light & Ventilation

Employee/Service Entrance

Facade Construction: Daylighting & Natural/Induced Stack Effect

Program Organization The organization was based on each programs degree of dependency on the building service. With these formed dependencies, the service was designed to have full access to the necessary programs without causing a disruption to the building occupants or activities. Public Entrance

North Facade

6 Section B: Program Organization


Revit Renderings

Passive Strategies A double layered facade helps to regulate internal temperatures by promoting the stack effect, natural ventilation, and solar gain during the desired season. The facade has two layers of operable panels and provides daylight without glare concerns. The overall form is oriented on an east-west axis to provide southern solar gain and is also designed with the natural stack effect to allow hot air to be exhausted or recovered when necessary. Designed with passive and active strategies, the building acts as a learning tool and example for the public and students.

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Kent State University Pavilion Fourth Year Design Studio I Charles Harker Fall 2012

Design Intent The Kent State Pavilion is an outdoor facility that is used year round by university and school age children. The minimal amount of program produced a need for flexible spaces that could be used for a variety of activities. The programmatic elements are placed in zones rather than segmented rooms to maintain a continuity of space that is supplemented by movable partitions. By providing see through separations at the zone boundaries, visual connection can be made between the research area and classroom. The major focus of the Pavilion was on constructability and maintaining a low impact on the wetland. Promoting an easy method of construction and manipulating the layers of the wall construction made this possible.

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Floor Plan Site Plan Building Elevations

Program 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Entry Patio Accessible Restroom Corridor Wetland Research Flexible Classroom Outdoor Patio/Classroom Space

B

1

2

4

3

Designing for Orientation Each facade’s ratio of glass to wall surface was based on the A sun received from each orientation and season to either eliminate unnecessary heat loss or promote heat gain during desired the season.

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First Floor North Elevation

East Elevation

South Elevation

Site Plan N West Elevation

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Revit Exploded Axonometric Building Sections

Exploded axonometric

North Facade

10 Section A: Heat Recovery/Exhaust & Sun Angles

Section b: Cross Ventilation/Heat Recovery & Solar Gain


Revit Interior Rendering Wall Assembly Detail

Aluminum Railing Structural Insulated Panel Roof with Walking Surface Wood Beam Wood Cladding

Construction & Designing for the Seasons The building is prefabricated off-site and assembled on site to minimize time and disturbance to the site. By layering wood framing and structural insulated panels, the wall assembly R-value is much higher than a typical wall to minimize heat loss. The sun angles for all seasons were used to determine the size of windows to control the heat gain versus the need for daylight. To counteract excessive solar gain, the building form slopes upward to facilitate the natural stack effect and exhaust heat during overheated periods. During the winter, the heated air is captured at the roof and recovered to reheat the space.

Structural Insulated Panel -Wood Sheathing -Insulation -Wood Sheathing Wood Studs Batt Insulation Interior Wood Finish Wood Flooring Crawl Space

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Beach House Fourth Year Design Studio I Charles Harker Fall 2012

Design Intent The Beach House designed for Jimmy Buffet was located in Key West, Florida. Jimmy Buffett is a musician and entrepreneur who has built a career based on his love for the sea. He lives a carefree lifestyle filled with parties, relaxation, and enjoying what a tropical environment has to offer. The primary objective of this design was to extend and expand the building form to create a blurred division between exterior and interior spaces to achieve a continuity of space that conforms to site conditions, responds to climate, and addresses the needs of the client. By a blending these ideas, the landscape and structure directly relate and influence each other to achieve their form, providing Jimmy Buffett a home that allows him to be connected to his surroudings.

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Floor Plans Site Plan Building Elevations

Program 1. Studio 2. Private Balcony 3. Public Covered Patio 4. Public Balcony 5. Living Area 6. Dining Area 7. Kitchen 8. Master Bedroom 9. Master Bath 10. Guest Bedroom 11. Guest Bath 12. Roof Garden

View A 7 4

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A

Second Floor

North Elevation 3

1 a East Elevation 2 View B

First Floor

South Elevation

N Site Plan West Elevation

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Process Images Building Sections Ventilation Diagram

Process: Phase 1

Process: Phase 2

Extension of Building Form for Climate The projection of building form is intended to manipulate how climatic elements interact with the building. Due to high heat and humidity, the design maximized cross ventilation through window placement and a narrow, open floor plan with minimal obstructions that block ventilation. Projected overhangs control overheating by shading the building and providing an area for the client to be outdoors without feeling the intense sun. Section A

14 Section B

Natural Ventilation Diagram


Interior Views Model Photo

View a : Public Space

Framing Views & Experiences To create an integrated experience between the house and landscape, exterior views are captured in framed openings that provide a constructed view of the exterior from the interior which is very important to the client. As the frame projects away from the building, the client moves through the frame and becomes part of the view. As the client passes through the frame, they become an active participant in the exterior view.

View B: Private Studio

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Florence Gastronomy Center Third Year Design Studio II Filippo Caprioglio Spring 2012

Design Intent The Gastronomy Center located in Piazza Annigoni, Florence, Italy was designed to make the barren piazza a place that Italians wanted to come to. Situated in a dense urban fabric, the building was designed based on an analysis of the densities and extensions of surrounding spaces and buildings to integrate the building into the existing fabric. It was important to maintain the typical Italian street edge while incorporating a contemporary design different than classical Italian architecture. The objective of the building was to bring people into the desolate site and give the area an identity that was intended for private and public use. The building form was a funnel shape that allowed the piazza space to open towards the market to encourage visitors into the site to congregate before entering the building.

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Floor Plans Site Analysis Diagrams

Program 1. Lobby/Reception 2. Book Store 3. Library Reserve 4. Administration Offices 5. Culinary Teacher Offices 6. Auditorium 7. Restaurant 8. Outdoor Space 9. Storage 10. Food Tasting 11. Kitchen 12. Culinary Classrooms 13. Rooftop Terrace

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Third Floor

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Density created by connections to nearby internal courtyard

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A 1

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Second Floor

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Density created by extension of courtyards adjacent to site 5

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B Extension of Piazza and Existing Circulation

N First Floor 17


Piazza Design & Circulation Process Building Sections

Interior & Exterior Design Integration Circulation paths were used to unify the design. The circulation wrapped interior building spaces and eventually extended into the piazza. The exterior path began to denote exterior spaces Section A: Natural light & Ventilation that were related to the interior. By wrapping a circulation path along the outside of the building and next to the piazza, a visual and physical connection was made to create a greater integration of building and site. Employee/Service Entrance

Primary & Secondary Circulation Routes: PIAZZA DESIGN RELATED TO BUILDING FORM

Section A

18 Section B


Revit Exterior Renderings Facade Design Building Elevations

Facade Design Special attention was paid to traditional Italian facades to create a new interpretation of a steel and glass facade that wrapped the building. Through the process of wrapping the building, a continuity was achieved visually that also allowed for mixed ratios of solid wall and glazing to be placed based on degree of privacy desired and to maintain any particular views of importance.

South Elevation: View From Market

West Elevation: Facade Design

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Towpath Cafe Third Year Design Studio I Kathryn Strand Fall 2011

Design Intent Designed in Cleveland, Ohio the Cafe design aimed to extend the Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath Trail, while providing dormitories, bike services, and a cafe for trail users. The Towpath Trail extension resulted from an exploratory process beginning with an experimentation of various ways to manipulate a flat surface into a 3-dimensional surface and culminated by applying the surface study to a building form. The goal of this project was to transform the surface studies into a building form that would change how one view could be seen from different vantage points throughout the experience.

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Form Studies Site Application

Phase 1: Form Generation

Phase 2: Form Development

Phase 3: Interlocking Forms

Surface Exploration A simple piece of paper was bent, folded, and interlocked in a variety of ways to seek the potential of the material. The material study began to develop and became more sophisticated, forming intricate patterns that were to be manipulated and applied to the final model. All of the surface studies were applied to the site analysis by integrating the different surface explorations into the site where each element evoked a characteristic or view of a particular area of the site.

Phase 4: Form Application

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Building Form Application Building & Site Sections

Process: Integration of Surface Studies + Building

Development of Surface Studies + Building+ Structure

Formation of 3-dimensional Spaces The resulting material explorations were formed to interlock and provide habitable spaces. When applied to the building, slight variations in the form of the building began to make each space unique and different, while still maintaining a continuity of space. The surface studies further evolved into the structural supports for the building. Section A: Building Section

22 Section B: Site Through Monumental Stair


Revit Rendering Final Model

Designing for Views A pivotal aspect of this design is moving between exterior and interior spaces and how one’s view changes. The experience begins at a viewing terrace and ends in the cafe space. The area between these two spaces is characterized by changing views that begin and end with the Cleveland skyline. At the viewing terrace, the skyline was seen from an open exterior space. Along the downward ramping system, the view becomes distorted and obscured as one approaches the cafe. Before entering the cafe, the skyline is blocked by the physical form of the building. Once inside the cafe, the view to the exterior retains a trace of the skyline which was the focal point to the exterior terrace, but also opens up to a new view being along the river.

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Performing Arts Center Second Year Design Studio I Andrew McKeown Fall 2010

Design Intent Located in Lakewood, Ohio, the Performing Arts Center was designed to embody elements of techno music. Techno music is a nontraditional musical expression composed of individual layers with different beat patterns to create a syncopated, “off beat” rhythm. To unify differences, a pattern is continuously looped throughout the composition. The objective of this design was to incorporate the elements of this new media into the form and facade of the building as a reflection of the building’s function as a media center. Every element and detail in the building is important in creating a nonconventional building while still being designed using traditional principles.

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Floor Plans Site Plan

Program 1. Entry Lobby + Info Center 2. Event Space with Terraced Seating 3. Outdoor Cafe/Seating 4. Open Green Public Space 5. Cafe + Kitchen 6. Service Receiving + Elevator 7. Equipment Storage 8. Set Storage 9. Mechanical Room 10. Green Room 11. Public Lounge 12. Media Editing 13. Server Room 14. Black Box Theater 15. Video Control 16. Tech Center 17. Audio Control 18. Audio Studio 19. Office 20. Classroom 21. Lecture Room 22. Conference Room 23. Break Room 24. Personal Recording Studio 25. Restroom

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Fourth Floor

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25 25

6 11 4

3

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Third Floor 5

B

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25 1

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25 11 6

25

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A

6 6

N Site Plan

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Second Floor 25


Facade Diagram Building Sections Building Elevations

Facade and Form Composition The form and facade of the building exhibited the syncopation and musicality of techno music while integrating an investigation of traditional music. The form has individual layers projected on the street side to portray a progression of beats with slight differences between each level. The back of the form is differentiated by a chamfered edge acting as an “off beat� to the rest of the structure. The facade is textured by wooden siding laid over cement to give the visualization of sheet music. The windows are placed to allow the desired degree of privacy and become the notes of the composition. Vertical bars connect the layers visually and show which areas are more public with less vertical bars. Facade Composition In Relation to Music

East Elevation

26 South Elevation

Section A

Section B


Hand Drawn Perspective Model Photo

Spatial Organization The building was designed to allowed the combination of public and private programs while maintaining an appropriate degree of privacy when required. This was achieved by layering the program beginning with the most public and accessible programs on the ground floor. As the levels ascended, the programs became more private with more restricted and obscured access routes.

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San Lorenzo Facade Design Third Year Design Studio II Filippo Caprioglio Spring 2012

Existing Design

Modern Interpretation

Design Intent The Basilica of San Lorenzo in Florence, Italy was constructed in the Renaissance and is the only unfinished facade in Florence. The goal of the project was to analyze proportions and patterns in the current facade to create a modern facade. Breaking the facade into basic elements, a 1:2 and 1:4 proportion was found. On the interior of the building, the basilica was designed off of a series of squares, relating to the organization of the facade with simple shapes. By redesigning the facade, elements were taken from the current design and redesigned in a slightly different way to emphasize the classical proportions and shapes that are characteristic of Renaissance architecture. 28 System of Proportions


Facade Analysis Interior Analysis Process Diagrams

Pattern : ABBA Linear Pattern

ABBA Horizontal Pattern: Red is a flush surface

Modular System of Proportions

ABBA Vertical Pattern: Blue is a flush surface

Simple geometries & Proportions

Merging of Patterns

Design Process The existing facade pattern alternates between two recessed stone courses and one stone course with a series of three stones missing in the course. A new pattern was imposed to emphasize the geometric tendencies and proportions of the existing facade. A series of squares were created in pattern of 1:1 and 1:4. The density and combinations of rectangles imply a division of simple geometries. This was further emphasized by rectangles protruding from the surface in alternating flush and extruded elements. Integration of patterns with hierarchy of Surfaces

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Freehand Sketching Third Year Sketching & Drawing Roberto Nesti Spring 2012

Santa Maria Novella, Florence, Italy

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Santa Maria Maddalena Dei Pazzi, Florence , Italy


Landscape Sketches

Piazza Michelangelo, Florence, Italy

Bardini Gardens, Florence, Italy

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