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News

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009 news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Breaking ground:

campus’ future buildings taking shape

Sinead Mulhearn intern

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roundbreaking ceremonies for new math, engineering, and environmental buildings have already occurred. These expansions will be seen on campus in March of 2011. Vision 2010, an engineering academic plan created in 2005, guides the development within the faculty. According to the plan, there is demand for three new buildings: Engineering 5, 6, and 7. This improvement would be in addition to the Quantum-Nano Centre. Engineering 5, which is in the construction process (to be completed by March or April of 2010), will be a six-story building located in parking lot B. The first two floors of the building are intended to house the Student Design Centre, where students are credited for the design of the solar car and robotics projects. The department of mechanical and mechatronics engineering will be housed on the first floor, and the department of electrical computer engineering will go on the second. The department of systems design engineering will be located on the top floor. Substantial space for teaching and research will be present in the Engineering 5 building. The cost of this building will be around $55 million. While the groundbreaking has already occurred for Engineering 6, it is still in the planning stages. It will also be located in parking lot B in close proximity to Engineering 5. Engineering 6 will house approximately 60 per cent of the chemical engineering department which will be transferred out of Engineering 1, whose old facilities have become unsuitable for chemical engineering projects. Both the federal and provincial governments are providing

up to 50 per cent of the $42 million project through the Knowledge Infrastructure Program (KIP). “The university is working to engage in trying to raise private funds,” said Dean of Engineering Adel Sedra. The math expansion, a four-storey, 90,000 square foot building, will be located in between the existing math building and the Photovoltaic Research Centre and will house the department of statistics and actuarial science. It will include all required aspects for the department: offices for faculty, graduate students, and research assistants, along with style copy rooms, conference seminar rooms, and research lab space. “We are also going to provide space for undergraduate student clubs,” said Jack Rehder, executive officer for the faculty of math who also mentions that there are plans to put in a trading room for stock trading. An additional feature which will be seen in the new building is a large theatre-style classroom, located on the ground floor, accommodating approximately 350 students and available for booking by any faculty members. The bridge that currently connects the math building to the Davis Centre will be extended so that there is a link to the new building as well. The building is expected to be finished by March 2011; however, building commencement is unknown due to a pending building permit. The budget of $23 million for the project should also include the contingent fee as well as renovations. The federal and provincial government are contributing $18 million to the project through the KIP. “The rest of the funding comes from a variety of other sources,” said Rehder, “this includes central university funds and well as contributions from the math faculty

Clockwise from left: courtesty Young & Wright/ IBI Group Architects; Diamond and Schmitt Architects; Akitt, Swanson & Pearce Architects Inc.

Clockwise from top left: “Math 2”, Engineering 6, and Environment 3. and this is because the KIP isn’t for teaching but for research.” A growth in the undergraduate enrolment in the environmental department has caused the need for a new building in the department. “The undergraduate enrolment has doubled in the past three years. It went from 1,200 to 2,000 and is still increasing, in 2012 we are expecting up to 2,200 undergraduates,” says Deep Saini, the dean of environment. The increase in undergraduate students has called for the increase in professors and the requirement for more labs to be created. Inside the building there

will be a large foyer with a cafe and a fair amount of common student space. The top floor will have two courtyards. The new environment building, Environment 3, will be a fourstorey building located on ring road and attached by the first two floors to Environment 2 and on the third floor to Environment 1. The top two floors will spread across the top of Environment 2. “We want to keep our footprint on green space as low as possible,” said Saini. The faculty of environment is building to a gold

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standing. Saini added, “It would be the first to this standard on campus.” The plan is for the building to be only 52,000 square feet. The groundbreaking ceremony has already happened and we should see digging start in just a few weeks. The cost of the building will be between $19 and $20 million. Of this sum, the federal and provincial governments will be giving $14 million. smulhearn@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


News

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Afghan run-off coming Nagma Zerin reporter

Deadly bombing in Iraq

The deadliest attack on Iraqi civilians since 2007 occurred on Sunday, October 25, near the city’s “green zone,” in a heavily fortified administrative district. At 10:30 a.m., a twin suicide car bombing adjacent to Iraqi government buildings killed at least 132 people and injured nearly 600. One of the bombs exploded outside Baghdad’s governorate building, and the second one less than a minute after outside the Ministry of Justice, about 500 meters (1,600 feet) away. At least 25 staff members of the Baghdad Provincial Council, who run the city, were reported dead. The attacks are being compared with those of August 19, when truck bombs targeted on the ministry of finance, as well as the foreign ministry of Iraq. The Iraqi authorities believe that the two assaults are connected to each other, leading to a similar motive behind the attacks. Prime Minister Nouri Maliki denounced the involvement of Al-Qaeda and the supporters of former president Saddam Hussein after visiting the site of the blast near the Haifa street. The onslaughts were executed right before the impending Iraqi election, scheduled for January 16, 2010. The instable environment makes the poll more unpredictable and increases the possibility of enhanced violence ahead of the election.

Puerto Rican capital, on Friday, October 23. The mushroom cloud originating from the cremation forced the alteration of flights for airliners as well as closing down of the adjacent schools and offices. Fifteen of the 40 tanks at the Caribbean Petroleum Corp. facility in the suburb of Bayamon were ablaze more than 19 hours after a sudden eruption from an unknown source. According to the Puerto Rico Seismic Network, the explosion at 12:30 a.m., was the equivalent of a 2.8 magnitude earthquake. It shook people out of their beds across metropolitan San Juan and shattered windows in colonial Old San Juan. At least four people sought help for respiratory problems and two people suffered minor injuries at the nearby U.S Army Base. Nobody was reported killed by the blast. The peak of the flames, reaching 100ft (30m) above the oil centre, were tackled by about 130 fire-fighters and supported by the National Guard. Up to 1,500 people were evacuated from the capital and nearby cities, and a state of emergency was declared. The cause of the explosion was undetected, and the FBI was reported to be helping the authorities in their investigations. As the storage complex, filled with gasoline and gasoline-related products, sits near the San Juan’s bay, the authorities are taking necessary precautions to prevent the water from being contaminated. Iteration of Afghan election

Puerto Rico incinerated

An unprecedented explosion at a fuel storage facility created a huge pandemonium across San Juan, the

On Tuesday, October 20, Afghanistan’s election commission ordered a November 7 run-off in the disputed presidential poll

conducted on August 20. President Hamid Karzai agreed to participate in a new election against his main rival Abdullah Abdullah, a former foreign minister, despite the huge challenges that are lying ahead. The possibility of a run-off emerged on Monday after the UN-backed Electoral Complaints Commission invalidated one third of Karzai’s votes from the August 20 ballot due to convincing evidence of forgery. This overthrow pushed his totals below 50 per cent setting the stage for a run-off. To ensure a fairer election, Afghanistan’s Independent Elections Commission (IEC) is discharging thousands of officials from the first round and reducing the number of polling stations that were reported to be corrupted. Afghan diplomats provided mixed opinions regarding the reelection, while some see it as a necessity others perceive it as an imposition by western countries. At a time when the international community is optimistic about a democratic Afghanistan, Taliban militants have announced the launch of operations to prevent people from participating in the poll. Some civilians were killed during the previous election due to Taliban rocket and grenade attacks on polling stations in small towns. On account of thwarting Taliban calls to outlaw the polls, two voters had their ink-stained fingers cut off. Irrespective of these severe threats and an uncertain situation, U.N has already started delivering ballots and voting kits to Afghanistan in preparation for the election. ­— with files from BBC, CBC, CNN, and MSNBC

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Town hall starts referendum season Admin figures answer questions on Student Services Complex and Health Services extension Jacqueline McKoy Lambert news editor

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he first phase of public consultation of the campus’ triple-referendum campaign got a kick-start on Wednesday, October 28 with a Feds-hosted “Town Hall” outlining plans for the proposed Student Services Complex and Health Services expansion projects. Feds President Allan Babor was joined by Associate Provost (Human Resources and Student Services) Catharine Scott, Vice President Administration and Finance Dennis Huber, and Health Services Director Dr. Barb Schumacher to answer student queries about the potential new buildings. Attendance was relatively low, with no more than 30 people filling the seats

with an over-$90,000 architectural plan that eventually failed to pass. Having the student services complex would necessarily increase the Student Services Fee, but councillor Sam Andrey calculated the increase to be only 33 cents a term. If the Student Services Complex referendum fails, the future of services expansion on campus is uncertain. Scott said that “the services are constrained...[they] are in a space too small for them.” Both Feds and the GSA are holding referenda on the Health Services expansion, Feds in November and the GSA sometime in the winter term. In the event that either referendum fails, the expansion will not be undertaken. Another question raised was, that if there are plans to extend service hours

Currently, I think the only option is to vote yes for student space. — Feds AHS Councillor Dave Smith

in the SLC Great Hall. One question raised on account of the proliferation of construction on campus is what will happen to parking spaces that will be built over. According to Scott, “There will be a parking garage eventually which will make up for space utilized by buildings.” However, due to the expense of constructing garages, this solution is unlikely to be completed in the near future. With respect to the consultation process on the construction of the Student Services Complex after a successful referendum, “The actual process moving forward would be quite lengthy...my estimate, it’ll take over a year,” noted Babor. Some audience members expressed concern over vagueness of current plans for what the Student Services Complex will actually look like. According to Babor, “we have not provided exact details because it would be over $100,000 in terms of cost.” UWO staged a similar referendum



into weekends and holidays once the Health Services expansion is completed. According to Schumacher, though, “If we go too late into the evening, that takes away from their family time.” She also noted that it is difficult to attract physicians to UW, saying that “7:30 [p.m.] is pushing the envelope.” As well, some audience members wondered if the increased number of physicians in the new extension would increase the operating cost to students above and beyond what they would pay for the expansion. According to Schumacher, OHIP will pay for the extra general practitioners needed. “I think the major concern is the lack of current space on campus,” said Feds AHS councillor Dave Smith, who also feels that this brings the opportunity to design better-looking buildings on campus, more in line with those at schools like Guelph or UWO. “Currently, I think the only option is to vote yes for student space.” jmckoy@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


News Petitions, racism, layoffs, and violence on campus Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Adrienne Raw

assistant editor-in-chief

Concordia University students petition to leave CFS

On October 19, the signatures of over 5,000 Concordia University students were delivered to the national office of the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) in Ottawa. The signatures are part of a petition to hold a referendum to leave the student organization. The one-month campaign collected the signatures of over 15 per cent of Concordia’s student population, well-above the 10 per cent required for a referendum. The petition is not asking to leave the Canadian Federation of Students, just that a referendum be held so that students can have a say in where their money is going. The referendum will probably be held during the winter semester. The petition from Concordia University joins similar petitions from the University of Guelph, Trent University, and Carleton University, all of whom submitted petitions to the Canadian Federation of Students on September 29. CFS currently claims that they have not received any petitions. York University evacuated for the second time in one week

Recent weeks have seen two bomb scares at York University cause the evacuations of three campus buildings and the re-routing of busses that run near the campus. The bomb threats occurred on October 23 and October 27. Investigation by the Toronto police and fire department revealed no bomb in either case.

The bomb threats are disruptive, interupting classes and tests during York’s busy exam week, and costly to the university, which has to pay approximately $1000 for each false threat. One York official speculated that these bomb threats are the work of stressed students who are unprepared for their exams. York University student stabbed for saying no to marijuana

When a male student at York University refused to turn his Tatham Hall residence room into a marijuana grow operation, he was stabbed multiple times and robbed. The incident that occurred on October 18 at approximately 3:00 p.m. may have been commited by suspects the victim knew and invited back to his apartment. University of Alberta staff fear budget shortfall may mean faculty lay-offs

and antipathy towards eliminating racism at the Peterborough, Ontario campus. The hearings were part of a nationwide task force addressing racism on Canadian campuses, and the results from Trent University will be presented in a nationwide report by the Canadian Federation of Students in December. Results of the hearings were released in a document recently. The document records stories from students on their experiences with racism, both from other students and from the administration, on the Trent University campus. One student shared a story of being accused of racism by her roommate because she was black. Other students talk about being threatened with the Non-Academic Misconduct Policy when protesting a white supremacist article.

Recently-released results of campus racism hearings at Trent University show both racism

The report includes recommendations aimed at addressing racism on the campus, but antipathy towards both the study document and the issue may hinder the implementation of these recommendations. Only two attendees were present at the recent press conference where the results of the hearings were presented — one of those attendees was a reporter from the student newspaper. Additionally, fewer than 50 people attended the hearings, according to the student association Anti-Racism Commissioner Ayesha Asghar. — with files from Arthur, The Gateway, The Link, The Ontarion, and Excalibur araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Accelerate your

A $59-million budget shortfall at the University of Alberta had many staff fearing for their jobs. These concerns were one of the topics addressed by university president Indira Samarasekera at a recent town hall meeting. Samarasekera assured attendees at the meeting that layoffs were considered a last resort by university administrators, and that her office intends to work with individual faculties and departments to avoid massive layoffs. Trent University releases results from campus racism hearings



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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009 opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

The character reflected in costumes

Friday, October 30, 2009 Vol. 32, No. 15

Editor-in-chief, Michael L. Davenport editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Ad Assistant, Tony Tang Sales Assisstant, Aj Orena Systems Admin., vacant Distribution, Sherif Soliman Distribution, Garrett Saunders Intern, Paige Leslie, Sinead Mulhern, Josh McGrory Volunteer co-ordinator, Angela Gaetano Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Sherif Soliman president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Anya Lomako vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, Erin Thompson secretary@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Staff liaison, Caitlin McIntyre liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, Adrienne Raw Head Reporter, vacant Lead Proofreader, Alicia Mah Cover Editor, Katrina Massey News Editor, Jacqueline McKoy Lambert News Assistant, Clara Shin Opinion Editor, Rosalind Gunn Opinion Assistant, vacant Features Editor, Keriece Harris Features Assistant, Simone Toma Arts & Entertainment, Dinh Nguyen Arts & E. Assistant, Robyn Goodfellow Science & Tech Editor, Bogdan Petrescu Science & Tech Assistant, Shirley Ma Sports & Living Editor, Brent Golem Sports & Living Assistant, Komal R. Lakhani Photo Editor, Peter Kreze Photo Assistant, Sophie Sanniti Graphics Editor, Peter N. Trinh Graphics Assistant, Sonia Lee Web Administrator, Paul Collier Web Assistant, Xiaobo Liu Systems Administrator, vacant System Administrator Assistant, vacant Production Staff Julia Gunst, Deanna Ostafichuk, Andrew Dodds, Lishni Salgado, Abisade Dare, Jacob McLellan, Tony Tang, Omri Arbiv, Luna Wei, Ivan Lui, Tejas Koshy, Paula Trelinska, Felicia Rahaman, Chris Sparkes Graphics Team Xiaobo Liu, Ian Cutajar, Alcina Wong Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaperpublishedbyImprintPublications,Waterloo, acorporationwithoutsharecapital.Imprintisamember of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may alsoreproducethematerialcommerciallyinanyformat or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has beendistributedinanissueof Imprint,orImprintdeclares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. One copy per customer. Imprint ISSN0706-7380.ImprintCDNPubMailProductSales Agreement no. 40065122. Next staff meeting: Monday, November 2 12:30 p.m. Next board of directors meeting: Friday, October 30 12:30 p.m. Costumes mandatory

editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Projecting memes in our costume choices

O

ne of my favourite Halloweencostumes is “borg drone” from Star Trek. For weeks I attacked PVC piping with a heatgun and a hacksaw, forming the plastic to my chest, arms, and legs. I wired a few basic circuits to control a head-mounted laser, some LEDs, and an electric motor which spun a doohickey on the end of my left arm. I added some plastic piping for flavour. With the purchase of a voice modulator, I was done. A sweet, homemade borg costume. Walking around this campus, some people recognized me as a borg drone right away. Others wouldn’t be science fiction fans enough to place my costume specifically, but they still knew I was supposed to be something from a science fiction series. Both were far less disappointing than the response when I got while shelling out candy from my house. “Look honey, it’s a robot!” parents would say to their children. Over and over again. I was a borg drone, not a robot. The difference was lost to them. It was clear my house was far away from campus, in more ways than one. Halloween, in addition to being inherently awesome, allows one to gauge the culture of a place. I know I’ve said this before, but the University of Waterloo

is geeky. Really geeky. Geeky not only in comparison to other universities, but in comparison to the neighbourhoods around us. Now, it’s not that everyone on this campus could place a borg drone. We’re not all science fiction geeks. But at the

for the next decade. Meg Beckel, the VP external relations, was recently asking students to describe the university in a single word. What people dress as for Halloweenreflects on the university not in words, but in apparitions. Yeah, there’s always going to be the stock ghosts and

“Look honey, it’s a robot!” parents would say to their children. Over and over again. I was a borg drone, not a robot.

same time, this campus does field a flavour of costumes not as common outside ring road. If you happen to be reading this on campus, and if it happens to be October 31, take a look around. How many people dressed as Bender do you see? What about Link or Zelda? What about a character from Final Fantasy? Hell, in this place I wouldn’t be surprised to see six people dressed as a benzene ring. I’m bringing this up because UW is in the midst of trying to find its identity

Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca

vampires and zombies. But the outliers, the specific unique costumes tell you something. Ignore the mummies, but heed the Doctor Horribles and Captain Hammers. Halloween is awesome because it’s the one day of the year where you can be anything without any repercussions. If one wants to find the identity of a group of people, seeing what everyone becomes when they have the opportunity to be anything is a fine start.

Letters Re: Arts elitism I would like to address the recent stream of hate mail directed at the engineering faculty. First of all, I highly object to the implication that engineering students have no appreciation for the arts. I myself once entertained the idea of being an English major. I eventually abandoned this plan when I decided my own love of literature could be perfectly satisfied with a library card. Furthermore, I would argue that as a study of the natural world and all that exists in it, an appreciation of art is essential to the study of engineering. For what is more fundamentally crucial to art than nature? In fact, my understanding of art is

Re: “When in the course of clashing causes” by E Aboyeji, October 23, 2009 In his column, E makes a good point of highlighting the opposing ideologies of the fair trade and buy local movements, and I have to say that I agree with his overall analysis. That said, E’s assessment of the fairtrade-versus-buy-local dilemma is simplistic at best, and overlooks one crucial aspect of this debate: we are

only deepened by my education in science and mathematics. There are many kinds of beauty, and while like anyone I can appreciate the beauty of a fine piece of art or written work, I can also find beauty of another kind in a mathematical proof or a complex equation. This is a kind of beauty that few arts students can comprehend, though I would hope that some have taken the time to add this level of intellectual understanding to their repertoire. One of the letters previously printed in Imprint complained that arts students are often subject to prejudice against their chosen area of study. By making the assumption that all engineers are illiterate computer geeks, have you not done the same to us? The interests of those

who choose to study science and mathematics are wide and varied, and certainly not restricted to the domain of their faculty. I would caution you to be more precise in your choice of words, and more careful about whom you stereotype. Now I will address the initial complaint of these letters: that the engineering faculty overshadows the arts. The University of Waterloo is world-renowned for its engineering and mathematics programs. It is arguably the best engineering school in the country. Students travel from different countries and other continents to attend this prestigious institution. Honestly, what did you expect? You could have gone to any other university in the country for a comparable arts education. Every

university offers arts, but there is only one Waterloo Engineering, and justly so. This university began as an engineering college and has worked hard to develop and maintain its image as a leader in the fields of science and technology. We have every right to be proud to be here As for Orientation Week, I will share with you a piece of wisdom that was shared with me before I entered university: it is what you make of it. The engineers are cheering louder than anyone else? Then cheer back; no one is stopping you. To complain that we have more fun is ludicrous. We make our own fun. I challenge you to do the same.

not often given the choice between fair trade or local. Is it really logical to assume that the buy local activist in E’s story should have asked Feds Express for locally grown coffee? It is ludicrous to assume that “If everyone bought local … there would be absolutely no need for any kind of trade in food.” For some products, buying local is simply not an option. Until I can buy Southern Ontarian coffee or grow bananas in my backyard, I have to choose between fair trade

and exploitative production. If I’m a buy local activist, does that mean I have to stop consuming everything that isn’t produced locally? Should I try growing a sugarcane plantation in my garden instead of seeking out a fair trade sugar vendor? If I can’t find locally-produced toilet paper, is it hypocritical to buy the recycled variety? Perhaps E would have wanted me to start a UW toilet-paper-making cooperative that manufactures the stuff from old course notes? I’ll

gladly risk being labelled an “accursed cause-whore,” if it means that I try to make the most of my purchasing decisions. Local vsersus imported; fair trade versus exploitation; used vs new; vegetarian vs meat-based… these are all good causes to keep in mind, and in the context of everyday decisions, they are not necessarily contradictory.

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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009



Climate change fracas in Parliament mrowley@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

anonymous protestors to disrespect the institutions of government is quite a different matter. But who can blame them? Climate change is serious business: we are destroying our natural environment. It is our generation who are going to have to come to terms with serious

climate change in Canada. They are, by refusing to make things better, making them worse. What can young people do? How can we be heard? How can young people, thinking of the future, persuade older people who have everything to gain from maintaining the current order, and

This means that Parliament’s perspective is inherently biased: it emphasizes the concerns of the present over those of the future, because there is nobody sticking up for the Canadians of forty years from now (that would be us and our children). These future Canadians

other about what sort of country we want to eventually settle down in, and where its priorities will lie. We need to be conducting this debate even while making it clear that our votes are numerous and that they will not go to people who are not interested in our future quality of life.

Our demographic [of 18 to 30 year-olds] makes up an enormous part of the Canadian electorate, and we need to start throwing our weight around.

shifts in weather patterns, increasing acidification of rain in the Prairies, and the pollution from our remaining non-renewable power generators poisoning both our air and water. In Waterloo Region, our water comes overwhelmingly from the ground: what will we do when this becomes depleted, or polluted past the point of usability? Our generation needs to be ready with answers to these challenges, but one answer leaps to mind that we can act on now: stop making things worse. The frustration felt by these young protestors is perfectly normal. People from our parents’ generation are making decisions that trivialize the seriousness of

who will not be here to clean up the mess they made, to listen? It’s not people in their twenties who own the petrol companies, who own heavy manufacturing concerns, and who are writing climate change legislation. There’s a serious problem here. Close to 20 per cent of Canadians are between the ages of 18 and 30, but there is not a political bloc that represents them in Parliament. They are ignored by the mainstream political establishment, who don’t feel the need to attract the votes of the unanimous block of granolamunching hippies with the collective memory of a school of goldfish that youth are understood to be.

won’t want to live in a country experiencing ecological collapse. They, as we all hopefully do, want a country guided by ideas of social, economic, and environmental justice. Our demographic makes up an enormous part of the Canadian electorate, and we need to start throwing our weight around. In Waterloo alone, students make up close to a quarter of the population: more than enough to run a serious candidate even without support from older progressives. We need to stand up for ourselves: we can’t wait to get involved in making decisions about the future of our country because it may not be recognizable by the time we get there. We need to talk to each

We don’t need to be reduced to shouting from the sidelines of Parliament, or be trapped into looking like petulant children when we raise our valid concerns. We need to get in there ourselves, to benefit from the rules and regulations that ensure strong and reasoned debate in order to get our message out there. We need to articulate our vision, and then we need to share it with others in order to put it into practice. In order to create change, we need to make ourselves impossible to ignore, to write-off, or to dismiss. If we love our country, we need to get serious about helping it.

Letters Re: Imprint’s politics Every week in Imprint it’s the same story: why using tap water to brush your teeth in the morning causes six helpless little children in Zimbabwe to die, 10 easy ways to idolize Jack Layton in your dorm room, and how taxing evil business people and driving them out of the country will eventually lead us to an atheist paradise. Et cetera. I was on a ship in the Atlantic Ocean a few months ago, and I have great news to report: there was water out there... everywhere! Whew. Global crisis averted. I can show you where I found the water on a map, if necessary. And exactly how many articles can one write about the evils of plastic bottles? For balance, can we have an article about how incredible it is that humanity has captured the single most important resource we need to survive in an easy-to-carry package? What would Imprint’s writers say if a high-income straight white physically able fiscal conservative male saved the life of a small furry extremely cute rare helpless endangered dehydrated animal by letting it drink out of a plastic water bottle? The lefty alarmists always seem to find something to worry about. If everyone started walking to work —an environmentalist’s dream — Imprint would publish an article

about how the increased street noise is destroying the habitat of the local sparrow population. It would say we should all make sacrifices and strive to stay indoors more often — for the sake of the sparrows. The next week, an Imprint columnist would take up the task as a week-long personal experiment. Imagine it: “Day one: Staying inside isn’t so bad. I sat on my couch this morning and watched the pretty little helpless sparrows playing in the oak tree on my lawn. I had to open my door to yell at water-bottlewielding idiot going for a walk by my house, disturbing the sparrows. Why is humanity so self-centered?” I know it’s hard to have a balanced paper. But can you at least try? For the sake of the sparrows.

55

Tom Levesque arts alumnus

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onday’s session of question period in Ottawa was interrupted by loud, boisterous demonstrators, objecting to the government and opposition’s lack of progress on climate change legislation. The government has already drastically lowered expectations ahead of the Copenhagen conference on climate change coming up later this year, and the only piece of alternate legislation in the Commons has come from the NDP. It was this alternative bill that the protestors were loudly supporting, before they were dragged out by police. Now, far be it from me to celebrate the methods of these protestors. It’s obviously inappropriate to crash the House of Commons, and the decision to do so betrayed a lack of respect for this Canadian institution. The Commons is governed by very strict policies and procedures that exist to ensure that it doesn’t devolve into a simple back-and-forth shouting match, and these should be respected. If our Parliament is not a respectful chamber of reasoned debate, what is it? It’s easy to point at the occasionally raucous antics of elected representatives to suggest that this respect doesn’t really exist, but there’s an important distinction: when an MP carries on like a child they go on record, and can be held accountable and even publically reprimanded. For a bunch of

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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Sorry truths about stalking nbest@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

I

n keeping with the theme of Halloween, I think it is appropriate to tell you all about the scariest time of my life. However, it’s not a joke. It’s real, it’s common, and it can happen to anyone. I’m talking about stalking. Have you ever had someone tell you that you’re going to “regret this” when you broke up with someone? Have you ever had someone show up drunk to your house to harass you about leaving them? Have you ever had someone threaten your life because you didn’t want them in it? I have. Luckily, it was a rare case where I, being in legal studies, knew my legal rights and had no shame in citing the laws that would get me a restraining order, or the laws that would put my stalker behind bars. All it took was a car accident and a trip to the police — and I haven’t heard of them since. Unfortunately for me, my ex-stalker was someone I briefly dated — and then realized I wasn’t interested in them. Sometimes, being honest about how you feel can set a person off to the point of abusive anger. I have known other people who have had stalkers of the same sex who were something I would call “extreme-bullies.” These people would follow, threaten, and abuse their target just as a stalker would even though they were never in a romantic relationship. So now that you know it happens, how do you know it’s happening? The scariest part about all this is that many people have no idea when their rights are being violated, when they have a stalker-problem, or when they should go for help. What is “stalking”? Stalking is defined as “criminal harassment” from Section 264 of

the Criminal Code of Canada (1993). It states that “no person shall, without lawful authority and knowing that another person is harassed or recklessly as to whether the other person is harassed, engage in conduct [...] that causes that other person reasonably, in all the circumstances, to fear for their safety or the safety of anyone known to them.” Prohibited behaviour from a stalker can involve either being repeatedly followed from place to place, repeatedly being communicated with (directly or indirectly), having your dwelling, workplace, or commonly visited areas being watched, or having them engage in threatening conduct towards you. All of those behaviours can be targeted at people you know, to somehow affect your life, and that also constitutes stalking. People committing any number of these acts can be found guilty of an indictable (criminal) offence and is liable to imprisonment for ten years, or be charged with a summary offence which also results in imprisonment, or fines, and a criminal record. Therefore, stalking is a hybrid offence and each individual case will be determined of its severity once it is brought to the attention of authorities. If someone is repeating this behaviour, even just more than once, they can be arrested and charged with criminal harassment. The law can be invoked if their actions do scare you, regardless of the person’s intent to scare you or not. Found from the Department of Justice website, here are some 2002 criminal harassment statistics: In total, 9,080 criminal harassment incidents were reported to a sample of 123 police forces

in Canada in 2002. This number accounts for slightly over 4per cent of all violent incidents reported to those police forces that year. Of those 9,080 incidents, four in 10 (45 per cent) were cleared by charge and the complainant declined to lay charges in one in six (16 per cent). Of the victims, three in four were female (76 per cent). Female victims tended to be younger than male victims. Of the female victims, four in 10 (42 per cent) were under 30 years of age, compared to 27 per cent of male victims. Of the accused, eight out of 10 were male (84 per cent). Of the female victims, one in three (31per cent) was criminally harassed by a current or former intimate partner; slightly fewer female victims were harassed by an acquaintance or a friend (23 per cent each). So what do you do if you think you are being stalked? Or, if you think you are in danger? Who can you go to? Will anyone believe you? First, know that you are not alone. There are more than enough people here to help you, and all you have to do is make one call. Whether you make that call is up to you. The mental strain and damage that being harassed causes is sometimes more damaging than that of a physical attack. No one wants to live in fear for the rest of their life, and possibly ruin their academic and professional careers because of personal problems like this. Who to contact: Emergencies: • 911, or on campus you can push “22222” on

any landline phone, or you can call campus police directly from any payphone with the emergency button on the bottom of the phone. Don’t forget about the help lines that are outside all over the place! Once you hit that button, a direct line to UW Police is opened up and they will speak to you while someone arrives in the next few minutes. Non-emergencies: • Counseling services. Free counseling, confidential, and on campus. Call __ or show to their office in Needles Hall __ • Call or contact UW Police Services or the Waterloo Police to speak to a special constable about what you are experiencing. Also confidential unless you are in danger. • Speak to someone you trust and feel comfortable with. Your family, a professor, your don, or a friend. Don’t keep your fear a secret! If you or someone you know is dealing with a difficult situation that you think might be a “stalking” case, guide them in the right direction to get the help they need. Too many of us fall victim because of ignorance of our rights or out of fear altogether. If you help someone, you could save their life.For more information on criminal harassment, please visit http://www. justice.gc.ca or refer to the criminal code itself at http://www.canlii.org/en/ca/laws/stat/rsc1985-c-c-46/latest/. Be safe out there, people, we all want to live happy, fearless lives.


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009



The “I” in “councillor” in the hundreds for faculties in the thousands. Furthermore, it undermines the very essence of councillorship — the student mandate. Some councillors seem to have forgotten that their engagement with their constituency does not end when

Before the town hall on October 28; it seemed to me that the only costs students would incur with regard to the two new projects were the costs reflected in the referendum questions. But for Feds executives dedicated to detail and insightful questioning, I

that might impact some other people’s decisions. Thus, councillors owe it to their constituents to seek out this information, provide it to them and gauge their reaction to it as a basis for any decision making. Considering referenda have a

constituent’s interests are in conflict with that of another constituent. Inadvertently voting to backstab your own faculty simply because you were hypnotized by a “wiser” Feds councillor or executive is not an excuse that will pass muster with

As they raised their placards to debate for or against the motions on the table, a grammatically and democratically erroneous “I, personally” prefaced the positions of many a councillor on the issues.

John Andersen gets on that podium in late winter to announce election results. In actual fact, that is when their engagement with constituency begins. The primary reason councillors can at all share with council any opinions and have them taken into account is because they represent their constituency — and they must always do well to keep that in mind. It is not their opinions that count but their mandates; and that they must properly account for. Nevertheless, while I bash those opinionated representatives who repeatedly disregard the fact that their opinions may not necessarily be representative of their constituents, I do not ignore the other extreme—those councillors that have made their faculties auxiliary votes of others. Although, for a variety of reasons, I hate to hold this instance up as evidence of this vice, there is certainly something problematic about the health services building having passed during the council meeting without debate. Even the student services complex was discussed for a far shorter period of time than the Sound FM question was. Now, I am by no means inferring that “filibuster” style questioning should be the measure of a councillor’s efficacy (although certain noted obstructionists do hold themselves to that standard *wink*). Nevertheless, there are hidden details in such issues that councillors can only decipher and then properly reconsider in the context of the student council and the interests of their constituents by questioning. Perhaps I should supplement this point with a pertinent example.

Teach English Abroad

would never have known that with the two new buildings might come a very roughly estimated modest increase of about $2 to the student services fee. Not that this seriously impacts my decision to vote “yes” on these questions but it might be something

strictly individual basis, the above example might not necessarily hold. However, the need for such councillors to undertake independent deliberation within their faculties on issues before council becomes more pronounced in situations where

I

attended the last council meeting. Indeed it was a success. Nevertheless, despite the groundbreaking motions for three progressive referendum questions and the civil and mostly enlightening debate that led to their eventual passing, there was something that both disturbed and saddened me about this council meeting; “I” seemed to be many a councillor’s favourite word. As they raised their placards to debate for or against the motions on the table, a grammatically and democratically erroneous “I, personally” prefaced the positions of many a councillor on the issues. It certainly made matters even worse when the arguments they proceeded to advance under this “personal” mandate were completely illogical. For example, there was a certain councillor needed to be repeatedly corrected on his appalling misconceptions about one of the referendum questions up for discussion. Certainly if there is anything a councillor, however dictatorial, cannot be; it is misinformed. It seemed most sinful to me that this councillor could advance his own hopelessly misinformed positions on a platform granted to him by a probably more informed constituency. This wayward minority of councillors made no references to feedback from any level of consultation with their constituents or the objective measure that had led them to the position they held on the issue (except of course that it was their opinion). They hardly even indicated a single reference as to how their stated position was in the interest of their constituents. Clearly, the general impression was that they were speaking for themselves. Now, forgive my attempted wit, but councillors need to understand that the “I” in councillor does not belong to them. The truth is that this dictatorial approach to student governance is at the root of many problems with apathy in student governance. Perhaps some devious councillor was thinking, “Why should I care about the opinions of those underachieving students who couldn’t hustle up councillor like I did?” Well, it turns out that a dictatorial approach to student governance further weakens a councillor’s mandate. I hate to continually rub it in, but the poor voting numbers that gave most members of council their mandates, would ordinarily require they sat on their council seats with half their bottoms. The truth really is that the council’s legitimacy is already seriously threatened by low election turnouts. The last thing council should desire is for more students to believe their opinions are inconsequential to the student council. It’ll certainly add to the plethora of reasons for them to skip on elections. On the other hand, by engaging your constituents in consultations about the different issues that come up to council for deliberation, councillors can significantly raise their profile. Sooner or later, it will become clear to an increased number of students that councillors do matter and council elections need to be taken seriously. Until councillors seriously rethink their “l’etudiant c’est moi” attitude to student governance, they will continue to record turnout

eaboyeji@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

the pitch forks waiting for you in your faculty lounge right after. To improve student governance at our university, student leaders must realize that the “i” in “councillor” is for “independent”— not “individual.”

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Opinion

10

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Community Editorial Fear and loathing in UW

S

o apparently we can’t make appointments at Health Services to get checked for any influenza-like symptoms. That’s fine. Maybe our health professionals prefer the uncertainty of not knowing whether their next patient’s going to walk in, collapse and slip into catatonia or just report a case of herpes. In either case, the message I received was that if you suffer

mobbing the Health Services Complex at all times, allowing swine-flu patients, flu victims, peddlers of the common cold and purveyors of the ubiquitous sniffles to all distribute their wares freely on campus. And then you’d have more of each type of illness distilled and double-distilled to the point that we’d all be living and studying in a human pool of contamination.

but I’d rather have a human tell me if I’m ill, rather than rely on my self-diagnosis. In any case, an online checklist’s assuming that everyone’s capable of being his own GP. If that were the case, UW had better set up a medical school —we might as well get a head start pumping out Canada’s shortfall of medical personnel. Last week, I fell ill. Surprise! No really, let’s shovel the full payload of

re-assured by them that I was not, in fact, suffering from swine flu. Lies. What really happened is that a sign on the wall politely asked me to wear surgical mask, sanitize my hands and directed me to the regulatory revolver where I could then proceed to kill myself (I suppose it assumed that that was the better option if I could catch the cold after

I don’t hate Health Services. Far from it, I think they’re doing a pretty good job handling general illnesses and conditions, but I think that with regard to swine flu and its extended family containing illnesses of flu-like persuasion, they could offer a better set of alternatives

from an illness that resembles the dreaded H1N1, you’re not allowed to let them know in advance so that they can ready themselves. But then again, apologists would probably say that’s because they don’t want to be flooded with a caseload of flu-probables who all think they suffer from swine flu. I say that if you preclude patients from setting up appointments in a controlled fashion, then you simply increase the chances of patients

As I write this, I can already imagine people’s voices: What’s your problem? Why do you hate Health Services so much? Well I don’t hate Health Services. Far from it, I think they’re doing a pretty good job handling general illnesses and conditions, but I think that with regard to swine flu and its extended family containing illnesses of flu-like persuasion, they could offer a better set of alternatives. They have provided the online checklist,

dirt on this one: coughing, sneezing, fever, chills, sweating, irritability (maybe that’s just me) but in the end, plagued by harpy thoughts of swine flu, two days of this was enough; Health Services beckoned. Come, they seemed to say, we shall mitigate the symptoms of your illness. After entering the back door (the front door is a no-no for swine flu sufferance) I was ushered in by anxious medical personnel, given a thorough medical check-up and

all the aforementioned “prevention is better” information). Scrapping the last step, I moved on to the actual reception, where I was directed to provide my personal information, and then moved to a waiting room to fill out a questionnaire. To cut things short, the nurse in the end, politely asked me about my symptoms, medical history, and then proceeded to tell me that they did not conduct swine flu testing at the

university health centre, but for now, they would classify my illness as an influenza-like illness. Not only was that bad enough, but they did not have any other way of telling how many students actually had this, or related illnesses. In fact, what I got out of that conversation was that this university is operating blind with regard to swine flu. Although an external diagnosis confirmed that I wasn’t actually suffering from swine flu, this experience itself speaks volumes as to how unprepared we are for this crisis. We don’t know whether students have it, unless they actually go and report it at Health Services. If not all suffering students report their illness, then we wouldn’t know about it. If we don’t know about it, then we don’t know when and where we will contract it, and lastly, even if we do contract it, we wouldn’t know how to treat it. And although they announced the arrival of vaccines today in preparation for the second round of H1N1, I still can’t shake off the feeling that if this university is the blind bat, then we, the students, the metaphorical flies, are about to be devoured in its haphazard attempt to stay on top of this pandemic. Prashanth Gopalan 2a science and business

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Campus Bulletin VOLUNTEERING Shadow needed to be paired with international students for winter 2010. Show them around, help them resolve cultural conflict and make their stay in Waterloo more enjoyable. Make great friends and learn new things. Please apply at www.iso.uwaterloo.ca. Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence. One to three hours a week commitment. Call Canadian Mental Health at 519-744-7645, ext 229. City of Waterloo has volunteer opportunities. For info call 519-8886478 or www.waterloo.ca/volunteer. The Distress Centre needs volunteers to provide confidential, supportive listening on our crisis and distress lines. Complete training provided. Call 519-744-7645, ext 300. Volunteer Action Centre, 519-7428610 / volunteer@volunteerkw.ca, for all your volunteering needs! Deliver or befriend through Community Support Connections. Deliver meals, drive seniors to appointments or visit one for a few hours each week. Contact Kate Lavender at 519-772-8787 or katel@communitysupportconnections.org. Hey Hot Stuff! Volunteering at Imprint is fun, easy, helps you meet people and boosts resumes and grad school applications. All welcome, regardless of experience. volunteer@ imprint.uwaterloo.ca. Volunteers needed – The English Tutor program is in constant need of volunters to tutor international students. Volunteering is an essential prt of student life at UW. Apply online at www.iso.uwaterloo.ca. Speak Laos? Volunteer visitor required for a woman with Alzheimer’s Disease who speaks Laos. Two hours per week. Training/support provided by Alzheimer Society. Jill jmercier@alzheimerkw. com. Resume builder.

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Egypt – February Reading Week – 10 days, $3,300 from Toronto. Hotels, Visa, flight, breakfasts, daily transportation, entry fees. 416-727-1040 or www.egyptgrouptours.com

Housing on campus – St. Paul’s Univ ersity College has undergrad and grad housing available immediately and/or January 1, 2010. Please contact Jenn at jlaughli@uwaterloo.ca or 519-8851460, ext 205.

SERVICES Does your thesis or major paper need a fresh pair of eyes to catch English spelling and grammar errors? Thesis English editing. Five business day turnaround. Neal Moogk-Soulis, ncmoogks@uwaterloo.ca.

HELP WANTED STUDY Cigarette evaluation study – $90 paid for two visits, $120 paid for three visits. Name brand smokers only. Please call Sandy at 519-578-0873 or email at smokesstudy@hotmail.com or sandy.mich@hotmail.com. Qualified respondents are 19-29 years of age and smoke Players Original, Players Rich, Players Smooth, Players Special Blend, Craven A Gold, Dumaurier Distinct, Matinee Yellow or Export A Full Flavour, Medium, Smooth Rich or Extra Smooth. Study will take place December 1 to 15. Call for your appointment!

HELP WANTED Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, KW Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. Imprint is looking for UW students who are interested in joining the distribution team, to deliver Imprint, weekly every Friday from 6 a.m. to 12 p.m. Pay is $60 cash. For more info email ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca.

CAREER SERVICES WORKSHOPS Sign up for these workshops at www. careerservices.uwaterloo.ca. All workshops are held in the William M. Tatham Centre for Co-operative Education and Career Services. Wednesday, November 4 – Are You Thinking About Dentistry? – 5:30 to 7 p.m., TC 1208. Thursday, November 5 – Interview Skills: Preparing for Questions – 3:30 to 5 p.m., TC 1208. Note: There is a prerequisite for this workshop. Please see Workshop Registration at the end of these listings. Friday, November 6 – Interview Skills: Selling your Skills – 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Note: There is a prerequisite for this workshop. Please see Workshop Registration at the end of these listings. Monday, November 9 – Academic Interview Skills – 12 to 1:30 p.m., TC 2218. Note: Limited to 30 participants. Tuesday, November 10 – Career Exploration and Decision Making – 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1113. All About GMAT – 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., TC 2218. Are You Thinking About an MBA? – 5:30 to 7 p.m., TC 2218. Wednesday, November 11 – Successfully Negotiating Job Offers – 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., TC 1208. Note: This workshop is geared toward graduating students. Are You Interested in an Academic Career? – 12 to 1:30 p.m., TC 2218. Work Search Strategies – 2:30 to 4 p.m., TC 1208. Note: There is a prerequisite for this workshop. Please see Workshop Registration at the end of these listings. Thursday, November 12 – Writing CVs and Cover Letters – 12 to 1:30 p.m., TC 2218. Note: Go to the CTE website to register for this workshop: cte.uwaterloo.ca/events_registration/ CUT_events.html Tuesday, November 17 – Exploring Your Personality Type Part 1 – 2:30 to 4 p.m., TC 1112; Part 2 – November 24, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1112. Note: There is a materials charge of $10 prior to the first session. Success on the Job – 3:30 to 5 p.m., TC 1208. Wednesday, November 18 – Business Etiquette and Professionalism – 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Wednesday, November 25 – Career Interest Assessment – 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., TC 1112. Note: There is a materials charge of $10 prior to the session. Thursday, November 26 – Getting a U.S. Work Permit – 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC 1208.

Workshop Registration Required Modules at cdm.uwaterloo.ca – if you have completed any of these modules in the Career Development eManual or Co-Fundamentals (PD1, COOP 101, Co-op Fundamentals for Engineering or Co-op Fundamentals for Pharmacy) you have satisfied this requirement and may register for the workshop. To register for Interview Skills: Preparing for Questions, complete this module within Marketing Yourself Interview Skills ; To register for Interview Skills: Selling Your Skills, complete this module within Marketing Yourself Interview Skills ; To register for Networking 101, complete this module within Marketing Yourself Work Search ; To register for Work Search Strategies, complete this module within Marketing Yourself Work Search. To access the module, go to cdm.uwaterloo.ca and select the UW student version of the Career Development eManual.

STUDENT AWARD & FINANCIAL AID For all in-person inquiries, including OSAP funding pickup, your SIN card and government issued, valid photo ID are required. Please note that the BIYD card CAN NOW be accepted as photo ID.Visit safa.uwaterloo.ca for a full listing of scholarships and awards.

ANNOUNCEMENTS “In The Mind’s Eye 2009: Issues of Substance Use in Film + Forum” – offers a very rare glimpse into the world of drug and/or alcohol use through films, workshops and keynote presentations. In The Mind’s Eye is unique in North America and is held at locations throughout Waterloo region in October and November. For more info visit www.inthemindseye.ca or call the hotline at 519-575-4757, ext 5016. Tune in to Sound 100.3 FM radio to hear DJ Cool, Mondays 4:30 to 6 p.m. and Fridays 7 to 10 a.m., with lots of music, entertainment, helpful info, weather and more. www.soundfm.ca >listen or www.ckmsfm.ca.

Thursday, November 5: “Nutrition for the Holidays,” 12 noon, DC 1304. Monday, November 16: “Poinsettias and Door Wreaths Ordering Deadline,” order forms at UWRC@uwaterloo.ca. Thursday, November 19: “Entertaining Like a Caterer,” 12 noon, HH 334. Monday, November 23: “Humour in the Workplace,” 12 noon, DC 1302. Tuesday, November 24: “Feng Shui Discussion,” 12 noon, MC 5136. St. Jacob’s Country Playhouse – last call to order discounted tickets to the Robin Hood Pantomime. Would you like to assist with the planning of UWRC events for 2010?? Email UWRC@admmail.uwaterloo. ca with your interest. Exchange Board – looking to rent, buy or sell? UWRC.uwaterloo.ca/exchange_board. More info email Margaret at mulbrick@uwaterloo.ca. Lots of discounts available for UW employees – CN Tower, Ontario place, Empire Theatre, Galaxy Theatre, Kitchener Auditorium, Princess Cinema, VIA rail and more ... email Shirley at schatten@uwaterloo.ca.

ONGOING MONDAYS Gambling can ruin your life. Gamblers Anonymous, 7 p.m. at St Marks, 825 King Street, W, basement.

Imprint

Poke Your Head In And See What We’re Up To

UW RECREATION COMMITTEE tails www UW Recreation Committee events are open to all employees of the University of Waterloo. Register by emailing UWRC@uwaterloo.ca. UW Book Club meetings – November 18 – “So Brave, Young and Handsome” by Leif Engler ; December 16 – “Child 44” by Tom Rob Smith. De-

.uwrc.uwaterloo.ca.

Friday, October 30, 2009 USS (Ubiquitous Synergy Seeker) and The Scenario performs to benefit the Wellspring Cancer Support Cen-

tre at the London Music Hall starting at 9:30 p.m. Visit www.wellspring.ca for more info and tickets. Sunday, November 1, 2009 Join us for the official opening of the Activa Sportsplex with free skating, cake, and tours of the facility – 135 Lennox Lewis Way from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. RSVP by Oct 23 at 519-7412558. Thursday, November 5, 2009 Femfest 2009 fundraiser – a celebration of women – 6:30 to 10 p.m. at the Schwaben Club, Kitchener. Come for an evening of free pampering and do some shopping in our silent auction. Check out www.sascwr.org for ticket and event details. Thursday, November 5, 2009 Karl Kessler and Sunshine Chen present Hands On: Matters of Uncommon Knowledge from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Rotunda Gallery in Kitchener City Hall. For more info, contact Cheryl York at 519-741-3400 x3381. rare presents “Evolutionary Imagery from Darwin to Today” – a talk by Dr. Ryan Gregory, at 7 p.m. Register November 3. rare admin office, 1679 Blair Road in Cambridge. For more info 519-650-9336, ext 125. November 7 - December 20, 2009 Homer Watson House & Gallery proudly presents the 2009 End of Season Exhibition – 6 to 8 p.m. at 1754 Old Mill Road. Visit http://www. homerwatson.on.ca/ for more info. Thursday, November 19, 2009 MyWaterlooIdea is hosting a launch event with speakers Cheryl Rose and Diana Denton at the SLC Great Hall from 6 to 8 p.m. Visit myidea.uwaterloo.ca for more info. November 24 - 25, 2009 The 6th Annual Canadian Country Christmas, featuring Sean Hogan, Julian Austin, Jamie Warren and more – 7 p.m. at the Princess Cinema. Check out www.wpl.ca for more info and tickets. December 1 - 9, 2009 ACCKWA’s Online Charity Auction – On eBay.ca, search acckwa for great items! WestJet flight, art, hotel stays and more. All proceeds go to support and education programming for HIV in Waterloo Region. For more info, call 519-570-3687, ext 313.

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009 ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Located in the SLC or contact editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Features

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009 features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Democracy in Honduras Erin Harrison staff reporter

D

emocracy. A political institution, often sought after as the ideal, has proven less than sufficient for Honduras in light of the recent coup of their government earlier this year. Karen Spring, a representative of the human rights organization called Rights Action spoke to a enraptured UW audience on October 23, 2009 on the recent overthrow of Honduran President Manuel Zelaya by his political enemies. She also addressed the ensuing human rights violations created by the coup. The event, hosted by the Waterloo Public Interest Research Group (WPIRG), was Spring’s last speaking engagement in her fall speaking tour to raise awareness of the situation  in Honduras, a topic that appears to have received minimal coverage by traditional Canadian media outlets. The Lead-up to an overthrow In the wee hours of  June 28, 2009, the military and economic elite of the small central American country of Honduras overthrew the democratically-elected government of President Manuel Zelaya, who  was physically forced onto a plane and was removed to Costa Rica. Zelaya was born to a wealthy Honduran family and prospered as a businessman before being elected in 2005 as the candidate of the country’s powerful Liberal Party. Since taking office in January 2006, Zelaya began to implement social and economic policies that attempt to address the historically large and widening economic gap between the rich and powerful few and the impoverished masses. One such policy included significantly raising the national minimum wage and building a regional alliance with Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, renowned for his socialist leanings. These moves, while endearing him to the poor, civil society groups and labour unions, had the affect of alienating him from his own political party as well as the economic elites of the country. Zelaya’s leftward drift culminated in his attempt to hold a Constitutional Assembly – a move to write a new Constitution that would improve the lives of the poorest members of Honduran society. The goals of the Constitution were propounded to include improving the freedom of press, empowering minority groups through proportional representation, and permitting legal title to communal or ancestral land. Not mentioned as a change to the existing Constitution was extending the rule of the president who, according to the existing Constitution authored in 1982, can not extend his rule beyond one term. Misinformation, propaganda, and life in a state of siege Despite the fact the extension of a presidential term was not mentioned by Zelaya at any point in the lead-up to his removal,this was cited as the reason for the June military coup by media outlets across the world. Stations like CNN and FOX news falsely attributed Zelaya’s to have a Constitutional Assembly as a last ditch effort to retain power. In November of 2008, Zelaya announced a non-binding referendum to see if the people of Honduras wanted wanted to have an additional fourth ballot box (in addition to the presidential, congressional, and local electoral ballot boxes) in the next scheduled election asking whether or not voters would support the installation of a national Constitutional Assembly at the next election scheduled for November 2009 (basically, they would hold a non-binding referendum to see if citizens would support a binding referendum on whether or not to hold a Constitutional Assembly at the next election). The wealthy of the nation were generally thought to be generally in opposition to holding a Constitutional Assembly as it would compromise the amount of power they have by empowering the poor and disenfranchised of the nation. The non-binding referendum was to be held on June 28, 2009 but  two days before that, on June 26, a Supreme Court Justice issued a secret order to detain Zelaya citing “abuse of authority” among other offences.

After Zelaya’s removal, a de facto government was established under Acting President Roberto Micheletti who, in response to the massive, daily marches and demonstrations held by anti-coup and pro-Zelaya activists, declared a state of siege which suspends civil liberties like the right to due process, and protection from arbitrary detainment. It also permits search and seizure without a warrant. Since then, those rallying against Micheletti’s de facto government have been risking their lives each time they attend one of the demonstrations. There have been widespread allegations of human rights abuses committed by the army and national police including  beatings (including the beatings of diplomats from Cuba and Venezuela, and journalists from across the continent), detainment, making threats, and violence against protestors, including shootings. All of these acts are unequivocally denied by the government and state sponsored media. Acts of government sponsored terrorism like this are reminiscent of the Honduran turmoil of 1980s where community leaders or groups rallying to improve the lives of the poor or government dissenters were labelled as communists and were subject to threats or arbitrary beatings, with many vocal activists disappearing to be found six weeks later on the side of a rural highway tortured and killed, if they were ever found at all. Near the beginning of the coup, radio, television and newspaper outlets were systematically shut down, leaving only statesponsored media which continues to play down the unfolding drama. The state media continues to allege that Zelaya acted illegally in calling for a fourth ballot, and that the army presence in the country is for the protection of its citizens. The state media has never addressed allegations of human rights abuses, including incidents of soldiers firing at, beating or tear-gassing peaceful protesters. Zelaya returns to Honduras, but will he return to power? After several failed attempts to re-enter the country (his entrance was blocked repeatedly by the Honduran military), Zelaya secretly entered the country on September 21. While it’s unclear how he was able to enter, he has since been camped out  in the relative safety of the Brazilian embassy, unable to leave as the building is surrounded by thousands of Honduran soldiers and tanks. Daily protests have continued since his return with hundreds or thousands of his supporters rallying each day. He and his supporters continue to insist that the Micheletti government is illegal as will be the general election called for November 2009. Canadian and international attention Condemned by international organizations like the UN, World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund, many nations including the United States have publicly denounced the coup and demand that Zelaya be returned to power. Few nations however have actively taken steps against the de facto government by imposing sanctions or stopping official aid. Canada, for its part, has been silent on the issue of allegations of human rights abuses at the hands of the Micheletti government, and supports negotiations between Zelaya and him, which are currently being moderated by the Organization of American States. Critics say that Canada has taken a lax stance on the issue by still providing official aid to the country and by supporting negotiations between Zelaya and Micheletti instead of making a strong stance and not recognizing the legitimacy of the de facto government (to be clear, critics are not calling for all aid to the nation be stopped, but official aid – that which is given directly to the Honduran government by the Canadian government). A reason suggested for this weak stance is the huge financial interest Canadian businesses hold in Honduras like Goldcorp Inc., a mining company, which is renowned for poor environmental and human rights practices. According to Rights Action, the negotiations are going nowhere – Micheletti refuses to restore Zelaya to power, and it seems that he is stalling for time until the November 29 election in which a new President will be elected to replace Micheletti. While according to the 1982 Constitution neither Zelaya or Micheletti

are eligible for re-election, candidates that support Zelaya’s plan to rewrite the Constitution aren’t being allowed to run or were intimidated into not running. There have been unverified reports of government – sponsored assassinations of left-leaning political party members, including at least one prominent member of the country’s  Democratic Unification Party). Many governments world-wide will refuse to acknowledge the results of this election, including countries such as Mexico and Brazil, stating that while an election may have the trappings of democracy, all it will effectively do is legitimize illegal coup. According to Karen Spring and Rights Action, if the election results were recognized, it would set an example for the rich and powerful: if they don’t like a policy of the democratically elected government, then they may be able to get away with a violent overthrow against the government. President Cristina Kirchner of Argentina may have summarized the situation best in saying: “We must condemn any benevolent coup attempt, that is when through a civilian-military coup legitimate authorities are ousted followed by attempts to legalize the situation by calling new elections.” Whether you are left-wing, right-wing, or middle of the road, we can all agree that it’s time to restore democracy to Honduras.

eharrison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

What can I do ? Canadians should contact members of parliament or Canadian Minister of State on the Americas, Peter Kent as often as possible (Rights Action suggests daily) and demand: 1. Unconditional and public support for the return of the entire constitutional government of President Zelaya 2. Unequivocal denunciation of the military coup and no recognition of the illegal oligarchic-military regime of Roberto Micheletti 3. Unequivocal demand and pressures from the international community for regime to relinquish power 4. No recognition of the November 2009 elections that candidates from the traditional Nationalist and Liberal parties are campaigning for, even as the country is militarized and repression is widespread 5. Immediate suspension of all international funds and loans to the regime and targeted economic, military and diplomatic sanctions against the coup plotters and perpetrators 6. Application of international and national justice against the coup plotters and perpetrators, reparations to the victims of harms and damages (including loss of life, torture and rape) committed by the regime Call Minister Kent at 613-944-2300, or email him at kentp@parl.gc.ca

1. 2. 3.

Other ways to be involved Organize fundraising events, demonstrations or letter writing campaigns in your area and tee up with other active organizations. Contact the local media and provide them with updates about what is happening in Honduras (see www.rightsaction.org for daily updates) . Donate funds to Rights Action, every dollar of which goes to support the pro-democracy movement in Honduras

Courtesy Alcina Wong


Features

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Drinkable groundwater? A glimpse into the groundwater contamination issues of china

Photo Courtesy Sarah Al-Hage

Dr. John Cherry addresses his audience from the podium during his lecture on groundwater contamination in China on October 23, 2009. Sarah Al-Hage reporter

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r. John Cherry gave out an important lecture in Hagey Hall on October 23, 2009 on groundwater contamination with a focus on his experience in China. Cherry is an adjunct professor at the Universities of Waterloo, Guelph and Hong Kong. He holds geological engineering degrees from the University of Saskatchewan and the University of California, Berkley and a PhD in hydrogeology from the University of Illinois. In addition to conducting research regarding subsurface contaminant behaviour, he has participated in the development of several technologies of groundwater monitoring, remediation and co-holds several patents. Cherry’s lecture is based on what he has learned while traveling and conducting scientific collaborations in China during the past seven years. China, he said, which is still very much a developing country in terms of water and other environmental issues, has a population of 1.3 billion, nearly all located in an area smaller than the United States. There is approximately 50 per cent, and growing dependency on groundwater. There are expanding problems of inadequate water quantity and quality due to rapid industrialization, intensive agriculture, population growth and other pressures. Cherry’s lecture considered several groundwater issues, ranging from radioactive waste isolation in the desert, pathogens contamina-

tion of springs in remote mountain villages, chlorinated solvents in the industrial areas and nitrogen in deltaic lowlands. He compared hydrogeological conditions between particular areas in North America and China, and examined the role of field-based conceptual models in advancing understand of groundwater contamination. China’s goals since two years ago are to provide rudimentary health care and to provide healthy water, with this China became a great goldmine for Cherry’s research. Cherry first travelled to China as a tourist, but connected with Dr. Lee at the University of Hong Kong. After exploring parts of the country, a second trip was made to further explore Dun Huang and the Gobi Desert. China now only has 50 per cent drinkable groundwater because of all the contamination. Cherry stressed that this is a very large issue due to the rapidly increasing growth rate of the country despite efforts to slow it down. He also spoke about how to provide clean water to peasants living on mountains since their wells are old and contaminated. The mountain water table is at a certain level. However the lower a farmer obtains water on the mountain the more contaminated it will be. Cherry’s solution is to move or drill proper wells deep enough so that they cannot get contaminated. Other people working with water issues in China knew how to drill wells for peasants on flat surfaces but not on mountains, so they were grateful for Cherry’s solution. During the question period, a Chinese man drove all the way from Buffalo to at-

tend the event and thanked Cherry for the work he has done. Cherry mentioned that Canadians are headed downhill because of their financial priorities and that the Chinese are better since they do not focus on money, they focus on education and technology, which provides them with faster and more efficient solutions. Cherry’s lecture also featured Dr. Robert N. Farvolden (1928-1995), the founder of Cherry’s research and the Farvolden Scholarship Fund. This fund provides an annual scholarship to a graduate student in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences who is involved in research pertaining to groundwater resource management and protection. The scholarship was given out at the end of the lecture to an excelling and motivated student, Emily Henkemans, who is doing her own research in the field of environmental science. There were also two other Amec-Geomatrix scholarships/Ontario Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology (OGSST) given out that night to a few individuals. The Farvolden Lecture Series, hosted by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, was initiated in 1996 as an annual celebration in honour of Farvolden. Farvolden had an exceptional influence on the Canadian and international groundwater communities through his commitment to education and his promotion of the groundwater sciences. Most of the people who attended the event seemed to be there in Farvolden’s memory.

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I hope this makes you angry jgoodhand@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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y initial aim for this column was to participate in personal challenges that literally put myself in the shoes of another in order to reflect on how good we have it and the actions we can make in order to relieve a few burdens on the world. Eight weeks into it and the challenge I now face is to find something that I can commit to without running the risk of extreme pain, illness or death. In the past two months I felt more in touch with the rest of the world than ever before, but the issues that really break my heart seem far away and without a corresponding personal sacrifice I am able to make. I don’t feel my sentiment that “what the world needs now is love, sweet love” is one I feel alone. I am confident that there are more people, probably even you, who wish that more could be done, and feel the same levels of frustration when hearing about thousands of refugees forced to leave their homes, or seeing children on television with sunken eyes and only a thin layer of skin over their bones. Makes you feel a little helpless right? What good is helpless when you can get angry? Take 40 seconds right now to think about all the things you think are wrong with this world. Go on, get right pissed off about it! Furrow your brow, grind your teeth and get all sweaty mad about it. I know a certain level of Canadian makes you feel you should remain compliant and hush yourself on issues that might make others feel uncomfortable. If you think discussing other people’s trials and tribulations is uncomfortable, try imagining what it would be like to live in fear of being raped in the middle of the night, living in a country where you face imprisonment for standing up for rights you should inherently be granted, watching your

family massacred in front of you, or watching as your entire country slowly becomes engulfed in water with no one willing to take you in. I wonder how it would make them feel to know you are too reserved to speak up for them when you are living comfortably on the other side of the world most likely using resources and buying things of unnecessary material value at their expense? We are just one on our own but together we are a vital force that can challenge even the most trying of global issues. This doesn’t take an overwhelming amount of energy or time from each of us, but it does take a little bit of anger and willingness to use the privileges we have to carry the rest of our global family. The following are some recommendations that I have about alternatives to keeping quiet and waiting on the world to change: Petitions: Level of difficulty: Can you sign your name? There is literally a petition for every cause that makes your heart beat. Rallies/marches: Level of difficulty: a little more than a signature, but allows you to physically connect with others that are passionate about the same issues as you while making those around you take note. Bonus: Who doesn’t love an excuse to walk and chant? Write to politicians/corporations: Level of difficulty: If you can put your thoughts into words and have access to a computer or a pad of paper and stamp, you are golden. They are dependent on our demands for support and paycheques so tell them where to put your dollar. Educate yo’ self: Level of difficulty: It is what you make

it, but for the love of humanity don’t play the ignorance is bliss card. Ignorance is not bliss...it’s ignorance. Speak up: You have a voice, use it. Angry that your grocery store doesn’t sell local strawberries when they are growing from grates all over Ontario in the summer? Mention it to the cashier at the check-out. Disappointed that your favourite restaurant still uses styrofoam for take-out? Ask if they want help looking into alternative packaging solutions. Ever wonder what conditions your shirt was made in then just ask. It may surprise you to know that people in business are people too, and inside the hard exterior they are just as concerned about the issues you are, or at the very least want to make you happy so you will return. Next time you see something that makes you angry or that you know is at the expense of someone else who is just as worthy of life, love, safety, and freedom as you are, don’t calm yourself down. Pick up a pen, a sign or a book, and do something to express your frustration in a way that challenges the current state. Note: If you are part of a student group or local community initiative that works to bring attention to an important ethical, environmental, or social issue, or you just have a creative idea and would like me to take it up as a weekly challenge, drop me a line. Resources: 365 Ways to Change the world: http://www.365act.com/ The Petition Site: Look up thousands of petitions or start your own, http://www.thepetitionsite.com.

Ian Cutajar

28 King Street, N WATERLOO

Dirty Burger Days

519-954-8660 www.chainsawsaloon.com

Mon, Tues, Wed

$2 BURGERS & WINGS $5.50/lb


Features

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

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Taking action for climate change

Sarah Al-Hage Reporter

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n October 24, the Waterloo Public Interest Research Group (WPIRG) Climate Action Project’s (350) rally began by the Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery on Caroline and Erb Street in Waterloo and continued down King Street to deliver a motivational letter to Peter Braid, MP Kitchener-Waterloo, at his office in Uptown Waterloo. Everyone from families, children, and students brought their signs to stand up for what is now a worldwide issue. A local band called The Rosewoods attended the beginning of the event to play music for everyone. While marching, many individuals chanted, including slogans such as “What do we want? Clean air! When do we want it? Now!” When the group consisting of approximately 50 people arrived at Braid’s office, they continued chanting in hopes of Braid getting the message. The Forest Ethics campaign was also a big part of this event. A Forest Ethics climate outreach co-ordinator in KW by the name of J.M.Toriel gave a motivational speech at the end of the rally. “This is about the future, for our children and grandchildren,” he said. “We now have to live with the failures of our polititians. We must realize this isn’t an average problem

— this is a crisis.” He went on to say that we have to take responsibility. “Our polititians need to realize how extreme this issue is before they go to Copenhagen so we are not embarrassed as a country.” 350 is a group of students at the University of Waterloo who are raising awareness about the amount of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere. We are currently at 387 parts per million, but we need to be below 350 to be at a safe level for living organisms to breathe. Their immediate goal is to ensure that Bill C-311 is passed when Braid goes to Copenhagen in December. Our emissions have risen by 26 per cent since 1990, which is worse than the US. While a 350 member gave out a speech before beginning to march, many ralliers yelled out “shame!” and proudly held up their banners and signs. An individual that took part in the 350 rally made a point to tell everyone that what stops us is fear — we need to restore hope. If we look at past movements, we can see that polititians were scared of activists, not with violence, but with pressure. Therefore they do not have the power — we do. For more information, visit www.350. org or www.forestethics.org.

Participants in the march for climate change were energized and ready to take their letter to MP Peter Braid. Photos Courtesy Sarah Al-Hage

POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICINGACTAERESERS FOR REWARD

FINANCIAL PLANNING GLOBAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNATIONAL MARKETING MARKETING MANAGEMENT PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Participants of all ages gathered to make a statement about the state of our climate.

business.humber.ca Graphics by xiaobo liu


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Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

GEM & MINERAL SHOW Photos Peter Kreze

The Gem and Mineral Show was held at the Centre for Environmental and Information Technology (EIT) as part of the Science Faculty Open House on starting October 24, 2009.

Design Xiaobo Liu


Features

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

17

Espresso 2.0 Swift, precise, and affordable

Courtesy Michael Chung

Alumni from Canadian universities (in centre photo) celebrate the successful completion of their collaborative Campus Chills novel that was printed using the Espresso 2.0 Book Machine. Tejas Koshy staff reporter

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any visitors to the UW Bookstore will notice a closed off section in the corner. Any question as to the nature of this partition will yield the answer “It’s a printing press.” May Yan, director of UW Retail Services calls it “An ATM for books”. The printing press is an “Espresso 2.0 Book Machine” otherwise known as EBM. There are only 12 of the latest version of these machines in the world, with the University of Waterloo being the first to receive delivery in February 2009. Manufactured by On Demand Books, a company based in New York, the 2.0 version is the latest in the series. Currently this machine is not capable of printing colour pages, although this feature is promised in the next version. In an April 23 University of Waterloo news brief, the machine was described as measuring seven feet (two metres) long, three feet wide and five feet tall. Randy Dauphin, the bookstore information systems specialist, was quoted as stating that UW owns the latest

version of the machine, which costs under approximately $200,000 USD. Having the ability to print 80 to 110 pages per minute, the Espresso has generated waves within the book business. Recently, the Espresso machines were featured in a CBC article, which promised that the machine offered solutions to various problems that book retailers face. It offers the retailers the ability to handle book returns, increase inventory despite space restriction and to supply out-of-print books. Additionally, the machine has the ability to print books for authors who have yet to make a formal agreement with the major publishing houses. Many will wonder how the machine answers these problems. This is primarily because the EBM prints from a digital library. Currently, the University of Waterloo has agreements to print, upon request from Google Books and Lightning Source, which currently have a selection of two million books. Many University of Waterloo staff members have praised the addition of the EBM 2.0 machine. Yan was quoted in UW news brief on April 23, saying that the EBM machine revolutionized the traditional supply chain for book distribution. Yan continued to add

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that, due to the EBM, Retail Services has the ability to offer cost effective solutions to students and staff and the option to print customized textbooks. Currently staff and students receive a discount of printing costs, thus paying about five cents per page. Dauphin, in the April 23 news brief, stated that students will be the main beneficiaries of the EBM. This was due to the fact that the machine made it possible to distribute books easily and quickly at huge saving on print runs under 500 copies, depending on copyright costs and book sizes. “It can print out a 300-page paperback, complete with a cover and standard paper stock in just four minutes,” said Dauphin. An example of this cost saving is, for instance, a 12 chapter textbook, which would normally retail for $240. However, if the academic course covers only five chapters of the textbook ($100 worth), students are unnecessarily paying extra for the book. However with the EBM in operation, the instructor now has the ability to print a customized five chapter version of the textbook, thus saving students $140 on their textbook. However one should take into account printing costs and copyright charges.

Students, thanks to the EBM machine, now have the ability to get books printed, instead of ordering books online as long as the publisher agrees. Since the EBM installation in February 2009, there have been instances of students requesting textbook prints right before exams. There is a possibility that students will have the ability to self-publish the book, with the help of the EBM machine. On October 22, the EBM printed its first new fiction book, Campus Chills. This book was exclusively printed by EBM machines on the University of Waterloo, McMaster University, and University of Alberta. The book is a compilation of stories created by alumni from all three universities, which included UW graduates from the science and maths faculties. Currently, the book is available for purchase from the University of Waterloo’s BookStore website. At time of print, nine textbook titles have been printed by the EBM this fall. The next version will have the ability to print colour on the interior pages. tkoshy@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

SunLife sheds light on finance Jacqueline Chan staff reporter

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ntent on tying together both the practical and theoretical aspects of the business world, University of Waterloo club WIREX (Waterloo Investment Research Exchange) helps students develop a more practical financial and investment background before they embark into the world where business plays an ever-growing role. On October 28,2009, WIREX hosted an information event and invited Dean Connor, the current president of Sun Life Financial, to be the keynote speaker. With an honours business administration degree from the Richard Ivey School of Business and a background in applied math, he gained experience in his industry while doing work on pension plans and investments in Mercer’s operations in Canada. He joined the global financial services business, Sun Life Financial, three years ago and became president of the company last year. Dean Connor shared information both about his life and the road to success in the insurance industry, and he did a wonderful job of introducing the complicated world of risk and investment to a room full of interested students. The main focus of his talk was the topic of risk in current financial markets, and near the end of his talk he gave some reasons for why the 2008 financial market meltdown had a smaller effect on Canadian companies than American companies. Drawing on company and industry reports, he demonstrated his ideas for a balanced business model. In order to experience success with this model, a company should meet certain requirements in terms of financial strength, diversity of profiles, and position for growth. One way for companies to ensure financial strength is to have high quality asset portfolios, and good geographic and business diversification. This means building a presence in different regions and countries, especially those with rapidly expanding markets such as China and India, and offering a number of products and services. These services may include various forms of protection (including health, life, and disability insurance) or wealth management, (one of which is the pension plan).

By having a wide variety of products available and not relying on any single product, companies cushion themselves against the potentially devastating results of global events. However, it is difficult at times for companies not to succumb to the pressure to duplicate high-risk products experiencing success in the market despite their own doubts about the product. Since the profitability of life insurance companies is strongly tied to the accuracy of their estimates of figures, these companies must be able to deal with the risks involved. With the exponential increases in investments in pension plans by the aging baby boomer group, this issue is more important than ever. A good way to ensure that the company can afford to pay off these pensions despite financial downfalls is to consistently set aside a portion of earnings in reserves or in capital. However, financial meltdowns have other effects as seen in the market for subprime mortgages, a riskier investment profile, which fell through and impacted a large number of companies on a global scale in 2008. The widely accepted reason explaining why this meltdown had a smaller impact on Canadian businesses than on American businesses was that Canadian banks were stronger and that they had continued to have lower risk mortgages during that period, but another theory is that the financial strength of the life insurance companies was also important. As well, the differences in the competitive environment between the two countries could have had an impact on the decisions made by the companies. With the more competitive environment, the U.S. companies were more likely to take risks and to engage in an arms race on products. So knowing that the U.S. had such a competitive market, the challenge that Dean Connor posed was for interested students to travel to the U.S. (or even another part of the world) to work in the fast paced financial services business after graduation. This would not only provide more insight into risk and give them more exposure in terms of foreign companies, but also test their ability to adapt to these new environments. jchan@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Windows 7 launch Microsoft’s new operating system Windows 7 became available to the general public on October 22, 2009. A launch party was held at Velocity on October 28, 2009.

photos peter kreze design by xiaobo liu


Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

P90X Day 90

Features

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Only just the beginning

Peter N Trinh

Steven R. McEvoy staff reporter

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pon reaching the end of a journey, or achieving a goal, we often realize it is not in fact the end but really just the first step in a new journey. I started feeling that way part way through P90X; at some point late in phase II or early in phase III, I stopped counting down the days until my 90 days were done and started counting up a number of completed days of being more active and living a healthier lifestyle. That was a big mindset change, and I am not specifically sure when it happened but it was a very important shift. P90X is an amazing program, if you follow Beachbody’s motto “Decide, Commit, Succeed” it is possible to start a transformation that can last the rest of your life. My transformation surprised me; in the last 13 weeks I have worked out 90 days straight. I achieved 11 of 13 goals for the fitness test and I have reached 9 of 14 goals on the fitness level. But what the chart doesn’t show is the body transformation. I lost 56lbs of body fat, gained 23lbs of lean muscle mass and lost 33lbs on the scale. I went from a 46 inch pants to a 38 being loose, and from a 3XL shirt to a L. I have succeeded in establishing working out each day as a habit in my life. As well, I have started creating patterns of healthier food choices. There have also been some unexpected benefits and changes. First my asthma seems to have drastically improved; I have only used my inhaler once in the last 60 days. Also, for the last few years I had been having problems with heartburn at night and sometimes it would trigger a coughing attack and I would have to get up sip some warm liquid, use my inhaler, and sleep propped up. That has completely cleared up. I have also had problems with snoring during these last few years because of weight gain. And, I began to realize that the more weight I gained the worse my snoring became. Not only did this bother my wife, but it also caused me to have disrupted sleep. Needless to say, things have drastically improved and I rarely experience snoring problems anymore. Those things combined were unexpected benefits contributing both to greater health for myself, and as for the snoring,

for my wife also. That, combined with how much better I feel; the fact that I have more energy; am sleeping better; and that the sleep is much more restful and restorative; makes this journey well worth the effort. After the first four or five workouts I did not want to miss any days, hitting play was hard a few times when I did not get to begin my workout until 9 or 10 p.m. because of life but I managed to do it every day. The hardest part for me was nutrition; where my biggest temptation was pizza; almost every week I wanted pizza. In the past I would often eat all or most of a pizza in a single sitting. I was able to avoid this temptation for most of the 90 days. I did have one medium slice part way through and one of my first meals after finishing was pizza, but I limited myself to a reasonable portion. It was also hard to give up pop and carbonated energy drinks. I went the full 90 days without either. I have started drinking a lot more water, and find myself choosing green, red, or herbal teas. I still have my one coffee a day at work each morning. I am not prepared to give that one up yet. I also avoided alcohol for all but Thanksgiving Day. Speaking of Thanksgiving, that weekend was a blow off. Only about half of my meals would have been P90X approved, but I had great times with friends and family. For a number of years now I have written a journal often answering the following questions from Crusade a Babylon 5 spin off Science-Fiction TV Show. Each episode began with these questions: Who are you? What do you want? Where are you going? Who do you serve? Who do you trust? In part they have become my own personal driving questions, at the beginning of each term I would journal and answer each question. These questions were also guided by daily goals, which were: 1. To get enough sleep. 2. To eat right and exercise daily. 3. To refuse to be a perfectionist. 4. To carefully control finances. 5. To ask for help when needed.

6. To pray and read the Bible daily. 7. To not pressure self into planning entire life today. I can say that in the last seven years I had lost discipline in all areas of my life. My personal dream or personal mission statement would be: “To learn to live life to the fullest, while finding balance between body, mind and spiritual development.” What P90X has helped me to achieve is discipline in the physical area of my life, and that discipline has been carrying over into the other areas of life. Since I started this journey I have met about 15 other people who have also started it. So far only two are still following the plan. I have also encountered about 20 people who’ve asked about my weight loss. When I tell them that I am doing P90X they say that they have tried starting it, but did not make it out of the first week, or first month. Many have said they wish they had the commitment to start again and see it through. One even said they would have to find the disks again. In order to avoid being placed into this category I have had to prove myself as an accountable person. I frequently contact friends that I contact friends that I have met through various media formats such as the Beachbody online community, forums, and online chats. I constantly find them an inspirational and motivational tool to move forward with my healthy lifestyle program. Yet as this 90 day, 13 week journey ends, where do I go from here? First for the next few weeks I will be experimenting with some other workouts from Beachbody. I will be trying the workouts from Tony Horton’s One on One, as well as 10 Minute Trainer and P90X+. I have also borrowed some kettlebells from a friend and am going to try some weight routines with them. My goal now is to decide on another plan and do another 90 day challenge to maybe reach some of those long-term fitness goals. What program that will be is yet undetermined but I will be starting on November 9. All I know for sure is that I will continue to push play and workout every day and try each day to improve my food choices. Therefore the journey continues or begins again. smcevoy@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Arts & Entertainment Event Calendar Tuesday Nov 3, 2009 Music

Movies

Friday Oct 30, 2009

Friday Oct 30, 2009

Discoteria with DJ 88 — Jane Bond Behind The Milk With DJ Charless (19+) — Starlight — ($5) — 10 p.m. Retro Devil’s Night (19+)

— Club Abstract — 9 p.m. Jack deKeyzer — Boathouse — ($10) — 11:30 p.m.

Live Jazz Duo — King Street Trio — 7:30 p.m. - 11 p.m.

Saturday Oct 31, 2009 Shotgun Jimmy, B A Johnston, Raccoon Wedding, Slow DownMolasses, Kris Misner — Trepid — ($5) — 8:30 p.m. - 1 a.m.

19th Annual Halloween Party (19+) — Club Abstract — 9 p.m.

Sunday Nov 1, 2009 Jason Cutmore playing Spanish Piano — KW Music Room — ($10) — 8 p.m. Jim & Al — The Boathouse — 3 p.m. Paul MacLeod — The Boathouse — 9 p.m.

Monday oct, 19 2009

WLU Jazz Ensemble — Maureen Forrester Recital Hall — ($10) — 7 p.m. 09

Attack in Black with Dog Day — Starlight — ($12) — 8 p.m. Open Stage — The Boathouse — 8 p.m.

Courtesy Sara Rogalla

WLU Bricker Academic Room Under The Radar

Shoshana Telner on Piano — Maureen Forrester Recital Hall — 12 p.m.

— 7 p.m. - 10 p.m.

Wednesday Nov 4, 2009

The Invention of Lying — Friday 6:50 p.m. — Also playing from Oct 31- Nov 3 (various times)

DJ Gold Soundz — Jane Bond

Stage Friday Oct 30, 2009 Terry Clement — Yuk Yuks — ($17) — 8 p.m.

Saturday Oct 31 2009 Ghosts, Ghouls & Spectres — The Registry Theatre —($15) — 8 p.m.

Sunday nov 1, 2009 Now Who’s Talking... Telling Our Recovery Stories — The Registry Theatre — ($15) — 7 p.m.

Monday nov 2, 2009 St. John’s Kilmarnac, David Newman — The Registry Theatre

Tuesday nov 3, 2009 60 Dances in 60 Minutes — The Registry Theatre — 8 p.m. Jake’s Gift — Centre in the Square —($35) — 7:30 p.m.

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009 arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Princess Twin Cinemas

Amelia — Friday 9 p.m. — Also playing from Oct 31 - Nov 4 (various times) Whip It! — Friday 9 p.m. — Also playing from Oct 31 - Nov 4 (various times)

Princess Cinemas Unmistaken Child — Friday 7 p.m. — Also playing from Oct 31 - Nov 3 (various times) Star Trek — Friday 9:10 p.m. Rocky Horror Picture Show — Saturday 7 p.m. , 9:10 p.m., 11 p.m. Capitalism: A Love Story — Sunday 4:30 p.m. , 9:10 p.m. — Also playing from Nov 1 - Nov 4 (various times) Lemon Tree — Tuesday 7 p.m. Paris 1919 — Wednesday 7 p.m.

Galaxy Cinemas (Conestoga Mall) • Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs (PG) • Cirque Du Freak: The Vampire’s Assistant (PG)

• • • • • •

Couples Retreat (PG) The Stepfather Michael Jackson’s This Is It Saw VI Paranormal Activity NY Times Talks: A Conversation with John Irving • Where The Wild Things Are • Zombieland (14A) • Law Abiding Citizen

MISC. Saturday oct 31 2009 Beginner Scrapbooking with Sue — Herrscheners — ($20) — 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Monday nov 2, 2009 Bookstravaganza — Starlight (19+) — 8 p.m. Swing Dancing (19+) — Caesar Martini`s — (Free)

Tuesday nov 3, 2009 Learn How To Knit Thrummed Mitts — Herrscheners — ($25) — 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Learn How To Knit Rocking Stockings — Herrscheners — ($25) — 1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Dinh Nguyen

Grand River Reels Renaissance Adrienne Raw

assistant editor-in-chief

“I

t is my belief that this festival has become a cornerstone of this region’s cultural renaissance and an annual focal point of provocative screenings of movies from around the world, which may shape and change the way we view the globe,” wrote Ken Nakamura, Grand River Film Festival director and CEO, on the festival’s website. The third annual Grand River Film Festival (GRFF), showcasing numerous full-length films and shorts, took place in Cambridge, Kitchener, and Waterloo from October 22 to 25. The festival was founded as a non-profit organization to promote community interaction and shared appreciation for film, especially high-quality films that might not otherwise be available in southwestern Ontario. Originally a Cambridge-centered event, recent partnerships with organizations like the Waterloo Children’s Museum and the University of Waterloo’s School of Architecture have resulted in the festival’s growth and expansion into other cities. Besides being a part of the local art community, part of the festival’s goal is to invest in local youth. The three-day event involves a structured volunteer program and a shared appreciation for cinema, while the festival also offers year-round mentoring and skills development. One group of youth, a class of UW students, has been closely involved with the festival this year. As part of their class, English professor, Neil Randall’s “The Discourse of Advertising” students worked on promotion for the Grand River Film Festival. Students worked in groups to promote various elements of the festival including the individual films and the Indie Lounge event. Promotion involved traditional advertising like posters and print ads, as well as newer advertising mediums like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter. Randall’s involvement with the Grand River Film Festival began with a conversation with fellow UW Prof. Marcel O’Gorman who has worked with

the festival in the past. When Randall heard about O’Gorman’s past involvement with the festival, he “jumped on the opportunity to try something a bit different,” Randall said. “The purpose was to promote something that could allow full-class participation and that was local and could use promotion, in the sense that it was clearly (to judge from people I and others in the class had talked to) not very well known,” said Randall. Randall said that his motivation for getting his students involved with the Grand River Film Festival advertising was doing “real promotion for a real event.” He added that, “While a course about discourse and advertising can — and when I teach it usually is — about analyzing and evaluating ads (from various theoretical perspective), I wanted to have students experience a project with external interests and real deadlines.” Randall believes that, despite what he perceives as a lack of interest in the festival among university students, they should be the ones most involved in the festival. This belief is part of his motivation for bringing the advertising project to his class. A film festival is something Randall thinks is a valuable addition to any city. “A city (or set of cities) the size of K-W/Cambridge should have its own film festival. Or more than one,” he said. “GRFF is in its third year is still building, and deserves an audience.” Randall’s students are not the only UW group involved with the film festival. UW’s School of Architecture served as a venue for several of the film screenings during the festival. The Grand River Film Festival is a welcome feature of the local arts culture and an event with a lot of potential for community interaction. — with files from The Record and the GRFF homepage

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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Paradoxes, complex metaphors and intertwining symbols are the cornerstones of this film. Takita manages to put together a film that encapsulates a wide range of themes, from the importance of familial fidelity to the effects of death.

Jamie Damaskinos staff reporter

T

he Oscar-award-winning film Departures was presented during the Grand River Film Festival (GRFF) on Saturday, October 24. Director, Yôjirô Takita, was on hand with a translator after the screening of the film to answer questions from the audience. Yes, you read that correctly. An Oscaraward winning director was in Kitchener and you missed it. Shame on you. Paradoxes, complex metaphors and intertwining symbols are the cornerstones of this film. Takita manages to put together a film that encapsulates a wide range of themes, from the importance of familial fidelity to the effects of death. While the subject matter of the film is not particularly unique, the film’s execution and direction were outstanding. Takita was able to simultaneously embody a spirit of irreverence with the film’s black humour, while demonstrating a deep reverence for the importance of the rituals and emotions surrounding death. The plot revolves around Daigo Koboyashi, a concert cellist, who loses his job after the orchestra he plays for is dissolved. After some soul-searching, Daigo and his wife decide it would be best to move back to his hometown and start all over again. The first day that Daigo moves back into town, he stumbles across an ambiguous classified ad in the paper advertising a job involving “departures.” Thinking the job has something to do with tourism, Daigo responds immediately, only to find out that the job he’s applying for is that of an undertaker. The film follows Daigo’s journey through the world in his new situation, as he struggles to reconcile himself with his past and with his new job. Paradoxes seem to lie at the heart of this film as it strikes a delicate balance between the more depressing aspects of Daigo’s new job and a certain joie de vivre. Takita explained that this project grew out of his own personal experiences with death. As he grew older and more acquainted with

death in his own life, his translator explained, he desired more and more to explore the concept and saw Departures as the perfect opportunity to do that. The actors do a spectacular job in their respective roles. There isn’t a single weak link in the cast, from the main characters to the bit parts. The two actors that truely shined were Tsutomu Yamazaki and Ryoko Hirosue, respectively Daigo’s boss and Daigo’s wife. Yamazaki managed to seamlessly embody his role as the wise and world-weary mentor, while maintaining a slightly comedic edge. Similarly, Hirosue does a spectacular job as the adorable and adventurous wife of Daigo. She infused every scene she was in with an enchanting aura of tenderness and affection. Acting aside, what really makes this film stand out is the music. The score begins during the choral climax of the fourth movement of Beethoven’s Symphony #9 and slowly moves into more esoteric and individual pieces on the cello. As the translator explained, Takita wanted the music to reflect Daigo’s journey from being a concert cellist to being an individual striving to make sense of his new position in the world. The purposeful shift from such a pervasive and well-known piece as Symphony #9 to more unique and individual music mirrors Daigo’s journey from having a life that was molded for him to being placed in a situation where he must carve out his position in life. The music is emotionally charged and is sure to tug at the heart strings of even the coldest of viewers. Ultimately, Departures is a tender and humorous film that is sure to warm the hearts of those who see it. It manages to flirt with sentimentality and profound emotions without delving into the cloying depths of traditional Hollywood tearjerkers. I highly recommend this film to anyone with an interest in Japanese culture or anyone who simply wants to see a wellmade and well-executed film. jdamaskinos@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Departures


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

23

The second half features technology that helps produce patterns used for the creation of origami, talks about origami in relation to various sciences (geometry, physics, biology) and its possible applications in space...

The Art of Science, The Science of Art

photos courtesy Green Fuse Films

Steve Cutler reporter

“N

o scissors, no tape, no glue,” these are the rules for origami. For those of you not familiar with this art of paper folding, the goal can be to create anything from a realistic animal, to an abstract shape, to disease-fighting proteins (bear with me). Vanessa Gould’s Between the Folds explores origami in three ways. First, it presents a series of interviews with different origami artists, in which they demonstrate their own particular style, methods, and experiences. Then it explains the history of origami and how it has advanced in the past 50or-so years, which then leads to the exploration of the scientific approaches to art through the vision of Massachusetts Institution of Technology’s (MIT) associate professor of computer science Erik Demaine.

Demaine, who is just one of the people introduced in this fairly short film, received his first bachelors degree at the age of 14 from Dalhousie University in Halifax. He completed his Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada doctoral prize, earning a PhD in computational origami right here at UW, and has gone on to become the youngest professor ever to teach at MIT at age 20. The tagline for the film: “The Art of Science, the Science of Art,” implies that origami is as much a science as it is an art. This theme was explored through the two halves of the movie. The first half contained mostly interviews concerned with the artistic side of origami. Included were a French artist who made lots of stylized cartoony figures, an origamist who manufactures his own paper in his home studio, and the history of origami as it relates to Akira Yoshizawa, the man generally credited

with taking origami from the blocky paper swans of the past to the complex art form that it is today. The second half features technology that helps produce patterns used for the creation of origami, talks about origami in relation to various sciences (geometry, physics, biology) and its possible applications in space, and, of course, donates a large portion to Demaine. Between the Folds is the debut film of director Gould, who also wrote, produced, shot, and narrated the film. It is a well-executed documentary — informative but also with enough chutzpah to keep you awake, even if you woke up at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday to go see it. It is recommended to anyone interested in the arts or sciences, and the interaction of the two disciplines to create something unique. Though the film is deserving of abundant praise for its content, structure, and participants, it still lacked the answer to one important question: how do you make a paper goose?

Between the folds


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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

25

What causes this bizarre behaviour from the people of Pontypool? And why are the people at the radio station unaffected? It all has to do with the English language. Yes, the correct reaction is: what, seriously, the English language?

Speaking into zombies Deanna Ostafichuk reporter

Y

courtesy IMDB

ou always know that something is going to happen, but then again something always happens. Bruce McDonald’s Pontypool manages to keep you on the edge of your seat, all while your imagination works to create the all consuming enemy. Bringing laughs, horror, and romance, this film is truly something to marvel at. Right from the beginning, the film manages to shock and surprise. It starts off with a radio transmission about Honey, a local lost cat, in a deep ominous voice. However, instead of offering images of said cat or the person talking, it simply provides a frequency line of the voice. Talking about a cat, adding a touch of humour at the beginning of a psychological thriller, is something rarely present in this genre of film. When adding the humour and the frequency line, you get this eerie initial image that sets the tone for the rest of the film. After this initial experience we see Grant Mazzy (Stephen McHattie) driving to the radio station, the Beacon. We are suddenly hit by the initial indication of some weird happenings in the town of Pontypool. A strange woman knocks on the window of his car, which startles you right out of your seat and out of the confusion brought on by the beginning. She garbles a few words then disappears into the white abyss, created by a blizzard. This lone woman begins the story line of a town under attack from its own people. What causes this bizarre behaviour from the people of Pontypool? and why are the people at the radio station unaffected? It all has to do with the English language. Yes, the correct reaction is: what, seriously, the English language? Apparently this ensuing chaos is caused by the understanding of certain infected words. This causes the virus to take hold in their body, resulting in an odd language and the urge to try and chew their way through another person’s mouth. It also appears that this ‘virus’ causes you to act kind of like a bat or a dolphin, by using echolocation or a form of it, in order to locate people who are unaffected and eat them. Since you rarely see them, your imagination is

able to mould and shape these people, making the image of them with startled, wild eyes, even more frightening. More so, Ken Loney (Rick Roberts), the man in the Sunshine Copte, not actually a helicopter, phones the radio station repetitively from his hiding place, in a grain silo, and describes the activities and behaviour of these people. He says he’s seen “things that are going to ruin the rest of my natural life” when unable to use words to describe exactly what he has seen. Seemingly, the only other people in Pontypool unaffected by this virus, Mazzy, his producer Sydney Briar (Lisa Houle), and Laurel Ann Drummond (Georgina Reilly) are locked away in the radio station, given the task of informing the world of what is happening to the people of Pontypool. However, one of them becomes infected with the virus upon the arrival of Dr. Mendez (Hrant Alianak). Upon Dr. Mendez’s conclusions as to the origin of this virus, I could only think “what, is this guy serious?” As the film progressed it was evident that this was the virus and indicated that the cure was sure to be even more bizarre. Other than three scenes, yes three, Pontypool was completely filmed in one location, a sound stage dressed up as a radio station. According to costume designer Sarah Armstrong, who gave a lecture at Indie Lounge, the lack of multiple locations allowed the filming to be sequential, something that is rarely done in the film industry. Having grey overtones to all images, as well as the all important horror movie music, provides the viewer with the ability to understand the context of the film, without speaking the language, something very crucial to setting the mood of a movie, according to Sarah Armstrong. If you ever see this film, make sure that you stay right till the end, past the credits (don’t worry they aren’t that long). You will encounter one of the most bizarre things that I’ve ever seen in a movie. It simply adds more confusion, rather than providing a fulfilling conclusion. You really do need to see it. However different that final scene may have been, it did start up a discussion, and made me think, why did the director add that, and what does it mean? Omitting that final scene, Pontypool did what it promised, providing you with a good Canadian scare.

Paula Trelinska reporter

W

hat’s your all time favourite movie? If you’re like most people, you’d likely think of a very popular movie that everybody has heard of, and that makes sense. Hollywood know what sells, and for the most part, selling is what it does. Many of the movies produced by large production companies are written in a strict structured format, and they stick to topics that are popular and rarely take risks. This kind of movie may not sound like much fun to make, but, it is cost effective and popular. There is a whole other industry out there for those who want to make movies but are still able to take risks and portray unpopular topics. These films, called independent films, are created with much more artistic visions and usually aimed to deliver at least one clear message — their artistic value takes priority over sales. Independent films are any films which are not produced by one of the “Big Six” production studios including Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros., Walt Disney Studios, Universal Studios, Century Fox and Columbia Pictures. North America actually has a long history of independent film-making dating back to the early 1900’s when filmmakers who didn’t want to be a part of the Edison Trust (a trust comprising the largest production and distribution companies of the time) began moving from New Jersey, the previous home of cinema, to southern California. Although independent filmmaking has been around for many years, it has changed a lot since then. Filmmakers no longer have to build their own cameras (which used to be the case), there is now a much larger industry for independent films, and independent filmmakers do not have to stay in the United States. In fact, Canada has quite a large independent film industry right within its borders. Though you may not see many Hollywood blockbusters being cranked out by Canadians, we are actually a global leader in the arts. However, the price of great artistic integrity often causes the film quality to reflect the nature of its low budget. According to Grand River Film Festival (GRFF) Indie Lounge and costume designer for the zombie film Pontyool, Sarah Armstrong, film makers should not attempt creating film without first doing their research. Armstrong has worked on many television shows, films, and theatre productions and has experience both with major studios and the independent market. She was at the GRFF to help those who were on a budget make their dreams become a reality. “Working on an independent film is like mobilizing an army,” she said. “It is important to work with everybody to try and minimize expenses. It’s important to always consider how the crew will react to every expense you cut.” This,

she claimed, makes independent film more exciting, working within a budget makes the work challenging and creative. Planning is also one of the most important and cost effective things you can do when trying to save money. If everything is planned and contingencies are mapped out then you should not run into many unexpected expenses, Armstrong explained. The problem comes when you don’t plan, or you hold off on decision making, that’s when expenses start piling up. Although Armstrong is an expert at creating sets and costumes on a budget, she does not suggest going into a movie with less than $300,000. This may seem like a colossal amount of money to many people, but it is readily available if you are really interested in film. Canada has many resources, such as the Canada Film Centre (CFC), where independent filmmakers can learn and develop their craft and even receive money to produce their films. What Armstrong said of her experience in the independent film industry is that it is difficult, and many times you do need to seek the help of institutions such as CFC, but in this industry, she said, she is more able to produce movies that she cares about, that mean something to her, and that have emotional depth to them. In Hollywood, she claimed, it’s different. If you produce a pilot episode for a Disney Channel show then it needs to be in a very specific format, catered to very specific individuals — creativity is not the goal. It’s a tough business but Armstrong isn’t in it for the money, she’s in it because she loves it and hopes that Canada remains a haven for independent filmmakers. She doesn’t believe that Canada should start producing major Hollywood blockbusters, rather we should concentrate on the artistic talent that we have and develop it the best that we can. An example of a talented Canadian is Paul Gross, who wrote, directed and starred in Paschendaele, the biggest budget Canadian film in history. Gross has not only won awards for it, but this film also went on to do well at the box office. It is not just directors who get their start in independent films, however. Many actors and production crew first work on independent films before becoming more well known. Ellen Page, for instance, starred in Juno, which did very well at the box office and made her a star. For those who want to set their sights on Hollywood or those who are more drawn toward the challenge and creativity behind film production, independent film can provide an excellent stepping stone to where you want to go. Though your favourite movie may still be the one you were previously thinking, next time you have a chance to watch a movie you’ve never heard of, starring somebody who has never been in a lead role, take it, you never know what you will find. You might enjoy it, recommend it to your friends and turn it into the next Juno.

Pontypool


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Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Comparison of Krabat to Harry Potter is inevitable, but Krabat does present a unique story without being overwhelmed by cliches. It brings to the table a darker take on sorcery and those who practise it.

Serbian folklore evokes dark magick

Julia Gunst reporter

E

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ver wonder what Harry Potter would be like if it took place in 17th century Germany, with a fraternity of mill workers learning dark magic from the mill owner who is known only as the Master? If so, then Krabat, a film adaptation of Otfried Preußler’s 1971 children’s book, fulfills this curiosity. These sorcerers definitely did not get any Bertie Bott’s Every Flavor Beans, or a cozy room in a luxurious castle. Comparison of Krabat to Harry Potter is inevitable, but Krabat does present a unique story without being overwhelmed by clichés. It brings to the table a darker take on sorcery and those who practise it. The story itself has been around for quite some time, as it is based on Serbian folklore, and it is well-known in Germany, Serbia, and Russia. It begins with a 14-year-old beggar and orphan, Krabat, struggling to survive in the rugged and plague ridden mountainous valley of Schwartzholm during the Thirty Years War. The scenery is stark and breathtaking, of which the director, Marco Kreuzpaintner, makes good use of with many long panoramic shots. Although for me, this sometimes became a bit redundant. The filming is highly atmospheric, often by utilization of strong contrasts, such as that of black crows and crisp snow. Black crows are a constant presence in the film, and first appear in a dream somehow created by the mill Master for Krabat in order to lead him to the mill. In the dream, Krabat is promised to rise out of poverty and gain power if he finds the mill and agrees to become an apprentice. Being desperate, Krabat listens to the dream, finds the Master and becomes an apprentice, unknowingly agreeing to also learn the dark arts. In order to learn from the Master and earn room and board, a steep price is paid by Krabat and the other all-male apprentices (numbering well over 10). They must work hard at the mill by day and perform dark magic at night — although the film strangely chooses to focus lengthly on the former. Krabat had to first earn his participation in the dark magic night shift by working hard during the day, until Easter Eve. Once this day arrived, he was initiated by swearing allegiance to the Master and pledging the total devotion of his life to dark magic. After the initiation, amusingly, what appeared to be a medieval version of a col-

lege-style kegger celebration occurred, which for me felt somewhat out of place. Without giving too much away, following his initiation, a decent begins into the sacrifice of Krabat’s ordinary freedoms and dreams for power and separation from the outside world. Mistrust and schemes for the favour of the Master develop among the apprentices in a drive for more power, making for a complicated and stimulating plot. Further thickening the plot is the love interest of Krabat, Kantorka, who is both endangered by the Master’s rule against any evolvement of the apprentices with women and challenged by Krabat’s seemingly unbreakable separation from the real world. A strength of the film are the plot twists, which were surprising and unconventional. There are a few weaknesses within the film. The special effects, at times, did not mesh with the rustic, medieval, and realist tone of the film and created an awkward jarring effect. Also it often seems as though important emotional heights in the movies are rushed — especially when ending the film. Despite this, the acting is emotive and believable. You may recognize Daniel Brühl from Goodbye Lenin, an award-winning German film, as Krabat’s friend Tonda. The emotion left in the destructive wake of the drive for power is brought to life starkly on screen in the film’s prime moments. This is quite possibly the only film I have seen in which men are seen both collectively inebriated on beer in one scene and then shedding quite a few tears in another. “Everything has its costs” is the main moral driver of the film, and is mentioned more than a few times. In the end, the Master’s best magic was of persuasion. This is also literally the case on screen, as very little visually spectacular magic occurs, with the sorcerers using their magic sticks mainly to wack people. Despite its weaknesses, the film is entertaining and provides a glimpse into an important piece of German folklore. Debatably, this may be better viewed in the imagination with the aid of Preußler’s book. Krabat has already won awards at the 2009 Bavarian Film Award with Best Children/Youth Film, the 2009 Stockholm International Film Festival 2009 and the 2008 Toronto International Film Festival, and has made a respectable and unique contribution to the diverse array of films at the Grand River Film Festival.

Krabat dinh nguyen

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10/23/09 10:00:13 AM


Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Arts & Entertainment

27

Gertrude disciplines Sylvia the only way she can. Physically. The violence toward her escalates until the young girl is locked in the basement and tortured by the family and the neighbourhood kids.

Paula Trelinska reporter

A

n American Crime was powerful, but very difficult to watch. It is a film that chronicles the worst crime ever committed against one person in the history of the State of Indiana. Sylvia Likens (Ellen Page), her sister Jennie Likens(Heather McFarland) and their parents had just moved to a small town in Indiana when their parents decided to go away and work the carnival circuit. The girls parents paid a neighbour, Gertrude Baniszewski(Catherine Keener) $20 a week to look after their children.Gertrude, who also has six children of her own to look after, is a chronic smoker, sick with asthma and is not in a very good financial situation. Soon after the girls move in, the problems began.Gertrude becomes convinced that Sylvia is a problem in her house, since she thinks that she has been spreading lies about her daughter, is sexually loose and has been stealing from her. Gertrude disciplines Sylvia the only way she can. Physically. The violence toward her escalates until this young girl is locked in the basement and tortured by the family and the neighbourhood kids. This is a shocking and horrific story, so how this could ever happen, and why this would ever happen is hard to describe, but it seems that is the question director Tommy O’Haver was trying to answer with this film. The story of Sylvia Likens is well known and O’Haver did not simply retell it, he really tried to explore the mental state of Gertrude and what led her to be able to

Behind closed doors

commit such a crime. Although the concentration was largely on Sylvia, there were many times when O’Haver tried to show the film from the perspective of Gertrude. Although on one hand Gertrudei is a monster for what she did to Sylvia, on the other, she loves her children and is trying to protect them by showing them what will happen if they become sexually loose or start spreading lies. Ironically, by attempting to discipline and protect her children she ends up scarring them for life, and torturing Sylvia to death. Despite the terrible acts that her character commits, Catherine Keener is still able to give Gertrude a depth and humanity that many actors would not have been capable of. Somehow in this film we understand not only the plight of Sylvia, but also of the single mother who is doing her best to get by and raise her children properly. The lead role in this film went to Canada’s own Ellen Page(Juno). Page gives a heart wrenching performance as a child who has been through something unimaginable. Though many of us are well aware of Page’s more comedic side, this film proves that she has more than just humorous talents, she is a real dramatic actor. From the very start of the film she is believable and draws us into

the story. She grabs the audiences attention and holds it, showing that she can carry a film on her own. Page is able to portray the details and nuances of the mentality of a child in such a horrible situation so well. At her young age this must have been incredibly emotionally difficult, yet she portrays Sylvia with an honesty and sincerity beyond her years. The rest of the film was also well cast. Sylvia’s younger sister, Jennie was played by Heather was also great at tapping in to that raw emotion felt by the character. For such a young actor she really exhibited a lot of emotional strength and sold the audience on the role that she was playing. Although Jennie does not help her sister, the audience harbours no ill feelings toward her because McFarland was able to bring out those emotions of the scared and helpless girl, even with the limited screen time that she got. The film was well written, well cast and well shot. It may be hard to understand why or how this could ever happen, but this film at least begins to explore that. It explores the idea that the society was much different back then and that perhaps there were societal pressures that led to this incident occurring. Although difficult to watch (I found myself trying not to look sometimes) the film is definitely worth seeing. Even if one doesn’t enjoy the film, as it is not on a very pleasant topic, at the very least it will open up a dialogue. These sorts of cases still happen today and if this film can at least open our eyes to why and how such things happen and kept as a secret, then it is definitely and film worth watching. photos courtesy Podnapisi

An American Crime


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Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

The plot thickens Dinh Nguyen Arts editor

I

magine hastily walking through the MC Building on your way to South Campus Hall (where the UW book store is located) to catch the last bus of the night — the 12:48 a.m. ride. The lights in certain class rooms are turned off and the hallways are empty — you can hear clearly the rhythm of your steady footsteps tapping towards you destination. You feel like the only one in the building. The atmosphere is lifeless. Just as you are about to exit the doors leading into the rock gardens and onto the underpass of Biology 1, you notice that there are classrooms to your left and right with only the front section lit. Curiously, you get the urge to look through the clear doors and into the classroom on your right. You could’ve swore that you saw a human figure in the classroom. There is no one there, you decide to leave to catch you bus. Turning away from the classroom door you sense a slight chill, your arms begin to goosebump. You can feel eyes on you — more specifically, you can pick up that there are 13 pairs of eyes staring at you. You look back into the classroom but sees no one there. You run for the exit and continue your way to the bus, but is unable to ease the evoked feeling of fear. Now, every time you walk past that classroom at night you try your best not to look over, and you make a run for it as fast as you can. There is no doubt in my mind that similar chills are felt by the majority of students who’ve read UW Alumna, Julie E. Czerneda’s horror fiction story, The Forever Brotherhood, that was published in the UW, University of Alberta, and McMaster University’s horror anthology: Campus Chills. Similar to the hypothetical situation above, Czerneda vividly and descriptively tells a story about people who encounters the ghost of 13 math students imprisoned in the same class room described for all eternity. Her words and rhetoric were so believable that I watched my back while walking at night for the next couple of days after reading her story. There question there lies is, what is horror fiction? And how is it that it can have so much power over the reader? The answer I believe is that horror fiction reflects our deepest inner fears, and thus appeals to our inner consciousness which caused us to react to things instinctively. UW alumni and successful fiction science fiction

michael chung

author James Alan Garner, who was at the release of Campus Chills with Czerneda believes that horror fiction is terrifying because it lead readers into a story without a flashlight or instruction manual. “In science fiction there is at least a story that people are going to solve, or can solve. Even if the characters don’t end up solving it, the solution or hopes of a solution is still there,” he said. “In horror you just get deeper and deeper and the quick sand just pulls you down. The whole point to writing horror is ‘thickening’ the plot.” In his book, Sacred Terror, UW professor, Douglas E. Cowan argues that, contrary to critics who think otherwise, horror films are indeed religious in that they use religious elements to efficiently enact fear. More specifically horror uses sociophobias (socially constructed fears which can often be linked to religion because religion is responsible for many sociophobia). Here the key element of horror is fear, which is dependant on sociophobia. Hence different people may have different opinion about horror. Take for example the movie, The Exorcist. It is widely documented that when the film was first released many people ran out of the theatre in tears while others laughed at how silly it was. In 1999 Reuters News published a survey which claimed The Exorcist to be the scariest movie of all time.Yet there are ample reviews bashing the movie, claiming that it caused many people to fall asleep out of boredom. Why are the reactions of people viewing the film so distinctive from each other? The answer is yet again sociophobias. While people with Christian background who were raised to believe in the existence of the Devil were horrified with the film, those who did not believe in the Christian God saw the film in a different light. While people who saw the film in the early 1970’s (when it was first released) were falling off their seats, many raised in a more contemporary society, such as today, fell asleep. Just we as a society have the power to construct fear, we too hold the power denounce that fear. Halloween may be known as the holiday of horror, but when the day comes around we do not indulge ourselves in the spirit of fear like we do while watching a horror film or read a scary book, — finding pleasure in moments of fright — instead we dress up as our nightmares and surround ourselves in festivity, laughing our fear into the dark. dnguyen@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


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Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Imprint Publications presents

“Gone But Not Forgotten”

“Fried Chicken and Coke”

George and Kayla walked across the same road on the way to class everyday. Nothing was out of the ordinary, except for the thick fog. The lights of passing cars barely reached their eyes. Through the silence, the sound of rustling could be heard nearby. Such an ordinary sound gave them no sense of danger, and they continued on. But, the rustling grew louder among the blanket of fallen leaves. Without any warning, the sound of barking dogs pierced their ears. It grew louder and louder behind them, until they turned around. Still seeing nothing, but fearing the worst, they began to speed up into a quick jog. It sounded as though a thousand dogs were behind them, and neither of them dared to slow down. The fog, without reason, began to lift. “What’s going on?” asked Kayla. No longer the sounds of the dogs, they stopped and turned behind them. They noticed something both had ignored previously. Beside the park to their left, were small gravestones in front of a run-down house. A pet cemetery?

The couple sat on a bench in the middle of a park. The moonlight shone on the midnight snack they had picked up from the nearby plaza. “Pass the thigh,” the girl said, nudging the boy’s jeans-clad knee. The boy scowled. “Get it yourself! Geez, you’re so spoiled. ” She stuck her tongue out at him. She grabbed it, but frowned. “You pig! You ate the entire breast! You could have left some!” “You snooze, you lose.” Leaning over, he nuzzled her neck, and gave it a hard nip. A figure approached, faster than the human eye could follow. As it loomed over them, the boy spoke. “She’s mine.” “Aw, come on. Share a little! An arm, a leg, an eye...” He drew back. The boy and girl on the bench turned slowly, and the boy bared his alabaster

teeth. The girl’s chin was covered in juice, and as the newcomer stared on, she licked the thigh bone that filled both her hands, from top to bottom, and back again. “Here.” She tossed the bone at him, and it thudded heavily against the ground. A cloud passed over the moon, merging the four shadows into one.

A figure approaches from somewhere I cannot see. It stands right beside me, looking down at me. It wears a white lab coat and its face is obscured by a set of goggles. The industrial machine words grow louder. They drown my screams. The figure smiles at me. “Let’s begin.”

“Help Is On The Way”

“The Awakening” Bright light. Argh — too bright. Head hurts. Too much noise around me — industrial noise. Like machines in factory. Urgh — head hurts so much. I open my eyes groggily, squinting against the bright light. It’s too bright to see, and a strange smell surrounds me — I can’t quite put my name on it. I don’t recognize this place. How did I get here? My head pounds in agony. I try to touch it, but I find I cannot. I pull my arm harder — no use. It’s tied down by some sort of... strap? My vision starts to clear and I make out the outline of a brown thing around my wrist, attached to whatever I’m on. I squint more, trying to see better and clear the anxiety in my mind. My head hurts so much. I squirm, and I realize I can barely move at all. I’m tied down. I try to move my head - no use. I look down as best I can - oh my God, am I naked? I choke on a scream in the back of my throat. I squirm, I thrash. Panic overcomes me.

michael chung

The third time they called down to Simon, there was no answer. “Now what?” Carl asked the rescue team leader, Eric. They were clustered around a hole leading into the basement of the home of Dr. Hoenikker. About 30 minutes ago the house had exploded, spraying the first two stories all over the surrounding woods. A dog, Kojak, had been sent in to search the basement, and hadn’t come back. Now Simon was quiet down there too. Eric told them to relax. “Turn on your flashlights. We’re all going in.” Twenty minutes later Carl’s arm reached out of the hole and pulled the rest of the body out. The hand was grey and melting into a single hooked spur, dripping yellow fluid. His stomach and chest were dissolving into a slurry of eyes and mouths, and barbed tentacles were sprouting out of his back, waving in the air. After five minutes of fumbling, it got the cell phone in Carl’s pocket to work. “Send in everyone,” the lips hissed. Other mouths, with needles for teeth, were forming on the back of Carl’s head and grinning. “We need help. Lots of help. Please, we need everyone here right now.”


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Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Long live the thrill Michael Chung reporter

S

aturday night was no typical night. The wind was howling, the night was dark. Everywhere you went seemed a little bit dead. Everywhere except Kitchener City Hall that is. A hundred of the undead gather together, ready to strike. Fortunately, this wasn’t a zombie apocalypse, but rather the third annual Thrill the World event. Thrill the World is an annual event to honour the late Michael Jackson. The goal of the event is to have a million people across the world simultaneously dance to the song, Thriller. The event started in 2006, when 62 people from Toronto danced to the song. It started to spread and eventually, in 2008, over 4,000 people in 10 different countries danced simultaneously at 12:30 GMT, setting a new world record. The tri-city version of the event was held at the Kitchener City Hall, and various schools and communities across the Waterloo region. A few of my fellow Imprint reporters and I went to check it out. Upon arriving at City Hall, dozens of

people were already practising for the dance. Each person there was in some kind of unique zombie outfit. Perhaps the unique (and cutest) zombie-wannabe there was a five-year boy dressed up as Michael Jackson in the Thriller video, complete with the shaggy black hair, shiny red vest, and tight red pants. What struck me the most about this boy was that he did a kick-ass dance to the song Bad. I mean he was five, and yet he danced better than anyone on So You Think You Can Dance. I have a feeling he will go somewhere big. But the main event was starting. Rows upon rows of the undead lay motionless on the floor. The commencement of the song summoned them up and brought them to their feet. And move-by-move, along with thousands of people around the world, they followed Michael Jackson’s legacy set down in dance 20 years ago. Six and a half minutes and countless memorable dance moves later, applause and cheers replaced the booming music. The dance and the event were a success. In the end, 79 dancers raised over $1,500 for The Working Centre in

Kitchener. Worldwide results are still being verified. If you would like to participate in Thrill the World, keep a look out for event postings around Halloween, or visit the website http:/ www.thrilltheworld.com for more information. abisade dare

40Crk_Imprint_Oct09_fin:Imprint - Waterloo - 6.125x8.3125 b&w 29/09/09 1:57 PM Page 1

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Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Halloween Chillers and Thrillers

Events Bingeman’s Scream Park Open 7pm to 10pm daily Phobia & Chills haunted houses - $20 Museum After Dark The Rocky Horror Picture Show interactive screening The Childrens Museum Saturday October 31 - 7:30pm $7 in advance, $10 at door Scare Fair Halloween Event For All Ages The Button Factory Saturday October 31 - 1pm to 4pm Members - $10 Non-Members - $15 Rocky Horror Picture Show Princess Cinemas Saturday October 31 - 7pm, 9:10pm, 11:20pm

Club Nights Bombshelter Pub All Ages Halloween Party Saturday October 31, 8pm - $6 in advance, $10 at door Dry event, UW students only Club 140 Devil’s Night, Friday October 30 - $5 Halloween Night, Saturday October 31 - $10 Elements Night Club Devil’s Night ALL AGES, Friday October 30, 9:30pn - $10 Halloween Party, Saturday October 31, 9:30pm Federation Hall 21st Annual 19+ Halloween Bash Saturday October 31, 8pm $6 UW student in advance, $8 non-UW in advance, $10 at door Revolution Night Club Halloween, Saturday October 31 21+ only Starlight Death Before Disco Costume Party, Saturday October 31, 10pm No cover with costume, $5 cover without joyce hsu

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Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Movie Review

Paranormal Activity fails to deliver hype

courtesy IMDB

Lead character Katie Featherston (Katie Featherston) wakes up to an unknown entity crawling under her blanket.

B

y now you should all have heard about this little movie that could. Filmed in one week with a measly budget of $15,000, Paranormal Activity had been floating around for two years before being picked up by a major studio for remake rights. Now, through their “Demand It” marketing campaign, which allowed

consumers to vote for the film to be brought to their city, the Paranormal Activity is number one at the box office, even beating out the latest installation of a more established horror franchise, Saw VI. Some might blame this on the audience’s weariness of the Saw series, but I choose to blame the hype. Whoever was in charge of marketing

did their job right. That is, they got a lot of people interested in watching the movie. But what they also did was raise everyone’s expectations to the point that people actually expected to experience an emotional breakdown during their viewing. Appropriately labelled, “The Blair Witch Project in a house,” the film is shot from one camera as we

follow a couple’s experiences with a ghost-like entity that continuously haunts them while they sleep. The boyfriend, treating this as an exciting home project, records these paranormal activities in the hopes of catching this apparition on tape, and even goes as far as to provoke these encounters and attempt to contact whatever has been haunting his girlfriend for years. The limitations of this movie’s low budget and filming device actually work to its advantage as it forces the director to be creative in order to get a good scare from the audience. Thus, the movie shows as little as possible and lets us imagine the worst. Like Alfred Hitchcock, the director here understood that the things we fear most come from our own minds. This tactic is usually very effective, and would have been for this movie had it not been for two things: the advertisements and the fans of this film. The movie’s trailers and promos not only promise overwhelming physical fear with shots of terrified audience members, but give away some of its scariest scenes and key moments. Thus, a follower of the movie such as myself would have been well prepared for the spooks before they occurred, removing them of their scaring abilities all together. Not only that, but critics and fans of the film have been going on and on

about how Paranormal Activity was the “scariest movie of the decade.” How could I not go into the movie with high expectations? Thankfully, the film was still able to keep its tense atmosphere and lingering sense of creepiness throughout with slow-paced storytelling and reoccurring phantom events. Not to mention the last scene of the film was truly terrifying. The director artfully uses simple activities (like doors closing and an old photograph) to, surprisingly, scare audiences effectively, and he takes his time to achieve the suspense and dread felt in the audience. Though the film has garnered favourable critical reception and a raving horror-fan base, the best way to enjoy this film is to avoid watching the ads or seeking out any of the marketing. Ignore friends’ reports on how scary the movie is and see it for yourself. Though it is not a groundbreaking horror movie, it is especially effective in a crowded theatre and is a welcome addition to the mock home-video subgenre. If you are a horror fan who enjoyed movies like The Blair Witch Project, Cloverfield, [Rec], Quarantine (the American remake of [Rec]), and have not yet been subject to this movie’s ridiculous hype, you will love this movie. — Zoe YeJin Kim

Ich sehe ein Nazi zombie kmassey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

F

orgive me — the movie that I am reviewing this week does not currently appear in theatres. It is, instead, a movie that I have been dying to see since June. As I only recently managed to get my hands on a good English translation, and seeing as this is Halloween week, I can’t help but discuss (and advocate) Dead Snow (Død snø in German) for the benefit of horror fans everywhere. After

COME JOIN US. THE TRADITION CONTINUES

all, who could avoid a movie whose tagline is ‘Ein, zwei, die!’ Død snø is a German zombie film that was released this past summer. However, these aren’t normal zombies. These zombies are also (can you guess?) Nazis, buried in the snow along a mountain range during World War II. You’ve got to hand it to the producers — they’re bold. Død snø is the movie that Zombieland should have been: no dorky teenage kids,

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and lots and lots of gore. Written and acted by a whole lot of people whose names I cannot pronounce, Død snø is probably the best zombie movie since Shaun of the Dead. In some ways, it is better than Shaun of the Dead. It doesn’t start out that way, however. The weakest part of the movie is by far the first half hour, which is so chock-full of pointless dialogue and the typical horror movie set up that it’s enough to drive you crazy. I was grimacing with how painful the opening of the movie was. But with the promise of flesh being ripped from bone, I continued on. And how very glad I am that I did. Once you get past the first half hour and into the good stuff (i.e. people screaming and blood spurting everywhere), Død snø is incredibly awesome. Parts of the movie were an obvious homage to B horror movies such as Army of Darkness. This included rapid close up shots of people gathering weapons, and a character cutting his own arm off with a chainsaw (to stop the spread of zombie bite infection). Amateur camera work is also used in areas to add to a feeling of realism, which is classic to the B horror genre and a personal favourite style of mine. Mind you, Død snø didn’t quite do B horror style in a modern context quite as well as director Sam Raimi’s Drag Me to Hell did, but nonetheless, I appreciated the vibe. Oh, and is there ever gore in this movie. Gore of a variety I had

courtesy IMDB

Students Hanna (Charlotte Frogner) and Sara (Ane Dahl Torp) battle these specimens of the undead in Dead Snow. never seen before. People’s heads popping like balloons. People being eaten alive as they see it from their own perspective. Some of the gore was intentionally fake in appearance, but it didn’t take away from the cleverness and the creativity in the variety of ways that people die. And my God, the zombies. There is nothing in the world that is more cool and at the same time terrifying as a zombie in a full-out Nazi uniform. The makeup for the monsters in this movie is phenomenal. By the way, the zombies aren’t stupid. They run, adapt to their situations, climb up trees, you name it. Never have zombies been so inescapably fatal. Lastly, the music track is ever so

ironic. Transitioning between thriller suspense music and overly happy classical melodies during the action adds a huge entertainment value to the movie that makes mindless slaughter so much more appealing. Guys, if you’re looking for a good movie to rent this Halloween with friends, or are just looking for an awesome horror film, watch Død snø. There’s no way this movie could disappoint. Girls, for those of us who aren’t into overly sentimental romantic comedies and instead love watching things get killed with machine guns and axes, do yourself a favour and catch this film. Watch zombies devour warm, sticky human entrails as they freeze in the snow.


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

33

Music Reviews

Joss Stone Colour Me Free Virgin Records

T

his latest album from Joss Stone doesn’t lack any of her typical rebellious nature and lyrics. Much like her other albums, Stone has included a wide variety of musical styles in this one, including soul, R&B, and one ballad. Though there are many different styles throughout the album, Stone does — mostly — manage to thread them all together with her uptempo beats, rebellious lyrics and amazing vocals. All but one of the tracks features an upbeat tempo. The one that doesn’t, “I Believe it to my Soul,” actually doesn’t fit in with the rest of the album. It seems as if all the songs on the album are following a common thread with similar arrangements and beats until this one plays. This

MIMS Guilt Capitol Records

T

he first time I listened to Guilt, MIMS’ sophomore album, I thought it a monotone compilation of tracks, with one song blending into the next. However, after listening to it on repeat for a while, I was left wondering if I’m still listening to the same album. Guilt sports a variety of different sounds, made more prominent by the slew of various featured artists. The album is able to please a diverse audience with its fusion of genres. Certain tracks take

A Fine Frenzy Bomb in a Birdcage Virgin Records

F

ans of A Fine Frenzy’s 2007 debut album, One Cell in the Sea, will be thrilled to hear about the group’s new release, Bomb in a Birdcage. Formed in 2006, A Fine Frenzy found its name in a passage of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Since then, their debut album has gone on to snag top 30 spots in various countries, and the single “Almost Lover,” has consistently found its way into the top ten spots of a number of charts. As would be expected from a sophomore album, a significant number of the songs retains the smooth melodic style of the first album.

song, being one of only two on the album not written or co-written by Stone herself, is surprisingly bland and boring. Although it is different from all the other tracks on the album it is not a stand out song, rather, one that blends into the background and you forget is even playing. Other than this one track that doesn’t fit in, the album is really quite good. The first track, entitled “Free Me” is not really a departure from her other albums, yet still it evokes originality and confidence in the lyrics. “Free Me” is a song about freedom and empowerment, in the chorus she says: “Don’t tell me that I won’t, I can.” Stone is very well aware of what she can and cannot do and she is not willing to let somebody else define that for her. She is a strong woman, and her lyrics reflect that. Although many of her songs are more contemporary and upbeat, they still manage to convey their message. Stone shows us that even modern and catchy tunes can be an expression of emotion and creative artistry. Overall, the tracks that Stone wrote were much better than the two she did not write. Her strong confidence in the lyrics that she sings really brings them out as something worth listening to — she’s not just another person with a good voice. As a singer/songwriter, Joss Stone is a true musician. She is somebody who can appeal to almost anybody’s musical taste. With her original yet mainstream appeal, everybody, from those who like R&B to those who like blues, will like what Stone has to offer in Colour Me Free. — Paula Trelinska

on a distinctly more rock influenced sound, such as “Rock ‘N Rollin’” featuring Tech N9ne. On the other hand, “One Day” featuring Ky-Mani Marley is a track that showcases Marley’s reggae inspired contributions. Two tracks on this album really caught my attention. “Move (If You Wanna),” carries a heavy bass that would be difficult to not appreciate on the dance floor. Although I don’t know why you wouldn’t want to move after hearing it regardless of your location (you have been warned). The track “One Last Kiss” featuring Soler Mesh is my personal favourite. From the title I thought it was going to be a syrupy love song, but once again I was wrong. The combination of softer lyrics with an alternative beat proved to be the perfect balance. The vocal contribution from Soler Mesh rounded out the whole track nicely. His work on this album is the first I’ve heard from him and I’ve failed to find anything else about him since. One of few reservations I have about this album is the entire minute and 28 seconds wasted on “The Skit.” This track is a garbled dialogue that interrupts the flow of the album, and would have been time better spent on any of the other remarkable songs. With the release of Guilt, I daresay that MIMS has managed to tear off his “ring tone rapper” label for good. —Felicia Rahaman

However, in contrast to One Cell in the Sea, the remaining songs are a mixed bag, each having been inspired and brought in different directions by lead singer Allison Sudol. With “Swan Song,” and “The Beacon” capturing the free-flowing melodic quality in the debut album, and “Electric Twist” creating a contrasting high-energy pop sound, there is a progression within this album from more lyrical, ballad style tracks to those with a more prominent pop sound. Other tracks found on this album, such as “What I wouldn’t do,” “Happier” and “Bird of the Summer,” have a similar ballad style and are worth listening to. “Stood up,” “New heights” and “Elements” end up somewhere in the middle of this transition between styles. The first track is not particularly appealing due to its messy nature. The melody of the second track is very smooth, but it also incorporates a dissonant and high-pitched repeating piano section which is painful to listen to. The third has a new-age mood to it and is calming. Although all of these songs are fully equipped with the whimsical lyrics and the musical hooks that defined the tracks of One Cell in the Sea, they also show Allison Sudol’s growth and development as a singer-songwriter. By including tracks spanning a broader range of musical styles, A Fine Frenzy’s newest album Bomb in a Birdcage carries greater appeal. — Jacqueline Chan

Default Comes and Goes EMI Music Canada

A

fter nearly four years, Canadian alternative rock band Default has released their fourth album, Comes and Goes. Considering the length of time since their last release, it’s refreshing to see them come back, instead of falling into oblivion. It’s a feat in itself to come back after four years, considering their success started to dwindle after “Count on Me,” the first single from One Thing Remains, their third album. It’s clear that Default is trying to get some of that success back, but have the four years of “rest” provided them with a musical epiphany? Perhaps, but such a change isn’t displayed prominently on the album. One track, “Goodbye” shows promise as it has an original musical style and bizarre segments. The lyrics, although slightly repetitive, have a certain quality that makes them more powerful than the others on the album. All in all, this track stands out from the rest. One track in particular shows little to no musical flair: “Show me.” Although the lyrics aren’t quite as repetitive as some of the other

songs, the lyrics for “Show me” still aren’t very well written. Also, when listening to the beginning one can notice a striking resemblance to “Iris” by The Goo Goo Dolls. In fact, it almost seems as though they used the same string arrangement as was present in “Iris.” The track “All Over Me” displays a reasonably well-written instrumental melody. However, when it came to the chorus I couldn’t help but cringe. How could I stop cringing when the lyrics are “All I want is you all over me, All I need is you all over me, I heard, you say, if you left I’d be okay, All I want is you all over me.” Honestly, it’s just too repetitive to listen to multiple times. Although not very noticeable during the song, at the end they insist upon repeating it. The chorus consists of four lines, three of which are basically the same; only a single word is changed. To make matters worse, when examining the chorus, one can determine that, based on the rhyming between the segments of the other line, the rhyming of me with me was intentional. So it seems as though that four year break did very little to help them develop their sound. In my opinion, the album title sums up their career. After a few well-received tracks, they seem to be doing exactly what they wanted to prevent: falling into obscurity, disappearing from the music industry. They really have come and are going. — Deanna Ostafichuk

Want your music reviewed? Send CD to: Imprint Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1. Canada


Arts & Entertainment

34

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Movie Review

A

s an avid fan of all things related to Japanese animation, it was difficult to stop myself from being sceptical when the IMAGI Studios announced their new project of a CG remake of the Astro Boy story. Being the original anime superstar, a

national symbol, and with the enormous history that spans generations, it seemed as though IMAGI had its work cut out for them in order to please the fans and yet not alienate any newcomers. The production was plagued with funding problems and the stepping

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down of the CEO. It was questioned whether IMAGI could do the job, but it made it to the local movie theatre Friday October 23. The big names doing the voice-acting were well-placed and suited for the job, including the likes of Freddie Highmore as Astro and Nicholas Cage as Dr. Tenma. Astro Boy, known as Tetsuwan Atomu in Japan (literally “The Mighty Atom”), began as a comic, or manga, drawn by Osamu Tezuka. He is the man aptly titled manga no kamisama (god of manga), and the Walt Disney of Japan, a title often shared with the more wellknown Hayao Miyazaki. Tezuka drew about 500, 000 pages of comics in his lifetime, and is credited with creating several genres that exist to this day, including shonen, comics aimed at boys, such as Astro Boy; shoujo, ditto, but for girls, like Princess Knight; and even medical comics (Black Jack, Ode to Kirihito). He wrote, directed and drew for the first animated television show in Japan, and Astro Boy was the first ever anime to be exported to North America. Astro Boy is just one of the numerous works created by Tezuka, but is by far one of his most famous. The original Astro Boy is a story of a robot boy born in the year 2003, who was the son, named Tobio, of the brilliant scientist Dr. Tenma. Dr. Tenma, being a very busy man, often neglected his child for work, which eventually culminates in Tobio taking a joy-ride in a stolen car, and dying in the subsequent crash. Dr.Tenma then decides to rebuild his son so that he will never be hurt again by arming his body with various weapons, the ability to fly, and 100,000 horsepower. After a short while with his revived son, Tenma slowly begins rejecting him. Tobio runs away, and gets roped into the Robot Circus run by the tyrannical HamEgg. He eventually discovers his hidden talents and uses them to help people. The kindly Professor Ochanomizu acts as a friendly father figure, takes him in and teaches him about the world around him. As the real world is like, there are always problems to be solved. Atom usually comes out the other end alright, and makes plenty of friends along the way; human, robot, and alien alike. Despite the enormous power he has, we are constantly reminded that Atom is, after all, a child — he is kind, he cares for others, but naïve. Here lies his charm: there is always something to learn, always an underlying sense

of humanity. Atom wants an alternate way of solving problems, aside from a show of brute force. Although the odd names may make it seem like a childish story, it’s themes as deeper and more thought-provoking than most cartoons coming out of the 1960s. Tezuka’s tales contain issues and themes that engage the reader or watcher, and children and adults alike can enjoy and understand what he is trying to tell you. It’s one of those things that you grow up with and when you look back, you realize something new. Even in its brightest moments, the Astro Boy movie is built and programmed for North American children, and only North American children below the age of eight. Even with the built in homage to the original 1960s opening involving Astro outracing a train and the reappearance of a constant Tezuka joke, it would have never have gotten off the ground — there’s too many plot holes and clichés bogging it down. Herein lies the problem, because the Astro Boy movie strips away all the themes, messages, and character of the original story, and leaves only an empty shell of the tale for a few cheap laughs. The movie is tailored to what most people expect of “cartoons” in North America, as being shallow, fleeting, and simple. The movie opens up with a short intro to the human son, and then immediately cuts to an extremely cartoony and flaky introduction to the floating oasis of “Metro City” (a poor choice of name, but possibly an allusion to another Tezuka work, “Metropolis”). Here robots serve and care for the humans. When their expiry date is reached, they are dumped without ceremony onto the polluted and Wall-E-esque surface. Metro City itself looks like the animators skimped out on the work required in creating Tezuka’s vision of 2003. The movie version looks like a sparse and oddly immaculate version of the city found in the Disney film “Meet the Robinsons.” The city is no longer gritty and realistic, and instead, we are presented with a lobotomized and censored ideal place, a so-called utopia. Death in general was eliminated in the movie altogether. Toby dies in a freak accident in a lab involving a robot that acts like Katamari under the influence of the negative red energy. Perhaps the creators of the movie felt it was not necessary to traumatize the

children with a dead body, and instead opted for a full vaporization. The oddest thing is that if a child can’t understand the concept of death, how it is that they can comprehend the constant ramblings of Tenma’s complaints about scientific research funding, and the war-mongering, re-election-obsessed Stone? Another simplification of good and bad was presented. Positive blue energy and negative red energy show the warring sides in the film. If they meet, they will destroy each other. Stone decides that the red energy is a brilliant idea to use, which results in an extremely powerful renegade robot having the ability to absorb other robots and ignore orders. Toby is killed before the robot could be deactivated in the test run, leading to Tenma deciding to re-build him using the blue energy as the battery source. Life goes back to normal before Tenma eventually rejects him as his son. “Toby” makes a run for it, is kicked off Metro City by Stones’ military, and lands on the surface below. Here, he meets a ragtag gang of orphans taken care of by HamEgg, a seemingly kindly robot repairman. He is “rescued” from the humans by the joke of a robot rights revolution group, who dub him as “Astro.” The revolution is not treated seriously, serving only as a poor attempt at comedic relief. Somehow, even the Three Laws of Robotics were thrown in for good measure, leading to the conclusion that this movie was created in a melting pot of various successful films. Despite the fact that the film was peppered with such things as shallow toilet humour and poor writing (there’s a line in there that says “What? Someone’s in trouble? Oh no!,” as well as the sort-of clever “Onwards and Upwards” that made me want to scream “Keep Moving Forward” in the middle of the children-ridden theatre), I liked it. I have to admit that the film did offer a few belly laughs, in addition to a couple scenes that made feel like I was 12 again, watching the 2003 anime and cheering with all my might for Astro (yes, it was that exciting). I would warn Astro fans to take this version with caution and dose of open-mindedness; and anyone else, that this is not exactly the best way to take in the full beauty of animation and story-writing. Sure, the graphics were shiny, but the true heart beating in Tezuka’s tale had been ripped out, replaced with a popular and cheap brand of battery. Tezuka may not be spinning in his grave, but the audience will scratch their heads, but move on to simply absorb the awe-inspiring factor of seeing Astro Boy on the big screen. And even if you’re not satisfied you got your money’s worth, there’s always the comics and the anime series.


Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009 science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Perimeter Institute presents:

Quantum to Cosmos: Ideas for the Future

Adrienne Raw

assistant editor-in-chief

D

uring the closing ceremonies of Quantum to Cosmos, Wilson da Silva, editor at COSMOS Magazine, called the festival “a gathering that has sought to highlight the wonderful mix of the most noble of human pursuits — the quest to understand nature in all her complexity — and the urge to revel in the beauty through the arts.” Quantum to Cosmos: Ideas for the Future, an innovative festival celebrating the 10th anniversary of Waterloo’s Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, showcased a series of lectures and panels from October 15 to 25. The 10-day festival included over 50 events and attracted over 40,000 visitors. Lectures and panels covered topics from subatomic particles and quantum entanglement to the big bang and life on other planets to green

technology and neuroscience. The festival presents science hand-inhand with the arts; lectures from notable scientists are presented side-by-side with talks from artists and filmmakers. Presentations combine both fields, examining science through fiction, incorporating quantum computers into music, and discussing the relationship between math and art. Perimeter Institute’s lecture theatre was packed with interested members of the public during every lecture. The lectures appealed to all levels of knowledge and a variety of areas of interest. Here are just a few of the many notable lectures presented during the festival:

In “9 Billion People + 1 Planter = ?” Revkin and Smil explored our planet’s limited resources, the tenability of our growing population, and the possibilities of the next 50 years. The discussion included topics like the difficulties in making accurate predictions about the future, the debate between those who believe there is no solution to the problem and those who think we can innovate our way out of any problems, the contribution of human society to the problem of our dwindling resources, and the future of energy consumption.

9 Billion People + 1 Planet = ?

Seeing Science Through Fiction

Saturday, October 17, 2009

Sunday, October 18, 2009

Speakers: Andrew Revkin (environment

Speakers: Lee Smolin (Perimeter Institute fac-

writer), Vaclav Smil (author and University of

ulty member), Jaron Lanier (computer scientist

Manitoba professor)

and author), Neal Stephenson (author)

Quantum Physics in Sixty Minutes Saturday, October 24, 2009 Speaker: Damian Pope (Perimeter Institute Senior Manager of Scientific Outreach)

In “Seeing Science Through Fiction” Lee Smolin moderated an in-depth discussion between Jaron Lanier and Neal Stephenson about the relationship between science and fiction. Discussion topics included parallel realities, virtual realities, the science invented by science writers, and insights on society and its relationship with science and scientists.

Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Speaker: Sean B. Carroll (author and biologist)

In “Quantum Physics in Sixty Minutes” dynamic speaker Damian Pope successfully explained quantum physics in less than 60 minutes. This field of physics, notoriously complex and difficult to understand even for some scientists, was presented in simple layman’s terms. The explanation focused on tangible examples that explained the subatomic world.

In “Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species” Sean B. Carroll tells the remarkable story of several explorers in the last 200 years of the search for the origin of series. Carroll talk focuses on Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, and Henry Bates, three explorers whose discoveries and achievements revolutionized our understanding of the origin of species and our perception of our place in the world. araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Lectures and panels were presented onsite at the Perimeter Institute, and were also showcased on television through TVO and streamed online at http://www. q2cfestival.com. For those who didn’t get a chance to see the live presentations, the entire festival can be accessed online at the Quantum to Cosmos Festival homepage.

Sonia Lee


36

Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

PROTEINS AND PLANETS Nagma Zerin reporter

Protein versus blood

A recent scientific discovery regarding the cause of internal bleeding has potential to save lives threatened by traumatic injuries, severe infectious diseases, and diabetes. Researchers in Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF), in Oklahoma City, U.S. have gained new knowledge about the protein called histone, while writing in the journal Nature Medicine. Histones are strong alkaline proteins found in eukaryotic cell nuclei, which play a major role in packaging the DNA structure into a double helix as well as gene regulation. When cells get damaged from an injury, histone is released in the blood stream, where it disrupts the lining of blood vessels, resulting in uncontrolled interior bleeding. It also causes building up of fluid in tissues

which is considered to be a life threatening aspect. Researchers claim to have found an antibody which can prevent the detrimental effects of histone. Prior to this research, Marc Monestier, from Temple University in Philadelphia, had already determined a specific type of antibody, originated from mouse, known as a monoclonal antibody, which can counter the deadly impacts of histone. The OMRF scientists tested this antibody in mice successfully and now are looking forward to analyzing it in primates and eventually humans. These findings clarify some obscurities regarding the reasons of subsequent traumatic events in people. Novel planets enter the celestial lexicon

The existence of 32 new ‘exoplanets’ was confirmed by the European Southern Observatory for Astrophysics in La Silla, Chile, on October 19, 2009. This announce-

ment made in the University Porto Conference in Porto, Portugal, has enhanced the number of planets discovered outside the solar system to a staggering number of more than 400. Six of the newly found planets are roughly 5–6 times bigger than earth, commonly known as “superEarths” while the others are close to the size of the Jupiter or bigger. This discovery is very exciting, as it suggests that 40 per cent of the sunlike stars have low mass planets that are closer to being earth sized. High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph attached to a 3.6 m telescope was used to conduct the exploration. This contraption can apply the radial velocity method which is sometimes called as “wobble technique” to search for the orbiting planets outside the solar system. The device recognizes oscillation of stars as they get drawn by the gravitational force of the exoplanets. Among the 28 known super-Earths, HARPS has now identified 24 precisely which has been considered to be a major achievement. The scientists are expecting to unearth the presence of more exoplanets within the next six months. Spiders still going big

er spider in the tropics of Africa and Madagascar was announced in the October 21 issue of the journal PLoS ONE. Females of the new species, Nephila komaci, measure a body length of 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) and a leg span of 4 to 5 inches (10 to 12 cm), while the male spiders

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of any known spider. Further reconnaissance of 2,500 samples from 37 different museums failed to find any more valid proof and compelled them to accept that the species might probably be extinct. But three live spiders, two females and one male, from Tembe Elephant Park in South Africa turned up to prove the existence, as well as the rarity of the species. Its range is restricted to two endangered biodiversity hotspots — Maputaland and Madagascar.

—with files from BBC and CNN

The science section also likes technology articles. Are you interested in the newest software, gadgets computers and other interesting technological aspects ? Then write about them!!

Seriously!

Just write about it!!!!!!

The discovery of the world’s largest species of golden orb-weav-

Day one

stay petite by being five times smaller than their mate’s size. According to the widely spread theory, the female gigantism is being caused by the evolutionary pressure to produce larger members of the offspring. The first potential specimen of the new species was uncovered by Matjaz Kuntner, a biologist from the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, along with his colleague Jonathan Coddington, from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural history, in 2000. They found a huge female orbweaver among a museum collection of spiders in Pretoria, South Africa, which didn’t match the description

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Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

37

Canada at Copenhagen he Copenhagen Climate Conference is just over a month away. Starting December 7, governmental representatives from 170 countries will be meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark to discuss a new plan against climate change to replace the failed Kyoto Protocol. So what are some of the expectations and hopes for the major conference? Some don’t expect it to yield a treaty with very fine details and strategies laid out to tackle climate change. However, Yvo de Boer, executive secretary of the United Nations Framework

Convention on Climate Change, hopes to address four important issues. These include: how much the industrialized countries are willing to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, how much developing countries are willing to limit their growth in emissions, how the help needed by developing countries to reduce their emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change is going to be financed, and how that money is going to be managed. While Yvo wants to see something signed and agreed upon, since he believes it will be hard to work out the fine details of the treaty.

Sonia Lee

The Danish government also took on a Conference, Harper has become less of the couple of initiatives to increase the focus environmental skeptic that he was when he on the necessity of international agreement took office. It is now one of the more promiwhen it comes to the Copenhagen confer- nent issues our country is addressing. Harper ence. Namely, the Greenland dialogue and has already appointed his most trusted cabinet the climate attaches. The Greenland dialogue ministers in two straight cabinet shuffles to was an undisclosed, press-free, open forum tackle the issue. Our rather non-existant post with ministers from more than 20 countries — Kyoto plan leads others to believe we’re gathered in Greenland to both witWill we go from the being the most ness first hand the effects of climate doubted to the most inspirational? change and to talk to one another without restriction or consequence. This was a huge waiting to see what the U.S. does first, which success in fostering international relations isn’t a bad thing. Our economies and many and similar were held around the world. of our choices are largely tied together, it is The other initiative was that five climate important for us to have a unified goal which attaches sent to New Delhi, Moscow, Wash- will prevent both of us to carry through with ington, Brasilia, and Pretoria to report home our commitments. In February, after Obama on climate-related developments that were was elected President, Environment Minister happening in their respective regions. Jim Prentice told reporters that the new, more So what about our own country? So far, open-minded American government would we have a pretty bad reputation in the eyes allow for better negotiations concerning the of the other members of the upcoming con- environment and climate change — namely a ference. We are being portrayed as the least North American cap-and-trade system. climate-friendly country in the G8, so much So will Canada — hopefully with the help so, that during our government’s speeches at and co-operation of the US government — pull a pre-Copenhagen meeting earlier this month, through with the new post — Kyoto agreement? 77 countries walked out. This is largely due to Will we go from being the most doubted to Stephen Harper’s skeptical attitude towards the most inspirational? I think it’s entirely posclimate change. Does Harper or Canada deserve sible. As one of the countries with the most such a bad reputation coming into the Copen- untouched wilderness, not to mention having hagen Conference? Simon Jackson, the founder direct claims to much of the Arctic north, we and chairman of Spirit Bear Youth Coalition have to. Plus, a plan presented by the conserva— the largest youth-run environmental orga- tive Tories would likely garner more support as nization in the world — doesn’t think so, and right-leaning environmental policies are met I have to agree with him. The environmental with less criticism than left-leaning ones. At the movement is largely seen as a left-only initia- same time, it will help close that gap between tive, which is causing polarization on the issue left and right when it comes to environmental when it comes to politics, however it isn’t all initiatives — one of the most important things deserved. As Jackson explains in his article our country needs to do. about Canada’s position at the Copenhagen

T

thelferty@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

From facebook to twitter Shirley Ma

RIM’s new bold smartphone

assistant science editor

RIM has an enormous market among professionals like business executives, lawyers, politicians and so on. However, in terms of performance in the general consumers’ markets, Research In Motion, the Waterloo based company does not stand out in the competition with Apple. Inc. One of the most crucial strategy RIM will put its bits in the next 12 months is the release of its new Bold Smartphone. The new Bold is thinner and lighter than its predecessors. “It is expected to be high-end, super-cheap plasma TV on your belt type of device, also a game machine, an MP3 player, a camera”, RIM’s co-executive Jim Balsillie said in an interview. The first Bold is priced at $249.99 on a three-year contract with Rogers, and $649.99 without a contract. Therefore, taking all the features of the new Bold into account, the new Bold will have a higher price than its predecessors. AT&T and T-mobile will be among the first wireless carriers around the world that offers the new product.

Dead , but alive on Facebook

There are 300 million active Facebook users worldwide. Among them, 12 million of them are Canadians. What happens to the users’ profile after the death of the user? Canada’s Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart reminds most users of public communication sites that, “profiles can still remain online even after the death of the users.” In August 2009, Stoddart office has released a report through which concerns regarding how to handle the profiles of deceased users are addressed. The Commissioner had recommended Facebook to adopt a new policy that can address the above concer n. Commisioner spokeswoman Anne-Mar Hayden said Facebook was expected to release a new privacy report, which should have the deceased users’ privacy policy issue addressed, within ten weeks of the August report. In other words, Facebook have to release the report in the next three or four days. This week, Facebook has provided reminders to its users about a service used to memorialize profiles of deceased users at the request of friends and family members.

Twitter’s dual deal with Google and Microsoft

As both Google and Microsoft have gradually realized the importance of knowing what is in people’s

mind at any moment of the day, they have both thought about the friend to help them to achieve the goal: Twitter. The deal basically allows Google and Microsoft to get the updates distributed by Twitter

each day. Although neither Google nor Microsoft is willing to disclose the price they have paid. As the popularity of its service grows, Twitter is becoming one of the most powerful rivals of Facebook,

especially after they refused the buy deal from Facebook last year. —with files from the Globe and Mail, New York Times and Wired sma@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

write For SCIENCE the best thing since pennicilin Contact us at science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


38

Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

One whale penis, two whale penis, three... alomako@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Warning: this week’s article may make you transgress measuring things by the metric system. This is because after reading it, you will be educated in animal penis sizes, which is self-evidently a more awesome measurement system. The average human penis is — wouldn’t you like to know? The average of anything is a number I am not fond of, so I will instead give you the longest and shortest penile measurements taken by American researchers Masters and Johnson, in a survey of over 300 men. The study found that the owner of the smallest member was a moderately heavy-bodied 5 feet 11 inches man, whose penis measured 2.25 inches when flaccid. The largest organ was 5.5 inches when flaccid, and it belonged to a slender man who was 5 feet 7 inches long. So what is the average size of the human penis? Any number that falls between these two. And the owner should not stress about it much, either. Why? Keep on reading. What’s the difference between a smaller penis, and a larger penis

in bed? Relatively little to none, because the rate of increase balances out the size difference. As stated by Dr. David Delvin and Christine Webber, contributors to http://Netdoctor.co.uk, a man with a smaller penis will reach a 100 per cent increase in length during sexual arousal, while a larger member will reach about 75 per cent. This means that a majority of men will have a 6–7 inch long penis when erect, giving the owner full capacity to provide his partner a satisfactory sexual experience. In terms of penis length to body size ratio, humans do better than some species and worse than others. Compared to primates, humans have the largest penis size, while chimpanzees have moderately large members compared to body size. Surprisingly, gorillas have the smallest penis in the primate family, despite their grizzly size. So maybe it could have worked out between King Kong and Ann after all — kidding, kidding. The blue whale, on the other hand, has a penis to match its size, — the largest penis measured

is eight feet tall. Elephants are close to whales in body to penis size ratio, as the penis can grow up to 6.5 feet long. An elephant penis would tower above renown fashion model Heidi Klum, who is 5 feet 9.5 inches, a rather tall individual. So, is bigger really better, or is it “not the size mate, it’s how you use it?” In the animal kingdom, I would strongly argue that for animals, less is more. Why? Well, imagine that you’re an Argentine Blue-bill duck. You’re relaxing in a forest, picking some worms out of the moist ground — and then you see her. The sunlight glitters off her feathers just so, and the shape of her beak drives you crazy. She gives you the eye and you are extremely aroused. You begin to get your groove on when suddenly a fox jumps out of the bushes and heads straight for the two of you. It takes you five minutes to get your eight-inch penis out of the girl, and she flies away, but as you lift off, your endowment catches on a nearby bush, and bam, the fox has got you. See what I mean? Having a large

If you have any questions about the whereabouts or behaviour of your junk, please email me at: alomako@imprint.uwaterloo.ca. member can get you in trouble in the animal kingdom. From this perspective it’s easy to see how having a large penis could be an evolutionary hold-back, as it can slow you down. Secondly, a penis needs to become engorged with blood to become erect and enter the female (in a majority of species), and the bigger the penis, the more blood it takes, and the more challenging it is for the animal to reproduce. Now, aren’t you happy you don’t have to worry about the safety of your penis in case of an emergency?

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Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009 sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Football in like a lamb out with the lions

This Week in Sports

courtesy Lisa Ryerson

Women’s Fastball season in review- Look Inside

See PAGE 42

Peter kreze

Wide receiver Andrew Ward (#88) makes a huge grab from quarterback Evan Martin in second quarter for a 37 yard gain. The pass put the Warriors deep within York territory and set up a touchdown by runningback Matt Socholotiuk two plays later.

Waterloo 52, York 3 Brent Golem sports and living editor

T

he Waterloo Warriors football team matched up against the York Lions for the final game of the season on Saturday October 24. With both teams out of the playoff race, this game was about glory as Waterloo looked to distinguish itself from the scum that plays at the bottom of the barrel. The Warriors successfully accomplished that as they put together a great effort that got them their highest score of the season. Waterloo crushed York 52–3 and York was trailing in last place. Waterloo’s defence came to

play and that was very evident. Waterloo held York to the second lowest total offence per play of the year, as they limited them to only 1.8 yards per play (113 yards on 63 plays). Waterloo’s rushing defence, which has had some holes in it throughout the season, was astonishing as the longest run of the day for York was only 8 yards, which was good for second lowest longest run of any CIS game this year. The Warriors were so dominant on defence that York tied the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) season high for punting by forcing York to punt the ball 14 times during the game. The Warriors earned the win on Warrior field in front of 517 fans. 1st Quarter:

Warriors 22, Lions 0 Waterloo – Touchdown by D. Zender 40 yd pass from E. Martin (D. Sevigny convert) @ 1:14 [7-0] Waterloo – TEAM safety (York conceded) @ 4:13 [9-0] Waterloo – Fieldgoal by D. Sevigny 22 yards @ 5:48 [12-0] Waterloo – TEAM safety (York conceded) @ 9:15 [14-0] Waterloo – Rouge (1 point) by D. Sevigny @ 12:17 [15-0] Waterloo – Touchdown by S. Cowie 21 yard pass from E. Martin (D. Sevigny convert) @ 14:30 [22-0]

put Waterloo close to the middle of the field. The Warriors went to work quickly under the guidance of quarterback Evan Martin (#13). After two first downs, Martin decided to stretch it out and hit receiver Dustin Zender (#3) for a 40–yard touchdown. The Warrior defence went on the field and matched the offence’s effort. The defence forced York to lose yards on their next possession and punt it away after only three downs. Waterloo had no better luck with two downs, but after a booming David Sevigny (#4) punt for 40 yards, York was playing from their 4–yard line.

Waterloo started off the game receiving the ball. Nick Anapolksy (#1) had an excellent return for 23 yards to

Games of the week:

courtesy uw athletics

Warriors Field Hockey honoured with All Star Selections

See PAGE 44

See FOOTBALL, page 41 Courtesy Steve brooks

Men’s and Women’s Golf Comes to a Bronze Finish but Terrier Golden

See PAGE 45

the best games in town

Friday October 30 Men’s Hockey vs Lakehead at 7:30 pm at Columbia Barn (CIF)

Saturday October 31 Badminton vs McMaster at 10:00 am in the CIF Gym Men’s Basketball (exhibition) vs Guelph at 3pm on the War Court (PAC) Men’s Hockey vs Lakehead at 7:30 pm at Columbia Barn (CIF)

sophia sanniti

Men’s Soccer win a playoff berth on the final regular season game

See PAGE 45


40

Sports & Living

Team

W

L

Lakehead

6

5

0

1

Laurier

6

5

0

Waterloo

6

4

Brock

6

Western

5 6

OTL PTS

Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS

11

York

14

9

2

3

30

1

11

Windsor

14

8

1

5

29

1

1

9

Waterloo

14

6

5

3

21

4

2

0

8

McMaster

14

6

7

1

19

3

2

0

6

Guelph

14

6

7

1

Western

14

4

6

4

2

3

1

5

UOIT

7

2

5

0

4

Guelph

5

1

3

1

3

Windsor

5

0

5

0

0

Laurier

14

Brock

3

14

2

6 10

5 2

W

L

T

PTS

Queens

7

7

0

0

14

4

Western

7

5

2

0

10

0

4

McMaster

7

5

2

0

10

1

0

2

Ottawa

7

5

2

0

10

2

1

1

2

Laurier

7

5

2

0

10

Laurier

2

1

1

2

York

2

1

1

2

Guelph

7

3

4

0

6

Waterloo

1

0

1

0

Windsor

7

2

4

1

4

Toronto

2

0

2

0

Waterloo

7

2

5

0

4

RMC

2

0

2

0

Toronto

7

1

6

0

2

Ryerson

2

0

2

0

York

7

0

7

0

0

W

L

PTS

McMaster

2

2

0

4

Western

2

2

0

Queen’s

2

2

Windsor

1

Guelph

19 16 14 8

Oct.25: McMaster 0 vs. Waterloo 3

Team

West Division

West

GP

W

L

OTL

PTS

Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS

Team

Laurier

4

4

0

0

8

York

14

11

2

1

34

Queen’s

4

4

0

0

8

Laurier

14

9

3

2

Guelph

6

4

2

0

8 14

7

4

14

6

5

Windsor

6

3

3

0

6

Brock

Brock

6

2

3

1

5

McMaster

Toronto

4

2

2

0

4

York

4

2

2

0

4

Western

6

1

4

1

3

UOIT

4

1

3

0

2

Waterloo

4

1

3

0

2

Oct. 24: Waterloo 2 vs. Guelph 5 Oct. 25: Brock 4 vs. Waterloo 3 Oct. 31: Waterloo vs. York Nov. 1: Waterloo vs. Toronto

Team

GP

W

L

T

PTS

4

Guelph

13

11

0

2

35

0

2

Toronto

11

7

1

3

24

1

1

2

Waterloo

12

7

3

2

23

0

0

0

0

Western

11

6

3

2

20

York

13

6

5

2

20

2

0

2

0

McGill

11

2

6

3

9

Queens

13

2

9

2

8

Carleton

14

0

14

0

0

GP

W

L

PTS

Waterloo

2

2

0

29

McMaster

1

1

3

24

Western

2

3

21

Guelph

Western

14

6

7

1

19

Brock

Windsor

14

4

5

5

17

Laurier

1

0

1

0

Guelph

14

1

8

5

8

Windsor

1

0

1

0

Waterloo

14

1

11

2

5

Oct. 23: Waterloo 3 vs. York 1 Oct. 25: Waterloo 3 vs. Brock 2 Oct. 31: Waterloo vs. Ryerson Nov. 1: Waterloo vs. Toronto

Oct. 24: Brock 1 vs. Waterloo 0 Oct. 25: McMaster 3 vs. Waterloo 0

Oct. 24: Waterloo 0 vs. Guelph 5 Oct.24: York 0 vs. Waterloo 0 Playoff Game #1: Oct.30: York vs. Waterloo

athletes of the week

presents...

THIS WEEK IN

ATHLETICS & RECREATION

badminton Sarurday, October 31, 2009

vs McMaster 10:00 AM, CIF Gym

BOJANA JOSIPOVIC Volleyball 5th year, Arts Kitchener, ON

4th Annual Campus Rec

3on-3 Indoor

Soccer Tournament Fri, Nov. 13 - Sun, Nov. 15 Columbia Icefield Gym

(M) hockey vs Lakehead Thunderwolves 7:30 PM, CIF Arena Saturday, October 31, 2009

vs Lakehead Thunderwolves 7:30 PM, CIF Arena

Registration deadline:

MATT SOCHOLOTIUK

Wednesday, November 11

Football 1st year, Science Waterford, ON

More information available at the PAC Athletics Office (2039)

Friday, October 30, 2009

IMPRINT | OCT 30

Field Hockey

Women’s Volleyball

Women’s Soccer

East Division

Team

Oct.17: Waterloo 30 vs. Toronto 7 Oct.24: York 3 vs. Waterloo 52

Oct.23: Waterloo 1 vs. UOIT 4 Oct.31: Waterloo vs. Western

Playoff Game #1 Oct. 28: Western 6 vs. Waterloo 0

Women’s Hockey

GP

GP

Oct.24: Brock 0 vs. Waterloo 3

Oct.23: Guelph 2 vs. Waterloo 4 Oct.24: Waterloo 2 vs. UOIT 4 Oct. 30: Lakehead vs. Waterloo Oct. 31: Lakehead vs. Waterloo

Team

Men’s Football

West Division

GP

York

Men’s Volleyball

Men’s Soccer

Men’s Hockey East Division

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

volleyball

proceeds to:

I AM A warrior

Friday, November 6, 2009

vs RMC Paladins (W) 6:00 PM, (M) 9:00 PM, PAC Gym

Registered trademarks of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under license. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2005


Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Football: Warriors close out season strong

41

PLAYERS OF THE GAME OFFENSIVE

DEFENSIVE

Game 1 vs McMaster WR Sean Cowie (#2)

DB Pat McGarry (#6)

Game 2 vs Ottawa QB Luke Balch (#12)

Game 3 vs Laurier

brent golem

Continued from page 39

The Warriors weren’t able to return the safety point for any yards, but that didn’t dissuade them. Running back Matt Socholotiuk (#35) took the ball and broke through the Lion’s defence for a huge gain of 56 yards and within 10 yards of the end zone. The Warriors weren’t able to get the six but Sevigny kicked a solid field goal from 22 yards away to extend the lead. York, once again, was stopped from gaining any yards; but Waterloo wasn’t able to do any better. Martin was sacked for a loss of 7, but Sevigny made up the yards by kicking the punt for a 49-yard punt. The Warrior defence decided that if the offence weren’t going to get any yards then they would push down field themselves. Linebacker Bashir Moallim (#24) single-handedly stopped the York offence with two sacks consecutively! Moallim sacked the York QB one the first down for 6 yards, and then bested that one play later with a 15 yard sack. Moallim pushed York back so far that they opted to take a safety instead of punting. Waterloo extended the streak of disallowing York from getting a first down on four consecutive drives. In fact, in the first ten minutes of the game the York offence had 21 yards, not including the safeties that they took. The Warriors offence was struggling a little and Martin was intercepted. The Warriors defence stayed red hot and forced a punt, but the punt was only 17 yards long. The Warriors were in prime position inside the York 38–yard line but they had little success again. Sevigny tried for a long field goal 39 yards away and missed with accuracy, but he put enough power behind his kick that he earned a rouge as the ball was not returned out of the end-zone. The Warrior defence stayed red hot and after York took a 15-yard on second down they decided to punt it away. After a dismal 10 yard punt, the Warriors were within striking distance on the York 32-yard line. The Warriors offence finally found success this time. Martin found Zender for 13 yards and the first down to put the Warriors inside the red zone. Martin then put the ball home in the hands of Cowie for a 21 yard touchdown. After a kickoff and two York incomplete passes, the quarter ended with the Warriors leading 22 – 0. In seven possessions during the first quarter, York had failed to gain a single first down. 2nd Quarter: Warriors 43, Lions 3 Waterloo – Touchdown by M. Socholotiuk 2 yd run (D. Sevigny convert) @1:56 [29-0] York – Fieldgoal by A. Moretti 34 yd field goal @ 8:35 [29-3]

Waterloo – Touchdown by M. Socholotiuk 62 yd pass from E. Martin (D. Sevigny convert) @ 10:45 [36-3] Waterloo – Touchdown by M. Socholotiuk 26 yd run (D. Sevigny convert) @ 13:43 [43-3] In the second quarter, the status quo held out. It wasn’t until York’s tenth drive that they finally managed a first down. The Lion’s gained two in a row on two plays with 47 yards of passing. Waterloo held strong on their 25–yard line and stopped the advance. York settled for a field goal and earned their only points of the game. The Warriors answered back fast. On the fifth play of their drive, Martin had a huge pass completed to Socholotiuk who took the ball to the end-zone for a huge 62 yard touchdown. On their next drive, York earned two first downs but didn’t have enough power to maintain the momentum. The Warriors seized complete control of the game as Martin passed for 37 yards to Andrew Ward (#88), then Socholotiuk ran for 35 yards on two plays for another touchdown. Little happened on the next two possessions and the Warriors carried an insurmountable 43 – 3 into the half. 3rd Quarter: Warriors 50, Lions 3 Waterloo – Touchdown by M. Socholotiuk 1 yd run (D. Sevigny convert) @ 5:41 [50-3] The third quarter started off with Waterloo having the ball. Martin completed a 17 yard pass to Zender, and Socholotiuk followed up with two consecutive runs for 35 yards. The Warriors broke into the red zone but a pass interception in the end zone took the scoring chance away. York failed to get a first down and the Warriors got the ball back. Martin completed a 28 yard pass to Zender to York’s 15 yard line. Socholotiuk rushed for 5 yards to put them on the 10, then Martin took the ball himself and rushed but was forced out of bounds at the 1 yard line, narrowly missing the touchdown. Socholotiuk did not miss as he pushed for the single yard and the six points. After this touchdown Waterloo chose to give their reserve players a chance to shine. Neither team had much success, although runningback Steve Lagace (#36) had a nice 29 yard run. Nothing else really happened and the Warriors had a 50—3 lead after the third quarter. 4th Quarter: Warriors 52, Lions 3 Waterloo – TEAM Safety (York conceded) @ 13:36 [52-3]

DB Mitch Nicholson (#7)

Going into the final frame the Warriors had built a massive lead that hasn’t been seen since their game against Windsor, in which they shut out the Lancers 49 – 0. The fourth quarter had little success either went, although linebacker Moallim added an interception to his stats. With half the quarter over, quarterback Luke Balch (#12) finally completed a solid pass with a 24 yard pass to receiver Sean Cowie. Unfortunately the offence couldn’t piece together too many plays together and never got any significant chances to score. The opposite was true for the defence. They played solid all game and even forced York to take a safety with only two minutes to play. The game ended with the Waterloo Warriors sealing an exciting and incredible final victory over the York Lions. The Warriors also played hard because it was some veterans’ last turn to knock heads against intercollegiate competition. Waterloo can rest assured that running back Matt Socholotiuk will be back next year. Socholotiuk ran for an incredible 236 yards and caught another 66 yards, although one catch was a 64-yard touchdown, for a total of 302 yards on the day. Socholotiuk was untouchable as he scored 4 touchdowns for 24 points, the second most scored in any Canadian university football game this season. The Warriors will have some big shoes to fill as top Waterloo receiver Sean Cowie played his last game. The Martin–Cowie tandem has come to a close. Cowie was 15th in Canada this year with 4.62 receptions per game. The team will now have to depend on Zender stepping into a bigger receiver role next year. He was 11th in Canada this year as he caught 73.9 yards per game. Waterloo will also miss the services of punter David Sevigny. Sevigny was a huge part in helping gain field advantage with his booming kicks. Sevigny was the eighth best punter in Canada by kicking for 38.3 yards on average for each punt. The team will also miss cornerback Tyler Smith who is not returning. Smith was a key component of Waterloo’s punt returning squad, as well as being a big part of the defence. Smith had 14.5 tackles, 6 passes defended and 2 intercepts, 1 for a touchdown, on the year. Waterloo will also miss linebacker Brian Adams (#31) who had 10 tackles this season, linebacker Kyle Schertzer (#48) who was fourth on the team with 32.5 tackles and forced one fumble, defensive lineman Alex Wolfe (#50) who had 9 tackles on the year, and captain and offensive lineman Tom Bruce (#58).

WR Nick Anapolsky (#1)

DB Mitch Nicholson (#7)

Game 4 vs Windsor QB Luke Balch (#12)

MLB Jordan Verdone (#44)

Game 5 vs Guelph QB Evan Martin (#13)

DB Mitch Nicholson (#7)

Game 6 vs Queen’s WR Dustin Zender (#3)

DB Mitch Nicholson (#7)

Game 7 vs Toronto QB Evan Martin (#13)

LB Bashir Moallim (#24)

Game 8 vs York RB Matt Socholotiuk (#35)

LB Bashir Moallim (#24)

Players of the Year Offensive Player:

QB (#13) Evan Martin Martin had an incredible year with a passer rating of 153.26. He threw for 1321 yards which earned him 10 touchdowns. Martin led the team, averaging 264.2 yards per game (More than the entire offence of Windsor and York who averaged under 232 yards per game) peter kreze

Defensive Player:

DB (#7) Mitch Nicholson Led the defence this year with 58 tackles, 46 of them solo. He also had 1 interception and 1 fumble recovery. As a junior, Nicholson was 7th in Canada in tackles.

sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca brent golem


42

Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

University of Waterloo Fastball: Season in Review

reporter

T

he University of Waterloo Fastball team wrapped up the final games of the 2009 regular season on October 18th. The team ended a much-improved season on a high note, defeating the winner of this past weekend’s Ontario Intercollegiate Women’s Fastball Championships, the McMaster Marauders. The team earned a split in the weekend series. The team finished with a final record of 6-11, but became victim to missing multiple games due to rainouts and finished only one game out of the playoffs. However, even though the team did not make the playoffs, the 2009 campaign showed a turn around from last year’s season. As well, the team progressed as the season wore on and the weather conditions worsened. Veteran player and catcher Kelly Wills stated that

their turnaround was attributable to many factors, one of which was the close-knit family the team became. “This past season was incredible for getting to know each other as teammates and becoming closer both on and off the field.” Wills said. “Each member had the essential skills down so it allowed for us to focus our atten-

other more and play as a team rather than individuals.” The new attitude displayed by the team can be attributed to the team’s committed coaching staff of head coach Johanna Malisani, assistant coach Andrew Putnam and student coach Carson White. The three coaches used their extensive back-

Courtesy of lisa ryerson

ing and time was required by them to get to practices as well as home and away games.” Wills said in an interview with Imprint. “Without the work of these amazing individuals, our team would not be possible.” Also held this past weekend was the league’s award banquet. Taking home the team’s MVP honours were

Over the course of the season the team really had a chance to bond, which I found made our team a lot stronger. Near the end of the season we began to trust one another more and play as a team rather than individuals. — Jaclyn Hunter

tion on the little things that would help us win more games. Being aggressive and confident in our abilities played a major role this season.” “Over the course of the season the team really had a chance to bond, which I found made our team a lot stronger”, first year player Jaclyn Hunter reiterated. “Near the end of the season we began to trust one an-

grounds and experiences in the sport to not only teach the fundamentals of fastball, but also to aid in each players personal development by teaching important life skills. “Our coaches are extremely dedicated and we have to attribute our successes to their hard work. In fact, only one of the coaches lives in Waterloo, meaning an immense amount of driv-

Ryan Scott

veterans Lisa Ryerson and Kelly Wills. Both players exemplified the University of Waterloo spirit through their hard work, commitment and veteran leadership. This was a further reason for the team’s extensive improvement from past seasons. However, even though both Lisa and Kelly were honored to win the award, they stated that the awards belong to each and every member of team and coaching staff for the positive environment and winning culture that now surrounds the team. Aiding the cause for next season will be the return of several of the team’s talented young and veteran players with varying levels of provincial and even national experiences in the sport.

“As for next season, the team is looking very promising. We only have two graduating players this year meaning we are able to get a head start on next season by having a core group of girls to work with along with the new players joining us”, veteran and team manager Lisa Ryerson said. “As well, we will continue to work over the winter months in the gym to improve our skills and through tryouts next fall where we will welcome in some more players,” she continued. The future of the University of Waterloo Fastball team looks bright and with this new and improved winning culture the team will look to build on this year successes next fall. However, an even bigger motivator may be how close the team came this year. The team knows the feeling of being on the outside looking in and will look to propel themselves into the playoffs next year. “We were very close to making the playoffs and our goal for next season is to do our best to ensure that is exactly what happens,” said Wills. For further information on the University of Waterloo fastball team, or if you are interested in playing on the team next year and wish to contact the coaching staff, you can visit their site at http://www. uwfastball.ca, or the leagues website at http://www.oiwfa.org.

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Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

43

Getting your sugar fix, the healthy way Michael Gregory reporter

A

study this week by Yale University’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity probably didn’t surprise anyone, but it should get more than a few people thinking about being coo coo for cocoa anything in the future. A number of children’s breakfast cereals were short-listed as being remarkably high in sugar content, some containing up to 44 per cent sugar. Food dyes were also found to produce hyperactivity in study participants. To researchers studying the growing numbers of children dealing with diabetes and obesity, the parallels made could not be more clear. The result is the cultivation of a bad habit to crave all things refined, sugary, and unhealthy. In adults as well, the propensity to develop a sweet tooth at any given second can often make for unforgiving cravings. Part and parcel this is the nature of human appetite, influenced by what your parents fed you growing up, but very well under your control. The tendency to crave foods which are sweet, salty, or fattening is a normal part of any person’s appetite. The trouble lies in how you choose to fill the sugary void your mind, and stomach, tells you it desperately needs. Therefore, in the spirit of Halloween candy, and a the promotion of a healthy population, here are a few healthy suggestions for fulfilling your fix.

Mango coconut salad This isn’t a traditional salad in a sense, with no dressing or lettuce required, but it’s great as a side to any meal. Mango is sweet enough to leave you satisfied while giving you a great dose of vitamins. If you’re not a fan of coconut it can be left out, but the taste is fairly subtle. The vegetables add a healthy amount of fibre to leave you feeling full where most sugary snacks would leave you going back for seconds, or even thirds. 1 mango cut into ½ inch chunks

Buckwheat flour is a great gluten-free flour often used in pancakes. It’s packed with protein to leave you feeling satisfied, and has been shown to regulate blood sugar levels. You can find buckwheat flour at most health food stores. Bake at 350 degree Farenheit for 30 minutes, or until you can pull a toothpick from the bread without any remnants of uncooked dough. Homemade Apple Cinnamon Lara Bars 3 bananas (Tip: Bananas will ripen quicker when)

½ cucumber cored and finely chopped

2 cups buckwheat flour

1 red pepper finely chopped

1-2 eggs

1 tbsp grated coconut

1 tsp baking power

1 tbsp lemon juice

Vanilla, cinnamon, other spices as required

1 small apple, cored 1 cup fresh or soaked dates ½ cup cooked quinoa

1 tbsp lime juice Gluten-free banana bread Banana bread can make a great dessert treat, but when packed with refined flour and more sugar, the nutritional benefits are slim to none. Instead, cut back on the sugar by leaving your bananas to ripen. This will add to the bread’s flavour leaving little reason to include any sugar.

as with refined sugar found in chocolate bars. Their sticky texture also makes them perfect for binding the bar together. This recipe makes approximately five or six bars, depending on how thick you cut them, and extra bars can be placed in the freezer to keep them fresh. I find these are great for eating after a workout, and they won’t cost you a fortune to make either. You can find these recipes and others in Brendan Brazier’s book “The Thrive Diet”.

Lara Bars are a treat found at almost all health food stores and are now starting to pop up in groceries stores. The base of all the Lara Bars are dates which are combined with other natural ingredients to make a delicious treat. Dates are high in natural sugar which will still leave you energized but without spiking your insulin

¼ cup almonds, blanched are best ¼ cup ground flaxseed ¼ cup hemp flour (can be left out if you don’t have any ) 2 tsp cinnamon Place all ingredients in a food processor and blend until mixed. Spread mix out on cutting board and cut to desired size. If you’re freezing the bars make sure to wrap them in plastic wrap.

What do “the hills” and the NBA have in common? Drama! PART 2: NBA West Preview

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ast week I did a preview of the NBA Eastern conference. In the column I covered questions that many people wonder: How will our beloved Raptors do? How will Shaq fit in with LeBron? Is Kevin Garnett’s knee okay? This week I will delve into the biggest questions surrounding the NBA West, and I will disclose my prized underdogs. Will the Lakers repeat? You have to love LA. In a city where the drama-filled “The Hills” takes place, even the basketball team has to make life interesting. The Lakers and small forward Trevor Ariza couldn’t come to terms on a new deal, so they went out and signed Ron Artest. Now, for those of you who don’t know Ron Artest, I’ll give you a brief breakdown. Artest has his own rap label (TruWarier Records), is responsible for the biggest fight in NBA history (he went running into the stands and started throwing haymakers at fans), and is also known for walking around hotels in purely his boxers. Yes, Ron Artest is a gem, but he’s also an ultra-talented defender. Then you throw in sixth man, Lamar Odom, recently marrying Khloe Kardashian. They met a month ago at a party thrown by Artest and were engaged within three weeks. They got married and are going to live happily ever after... Both of these new signings (yes, I’m calling Khloe Kardashian a signing — they met a month ago, people) seem to improve the Lakers. There’s no doubt Ron Artest is a better player than Ariza right now and there’s also no doubt that having a Kardashian in the family makes things more exciting. But both could very well blow up in the Lakers faces. If Khloe were to get sick of being Mrs. Odom or Artest

jtoporowski@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

decided to fight some fans, these new additions could ruin a team that have “repeat” written all over them. So what do I think? I think the Lakers repeat, and I’ll give you two words to back that up: Kobe Bryant. I love Kobe. I have faith in Kobe. Kobe is the man. Is Richard Jefferson going to put San Antonio back on top? The Richard Jefferson trade to San Antonio was the most blatant salary dump I’ve seen since Pau Gasol to LA. Milwaukee could have gotten a bag of basketballs back for him and ended up with more. The Jefferson move does put San Antonio into a position where it can compete with LA. When Manu Ginobilli gets injured (as he does every season), Jefferson’s touches can increase and the Spurs can still be dynamic. The move made a ton of sense for San Antonio. Tim Duncan has one, maybe two good years left in the tank. You could tell down the stretch last year that he was literally falling apart and San Antonio will have to be extremely careful with his minutes. While I don’t think the Spurs can top the Lakers, the Jefferson move puts them into the conversation. They now have four great players in Tony Parker, Ginobilli, Duncan and Jefferson, and if things go smoothly have a shot at knocking off the Lakers. Their only problem is they don’t have anyone to guard Kobe — and that’s a big problem. Will A.I bounce back? It has to have sucked to be Allen Iverson last year. The team he was traded from suddenly went from a team most thought wouldn’t make the playoffs, to the second best team in the West. And while this was hap-

pening, Iverson was pumping out his worst statistical year, and helping the Pistons close out a decade where they had dominated the East, with a first-round exit. Oh, and by the end of the season the Pistons had essentially deactivated him pretending he had a back injury. Not his best season, that’s for sure. But this year he’ll be given a fresh start in Memphis, where the Grizzlies signed him not to particularly win games, but to sell tickets. It’s well documented that Iverson fills arenas, people love him, but for Iverson, this is about proving he can still play well — with a diminished role. If Iverson wants his career to carry past this year, he has to prove he can come off the bench, play less than full-time minutes, and still be effective. Personally, I don’t think he can do it. Yes, he’s tremendously skilled and determined, but he also has a huge ego and a style of play that is ball-dominant. He’s the kid in the playground that everyone calls the “ball hog.” I don’t think he can shake that. Which teams are sleepers? The Chicago Bulls are my Eastern Conference sleeper this year. Yes, they will miss the clutch because of the erratic shooting of Ben Gordon, but the maturation and progression of Derrick Rose will easily make up for it. Derrick Rose has 20-10 written all over him and his sidekicks are talented, too. Kirk Hinrich will be perfect off the bench for them, as he can cover both point guard and shooting guard duties. I love John Salmons, one of the most natural scorers in the league. You have to think Luol Deng will be hungry this year trying to prove he was worth the massive contract he signed a year ago, and their front-court of Joakim Noah and Tyrus Thomas

brings good energy to the table. The Bulls have the potential to knock off one of the big three in the playoffs and be a definite surprise team this year. Meanwhile out West, the Oklahoma City Thunder are my sleeper

choice. Kevin Durant will be one of the best 10 players in the league, Russell Westbrook is dynamic, James Harden can be a solid rookie contributor and I like Jeff Green. This will be the Thunder’s year to finally make the playoffs, although they will

xiaobo lui


44

Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Men’s rugby looking to make use of the second season: PLAYOFFS Waterloo 17, RMC 10 JJ Maxwell reporter

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ast Saturday, the Waterloo Warrior Men’s Rugby team traveled to Kingston to battle the Royal Military College (RMC). The stage was set for a battle because the winner of the game would knock the other out of the playoffs while securing their own spot. The Warriors were able to score early and win the game by a score of 17 – 10. It was Rich Lebel who opened the scoring by kicking a 40-yard penalty goal. Just moments later when Warrior Mark Goody intercepted a pass and ran it 30 meters the other way for a try; sure-footed Rich Lebel added the conversion putting Waterloo up 10–0. RMC clawed back into the game and scored after sustained pressure on the Warrior try line.

Courtesy UW Athletics

JJ Maxwell reporter

T

he 2009 field hockey all-stars were announced, and the Warriors pulled in their share of the honors. A total of 4 players as well as head coach Ehsan Ali were on the list. Coach Ali lead the Warrior team to a fourth place finish with a record of 7–4–3. As coach, Ali gave the team 11 more points this year then last and was largely credited with the turnaround. It is not often that a team turns around that fast in any sport, especially Field Hockey where fewer players come out of high school with a huge skill set.

FIRST TEAM ALL-STARS

Varsity rugby

Later on in the game, a great run saw the ball go from Dan Snider to Dereck McCubbin, who after weaving past several defenders was brought down. Mark Sweeney then sent the ball out to Jerome Fox who pitched it to a charging Lebel for the try. It was a great display of the speed and agility, and Waterloo will need to keep it up if they plan on standing a chance in the playoffs. RMC managed to score another try, but the game wound down with the Waterloo defense standing tall. The Man of the Match was Derek McCubbin who had several forceful runs that wore down the opponents, and played solid defense as well. The win vaults Waterloo into the playoffs, where they will play the Brock Badgers in the OUA quarter-finals on Saturday October 31.

Field hockey players take All-star honours under Coach of the Year

Field Hockey Coach Ehsan Ali named Coach of the Year

A day in the life of...

The university program teaches and brings players through the ranks who become leaders later on in their university careers. Despite this, a strong crew of first year players helped the Waterloo team this year. Ali also led the Warriors to a winning record for the first time since 2005. The second-team all-star list is filled with Warriors, who were the backbone of the Waterloo team. Rookie Courtney Bisch, who scored five goals this year, second-year midfielder Kara Moro and first-year goaltender Amy Tabbert were all honored as all-stars for the first time. Fifth-year defender Katherine Olsen made a repeated appearance on the second-team all-stars. The amount of young talent on the Warrior team is promising looking forwards. Hopefully the girls can create some chemistry and keep improving over the next few years. Overall, the Warriors have had a great season, starting the campaign 2–0–2. They only lost four games for the rest of the year, and many of these games were definitely winnable. This great start was due to good preparation and focus from the team during the off-season. A lot of work gets put in behind the scenes, and only now, months and months later does the effort pay off. For these girls, they chance to shine is coming up. The OUA playoffs are almost upon us, and the chance for glory, as well as stiffer competition has arrived. The girls are now waiting to play their quarterfinal game against York on Friday October 30. The game is at Western, and begins at 12 p.m. The entire league all-stars are listed below.

SECOND TEAM ALL-STARS

Name

Hometown

University

Name

Hometown

University

Brittany Blount

Ottawa, On.

York

Courtney Bisch

Wellesley, On.

Waterloo

Angela Lancaster

Burlington, On.

Guelph

Sarah Cobourn

Mississauga, On.

Western

Kyesia O’Neale

Mississauga, On.

Toronto

Kirsten Jewell

Toronto, On.

Western

Effie Petrou

Oakville, On.

York

Kara Moro

Port Moody, B.C.

Waterloo

Kristen Shier

North Vancouver

Toronto

Emily Newton

Vancouver, B.C.

Queen’s

Camille St. Cyr

Richmond, B.C.

McGill

Katherine Olsen

Calgary, Ab.

Waterloo

Brienne Stairs

Kitchener, On.

Guelph

Louise Radford

Guelph, On.

Western

Hannah Tighe

Penticton, B.C.

Toronto

Mary-Anne Reid

Gananoque, On.

Queen’s

Kaelan Watson

Richmond, B.C.

Toronto

Tegan Stairs

Kitchener, On.

Guelph

Michelle Weber

Ilderton, On.

Western

Rianna Sterk

Embro, On.

Toronto

Krissy Wishart

Hamilton, On.

Guelph

Amy Tabbert

Nithberg, On.

Waterloo

Courtesy Janice McGuire

Komal R. Lakhani sports & living asst.

T

his week Imprint catches up with the cheerful captain of the women’s rugby team Melissa McGuire, who has been a Warrior for the past four years. Balancing her life between being a student of health studies and the captain of the women’s rugby team she still manages to pose a big smile for Imprint. Originally from Croton, McGuire has played two positions on the team Lock/ Prop. This is her fifth season of rugby. To maintain strength and stamina for the game, McGuire puts in six to eight hours of practice per week during season time. One may wonder how does someone maintain a strenuous sport activity like rugby and the competitive UW class load. “I find it during the season I am better at time management, since know that I only have so much time, and the realization of how tried I am going to be after practice make me better procrastinator, even my grades are better during that time,” said McGuire. Once the season ends she has more time to do things outside school that she wants to do, off season training includes meeting up with the team two-three times a week for team runs and hitting the gym. On being asked about the team she would like to play against the most, her answer was Guelph because they are a highly skilled team that challenges the Warriors to step up to their level and play the kind of rugby Guelph play. If she had to pick a club to play with, McGuire would like to be a part of the Canadian team; but since that requires a lot of time and dedication for which, since she is currently finishes her degree, she said she does not have the time to offer. McGuire loves many things about the game of rugby, but only one thing tops her list. “The kind of connection you make with your team mates, the connections at this level turn out to be the closest of the relationships you make in life,” said McGuire. There are a few things McGuire does not like about the sport, for instance the fact about how much it hurts the day after the game, “everything hurts. Not just specific parts of the body, it all hurts,” said McGuire. Her best moments from the game are from last weekend’s game against Western. “I was absolutely amazed the way our team played together with all their heart, I will never forget how amazing they were and how they gave everything they had on the field, I couldn’t have asked them any more effort than they did put in.” McGuire told Imprint. “[The team] is easy to lead, when you get a lot of support from the other captain and coaches, it’s a little stressful at times but the amount of help that

I get helps me get through.” Captain McGuire didn’t have have it all easy this season. In the summer she was rehabilitating her knee injury from the previous season. “For me it’s been a big progressive season, I came in from a serious surgery from an injury at the end of last season I tore the ACL in my left knee, I also had to have surgery the summer before my second year as well. I did recovery all summer, so every game is an improvement.” Mcguire told Imprint. “From day one the team has connected really well and our energy as a team has been amazing, the new recruits were eager to play and the veterans seem to go together and eveything worked”. Even with all the injuries, McGuire would recommend that everyone try the game of rugby that she has grown to love. “I would definitely encourage people to join the team, not just for the benefit of a huge network of friends and amazing people you meet, but also for the game, rugby is not just a sport it’s a lifestyle you choose.” McGuire is a very enthusiatic about athletics and loves playing other sports. Even though she holds rugby dear to the heart she still loves playing other sports like volleyball, which she plays intramurally in her off time. Getting more personal with McGuire, we find out that her favorite TV show is Friends. Even though is off the air now she loves to watch it. Other activities she enjoy are music, she even plays a couple of instruments, and sings at wedding. McGuire enjoys reading when it is not for school and spending time at her friend’s houses. Her family connection to rugby reveals that her older brother plays the sport as well and their parents did not know much about until they started playing at a higher level. “They were very supportive and wanted to learn everything about it,” added McGuire. In her free time McGuire likes to relax by curling up with a good movie or hang out with her friends. Rugby is a sport that gets rough and dirty and it is important to know how players maintain themselves. “I lather sunscreen on before the game. I am a huge fan of it because I am so fair. I don’t like cutting my nails too short but we all have to so that you don’t hurt your fellow players. It’s also hard to wear skirts since there are all these so many bruises and you have to cover wear them up.” McGuire is a very motivated person, and has to be to be the leader of such a successful varsity team. “One thing keeps me going through the day or season specifically is time that I got to spend time with my teammates even though it’s just during practice,” said McGuire. klakhani@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

45

Warriors take down Brock Warriors qualify for the playoffs after victory over Badgers Waterloo 3, Brock 0 Siddhant Baride reporter

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he CIF soccer field saw a huge turnout this past Saturday, as the Warriors took on the Brock Badgers. This match was particularly important, as two playoff berths were up for grabs, with Guelph and McMaster already booked. The competition was between Waterloo Warriors, Western Mustangs and Laurier Golden Hawks. The game became a one-sided affair, with Brock having no motivation to play strongly, since they had already crashed out of the league. Warrior forward Leon Latty opened the account for the Warriors, scoring comfortably within 14 minutes. With a dejected Badgers team trailing early on, the Warriors upped the ante and began stabilizing their short passes and player co-ordination. The next 50 minutes entailed smooth ball transition from the defensive line-up to the midfielders, something the team

had been struggling to put into effect throughout the season. Latty scored again in the 69th minute while Billy Bean wrapped up with a 90th minute goal. The scoreboard read 3 – 0. That same day, Laurier tied against McMaster and hence was out of the playoff race. Waterloo had qualified, and so had Western. Thus, the final home game of the season against McMaster was virtually a practice match for both teams. The Warriors won that match 3 – 0, with goals from Bobby Colarado and Chris Lam. The 2009-10 season ended, with York topping the Western division and still in contention for a successful title defence. The Warriors, surprisingly, climbed up two spots, to number three. The next game will be against the #6 ranked Western Mustangs at home, in what will be the most important playoff match in the division as Western has not defeated the Warriors at home or on the road this season.

sophie sanniti

Warrior Prescott Goldsworthy (#5) heads the ball towards the Badgers goal.

Warriors golf teams win bronze at OUA championships Ryan Scott reporter

Poor Putting Leads to Bronze

T

he Warriors men’s golf team wrapped up the 2009 season by participating in the OUA championships on October 19 and 20. The team took home the bronze medal, missing out on the Ruttan Cup by only two strokes. The two-day championship event was hosted at the Angus Glen Golf Course, past host site for the Canadian Open. The weather proved to be no challenge as the golfers enjoyed sunny skies and warm temperatures after several difficult rounds in the past couple tournaments. The season-winning Warriors played solid golf but could not get the putts to drop. Their two-day combined team score of 592 placed them two strokes behind the teams from the University of Ottawa and the University of Western Ontario, who had to rely on the OUA tiebreaker. The tiebreaker gave the Ottawa Gee-Gees the title, while the Western Mustang golfer Charles Fitzsimmons took home the individual gold with a combined score of 6 under par. Simon McInnis once again led the Warriors with a combined two-day score of 144 or even par, giving him the bronze individual title. When asked to comment on the round Simon stated, “The first round was a roller coaster ride, which ended with me hitting a cart path on the final hole and making a triple bogey to finish with a 75. The final day I started off slowly but was able get about six good looks for birdie but unfortunately I only made two of them.” Rounding out the Warriors scores at the event were co-captains Garrett Rank and Jimmy Latta, who fired rounds of 147 and 148 respectively. Both players played solid golf, but like the rest of the team, they had problems getting the putts to drop. Veteran JS Rancourt also had consistent rounds on both days to give him a two-day total of 153, while Russell Mackay struggled with his control and finished with a score of 178. Besides the difficulty putting, the team played well and became subject to playing a team that was able to post consistent scores from the first player to the fifth on the Ottawa team, and a dominant single player effort by Fitzsimmons

of Western. Simon pointed to this fact by stating, “On the final day we knew that Ottawa was playing really well since we were paired with them, which may have indirectly hindered our play. They had great rounds from their fourth and fifth players, which greatly helps in a team event. We were solid but as our coaches said to us, we didn’t lose it we got beat and we should tip our hats at the great efforts by our competitors.” All in all, the Warriors men’s golf team have much to be proud of. They received three gold titles and two silver titles out of five events during the regular season and showed week-in and weekout that they were the team to beat this year in the OUA. Unfortunately, they ran into some hot teams at the final event, yet still put forward a solid effort. With veteran leadership from head coaches Dave Hollinger and Jack Pearse, as well as co-captains Jimmy Latta and Garrett Rank, the team practiced hard and worked off each others’ successes, which showed in their competitive rounds. The Warriors played great as a team and were able to consistently work together in this unique team sport. This bodes well for the seasons to come, and with Hollinger and Pearse at the helm, the Warriors men’s golf team will be ready for National come spring as well as the 2010 OUA golf season. Terrier red hot at OUA’s

The Warrior women’s golf team also took part in the OUA Championships on October 19 and 20 at the Angus Glen Golf Course. The team finished with the bronze title firing a combined team score of 526 and tying with the Western Mustangs. The Toronto Varsity Blue claimed the gold medal, while the Queens’s Golden Gaels took home the silver. Warriors’ veteran and last week’s Warrior Athlete of the Week Tiffany Terrier led the Warrior charge and dominated the competition with her back-to-back round of 77, giving her the individual gold title. Terrier finished seven strokes ahead of the nearest competition from the Toronto golf team who took home both the silver and bronze individuals medals contributing to their gold medal victory.

courtesy uw athletics

men leaderboard

women leaderboard

Pos.

Name

Par

Total

Pos.

Name

Par

Total

1

Charles Fitzsimmons

-6

138

1

Tiffany Terrier

+10

154

2

Scott Samuel

-5

139

2

Na Eun Park

+17

161

3

Simon McInnis

E

144

3

Laura Upenieks

+18

162

4

Matt Bortolotto

+1

145

4

Katie Campagnolo

+22

166

T5

Sean Lackey

+2

146

5

Lisa Boyko

+24

168

T5

Mark Coldham

+2

146

6

Christine Ho

+27

171

T7

Eric Pattenaude

+3

147

T7

Casey Ward

+28

172

T7

Brent Deighan

+3

147

T7

Kate Burnett

+28

172

T7

Taylor Henderson

+3

147

9

Justice Durland

+30

174

T7

Garrett Rank

+3

147

10

Katie Lebel

+32

176


Comics & Distractions

46

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Sudoku

6 2 1 5

5 7 1

8 2 1

5

7

8 6 3

6 4

9 6 4

8 1 9

Dear cute little chick, I’m not going to think about you, I’m not going to think about how you lean into me whenever we’re watching something, or how when our hands touched I got a tingly feeling, or that whenever we talked it was like we were the only two people on Earth, or how you always knew what to say or do to make the day a little brighter. I’m not going to think about how for a long time I thought I had a chance with you, or that you may have liked me back, or that you still don’t know who I am even though everyone else has figured it out. - Not thinking about you P.S. I lied , I did think about you.

2 9

Girl with partially blond/pink hair, Your hair smells wonderful. Can I touch it?

- Yu-Bis

Dear “Everyone”, Hello. Please discontinue the wearing of that shirt. You are not Santa Claus. - Your deeply concerned classmates

My fruity girl,

Missed any connections lately? Got any ideas, gripes, or randomly entertaining thoughts? Send them (with utmost affection) to

distractions@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

I saw you the other day, dressed up as the four food groups. Is that your Halloween costume? It’s totally hot. Could I watch you eat sometime? I’d really, really like that. - 2B 7 p.m. DP 305 Dear Afro Man, Your curly top of hair blocks my view of the professor every class. But I don’t mind as it sends me into endless daydreams. ` - The one who wants to bathe in your curly locks

JORDAN CAMPBELL

MICHAEL TO (irresponsiblyoptomistic@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)


Comics & Distractions

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

Crossword

By Mike Koivusalo Across 1. Fran Drescher’s voice, e.g. 6. This crossword’s theme 10. Jack or Peter 12. Northern Europe indigenous people 13. Mr. Clay’s current name 14. Dutch engineer Dr. ____ Nelissen 16. Approves 17. One-hit-wonder with “Steal My Sunshine” 18. Altar saying 20. Prefix meaning ‘beyond’ 22. Opposite of valley 24. Dangerous sailing maneuver 25. Passes 27. “People Are _____” 29. Beside? 30. “Let’s go!” 31. “When?” 32. Protagonist in Frank L. Baum’s series 36. American TVO? 37. Cap. of Ontario 38. Agitates 39. Start of major global sporting event? 40. “___/Tuck” 42. Did it, formally 43. Prefix meaning “in two ways” 44. Discount 46. A magazine targeted towards teenagers 47. Conjurer of sorts 53. 2007 Keira Knightley flick 54. Portugese city _____ de Canaveses

2. Most basic ionic salts 3. Dirtied 4. Many patios have them 5. Former capital of Ladakh 6. Type of dinger 7. Pierre’s friend 8. Moray, e.g. 9. Division by zero, to a CS major 10. Believer in the Flying Spaghetti Monster 11. Witches and worlocks are believed to have it 12. Many people have them in their closets 15. Small, troublesome creature 16. Egg dish 19. Eensy _____ 21. “___ Pupil” Stephen King novella 22. Preston Manning’s party once 23. Made a design in metal 24. “Dangerous” single by Michael Jackson 26. Pop 28. Rob and Patrick, e.g. 33. Company profitability acronym 34. Not safe 35. The TSX, formerly 41. Alford or Nolo Contendere, e.g. 43. Nipple 45. Randle McMurphy underwent this threatment 46. Channel 9 in Aus. 48. Museum located in 37 across 49. “I’m ____ boat” 50. Suffix with mono or poly 51. Cineplex competitor 52. Matrix hero

Down 1. Rapid form of psychological therapy (acr.)

Solutions:

October 23, 2009

What’s the strangest thing you have ever dressed up as for Halloween? By Michelle Spiers and Michelle Fujita “Spiderwoman.” Maria Lato 1A Speech Communication

“Marty (Back To The Future).” Adam Kabbeke 1A Math/Physics

“Dracula.” Adil Merali 4B Computer Engineering

“Fairy princess.” Josh Rennie 1A Arts & Business

5 9 2 1 4 3 8 6 7

47

3 6 1 7 8 9 2 4 5

7 8 4 5 6 2 1 9 3

1 5 8 9 3 6 4 7 2

6 7 9 2 5 4 3 1 8

4 2 3 8 7 1 6 5 9

8 3 7 4 1 5 9 2 6

2 1 6 3 9 7 5 8 4

9 4 5 6 2 8 7 3 1

“A troll.” Emily Dixon 4A Recreation & Business

“Pizza man.” Ryan Edralin 1A Honours Arts

“Queen of Hearts.” Joy Gal 1A Accounting & Financial Management

“Full suit Catwoman.” Kelsey Burton 2A Psychology


48

Comics & Distractions

Imprint, Friday, October 30, 2009

(postscript@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

PETER N. TRINH (impression@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

RAJUL SALEH (differentperspective@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)

“Treavs” (geese@imprint.uwaterloo.ca)


Imprint_2009-10-30_v32_i15