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Impr int The university of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Friday, May 1, 2009

imprint . uwaterloo . ca

vol 32, no 1

Quiet zone: explanation and student comments, pages 8 – 9

UW’s new building opens in downtown Kitchener

kitchenerÊ|Êwaterloo

staff reporter

U

W officials joined members of the provincial cabinet along with Kitchener’s mayor on Friday, April 17, to officially open Canada’s first new school of pharmacy in over 20 years. The school’s campus, a prominent new building in Kitchener’s downtown core, is the first step of a plan by the university to construct an entire health sciences campus on land provided by the city. UW’s new school of pharmacy will eventually host 480 undergraduate and 70 graduate students studying in the field. It is the second accredited pharmacy school in Ontario after the University of Toronto. Health sciences education is heavily regulated and universities require explicit approval from the provincial legislature before opening new pharmacy and medical schools. “I’m not sure everyone realizes what a coup it is for UW [to be granted] the rarely given permission of the Government of Ontario,” said the provincial minister in charge of post-secondary education and the MPP for the downtown Kitchener riding where the campus is based, the Hon. John Milloy. “Ontario has a shortage of pharmacists and this school is going to go a long way to ensure we meet that need.” Admission to the four-year professional undergraduate program is thus highly competitive. Applicants require two years of pre-requisite undergraduate courses, and a minimum GPA of 3.0 (75 per cent) to be considered. Required courses include a number in chemistry, biology, math, and humanities; a full list is available on the school of pharmacy’s website. Prospective students must also submit a profile and a reference letter from a pharmacist, physician, or nurse. After the initial pool of applicants is screened based on those documents, the remaining candidates will be subjected to an in-person interview with the school’s admissions staff. The program will typically accept 120 undergraduate students each January. UW’s pharmacy program has actually been operational since January 2008, with the initial undergraduate class set to graduate at the end of

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2011. Prior to the pharmacy building’s grand opening on April 17, the pharmacy students had been temporarily housed in the basement of J.R. Coutts Hall. The prior academic experience of students enrolled in the class of 2011 is indicative of the standards for entry: of the initial 92 students, 62 already held at least one undergraduate degree, six held a Master’s degree, and one has a PhD. The school of pharmacy continues UW’s history as an innovator in co-operative education. It is the first Canadian pharmacy school that offers a co-op option, and the second in North America. The only undergraduate program the school offers leads to an Honours Co-operative Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (BScPhm). The program will run in cohort streams, with students progressing through the program with a close group of peers. It consists of seven classroom semesters and four co-op semesters. The 2011 class has had one work term thus far, which saw 117 job positions being offered to the class of 91 students. The admissions’ literature states that the school of pharmacy’s goal is to create graduates that will be “leaders in their profession” and can “think broadly… and take decisive action.” The curriculum is designed to provide students with a wide breadth of skills, and electives allow for students to pursue specialties in business, policy, research, or informatics. The undergraduate program also focuses on creating positive change within the community; a community that UW President David Johnston explained extended much farther than the Waterloo Region alone, saying that one of its goals was “Improving the lot… of our entire country.” To that end, of the 16 total months of work terms undergraduates require to graduate, one must be completed in an “underserved area.” Furthermore, the curriculum incorporates an element UW calls “Community Service Learning” (CSL), which aims to connect “students with human and community needs, while providing structured activities that encourage reflection and growth from the experience.” Projects of the 2011 class have included an AIDS committee, and volunteering efforts at YWCA’s Mary’s Place and at KW Habilitation Services. See DISPENSED, page 4

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News

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009 news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Housing Debate

Tensions mounting between students and residents Michael L. Davenport editor-in-chief

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BATAVIA

COLUMBIA

HAZEL

LARCH

HEMLOCK

ALBERT

SUNVIEW

LESTER

HICKORY

graphic by paul collier data courtesy deborah easson

UNIVERSITY

The Northdale neighbourhood is bordered by Columbia and University, and bounded by Lester and King. A piece of the neighbourhood is shown above — the light grey blocks denote houses belonging to long-term residents, the dark grey blocks indicate homes which are rented out.

ester Street. When you hear the name, what do you envision?  What should Lester Street look like? This question was the focus of a town hall meeting held on Saturday, April 18 by city Councillor Jan d’Ailly. His question to the residents of the Northdale neighbourhood: “What do you want to see when you step outside?” The meeting is the result of mounting tension between long-term residents and students. The hope was to open dialogue between the two populations by getting them to sit in tables in small groups and brainstorm about ways to improve the neighbourhood. But animosity boiled to the surface early in the meeting — after being briefed about UW’s planned construction expansions, one resident asked, “If you’re building on parking lots, where are you going to park your cars? Hopefully not in front of my house.” The events at the town hall that day frequently highlighted a disconnect between the politicians and everybody else. While student and municipal politicians alike tried to emphasize that “We shouldn’t think in terms of students and permanent residents — everyone’s a resident,” many of the “permanent resident” speakers fell back to referring to students and permanent residents as separate groups. And they had stories: one resident spoke of his house and car getting egged, another said his four-year-old daughter’s window was broken. And residents are not hopeful their situation will improve. “The situation is going to implode if the city doesn’t do something radically different,” said resident Christine Carmody. She continued, “You’re going to have Kingston. And nobody wants Kingston.” If one was to judge from the impassioned speeches delivered, residents are both angry at and terrified of students. Previously, one strategy adopted by the city to limit the density of student housing in the Northdale neighbourhood was to enact a bylaw, imposing a minimum distance of 75 metres between student “lodging houses”. The controversial measure was enacted in

2002, under then-mayor Lynne Wolstencroft. The distance restriction was subsequently increased to 150 metres. Though the bylaw was intended to limit the density of the student population, it was impossible to enforce it to it’s intended end — nothing prevented other houses in the neighbourhood from being bought up and rented to tenants who happened to be students. Councillor d’Ailly told Imprint, “The 75 metre rule worked for a while, but ultimately not the best way to do it.” He continued, “The reality is that more students are going to live close to the university.” Councillor d’Ailly wants to see the neighbourhood improved through a combination of enforcement of existing bylaws, education, and community building. Landlords have a different perspective on the matter. Some of them would like to see the houses replaced with larger residential units. Local landlord Chris Weidermann said that the renovation of Ezra Street is a model the Northdale neighbourhood should adopt. “Before the buildings were put up, Ezra Street was a slum.” Weidermann says that not only would larger buildings allow students to create their own communities within, but would allow for the landlord to pay for property maintanence and snow removal, which would address some of the residents’ complaints. Weidermann said such a model was unaffordable with the dwellings currently in the region, saying, “By the time we pay the premium in taxes, insurance payment, and bank and mortgage payments, there’s no cash coming out of the business.” One attendee suggested that the city should buy the residents out. Others went so far as to suggest that students who are not living in lodging houses should be forcibly evicted from their residences. “One of the things I’d like to see eliminated is the grandfather clause,” said resident Joe Hobin, referring to the exception that allowed already established lodging houses to remain despite the 150 metre rule. He continued, “I want the universities to have more direction in telling students what the hell to do when they’re away from home.” editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

UW tightens belt Michael L. Davenport editor-in-chief

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he University of Waterloo is not in dire straits. “We’re in much better shape than any other institution I can think of, in Ontario and beyond,” remarked Amit Chakma, vice president academic and provost. While UW is not resorting to more drastic measures such as trying to introduce flat tuition (University of Toronto) or cutting Women’s Studies (University of Guelph) our university isn’t immune to the poor economy. The university budget for the upcoming fiscal year was approved at the April 7 Board of Governers meeting, however cost-cutting measures were announced to university staff at a town hall meeting the next day. Budget Cuts

The Board of Governers approved a three per cent cut to the budget for the 2009-2010 fiscal year. A five per cent budget cut is currently projected for the 2010-2011 fiscal year. Hiring Freeze

The soft hiring freeze which was instituted October 2008 will continue for the time being. The university will continue hiring for roles it deems critical (e.g., the reorganization of the faculty of environment will necessitate hiring additional faculty). “The key mantra

here is ‘mission critical,’” said Chakma at the board meeting. He also stressed that the budget cuts will not mean layoffs, and UW will not be forcing staff into early retirement. “The most damaging thing we could do is pay people to retire,” said Chakma, “We need to keep our talent.” Staff members who retire on schedule, however, will not necessarily be replaced. “The result is service levels will not be what they were in the past,” said UW President David Johnston at the town hall meeting.

the university’s interest in international students and in the Dubai campus as cost recovery measures. “We remain optimistic about the future of the Dubai campus, but the reality will be determined over

the next few years,” he said at the town hall. Also, increased enrolment has helped the university cope with budget shortfalls in the past, and will likely remain a tool for the future. According to Chakma, “By

growing we manage our affairs a little bit better. We’re poor, but not as poor as we might have been.” editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Classes of under 10 scrapped

In another measure to reduce costs, the university will no longer offer professors credit for teaching undergraduate classes fewer than 10 students. (Professors are still free to teach the classes on a “volunteer basis.”) According to Chakma, 10 per cent of undergraduate classes had fewer than 10 students. According to a memo Chakma sent out in March, “It is understood that there may be a short transition period where some small classes are offered while adjustments to programs, curricula and practices are implemented. However, the objective is that by the end of 2009 those adjustments will be made, and in 2010 and beyond offering undergraduate courses with 10 or fewer students will be unusual.” michael l. Davenport

Other coping strategies

Chakma repeatedly reiterated

Amit Chakma (left) and David Johnston address UW faculty and staff in an open town hall meeting on April 8, 2009. The meeting focused on the university response to the economic crisis.


 News dispensed: UW’s new pharmacists Celebrating Earth Day

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009

Continued from cover

The launch event highlighted millions in capital contributions that funded construction of the institution, as well as several endowments pledged more recently by corporate and philanthropic donors. The largest investors are the taxpayers of Kitchener through their municipal government, which committed $30 million towards the Health Science Campus in addition to eight acres of prime development space. Ontario’s Ministry of Training, Colleges & Universities committed an additional $8 million towards the campus. The Lyle S. Hallman Foundation led private contributions with its pledge of a $3 million endowment towards the school’s director position to “ensure that the school will always be able to recruit a top-quality leader.” Corporate donors included Pharmasave, AstraZeneca Canada, Rexall Pharmacies, and Shoppers Drug Mart. UW’s School of Pharmacy will employ 30 faculty members. Its founding Hallman Director is Dr. Jake Thiessen, who completed his PhD at University of California, San Francisco and is a former associate dean at UofT’s faculty of pharmacy. The school aims to build research strengths in drug delivery, diabetes treatment, vaccine development, pediatric dosing, and pharmacotherapy for the elderly, among other areas. The new $53 million, 120,000

square-foot building is located just blocks from Kitchener City Hall, at the intersection of King and Victoria Streets. As students are not expected to travel regularly to UW’s main campus in Waterloo, the school of pharmacy is mostly self-contained and includes its own lounge area and library. The building’s seven-storey tower rises above neighbouring buildings and is constructed mostly from local materials, including Eramosa stone quarried from Bruce County. The sides of the building are mostly covered in glass murals that depict medicinal plants. “Some 60 per cent of medicines originated in the natural world. The plants tell the story of the building — a story about bringing health and healing to campus and the surrounding community,” proclaimed director Thiessen. The glass mural also serves a practical purpose; it blocks out direct sunlight while allowing exposure to natural light. According to Kitchener’s Mayor Carl Zehr, the new building is merely the “anchor” of UW’s new Health Sciences Campus (HSC), which promises to bring together a wide range of health-related fields in a compact area. The campus will expand over the next few years, with the project expected to be fully operational by 2012, to include a number of primary care clinics and educational institutions in health sciences-related areas. Developers have ensured that

it will be possible to connect the school of pharmacy building with future buildings planned for the HSC campus with pedestrian bridges. Most notably, the HSC will be the location for the Waterloo Region’s first medical school, a satellite of McMaster University’s DeGroote school of medicine that will accept 21 medical students each year. The community will benefit from an onsite, full-service family primary care clinic, supported by students enrolled in the campus’ professional programs and graduates in residency. UW’s school of optometry, the only English optometry institution in Canada, will also create a primary care clinic and house its Centre for Contact Lens Research at the HSC. “We are underserved in this community with regards to quantity and quality,” Johnston declared in the atrium of the new building. “This campus, over time, will not only solve our shortage of health professionals… we will be a place where an entire health industry will grow; serving people and developing instruments, processes, and software.” For readers interested in applying to UW’s School of Pharmacy for January 2011, the application process begins in mid-September 2009. For more information visit its website at www.pharmacy. uwaterloo.ca. rwebb@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

A sample of 100 species produced by Nith River Native Plants, on their nursery just outside New Hamburg, Ontario. Julia Hawthornthwaite reporter

E

arth Day 2009 kicked off the third annual Living Earth Festival in Kitchener-Waterloo this year. The City Hall Rotunda Gallery hosted a Saving Energy event as part of Living Earth, which ran for five consecutive days. The festival hosted workshops, speakers, and events on topics including local food, recycling, water, and sustainable homes. The University of Waterloo’s Faculty of Environment and the Residential Energy Efficiency Project (REEP) hosted the opening day of the festival. REEP is a not-for-profit organization based out of Waterloo which helps homeowners strive toward sustainable living within and outside of their homes. The organization offers programs, services, public education, and information to the members of the KitchenerWaterloo community. In his address to attendees of the event, which kicked off the formal program of speakers for the day, Deep Saini, the dean of the faculty of the environment, explained that the faculty worked closely with REEP. Dr. Saini considers the initiative a spin-off of the Faculty of Environment; REEP is now running as a successful, private company. Booths and displays of environmental initiatives throughout the community, including Bullfrog Power, Kitchener Utilities, Sustainable Waterloo, and Community Renewable Energy Waterloo (CREW), surrounded the gallery. All groups were focused on sharing knowledge on energy, sustainable living solutions, water saving tips, and gardening strategies, at this “vibrant, grassroots celebration,” said Mayor Carl Zehr of Kitchener. Zehr spoke about the initiatives of the City of Kitchener, including achieving LEED certification on all new buildings, and improving standards for

existing buildings. He plans to retrofit the city’s built environment, and, as a small change, “Encourage the use of tap water in city buildings...there will be no more water bottles sold in these facilities.” The main goal Zehr has for the community is to be proactive during this time of environmental awareness and activity. The celebration of Earth Day, as outlined by REEP speaker Mary Jane Patterson, is truly about “reflecting on all the gifts Mother Earth provides us with, and learning how we are going to take care of her in the future.” All groups present were dedicated to this ambition not just in the spirit of Earth Day but to the idea of environmental awareness. Students and members of the community attended the event as both co-ordinators and spectators, and interacted with those manning the displays. CREW, a volunteer-based organization, stood out because individuals come to network on environmental topics, and support local projects which encourage energy conservation in a sustainable manner. Another interesting group was Nith River Native Plants. They work to promote the use of native species in gardens of the community. The organization provides a catalogue of over 100 types of Ontario native wildflowers that they produce on their nursery just outside of New Hamburg. They encourage the use of native species because imported plants can severely degrade the local species population, making it difficult for them to compete and survive in the long run. The event continued well into the evening with five other speakers, including individuals from the REEP House Project, Greening Sacred Spaces, and the Ontario Trillium foundation. jhawthornthwaite@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Campus Bulletin UPCOMING Sunday, May 3, 2009 “Walk to Remember 2009” – Bereaved Families of Ontario-Midwestern Region. 9 a.m. registration at Waterloo Memorial Recreation Centre. Lots to do from silent auction to children’s activities and prizes! For info 519-894-8344 or www. bfomidwest.org. Thursday, May 7, 2009 Hear the Music Symposium: learn about noiseinduced hearing loss and how to protect yourself while still enjoying the music you love. Keynote speaker Dr. Marshall Chasin, audiologist to some of Canada’s most well-known musical artists. 7 p.m. Conrad Grebel. For ticket info 519-744-6811 or akafadar@chs.ca. Saturday, May 9, 2009 Region of Waterloo spring compost giveaway: Regional residents can receive up to five bushels per household. Locations will feature food drive hosted by the Food Bank of Waterloo Region and the Cambridge Self-Help Food Bank. Cambridge Landfill, end of Savage Drive. Waterloo Landfill, 925 Erb Street West. 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Saturday, May 16, 2009 Nota Bene Period Orchestra: Fundraising concert of Baroque favourites and silent auction. Doors open at 7:00 p.m. for refreshments and silent auction, concert at 8:00 p.m. Tickets $25. The Registry Theatre 122 Frederick St, Kitchener. For more information: www.nbpo.net.

Saturday, May 30, 2009 Dance-a-thon: Dance the day away to help raise money for the Family Services program with the House of Friendship. 3p.m. to 8p.m., St. Paul’s MacKirdy Hall. Saturday, June 13, 2009 Moving Beyond Violence: Lessons from Gandhi: Keynote speaker Arun Gandi at Bingemans Ballroom starting at 5:30 p.m. Black tie optional. Tickets $150 each or table of eight for $1000. 1800-625-7925 or visit www.rebuildanselma.com.

CAREER SERVICES WORKSHOPS Sign up for these workshops at careerservices.uwaterloo.ca. Career Exploration and Decision Making – June 3, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., TC 1112. July 9, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1112. Career Interest Assessment – May 25, 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., TC 1113 Are You Thinking about an MBA? – an overview of requirements – 5:30 to 7 p.m., TC 2218. All about GMAT – presented by Geoff Vokes from Kaplan Centre, T.O. – 5 to 5:30 p.m. Career Exploration Workshop - June 3, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., TC 1112. July 9, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. TC 1112. Career Interest Assessment - May 25, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., TC 1113. June 9, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., TC 1112. July 15, 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.,

Classified BED & BREAKFAST

Colonial Creekside – indoor pool, ensuite bathrooms, private in-room dining, 2/3 acre city property, 10 minutes from campus. Ideal for weddings/ parents visiting/graduate students for longer term stays. Special rates available. 519-886-2726 ; www. bbcanada.com/11599.html.

HELP WANTED

Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, K-W Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. Extend-A-Family part-time positions – providing in-home and community support to indivdual with developmental/physical challenges in a variety of programs. Providers will be reliable, energetic and committed. $12.48/hour to start. If interested, please contact Recruitment at 519741-0190, ext 238 or via e-mail at joy@eafwr. on.ca. Web – www.eafwr.on.ca. Excellent student work opportunity! The Survey Research Centre (SRC) at UW is currently seeking part-time telephone interviewers for the spring and fall terms. The deadline to apply for the spring term is May 4. The SRC is an on-campus research centre that offers a variety of survey services. Telephone interviewers are responsible for conducting quality-oriented in-

terviews and performing administrative tasks such as data entry. Must be fluent in English and have a clear, strong speaking voice and excellent communications skills. Experience in telephone work, data entry, or customer service is helpful but not required. Ability to speak French fluently is an asset. 12-15 hours per week required, mainly evenings and weekends. Starting wage is $11.50 an hour. Please send resume to Lindsey Webster, at email lwebster@math.uwaterloo.ca. For more information email or phone 888-4567, ext 36689.

HOUSING

Attention Cambridge School of Architecture students! Live conveniently and comfortably right across the street from school in this beautifully renovated apartment. 4, 8 and 12-month leases available with excellent signing bonuses and rental incentives! Call Joanne at 519-746-1411 for more details. Room for rent for a quiet individual in a detached home near both universities. Parking and all amenities. Please call 519-725-5348.

SERVICES

Does your thesis or major paper need a fresh pair of eyes to catch English spelling and grammar errors? Thesis English editing, $50/hour. Five business day turnaround. Neal Moogk-Soulis, ncmoogks@uwaterloo.ca.

HELP WANTED Part-time Systems Administrator required immediately at Imprint. May 4 to August 15. $11.00/hour. Webmail server administration required. Familiarity with medium scale Linux network administration, Samba file management, Windows XP workstations, LDAP authentication, Apache administration. Responsible for maintaining and updating Linux network and 16 desktops. Applicant must be approved under Ontario Work Study Plan as posted on UW’s Student Award and Financial Aid Office’s website. For more information or to send your resume, contact Imprint Editor-in-Chief Michael L. Davenport at 519-888-4048 email: editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Imprint office, SLC1116 during office hours.

TC 1112. NOTE: $10.00 materials charge. Exploring Your Personality - May 20, 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., TC 1113. June 11, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., TC 1113. July 6, 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., TC 1112. NOTE: $10.00 materials charge. Work Search Strategies - June 16, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., TC 1208. July 22, 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., TC 1208. NOTE: Prerequisite for this workshop. Work Search within “Marketing Yourself.” Work Search Strategies for International Students - May 13, 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., TC 1208. June 1, 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. NOTE: Prerequisite for this workshop. Work Search within “Marketing Yourself.” Basics of Starting a Business - May 27, 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., TC 1208. May 28, 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., CBET Room. NOTE: 20 person limit. Entrepreneurship - A Student’s Perspective: UW Arts Grad Jasmin Hofer, reflects on her experiences as a successful entrepreneur. Interactive session - bring your questions. June 4, 12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m., TC 1208. Networking 101: May 12 & 26, 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., TC 1208. NOTE: There is a prerequisite for this workshop. Work Search within “Marketing Yourself.” Interview Skills: Preparing for Questions: - May 27, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., TC 1208. June 25, 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., TC 1208. July 14, 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., TC 1208. NOTE: There is a prerequisite for this workshop. Interview Skills within “Marketing Yourself.” Interview Skills: Selling Your Skills: - May 28, 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.,TC 2218A. June 23 & July 15, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. NOTE: There is a prerequisite for this workshop. Interview Skills within “Marketing Yourself.” Successfully Negotiating Job Offers: June 17, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., TC 1208. July 21, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. NOTE: Geared towards graduating students. Business Etiquette & Professionalism: - June 2, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., TC 1208. July 16, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Success on the Job: - June 24, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. July 23, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., TC 1208. Are You Thinking about an International Experience?: - May 28, 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Working Effectively in another Culture: - June 2, 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Getting a U.S. Work Permit: - Learn more July 23, 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., TC 1208. Are You Thinking about Med School/ Perspectives of a Waterloo Grad: Learn more about the medical school application process in Ontario July 11, 10 a.m. to 12, TC 2218. Job Information Session for Graduating Students: - July 21, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., AL 116. July 23, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., AL 116.

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009 ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

ANNOUNCEMENTS Crown Ward Status: attention students who are/ were Crown Wards needed to work with large, Provincially funded transdiscliplinary team (including UW students) dedicated to helping current Crown Ward youth. Please contact Kelly Anthony at 519-888-4567, ext 32802. Paid position. Excellent exchange opportunity for UW undergraduate students to participate in the Ontario/ Jiangsu Student Exchange Program in China for the 2009-2010 academic years. The OJS Program provides scholarships to successful applicants. For additional information and application form/ deadlines contact Andreea Ciucurita, Waterloo International, Needles Hall, 1101, room 1103, ext 35995 or by email: aciucurita@uwaterloo.ca. Tune in to Sound 100.3 FM radio to hear DJ Cool with lots of music, entertainment, helpful info, weather and more. www.soundfm.ca >listen or www.ckmsfm.ca. CIGI has an exciting line-up of public events for March. Check out website for full lecture listings. All events are free, but RSVP early as seating is limited. www.cigionline.org. Heart and Stroke Row for Heart – learn to row this summer while you raise funds for life-saving heart disease and stroke research. The eight week program begins June 22 to August 15, with the end fun-filled “Row for Heart Regatta” at Laurel Creek. For times/fee, etc call 519-571-9600 or cgies@hsf.on.ca.

ONGOING MONDAYS Gambling can ruin your life. Gamblers Anonymous, 7 p.m. at St Marks, 825 King Street, W, basement. FRIDAYS Season of Argentine Tango lessons in Waterloo starts May 2009 at the Princess Twin, Waterloo at 7 p.m. Beginners and advanced lessons with dancing from 9 to 11:30 p.m. (Tango, Swing, Salsa) Call 519-581-7836 or casadeltango@yahoo.ca.

UW RECREATION COMMITTEE UW Recreation Committee events are open to all employees of the University of Waterloo. Register by emailing admmail.uwaterloo.ca. Spring 2009 – TBA: Discover Trails in Waterloo Region ; E-Bikes: What are they all about? ; Preplanning Your Funeral by Erb & Good Funeral Home. Tuesday, May 12: Identity Theft and Internet Safety – from 12:05 to 2:55, PHY 145 – updates on internet safety issues by UW police. Sunday, May 3: High School Musical at St. Jacob’s Country Playhouse at 4 p.m. Monday, May 11: UW Blooms 2009 – time to be announced – Multipurpose Room, SLC. Saturday, November 21: Robin Hood Pantomime at St. Jacob’s Country Playhouse at 2 p.m.




News

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009

Put your best foot forward for cancer research Mark Zammit staff reporter

W

e are only as strong as we are united, and the Canadian Cancer Society is an outspoken advocate of this adage. People of all ages gathered at the University Stadium (located just off Seagram Drive) on April 26, for the 31st instalment of the Great Ride ‘n’ Stride. This event brings together individuals who have survived cancer, are fighting cancer, are related to or are friends with cancer victims or sufferers, or those who are simply interested in supporting the

advancement of research in the quest for a cure. With modest beginnings in 1968 as the Women’s Ride for Cancer, this event now raises more than $400,000 a year for research and services. This year the Kitchener-Waterloo Great Ride ‘n’ Stride was sponsored by the Ontario Teachers Insurance Plan and covered by a multitude of local media outlets. It consisted of a 6 kilometre foot trail and a 15 kilometre bike trail – overall not much longer than 45 minutes total to complete. Gerry Blanchard , the chair of the Kitchener-Waterloo organizing committee, stated that the monetary goal

of this event was approximately $100,000, which was set with the recession in mind. As of Sunday over $80,000 had been raised, with the numbers expected to climb for days afterward. Signing up for the event was very straightforward; online, participants were given the option to register as individuals or as members of a team. As well, team information was accessible for the purposes of making pledges. There were multitudes of coloured shirts and team logos, primarily depicting the name or face of a friend or relative who was fighting

or had succumbed to the illness. The sense of camaraderie was inspiring. The fact that so many people were willing to unite and raise funding for research and care is a shining example of the good in this world. It is the primary source of money for the Canadian Cancer Society, and I highly encourage everyone to come out next year and participate for an excellent cause. — With files from Cancer.ca mzammit@imprint.uwaterloo.ca photos by mark zammit

Left to right: Members of Team Auntie Nette; female participant crossing the finish line; members of team Mitchell’s Marshalls.

Food Services “thinks fresh” Keriece Harris staff reporter

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Judy Westman,

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t’s been a long time coming, but that does not make the recent decision by Food Services any less exciting. As evidence of construction alighted in the Student Life Centre cafeteria area, murmurs started and slowly transformed into outrageous rumours. But if you heard that Subway is coming to the SLC, you have the facts correct. Lee Elkas, the director of food services was able to squash this rumour by confirming with Imprint that Subway was indeed contracted to the University of Waterloo. Why Subway? Elkas explained that, “Subway offers students, staff and faculty a healthy and nutritional meal option made to order on freshbaked bread. It is a recognizable successful brand that will attract more traffic to the SLC and the services that the building provides.” Although Food Services is improving the level of health foods and snacks available on campus, Pizza Pizza will still be available at Brubakers.

Subway will open alongside Brubakers and Teriyaki in time for the Fall 2009 term with its construction and the refurbishing of Brubakers and Teriyaki occuring over the upcoming summer months. Needless to say, Brubakers will be undergoing a few changes. More specifically, Food Services will be adding a variety of healthy food options such as the Pita Pit (not the franchise), a full service salad bar, and a Freshens Smoothie bar. In addition, Food Services is opening up Brubakers with a second register area. This will improve traffic flow and reduce customer congestion over lunch. In order to accommodate Subway the SLC cafeteria will lose 24 to 48 seats. However, Food Services is using the “grab ‘n’ go concept,” not tray service in keeping with the trend in which students behave, thus the seat loss is a minor concern. According to Elkas, table sizes will be reduced to two or four people, as large rounds of six were underused. The only question that remains is ,“How do you like your sub?” kharris@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009 opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Transparency where no one can see it

Friday, May 1, 2009 Vol. 32, No. 1 Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editor-in-chief, Michael L. Davenport editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Ad Assistant, vacant Sales Assisstant, vacant Systems Admin., vacant Distribution, Christy Ogley Distribution, Garrett Saunders Interns, Julea Gelfand, Brandon Rampelt Volunteer co-ordinator, vacant Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Sherif Soliman president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Anya Lomako vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, vacant secretary@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Staff liaison, Caitlin McIntyre liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, vacant Head Reporter, vacant Lead Proofreader, vacant Cover Editor, vacant News Editor, vacant News Assistant, vacant Opinion Editor, vacant Opinion Assistant, vacant Features Editor, vacant Features Assistant, vacant Arts & Entertainment vacant Arts & Entertainment Assistant, vacant Science & Tech Editor, vacant Science & Tech Assistant, vacant Sports & Living Editor, vacant Sports & Living Assistant, vacant Photo Editor, vacant Photo Assistant, vacant Graphics Editor, vacant Graphics Assistant, vacant Web Administrator, vacant Systems Administrator, vacant Production Staff Katrina Massey, Mark Zammit, Keriece Harris, Steven R. McEvoy, Jacqueline McKoy, Rajul Saleh, EthanOblak, Adrienne Raw Graphics Team Armel Chesnais, Paul Collier, Tan Cutajar, Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may also reproduce the material commercially in any format or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has been distributed in an issue of Imprint, or Imprint declares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. One copy per customer. Imprint ISSN 0706-7380. Imprint CDN Pub Mail Product Sales Agreement no. 40065122. Next staff meeting: Monday, May 4 12:30 p.m. Next board of directors meeting: TBA

editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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ffective this spring, every single undergrad will be paying $9 more. The student services fee has increased — where formerly it was $126 a term, it will now be $135 a term. I personally don’t have a strong opinion about the fee change (though gods know the CIF gym could use the money to replace all that broken equipment). Rather, I just want to tell you how it happened. There I was, half an hour before April’s UW Board of Governors’ meeting, going through the agenda. On page A8, I found the backgrounder and notes about the fee increase. “Oh, that’s interesting,” I said to myself. “I wonder what they’re going to say about that.” I printed the page off and stuck it with my files for the meeting. Throughout the first half of the meeting I was sitting there thinking to myself, “I wonder when they’re going to get to that fee increase? I wonder what they’re going to say about that?” It wasn’t until after the recess (two hours later) that I realized that the fee increase was a part of the “consent agenda.” For the uninitiated, in every sort of bureaucratic meeting, there’s a lot of drudgery that needs to be taken care of — boring stuff by even a bureaucrat’s standards — this is the “consent agenda.” Approving the minutes for the previous meeting, approving the agenda, approving reports, et cetera. Basically, all that stuff gets thrown in a big pile, and the chair of the meeting says, “We approve everything in this pile, right?” The committee (usually)

says, “Yeah, it’s a’ight”, and the meeting moves on. It’s necessary because without it, a two-hour long meeting could become a four-hour long meeting. The fee increase was in that big pile, so nobody at the Board of Governer’s meeting said anything about it. I don’t want to leave you with the impression that the fee increase was “snuck in.” The backgrounder said the fee increase was unanimously recommended by the Student Services Advisory Committee (SSAC), and the Board of Governers isn’t likely to vote against it, no matter what the discussion. But the process amused me — and I figured students should know a little bit about how these processes actually work. Considering there are students who get their $3.30 back from Imprint every term, and considering there were students opposed to the $1 WUSC Student Refugee Program fee, I figure there are plenty of students who would care about getting charged nine more dollars. But, I’ve met the people in UW administration. President of UW David Johnston isn’t Scrooge McDuck; he’s not going to take $9 from every undergrad, fill a pool full of change, and go swimming in it. Vice President of Academic and Provost Amit Chakma isn’t going to buy himself a Lexus on your dime. These people all want what’s best for this school. And you (I assume) also want what’s best for this school. It’s just that their and your definition of “best” don’t always line up. Does “best” mean more

greenspace, or a shiny new nanotech building? That’s where the discussion needs to happen. So yeah, your fees just went up by $9. There are a couple of lessons in this. First off, all those boring governance meetings really do matter. Students who care about anything outside their studies shouldn’t just be paying attention when UW is planning on opening a campus in Dubai, they should be paying attention all the time. You never know when Feds or the UW administration is going to try something crazy, like add an academic services fee, get rid of exam relief, or try and sneak lectures in on Saturdays. Secondly, this is yet another example of why the student elections actually do matter. I’ve been saying that for years, but it feels like nobody believes me. The majority of the seats on the SSAC are held by students. The Feds president has one seat and gets to appoint three others. That’s four out of twelve positions controlled by the Feds president. But, Justin Williams didn’t make your fees go up, the fee is entirely cost recovery. To quote an email from GSA president Craig Sloss, “Because the fee is determined based on the previous year’s expenses, this is why there is a two-year lag in the fee increase; decisions made in 2007 were implemented in 2008 and are being paid for now.” If you want your $9 back, lobby the SSAC to cut services — and perhaps the fee will be smaller in two years.

Community Editorial

Grin and bare it Melody Jahanzadeh respondent

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or most students, the weekend provides that much needed release from the stresses of the week and serves as a time to unwind and let loose. But set foot inside any club, and you will immediately notice that many girls go one step further by quite literally “letting it all hang out.” Short shorts, plunging necklines, and barely-there dresses are the norm when it comes to club attire, which in turn raises the question of why these girls choose to dress that way. One obvious answer is to garner the attention of their male counterparts; it

is no secret that just as guys go out to “pick up,” many girls are looking for the same thing on a Friday night. But it would be unfair to conclude that as the sole reason girls choose to dress provocatively. Shows like Sex and the City convey the message that there is nothing wrong with females embracing and being proud of their bodies, as being sexy does not preclude being intelligent. While it may be easy to judge the bleach-blonde girl wearing the slit-to-there dress, it’s important to take a step back and realize that the way one dresses does not necessarily reflect anything about their personality or values. Sometimes, girls do indeed just want to have fun, and why shouldn’t

She says “Why do you feel the need to put so much of yourself on display? What people wear says a lot about their personality, objectives, confidence. In my opinion, the more ‘scandalous’ a person dresses, the more they convey the message that they want some action without actually verbally saying it. Even if they deny these intentions, actions speak louder than words.” — Amanda George

they be able to dress in whichever way makes them feel confident? I admit, I have seen some cringeworthy outfits, rendering me almost embarrassed to be female, and there are also times when it is painfully obvious that the girl in question simply wants attention. But on the other hand, I have also donned outfits that I would rather my parents not see; that shouldn’t mean that I automatically get labeled as a floozy. Terms such as “slut” and “whore” are thrown around far too easily, and the basis for classifying someone as such should include more than their mere appearance. Not all girls can be judged by the same standard and we all have different motivations

for our actions. It can be fun to get all dolled up for a night out on the town and yes, sometimes you really do dress up just for yourself. There is no reason to assume that a girl is doing so just to get attention. At the end of the day, we are entitled to our own decisions, which includes the way we choose to present ourselves. And while it’s fine to have an opinion on dressing provocatively, opinions become a problem when they turn into all-out prejudices used to evaluate a person before you’ve taken the time to actually get to know them. Remember that underneath the skimpy clothing may very well be a woman of substance.

He says “Personally, I feel sort of awkward around girls who are flashing their cleavage and have their skirt hiked up unnecessarily high. I mean it’s nice to look at, but I wouldn’t want to get involved on the dance floor with a lady like that; it just seems sort of trashy and trying to compensate for a poor attitude or plain personality.” — Craig Moreau

“Honestly I don’t care. What you wear is your business and what I wear is my business. As long as I’m not having to shield my eyes so as not to be scarred for life, you can go entertain all the guys you want to your hearts content.” — Karima Ladhani

“The cause of it is like 99 per cent because this is how society tells us to act. You have to be dressed a certain way to be a popular person and get attention. I don’t think that it’s right that people conform so easily to what society tells them they should do, but obviously I don’t have a huge problem with the end result because... well... I’m a guy.” — Scott Hooker

“I think it’s something everyone does at some point, you just need to get it out of your system. It by no way reflects your personality or character. Your actions should determine that, not the clothes you wear” — Pooja Punjabi

“I don’t mind one bit! Seriously, girls dress like that to get attention, and it works, I’m telling you... at clubs, where guys are intoxicated, that is what they’re looking for.” — Shaheer Bhaidani


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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009

Opinion

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009

Quiet zone quandry Julea Gelfand imprint intern

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uring the exam period of March 29 to April 24, The Davis Centre Library of the University of Waterloo implemented several changes to its regulations of noise levels. The library went from being submissive about its noise content to being very strict. These changes being a trial run were set in interest to see how students would react. Changes are removed after April 24. The library divided itself into two sections: a quiet study zone and a silent study zone. Quiet study zones permitted talk-

ing and requested that all devices such as iPods and other music devices have headphones so no one else was disturbed. Silent study zones permitted no talking and the same rules applied for music. Additionally, to help reduce noise and other disruptions, students were required to set their cell phones on silent prior to entering the library. This is quite the change from what the Davis Centere used to be, with its large study groups and talking. Students have been quite good about keeping the noise level down, however the DC has cut down the group study section size in order to enforce a more convenient and silent study program. The DC hasn’t eliminated all talking, of course, because group sessions are still available.

Fiona Elder, a first-year applied health science student said, “Personally I didn’t know it was divided into two sections at first, but now that I do know, I can say I do like it a lot more for exams because then I’m less distracted.” Most other students agree. Mike Dunn, a first year honours arts and business co-op student, said, “I find it helpful for homework and studying because I can now use the silent study zone if I want to study. However, if I want to hang out, I use the quiet study zone. The new designations of study zones work better than before, because it seems that people are now using the zones much more effectively. So quiet study zones can be used for group studying (for those that prefer this style) and people that prefer silent studying on their own can use that designated area.”

Inability to follow these guidelines result in being asked to leave the library. However, if police or other authorities have to escort you out of the library, your library privileges are suspended until the end of exams. These changes were made because of requests from many students for reduced noise and increased quiet study space. Students have provided feedback through comment cards, discussion groups, and numerous surveys. The ultimate goal of the exam study zone is to support students’ exam preparation providing a pro-study environment without disruption. Students are still able to book group rooms which allow them to have necessary conversations. One concern raised by first-year arts student Kate Caughell was regarding the available space in DC. “I think the set-up is a good

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photos by Michael L. Davenport

idea, but I think they need a larger silent study area because it is always full.” Another student, Alison Erb, a first-year recreation and leisure student, voiced the idea that if the DC does not meet your study needs, go somewhere else. “I like the new set up for the DC,” she said. “I like that there’s the option for something other than silent study, because sometimes I like to study in a group, and sometimes I’ll go to the SLC if I want to study in a more active setting, because the DC doesn’t always fit my needs.” Jennifer Haas, a library staff member, explained, “The exam study zone guidelines are not, in fact, new.  We have had guidelines for noise, cell phone use, and food and drink in place for several years.  During this exam period, we are working to raise awareness

of the guidelines and to apply them more consistently, creating a quieter environment in Davis to support students’ exam preparation.” Change is not always easy, and introducing it can be hard on everyone. Enforcing the guidelines can be a challenging task. Haas said, “For some students, applying the guidelines is a positive change, while others think it is horrible.”  Students who disagree with the guidelines have expressed themselves in a number of ways, e.g. submitting comments to the online feedback form (http://www. lib.uwaterloo.ca/dczone/feedback.html), filling out comment cards in the library, and, on occasion, some have taken the route of non-compliance and have been asked to leave the library.” Below are some of the responses from students.

Student Response

2009

Left, above: Signs designate quiet and silent study zones in the Davis Centre Library.

I have always gone to DC for the great big tables which are good for group work. If you want silent study go to Dana Porter. Keep DC for the casual study times, that’s why it’s used so much! Erin Roberts Environment and business, second year

wrote to berate a fly stuck in the window and a young man eating an especially noisy muffin). The point is: noiseophobes and quietophiles alike know where to go for quiet study areas. Let the humans have DC. As an aside: How likely is it that students used to the freedom of DC will be able to “snap to” this new policy? Ha! Is all I say. Ha!

that is when most students really need to crack down on studying. I think this should be implemented for midterms and exams every year. If the library is considering using this system year round, that would benefit people who actually come to the library to get work done. I hate when I come into DC and the main area is full of people watching movies on their laptops or chatting.

I am glad DC is finally starting to resemble a library where work can actually be done. I don’t think the partitians should ever be removed. If people want to have a “study party” and be loud, they can do it somewhere else — get out of the library where people need to study and don’t appreciate hearing your conversation about your life. We only have two libraries, and DP is notorious for being dead dead silent, so while I understand DC wants to offer a different setting, I don’t see its relevance for study purposes. Keep it quiet! Way better this way!

Tabitha Viscontas Psychology, third year

Ashley Wasylkiw ERS, fourth year

I completely agree with the noise restrictions. In the past, the DC library seemed to be used as a area to hang out. It seemed that many students went there to socialize, when libraries should be used for studying and work. I think that the large tables make the space inviting for students wishing to socialize. The large tables are also beneficial for group work, which I think it’s important because there is not a lot of space for group work in the DP library (other than level five and the private rooms); however, the noise level used to be ridiculous. It is also a very open space so when the noise level is high the sound carries. Maybe there can be a happy medium, though I can see that being difficult to achieve. It is also important to consider those student who need some background noise when completing work. I am the type of student who needs silence to focus, which I why I usually go to DP in order to study.

I think that the enforcement of quiet and silent study zones is a necessity in a library. Where else would students find a peaceful area to work when dorms, cafeterias, and the SLC are often noisy and crowded? The only problem I perceive is if the area for group work is too small to accommodate demand.

Julia Hawthornthwaite ERS, second year

2007

The Davis Centre Library was without explicitly enforced noise restrictions during the exam period of winter 2007. Also missing were noise barriers.

The new setup implemented at DC really sucks. Students shape a university, students pay tuition fees and students have assigned the Davis Centre as an area for social studying. It’s not like silent studiers have no place at DC — they just have no place at the tables. The tables are seriously the only place that gets a little rowdy and noisy. I’ve studied at the cubicles and the silent study rooms without a problem when I needed some quiet time. And don’t even get me started with the library monitors. I don’t know if it’s just me and the reputation I have with them, but a mere whisper seems to get a red flag waved in my face. How are you supposed to communicate with people and get questions answered? Do we now need to use weird hand signals and winks to say “I think (a) is the answer.” I don’t know. But I feel that would even be seen as too much of a disruption to Seargeant-I’mWatching-Every-Move-You-Make. Please bring the old DC back! And get rid of those stupid dividers — health and safety hazard right there. I nearly tripped face-first trying to get around one. Danna Sulaiman Knowledge integration, first year I think DC needs to be the library with no noise restrictions. We have DP, and it’s silent as the grave. Personally, I can’t study in DP. I feel like even my shoes are too loud (Recall the letter to the editor a while back written by an irate planning student whilst in DP. He

Kaly Manson Planning, second year I don’t think the noise levels at DC have changed at all. I usually study at DC throughout the school term, and the noise level during exams is the same as any other day. The tan boards that have been implemented are a big obstruction — it is a hassle to reach the free standing computers, as I have to ask people to push in their chairs to make space for me to walk. This just adds to the disruption. I think the quiet zone is a modest idea, however poorly implemented. More library staff need to monitor the noise levels and kick out students who are noisy. Warnings are simply not good enough. Emily Mei Environment and business, fourth year DC is often a loud library to begin with. People come to socialize rather than study. I appreciate the quiet and silent study areas for studying come exam time, because

Eva Mathieu Environment and business, second year

those cubicles only eight. Also those ‘walls’? What is the deal with those, they block out the natural sunlight and make it feel like a prison and aren’t even making it that much more quiet! Also, some of the librarians are abusing their power to silence people. There are people whispering and the librarians will rush over and tell them to be quiet, but when I’m observing this I can hear people on the other side of the library still. Sure they tell them to be quiet, but they are trying to make the Quiet Study into Silent Study. Also, their surveys are so biased and force you to say that the new changes to DC are a good thing! The first survey asked if DC was too loud and of course the people who think it is okay won’t say no, but it was those who are “annoyed” with the sound level that voted for the changes basically. It’s ridiculous, I know people who don’t go to DC anymore because of the weird new changes to the library. The whole idea of the library changing in the first place was a bad call and shouldn’t stick around for the whole term. Mike Chan Biochemistry, third year

It’s awesome that they have these quiet zones because the majority of the time the DC is constantly noisy with people passing through or being on computers, cell phones, etc. Now I can go and actually get a good couple of hours of studying in and feel better about it, rather than wasting time at the library that I could have easily wasted being at home in the first place.

I think the new changes have finally made DC a real library instead of another lounge to play DOTA, Counter Strike, or hang out with your friends. I think the outrage to the changes highlights the need for more student social space, which has basically been stagnant for years.

Emily Kunz Purser Enviroment and business, second year

Trevor Jenkins Management, first year

These changes in DC are absolutely ridiculous. The first problem is they took away the group study area that is supposed to be there. There are people who need some sort of noise around them (not coming from their group) to study and do work. So where will the people who group study in DC go now? MC? DP? No, because all of these places are so quiet already and if there was noise in these areas, those who did go to these buildings to get silent studying done will complain. If students want to do silent studying, they can go to the 10 floors in DP, three floors in MC, third floor SLC, the college libraries, three floors in RCH, and if you really want silent study, study at home where it is the most silent. Next, the layout has destroyed DC. There are “cubicles” in the middle of the library where group tables used to be and this actually has decreased the amount of space for students. Think about it, the two group study tables can accommodate about 12 people,

I think it’s dumb. DC was always the group study place and it was known that it would be a bit loud. If you wanted quiet study you went to DP or elsewhere. I liked the atmosphere of DC for studying and I don’t think it should be changed. James Servos Mechanical engineering I think this is a great idea. Quiet study space is at a premium on campus, especially during exam time. Plus, if people want to socialize while studying there are plenty of places both on and off campus where this can be done with their friends. Scott McKee Computer science, third year


Features

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009 features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

photos by Michael L. Davenport

Events at the grand opening of the University of Waterloo School of Pharmacy, which took place on April 18, 2009. Top: Pharmacy student Tara MacLeod shows children how to make slime. Bottom Left: Emily Lamantia answers questions about the pharmacy program. Bottom Right: Nick Vander Gulik explains a sheep’s lung to interested onlookers.

Michael L. Davenport

If you frequent the Peter Russell Rock Garden, you may have noticed this recent addition. The Non Existent Action Council at the University of Waterloo may be sending a subtle message regarding the current trends of apathy and uninvolvement in the student body.

Asians in politics

when east meets west

originally from entering civil service or pursuing a career in politics. Early Asian arrivals to North America were largely male migrant workers who had not intended to put down roots in the West and thus were apathetic about political organizing in the West. Those who did move permanently travelled to the West,

Centre, he would become the first Asian ever elected to a federal office. Since then a steady stream of Asians have been elected to federal office, largely from Toronto and Vancouver. In the U.S., Hawaii has sent the largest delegation of Asians to Congress with two senators and two House representatives. As a state with an

The loosening of immigration laws along with movements in civil rights and diminishing institutionalized racism opened the doors for Asians to participate in politics

tended to shelter themselves in insular ethnic enclaves to avoid discrimination. The lack of early political organization allowed laws such as the Chinese Exclusion Act to pass in both the U.S. and Canada. This effectively dwindled much of the Asian population making them a political non-entity until after World War II when immigration laws were loosened. The loosening of immigration laws along with movements in civil rights and diminishing institutionalized racism opened the doors for Asians to participate in politics. In 1957, Douglas Jung, a Chinese-Canadian was elected as a Progressive Conservative MP from Vancouver

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sians have been largely absent as a political force in North America ever since their arrival on the continent during the mid-nineteenth century as migrant labourers. This is a stark contrast to Asia, where the continent has been besieged by constant political activism and revolution in the last 150 years. However they compose only one per cent of the representation in the House of Commons. Why are Asians only a blip on the political radar despite East and Southeast Asians comprising more than seven per cent of the population of Canada? Various minorities groups have at times held significant sway in Canadian and American politics, from the Irish and German ethnicities that formed the backbone of urban Democratic voters in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Jewish politicians have made significant segues into Canadian and American politics despite comprising just two per cent of the population, including considerably shaping both domestic and foreign policies of the two countries. The history of Asians in North America like many other ethnic minority groups begins with marginalization. Overt racism and institutionalized discrimination prevented Asians

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Asian population of nearly 40 per cent, many of the past Asian congressmen have come from Hawaii. Despite a generation of Asians participating in politics, few Asians have ascended to high political offices. Gary Locke, a ChineseAmerican who was governor of Washington State and current Secretary of Commerce in the Obama Administration, is among the few prominent national Asian politicians. Chinese-Canadian Adrienne Clarkson was appointed to Governor-General of Canada. However, no Asian has ever ascended to a party leadership position in Canada, and no

Asian has ever been part of a national election ticket in the US. This should not be surprising though, as many Asians living in North America are first or second generation immigrants and have not largely taken to North American politics. Asians weren’t heavily involved in the civil rights movement and political upheaval during the 1960s and ’70s. Often times it takes several generations for groups to build grassroots movements to heavily influence beltway politics. Jewish-Americans and Canadians started off as largely non-political professionals and have come full circle to be a dominant force in North American politics despite their small numbers population wise. For Asians to move forward and assert their political voice in North American society requires first grassroots efforts into local politics. In the last municipal election in Toronto more than 30 Asian candidates ran for various political offices. It is here that a potential Asian version of Barack Obama is going to arise one day. A highly charismatic figure that goes far in national politics will go a long way to dissolving the political apathy of young Asians, and inspire them to a career in politics.


Arts & Entertainment

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009 arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Pete’s anatomy

of a female character

or not to write Steven R. McEvoy respondent

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his summer I am applying for a column here in Imprint. I am doing so for a number of reasons, but first and foremost is to expose my love for books and all things bookish. I am a book addict! I have bought books rather than groceries - I have stayed up reading all night even though I had exams or work the next day but just could not put the book down. I have sat in Chapters and read a book from cover to cover because I did not have the money to buy it. One such book Starbright, by Andrew M. Greeley, I read three times in Chapters before I had the money to pick it up. I would even put a book mark in it and put it in the back of the stack till my next visit. Yet what does all of that have to do with writing? You see I never expected to become a writer. I have a dual form of dyslexia and writing was never really an aspiration of mine. I never thought it would be even remotely possible. However a few years back, I was working as a zone lead in Chapters and developed some contacts in the publishing industry, and over time I started getting more and more free books, and getting them further and further before the books street date. The review copies are called by a variety of names: ARC (Advance Reader’s\Reviewer’s Copy), Galley Copies or Uncorrected proofs. I have received some of these as much as 8 months before a book’s street date. I have had publishers send me PDF’s of books because the ARC’s were not

even ready yet. I started writing reviews for publishers from which they would use excerpts in marketing campaigns. So I thought, why not try to publish in Imprint? I had not seen any book reviews in the paper for a while and each week in the arts section there were CD, DVD and movie reviews. Most major papers have book reviews and usually a weekly section dedicated to book reviews. Then in May 2006 I published my first review in Imprint. Since then I have published almost 130 articles, and about 120 of them have been book reviews. Over my years at the paper my involvement has been up and down some terms, depending on how much I was on campus and other life events — having two children, being injured at work, surgery and more. Yet Imprint has remained a central part of my life, and my identity both as a UW student and as person. I am an author. So this term I am going to try to expand my horizons. I am applying for a column in the spring term for the paper. The process of becoming a columnist at Imprint is as follows: write a letter of intent, outlining the title of the column, the focus and the purpose, and include three sample columns. Then at the first staff meeting of the term, the current staff and members who become staff by successfully achieving editorial board status vote on the concept and determine your fate. If you already have a column and you wish to continue it you have to reapply each term. If I am successful over the next four months you will read my reflections, confessions and predilections as a bibliophile.

Comics have historically used women not as round and developed characters but rather as mere plot devices.

artwork was drawn by female comic artist Pia Guerra. If you’ve got it comic-women flaunt it, but please just make sure our libido can keep up and stay in check. Today we live in a more developed era of comics. The underground and alternative scene of comics has made the medium accessible to everyone and not just for 30-year-old men living in their mothers’ basements. The scene’s even influenced the Big Two, which makes sense; many of today’s contemporary comic creators — both indie and corporate — grew up with similar influences that I had and are sharing them with the high-rollers. The influence hasn’t been

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a character to enjoy him or her in a story. The same is even truer in the case of a superhero comic where it ends up needing to be so in a visual perspective. In a way, that makes the design of most female superheroes reasonable. Here, it can be argued legitimately. However, if superheroines compared with their male counterparts, that’s where the controversy starts to be realized. Typically in comics history, women in superhero comics are in the lower level of the totem pole when it comes to their character roles. It’s nothing subtle, my friends. Comics have historically used women not as round and developed characters but rather as mere plot devices required for the male role to reach his goals. Either the women are struggling to get into the “big leagues,” or play on the whole “princess is in another castle” gag. If the women supers are scantily clad, then it’s a bonus, if not a requirement. Take a look at the website Women in Refrigerators (http://www. unheardtaunts.com/wir/index.html) and you’ll see how much of an impact these buxom babes have on both comics fan culture and the female public. Taking a look at Y: The Last Man is pretty strange. It’s a comic where every male creature on Earth dies save the protagonist, and women are on a mission to hunt him down like a witch. But as you read the comic, you may start to realize that each woman in the comic looks like they fell off of the pages of Maxim. This comic’s an odd one to argue for or against feminism, based on the message that is meant for the implied audience and the fact that the

ian

hat the world lacks right now is a sense of reality. By a lack of sense, I’m referring to the typical portrayal of women. Based on an odd twist of fate considering the premise of this column, comics history hasn’t been much of a help in the details of the female attitude either. After reading an article on Comixology (www.comixology.com) aptly titled “Feministsploitation” by Noah Berlatsky I was amazed at how much of a sex symbol a female superhero has to be visually. To start off, I will be one to admit that superhero comics aren’t my forte, but much of what came from Marvel and DC has influenced me greatly since I was a kid watching cartoons. As well, I try to keep up with the world that surrounds the culture, such as the evolution of the Comics Code Authority (CCA) system and how it’s affected the writing found in the Big Two of comics (Marvel and DC). The acceptance of non-stereotypical gays and lesbians in comics was a great move in my opinion, and it makes me glad that the world of superhero comics is still trying to grow. But there’s still a perceived need to make white-hot, smoking women in comics. Don’t get me wrong; I’m an avid fan of the female figure to the point where I should stop talking about it so I don’t get into trouble. But with the comic world’s over-saturation of skimpy-clothed women throughout the years, it makes it seem like that’s all there is to be a woman, and I know whole-heartedly that’s not the case. It’s a well-shared experience that most of us need to find something greatly attractive about

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ptrinh@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

great, but at least it’s improved the overall writing and creation within their works into something a bit more tolerable. At least the times have changed and so have the comicists. Sexy’s not a bad thing. Comics are one of the many mediums of entertainment that can do such a theme really well. Truth be told, I think sexy women should stay in comics. But I’d like to see more subtle approaches to a superheroine’s design: more on the cool factor and less on the hot factor. There are times I worry that the comic medium is so amassed with giant breasts, that I’m concerned about the medium’s backbone structure. Pun intended.

Book review

The 39 Clues – For Books 1, 2 and 3 Scholastic ISBN 9780545083423

During the last term in Imprint I reviewed the first three books of the new and unique series The 39 Clues. What makes this series so unique is the fact that seven authors are writing 10 novels to tell a single continuous story. In the series the Cahill’s family matriarch passes away. In her will she leaves one million dollars to each family member, or they can trade that money-order for a clue that will lead to the treasure that will lead them to become the greatest Cahill of all time. There are four branches in the family: Janus, Ekaterina, Lucian and Thomas. Each branch has its own strengths and weaknesses. Our story follows Amy and Dan Cahill, orphans who choose to take the quest. The adventure crosses continents and has clues hidden in art, architecture, music and more. The books teach much about historical characters, events and places. These cards supplement

the story, they are also used for online games to help you solve the 39 clues and the chance at $100,000 in prizes for solving the puzzles. This Card Pack supplements books 1, 2 and 3. There are 16 cards per card pack and a total of 55 new cards in these packs. Each card has a unique code used to enter it online, and add it to your collection to help you solve the 39 clues. The cards are great as collector’s items go. One drawback is that you cannot really trade them, because even duplicate cards have different codes and can be used online for game play differently. The artwork is great and the cards are fun and interesting. There are distinct advantages and disadvantages to how Scholastic is working these books and card packs. The concept of numerous authors writing a series together is great; it will introduce readers to a number of authors, and fans of some of the authors will be introduced to other writers. The online games are fun and interesting, the puzzles challenging and entertaining. The drawbacks that I see are: first the online game zones close down as each new book becomes available, and the online puzzles for the cards will end when the books finish. Now what I have read of the books so far is great and the books will stand on their own without the cards or online puzzles, but the online interaction definitely enhances the books and the whole adventure of it all. What I wish is that the daily prizes for each game zone end with the next book, but the zone stayed open for future readers to have fun with. That way the card packs would also have a continuing interest and market.

The books are great, the cards are well done and enhance the books and supplement the online game component. The fact that the cards and online is planned to have an end is disappointing. Even without the daily prizes and grand prize these add to the adventure of following Dan and Amy as they follow the 39 Clues. But be warned - they are addictive and you will want them all. As a side note it took me 6 Card Packs to get the one Ultra-Rare card for this first set, and yet I was still missing nine cards. — Steven R. McEvoy

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Science & Technology First Principles Aletheia Zoe Chiang reporter

“T

he first principle is that you must not fool yourself – and you are the easiest person to fool.”  These words, originally uttered by Richard Feynmen, constituted the theme of Dr. Howard Burton’s message to graduate students and aspiring graduate students on April 28 2009 at the University of Waterloo’s ninth annual Graduate Student Research Conference. Burton was billed coming in to the conference as the keynote speaker to talk about his new book, entitled First Principles: the Crazy Business of doing Serious Science.  The book itself, as UW student John Heil describes in his review (see below), is “an unconventional story of how the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics came to be, through the perspective of its founding executive director Howard Burton.” But the physics guru and author had a surprise for the many students, professors, friends, family, and curious community members who came for a chance to listen to — and perhaps for the opportunity to see/touch/speak to, in flesh — the man. “All my life, I have never been one to do what I am expected to,” Burton warned at the beginning of his talk, which took place early afternoon in Davis Centre room 1350. “So when my publishers told me to come here to talk about my book, naturally I decided that that’s not what I’m going to do.” Instead, the title of Burton’s presentation was this: “The Best Years of Your Life: An existence proof ”, particularly directed towards the students in the room. It’s an ambitious thesis, he admitted, but his qualification: that he “is now ‘an old guy.’”

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009 science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Wise Words from “an old guy”

In his eccentric “pep talk” for graduate students and for those considering the extended academic journey alike, Burton identified the five major excuses that students present when refusing to take the “long road.” To Excuse #2, “I’m not smart enough,” Burton indicated that, analogous to real life situations, one must learn to live with his limitations. “Along life’s journey, it is not uncommon for many people to find themselves among others who will grasp concepts quicker than they do,” he pointed out. “And that better not change. Because that means that you’re hanging around people who are smarter than you are.” In fact, Burton illustrated, good faculty recruiters at good academic institutions want to hire persons who are better than them and who know more than them. This, he said, is the only way an institution can advance. The two major advantages that students have are ignorance and youth. But, Burton emphasized, the more important term in the equation is the youth. Do what you love, he urged the young people, and do it now. Throughout his presentation, Burton’s refutes of each of the five excuses were flavoured with wit and humour, following a pseudo-scientific protocol (his official dismissal of Excuse #2, for example, was some eloquent phrase involving the word “hyperegosensitivity”). Thus the “inspirational conclusion” to Dr. Burton’s talk affirmed his original thesis directed towards students: you have no excuse not to maximize your research potential. Still, when asked later whether he feels he’s maximized his own research potential, Burton paused and gave a calculated response: “No.” He then followed by joking, “Just don’t start a Physics Institute. But most importantly, don’t

courtesy Kathryn King-Fedy

Author and Perimeter Institute founder Howard Burton signs a book for a fan at the April 28 Grad Student Research Conference. go to Wall Street — well, you can’t do that now anyway.” (In his cover letter to Research in Motion founder and co-CEO Mike Lazaridis nearly ten years ago, the freshly minted physics PhD had pleaded: “Please save me from a lucrative career on Wall Street.”) But Burton’s truthful and frank answer was a testimony to the notion that each person has his own portion to contribute, whether it is in the field of pure scientific research or not. In response to a pointed question from an audience member, he agreed, “Yes, I think you should use your brain for many things. In fact, I think you should use it for as many things as you can.”

His next book, he revealed, will treat the topic of the role of science in society. “It sounds mundane,” he admitted, “but it is based on the statement made in [President] Obama’s inaugural address [in which he said] that we would ‘restore science to its rightful position’...The question is then, ‘what is its rightful position?’” But to be able to understand the answers to all of these important questions, he revealed to us the secret: buy three copies of his book. Howard Burton’s newly published book, First Principles, is available for a very reasonable price at the UW Bookstore, as well as in most bookstores everywhere.

The Biggest Garbage Bin:

Earth Itself

S

pring is here, summer is so close we can already feel the warmth, and classes are done (for some of us). When it’s not raining, everyone is out enjoying the sun. This means going to beaches, enjoying the company of friends in a park, and eating lunch and studying outside. As well as patios. Oh how I miss a beer on a patio while the sun sets. We get so caught up in enjoying the warm air and sunshine that we forget what all of these things have in common: we always having some sort of disposable drink or other item in our hands. We go to parks with lunches, grab ice creams and frappuccinos from any parlour that has them cold enough to give us shivers, and we always finish them before we make it home or near a garbage can. First response, chuck it. The world is huge, one last little piece of garbage won’t be noticed. Unfortunately, it is noticed. I don’t mean by the more environmentallyminded who go around looking for trash to clean up, but rather by everyone who walks through the park and sees the piles scattered around the bushes and along sidewalks. A friend of mine took a train to Waterloo to visit from Kingston recently. The first thing he mentioned (and he’s one of the least environmentally-minded people I know) was seeing the piles of garbage along the train tracks most of the way here. Litter is a basic problem that we have yet to solve. Don’t get me wrong, I as well know the massive amounts of “do not litter” ads and the “only cure for litter is you” posters plastered around the city. Even I ignore have grown numb to their messages, but that doesn’t make it any less of an issue. While an

thelferty@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

advertisement may become redundant, seeing the effects doesn’t. Most of us have gotten used to the sight of litter around campus and the city. It’s become just another part of the landscape that some of us are able to live with. It doesn’t seem to really grow to any unmanageable size, after all. That’s only the trash we can see. The trash that is only a few days or weeks old, or the stuff that doesn’t blow away easily. The rest is in landfills that are getting bigger. The vast majority is in an even worse spot: the ocean. Meet The Great Pacific Garbage Patch. It’s a continent of garbage floating in the ocean. As of now, scientists believe it is around twice the size of Texas. In some places, it’s as much as 90 feet deep of garbage. About 80 – 90 per cent of it is plastic, which will never completely degrade. Instead, it all breaks into smaller and smaller pieces which are taken up by even the tiniest of living organisms. This may not seem like a problem, but as it can’t be digested, it only builds up. Plus a lot of it is eaten by and kills wildlife before it can break down, as the process takes hundreds and thousands of years. This is the collection of all the world’s trash being blown across continents and countries, into oceans, and finally being swept into the spot where all the currents meet. There, this continent of garbage continues to build. The ocean isn’t the only place this garbage can be. It is also strewn across shores and even within human settlements. For those of you who watched the movie Slumdog Millionaire, all that garbage you saw in the slums that people were wading

through wasn’t fiction. That is only a mere glimpse of the amount of garbage these people live with — and in. The reason we can’t see the effects of our litter and believe it a small problem is because it is blown away elsewhere. Instead of our problem, it becomes the problem — and death — of millions of people and other life in many other places. Being in the age of plastics, this garbage will not go away even for millenia — if ever — after humans have left the planet one way or another. Recycling helps, but avoiding plastics outright (as much as you can, I do realize it is near impossible to cut them out completely) is the best way to do it. Cut out water bottles and plastic grocery bags. There are other cheaper, better alternatives. Recycling uses more energy and is generally not done because it is cheaper and easier to make a new platic bottle or bag. Unless you want your next swim in the ocean to be in garbage, I’d suggest making it a summer — and lifetime — resolution to hold on to any trash you may have until you get to a garbage or recycling bin.

armel chesnais

Arianne Villa staff reporter

Touch screens that feel like “real” buttons

Touch screens have always been cool — from the very beginning, when high-technology first started becoming mainstream, movies and television shows have always awed and amazed with their promises of projected keyboards and TV screens that interacted with the viewer. However, there was one problem with the touch screen: when you tap it, you can’t actually tell if you managed to tap it correctly without looking at it. This can be quite a problem since touchscreens are now predominantly found in GPS systems in cars — and thus become safety hazards, or on portable gadgets designed for people on-the-go — and so become annoyances. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University are developing a potential solution to this problem: touch screens with pneumatic pop-up buttons underneath that morph and are pressure sensitive. These new touch screens have the same versatility and functionality of a normal screen, but with the added bonus of giving tactile feedback to the user. This innovative system is still a workin-progress and is a bit too large for today’s the-smaller-the-better market, however researchers are not giving up and are excited about its potential. ­— With files from The Technology Review

The time has come for U.S. Science

On Monday, April 27 2009, Obama announced that he would aim to commit more than three percent of the country’s GDP to research and development in the hopes of allowing the U.S. to once again lead the world in technological innovation, such as it did during the space race in the 1950’s. That three percent of the country’s GDP would amount to about 420 billion USD. Obama plans to double the budget of key sciences agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, Department of Energy Office of Science and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology. He also announced the launch of the new Advanced Research Projects Agnency for Energy which would be dedicated to “high-risk, high-reward research.” “Science is more essential for our prosperity, our security, our health, our environment, and our quality of life than it has ever been,” said Obama as he addressed hundreds of scientists, researchers and educators in his speech at the National Academy of Sciences. “I believe it is not in our character, American character, to follow—but to lead. And it is time for us to lead once again.” — With files from Discovery News, and Yahoo! Finance avilla@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Science & Technology

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009

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Canada, accidentally abstinent alomako@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

S

o, I’ve been thinking. According contributes to further a) weight gain to the statistics on obesity, depres- and b) libido loss; and loss of libido sion, and lack of sex drive, North contributes to depression, which can America is a pretty shoddy continent to contribute to weight gain. As such, live in. Although the health care system the relationship between weight gain, significantly lengthens lifespans, if one depression and sex is cyclical, which is had to pick two words to describe a good because it’s clear what patterns good chunk of the living population, need to change, but it is challenging I’m sure the words “overweight” and because these patterns are potentially “depressed” would come to mind. And culturally or socially rooted. One thing to no surprise — according to Health is for certain, they didn’t pop up Canada and Statistics Canada, there overnight, so an express solution may were 11.6 million visits made to doctors be impossible to find. Even then, the across Canada concerning depression best way to deal with the issue is to in 2003 alone, at which point Canada’s become educated, much like you are population stood at 31,510,000. To doing now, and reconsider a lifestyle add to this bleak statistic, the 2004 as to maximize its potential. Canadian Community Health Survey Colette Bouchez from MedicineNet. (CCHS) found that 5.5 million adults com, an online doctor-led medical re(23.1 per cent of pop.) of Canadians source, agrees that cultural and social over 18 were obese, while another factors contribute to sexual self-im3.6 million (36.1 per cent of pop.) of age. She says cultural messages assure those over 18 were overweight. What people that, “No one bigger than a size do all these numbers mean? For start- six should be singing the siren song of ers, that North America is becoming sexuality.” I’m a size seven, and although sluggish and miserable as the rates go I’m “singing my siren song” through this up. If that doesn’t catch your attention, column, I can definitely relate to feeling depression may also be making the oppressed by the social norm of beauty overweight and obese 59.2 per cent and sexiness. I even get depressed about of the population over 18 sexually it sometimes, and start eating all things reclusive. Now, there’s an epidemic if crunchy, gooey, creamy, salty and fried I ever saw one. (preferably at the same time). Then I The reasoning behind my alarm is begin to inch toward size eight, and simple: excess fat contributes to a) de- wobble towards my bike. Not that there pression and b) libido loss; depression7/5/04 is anything wrong size eight — I’ve IMPRINT/2004GEN/rawbco© 12:42 PM with Page 1

been there and it does bring some joys, especially in the booty department, but in my case the pattern of sexual self-image + depression + weight gain is easily breakable. Unfortunately, for millions of Canadians suffering from excess weight and obesity, the pattern is much more stubborn. Back on scientific track, I can personally relate to how self-image can contribute to depression and binge-eating, causing further weight gain. Weight loss may contribute to negative self-image in some individuals, which can cause an episode of depression. As I mentioned with my anecdote, depression can cause excessive eating, causing further weight gain — and loss of libido. In 2000, the American Family Physician (AFP) publication released an article called “Depression and Sexual Desire” by Dr. Robert Philips and Dr. James Slaughter of the University of Missouri Columbia School of Medicine which reported a candid correlation between depression and loss of sexual drive. One of the studies they considered in their research stated that “more than 70 per cent of depressed patients had a loss of sexual interest when not taking medication, and they reported that the severity of this loss [is] worse than the other symptoms of depression.”

There are further physiological repercussions of weight gain on the body that can actually threaten a sex drive. For example, Dr. Andrew McCollough, director of sexual health and male infertility at NYU Medical Center in New York says that “medical conditions such as high cholesterol and insulin resistance [an early indicator of type 2 diabetes] do have the ability to impact sexual performance, which in turn impacts desire, particularly in men.” While there are widely available drugs to improve male sexual performance and increase sexual desire, high cholesterol and

insulin resistance are two conditions that “can cause the tiny arteries in the penis to shut down, particularly when vessel-clogging fatty deposits begin to form.” There is no simple solution to this widespread problem, but it is clear that the way out is through the buns of steel of the population. Nobody but you (not even your mom) can make you lose weight. And she shouldn’t — if you respect your libido, I urge you to shut off this computer and march outside. March on, my friend. March strong past the Dairy Queen. It’s the only way.

ian cutajar

hey, What happens after is your business. thurs - sat 9pm- 2am 667 king st w kitchener 571-9032

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Sports & Living

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009 sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

UW well represented at east–west bowl imprint intern

Michael L. Davenport editor-in-chief

UW McGarry

Boonstra photos courtesy UW athletics

’s Joel Reinders, Mike Warner, Patrick McGarry and John Boonstra have all been chosen to represent Waterloo in the seventh annual East – West Bowl, presented by Under Armour at the TD Waterhouse Stadium on Western’s campus in London May 9. Our Warriors will be playing on the West team, and kickoff for the 2009 game is set for 1 p.m. Selections for the East – West Bowl are based on which players the coaches believe have a chance of playing in the CFL. The majority of the athletes are draft eligible for the following draft year. UW football defensive coach Dennis McPhee explained, “The whole game is to give the CFL coaches a chance to look at the kids coming out of the next level for next year.” Priority is given to stronger players to represent their schools, then the delegations are filled out by positions needed. Normally there is at least one representative from each school, with most schools sending three athletes — but Waterloo was fortunate enough to get four of their players on the team. Last spring in Hamilton, the East team put an end to their five-year losing streak with a 25-12 victory at Ronald V. Joyce Stadium. However

this year our West team is feeling confident about their abilities to regain victory. McGarry told Imprint, “Last year was the very first year the East team has won since the East West Bowl was created six years ago, so it’s hard to say, but seeing the rosters of both teams I know our side has a lot of really talented players so I like our chances.” The East West Bowl showcases mainly CIS players who will be eligible for the 2010 CFL draft. Waterloo is very lucky to have two coaches (McPhee and offensive coach Joe PaoPao) who both have in-depth knowledge of football at both the university and CFL level. McPhee says their connections “absolutely” puts Waterloo players at an advantage of being noticed. McGarry told Imprint, “I have been lucky to have had them both coaching me up along the way and getting me ready mentally and physically.” The East side is composed of student-athletes representing schools from the Atlantic and Quebec conferences in addition to institutions from the Greater Toronto Area and Eastern Ontario. The West squad is made up of players from universities from GTA, Western Ontario and the Canada West conference. With the East West Bowl being a little more nerve wracking than regular season games it’s normal for the boys to feel some butterflies.

s ’ l o h r a W y And



Julia Gelfand

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McGarry is a returning East West Bowl player but wasn’t able to play last year because of injuries. However, he’s determined to prove himself this time around. “It’s a great honour and privilege to be named to the West team and I thank my coaches and teammates for getting me in a position to compete at such a high level.” McGarry continued, “It’s going to be tough with there being such a high level of skill at each position. The backups are equally as skilled as the starters but I love the competition and am looking forward to it.” Waterloo is proud of the four gentlemen who have worked especially hard to get where they are today. McGarry says, “Although it will be nice to get to know some guys around Canada, no one can replace or can compete to the hard working teammates that are also great friends to me back at school.” McPhee spoke well of every athlete representing our university. “Joel Reinders is an interesting story. He played a year of basketball before he decided to play a year of football. Mike Warner’s a Hamilton kid, he has a huge upside, he’s a very athletic offensive lineman. And extremely gifted. Pat McGarry might be the best football player on our football team. And John Boonstra might be the fastest kid on our team. They’re all hoping for a dream to come true.”

Warner

Reinders

OU AR R 1 E 5 A L MI M O NU S T TES UP

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Comics & Distractions

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009

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Joseph Tuka 3B Biomedical Sciences “I’m against fast food. Period!.” Mayar El-Khatib Grad, Engineering

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Kevin Chong, Jin Ding 5A CS,

Sudoku

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A

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R

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S

L

O

O

S

A

M

I

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17 19 23 26

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31

37 43

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38

27

34

S

A

M

P

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Z

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A

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47 50 55 59 61

E

T

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D

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U

20

29

V

M

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D

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24

R

A

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36

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R

R

K

E

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Y

57

E

D

U

E

U

M

P S

N

E

N

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N 52

I

22

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C

A

45

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53

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41

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49

42

C R

46

B

F

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A

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S

54 58

S

E

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40

14

V

A

I

A

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13

M

A

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25

O

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30

12

M

33

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39

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51

H

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21

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48

11

D

18

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44

10

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35

A

16

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56

9

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8

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7

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32

A

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28

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L

I

G

E

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T

R

O

U

S

E

R

S

S

O

G

G

I

E

S

T

60 62

5

9

7 3

9

5 2 4 8 3 6 2 1 8 7 9 9 6 1 3 7 1 2 5 2 6 8 1 3 2

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Just sign the sheet in the Imprint office (room 1116 in the SLC) and get a FREE DOUBLE PASS to see Lymelife at the Original Princess!

“Startling performances, searing dialogue and an archaeologist's sense of late '70s period detail” - Rob Nelson, Variety

KIERAN CULKIN EMMA ROBERTS RORY CULKIN JILL HENNESSY ALEC BALDWIN CYNTHIA NIXON

LYMELIFE MAY 8 TO 14

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55 465 PHILLIP STREET LOCATION ONLY

746-6893 LIMITED TIME OFFER


16

Comics & Distractions

LOOSE SCREWS

POSTSCRIPT

Imprint, Friday, May 1, 2009

GEOFFREY LEE & SONIA LEE

GRAHAM MOOGK-SOULIS

IMPRESSION, BY JIM & LAN

GUEST COMIC: A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE

PETER N. TRINH

RAJUL SALEH


Imprint_2009-05-01_v32_i01