Page 1

Impr int The university of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Friday, January 18, 2008

Beeswax and blood

the art of Paul Roorda, page 13

imprint . uwaterloo . ca

vol 30, no 23

Will the next PM be a Warrior? CBC puts Feds president on shortlist for Canada’s Next Prime Minister, page 10

Referendum on our radio Michael L. Davenport assistant editor-in-chief

It was “finally time to raise the profile of the station,” CKMS manager Heather Majaury was reported saying at the station’s 30th anniversary celebration last October. While it now appears she may get her wish, the upcoming student referendum on CKMS’ student fee (from which the station draws most of its funding) probably isn’t what she had in mind. The issue of this particular student fee was brought to the forefront at the most recent Feds council meeting January 13. Science councillor Sam Andrey introduced a motion that would put the CKMS fee to a referendum. The motion passed 17 for, 2 against, and 3 abstaining after a lengthy and multi-faceted debate. When student voters hit the polls this coming February to elect their next Feds representatives, they will also be asked, “Do you support the removal of the $5.50 per term fee for CKMS, the campus community radio station at the University of Waterloo, effective the fall term of 2008?” “My motion is not a judgment of the quality of CKMS,” Andrey said while introducing the motion. “CKMS will have the opportunity to defend themselves during the referendum by heading the No committee.” Any “defending,” however, must be done by full time undergraduates, as people who aren’t Feds members aren’t allowed to participate in referendum proceedings. This is a significant detail; several of the current CKMS volunteers are not undergraduate students but rather members of the community. There are a few reasons this issue was brought up now. First, according to Andrey, of the three external organizations that are funded by refundable fees (the other two being

Ryan Kane mans the helm during some of CKMS’ regular programming. WPRIG and Imprint) CKMS is the one students complain about the most. “I think it’s been a long standing idea that CKMS didn’t represent what students wanted in a radio station,” said Andrey. “I would say I got about five complaints without prompting, and once I got on the bandwagon of finding out if people listened to it, I didn’t get any support until [the night before the council meeting].” It was also pointed out during the council meeting that of the three fees which go to external organizations, the CKMS fee is the highest. The second reason is one of pure economics and logistics. Holding

referenda alongside Feds’ elections is cheaper and reduces the risk that a referendum doesn’t make quorum. (The “Yes” side of the referendum must receive a majority of the vote as well as at least 7 per cent support among eligible voters to be considered binding.) The remaining issue is somewhat more complex than the usual referendum on a refundable fee. Though all have different takes on the matter, councillor Andrey, Feds president Kevin Royal, and councillor Andrew Falcao have all confirmed that Feds has been playing with the idea of running its own radio station. Andrey said the idea went back a couple of months,

while Royal said the thought goes back a couple of years. Royal’s report to council this month read, “There is a long-standing concern from students that the service provided by the campus radio station is disappointing, and that Feds should consider cutting the financial resources allotted to CKMS on behalf of the student body. To that end...I think there is strong merit in a comparative analysis of what we could provide should the Feds choose to run its own radio station.” In response to Imprint queries, Royal said that Feds run radio is merely an idea at present and the referendum itself is a “student-led initiative regarding the accountability of [CKMS], which

Jenn Serec

is independent.” Falcao, who was the most vocal opponent of the referendum during the council meeting, remains apprehensive about Feds’ motives. “It may not be true and I like to think that it isn’t, but this issue can be interpreted as an attempt to pave the way for Feds Radio. It’s suspicious that in the last few weeks, and in president Royal’s council report the idea of Feds Radio has been brought up, and that this motion comes only a month after the passing of Policy 24, before it can be implemented.” See CKMS, page 5

Women’s volleyball team routs Lakehead Yang Liu sports editor

The women’s volleyball team has been perched atop the OUA west division all year long, including a 7-0 run to start the season. However, a tough, straight set loss right before the holidays to east division leader Toronto, was a bitter pill to swallow. The women Warriors have come back home to start the new year after a stretch of six grueling games on the road. “Feels good to be back home, the team is full of confidence and driven,” said head coach Gabriele Jobst.

After a long month and a half layoff, the Warriors began their 2008 campaign with a visit from the 4-7 Lakehead Thunderwolves. Showing now signs of rust, the Warriors quickly jumped all over Lakehead with deft passing and several major spike kills to take a commanding 12-4 lead in the first set. The defensive game too, did not seem to have deteriorated from the long layoff, as Waterloo would come up with several big blocks that killed Lakehead rallies. The Warriors waltzed to a 25-15 first set victory. The second set once again began

with the Warriors on a run, as they jumped out to a 6-1 lead. However, a few miscues and errant serves allowed Lakehead to close the gap down to one at 9-8. However, a very vocal cheering section in the stands energized the home team, as the Warriors pulled away with strong play at the net, creating lots of second opportunity spikes on offence. Bojana Josipovic brought the crowd to their feet with a spike kill over two outstretched Lakehead defenders to end the second set. Waterloo won the set 25-17. With the momentum firmly in the

Warrior’s court, the Thunderwolves came out in the third set looking visibly dejected which showed in their play at the net. The Warriors once again jumped out to a commanding 13-4 lead behind dominance at the net and several kills from their front court. The Warriors were put it in cruise control to win the third set 25-14 and the match 3-0. “Our passing and volleying were really good tonight,” said Jobst after the game. “Gaby [Lesniak] and Bojana [Josipovic] especially were great for us, but the whole team played great.” Josipovic led all play-

ers in the game with 14 kills and 15 points, while Lesniak had 10 kills and 11 points. Looking ahead, the Warriors have a showdown against the surging second place McMaster Marauders this weekend. The two teams will duke it out for the OUA west division lead at McMaster on Saturday. Coach Jobst, however, is not worried, “We’ll prepare for Mac just like we prepare for anyone else. I think we’re a strong enough team to get to the OUA finals.” yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


News

news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Former UW student files lawsuit Student blames UofT for botched transfer Taylor Schnaeringer intern

Adam Rogers filed a lawsuit this month against University of Toronto for $5 million, after a mix up at the Mississauga campus which took place in 2007. Rogers, who was a third year student at the University of Waterloo, requested a transfer to University of Toronto Mississauga campus where he planned to graduate. After applying for the transfer he received a notice of rejection from UTM informing him that he was not accepted. Soon afterwards Rogers received a letter from UTM’s Schreiberwood residence offering him housing that was only for current students. Rogers assumed that UTM had made a mistake and he had been granted late acceptance and subsequently planned his move to Mississauga. Rogers then signed a lease, which the residence took, then he, along with his then-pregnant wife Erica Rogers and their three children made the move. Rogers said that, “If my status wasn’t confirmed, they would have denied the lease and I would have said fine.” Upon arriving at UTM and being informed that he was not a student, he then filed a series of appeals for admission. After the second appeal was denied September 6, Rogers was informed that he and his family could

no longer stay in the residence. Rogers lost his full-time student status and his student loans, which were the main source of income for he and his family. Rogers said that he did not have enough money to move back to Waterloo and his family has been forced to live in poverty. Rogers protested the removal of his family in late September and was denied, the university then began the eviction process. During the eviction ruling the Landlord and Tenant board decided that the situation did not result from an administrative error. “The tenants [the Rogers] moved into a rental unit that is intended for student housing, knowing full well that the male tenant had been denied admission to the university,” the ruling argued. Rogers appealed the eviction again but was denied December 7. VP Internal and Services of the University of Toronto Students’ Union, Ahmad Kahn, supported Rogers and condemned the university for handling the situation the way they did. “The issue is not on whether Adam is a student or not. It is about the fact that the Rogers family has been put into an uncompromising situation by the university,” said Kahn. The Rogers have had their fourth child and are living off a small amount of income from the Child Tax Benefit and the charity of their

friends and family. Rogers has not paid the university rent because he says he cannot afford it. Erica Rogers said, “It breaks my heart when my children complain they are hungry, but I have to tell them we have nothing to eat. It hurts

me to tell them they can’t play in the snow because we cannot afford winter clothes for them. Why should our children have to suffer so dearly for the university’s mistakes?” The Rogers eldest daughter, who is five, cannot attend school due to their financial situation. Rogers has made an undisclosed settlement offer to UTM but has not heard back as of yet. Rogers told

press, “UofT and I have something in common. They do not want me here, and I do not want to be here,” he said. Director of marketing and communications for UTM, Jane Stirling, said that UTM could not comment directly on this case. UTM has until the end of January to file a defence. tschnaeringer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Yosef Yip

Campus conflicts spur Facebook groups Sarah Hewey intern

Of the online applications and social networking websites available to be used for political purposes, Facebook has proved to be a popular medium and tool for public outreach and availability of candidates. Outside of the federal and provincial government, student politicians running for positions with the Federation of Students here at UW have found a home in the new media. Facebook and blogging are coming to the forefront of the online race to generate popularity and nominate candidates. A quick search of “Feds election” in the University of Waterloo network on Facebook brings up 10 groups dedicated to nomination of candidates, support of declared runners and the process of the election. In fact, group “officers” have taken on a new role: that of current Feds members pledging their support to those running. Outside of Facebook, student blogs are springing to life with running commentaries of the electoral process and interesting speculation that can’t be found in the traditional media. In the past, Facebook groups and online activity have documented issues in and around campus, such as the still controversial U-Pass. Students lined up on both sides of the debate in their respective groups, the numbers of which have since dwindled, but over 300 students are still currently members of the three largest groups surrounding the debate. In the group “Vote No on the Bus Pass” over 200 posts were made on the discussion board. For those students in favour of the U-Pass, results and statistics from the culminating vote

were posted alongside the referendum question posed to all who were eligible to vote. This information being so readily available once again enforced to students on the “binding” nature of the U-Pass vote itself. Students on the opposing viewpoint posted various concerns and complaints in regards to the referendum question itself, namely, the issue of the non-refundable student fee being somewhat clouded. Another campus issue that warranted the attention of the internet was the long- ranging debate over the presence of fraternities and sororities on campus. Online discussion boards gave students a forum to discuss their discontent with the exclusivity and supposed humiliation surrounding on-campus fraternity groups. For those students out there still deciding whether or not to run for a Feds position time is running out. Nominations for the election close on February 12 at 4:30 pm. In keeping with the web-savvy elections of previous years, nomination packages for interested parties are available for all positions online at www.Feds.ca. Elections for undergraduate arts, environmental studies, mathematics, science and atlarge Senate positions are all being held from February 12 to 14, and at the same time students will be able to vote about the hot button issue of the CKMS referendum. The radio station referendum is also being thrashed out online with Facebook groups, mainly those against the proposed removal of the student fee. For students, Facebook and blogging has become an outlet, a forum in which opinions and viewpoints can be expressed in an open

Mackenzie Keast

and unthreatening manner. Also, the idea of unity and inclusiveness is an issue is not only appealing, but also increases awareness and speaks volumes to other Facebook fanatics. But does it work? According to Facebook, there are currently more than 61 million active users logging in on a regular basis, a number that doubles every six months. Currently, an average of 250,000 new registrations have

occurred per day since January 2007, with an average of three per cent weekly growth. Of those statistics, 28,709 members belong to the University of Waterloo network. With that number of individuals perusing the web, social networks are bound to grow, and people are paying attention. shewey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


4

News

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Campus and community events JANUARY 21

Monday 7:00 p.m. “Carbon Trading: Solution to Climate Change or Corporate Resource Grab” @ Arts Lecture Hall – room 116

Join us for a conversation with author Larry Lohmann about climate change, privatization and power. NAA-A0A0 BLACK

JANUARY 21

Monday 2:30 p.m. — 4:00 p.m. “Ref Works” @ FLEX Lab, 3rd Floor, Dana Porter Library

Learn to manage your references, create bibliographies quickly and easily, and format your paper in your choice of citation styles all with this handy and free web-based tool.

JANUARY 22

Tuesday 11:00 a.m. — 2:00 p.m. “Volunteer/Internship Fair” @ SLC Great Hall

JANUARY 22

Tuesday 3:00 p.m. “Meeting to form ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ referendum committees” @ SLC room 2134

JANUARY 23

Wednesday 12:30 pm —1:20 p.m. “Noon Hour Concert Series” @ CGUC Chapel

Volunteer/Internship Fair. The Noon Hour Concert Learn about a wide variety Show up to join either a series sponsored by the committee of volunteer and internship “Yes” or “No”Jan. 878118A01_FCB 09, 2008 University of Waterloo Muin order to help the student _N27493 opportunities inTD theCanada K-W Trust_Student Banking sic Department at Conrad body make an educated area. Register at Grebel University College 28_0018_N27493_A1_ST decision in the upcoming www.careerservices.uwaterpresents performances by loo.ca/about/VolunteerFair Federation of Students ref- local and international talent. erendum on the CKMS fee. These free concerts are preApplication.asp sented in the fall and winter terms and feature classical, jazz, world music, and contemporary works. Noon Hour Concerts take place on most Wednesdays, 12:30 to 1:20pm, in the CGUC Chapel.

JANUARY 23

Wednesday 9:00 a.m. — 8:00 p.m. “Engineering Design Project Symposium” @ Davis Centre

The symposium showcases the innovation and talent of our upper-year students in electrical and computer Engineering. Student design groups will be presenting prototype designs, poster presentations, and seminars throughout the day. Alumni and friends of the university are welcome to attend anytime during the event.

JANUARY 23

Bank with no monthly fee by getting a Value Plus Account for Students. For details visit tdcanadatrust.com/free

Wednesday 4:00 pm “The Reading Series at St. Jerome’s” @ STJ 3012

Join us for a reading by Tamas Dobozy from his latest book Last Notes and Other Stories (HarperCollins, 2005), which has been widely and glowingly reviewed. He currently teaches in the Department of English and Film Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University, in Waterloo. Admission is free.


News

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

CKMS: Station could lose funding Continued from cover

The notion of Feds starting their own radio station is somewhat ironic, considering the station now known as CKMS started out as a group funded by Feds. CKMS only gained bureaucratic autonomy from Feds in 1977 as a condition for being granted a broadcasting license from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunication Commission (CRTC). In 1978 the portion of the Feds fee which funded the station was rolled into its own fee, the fee at the focus of this debate. While students against the fee have pointed out that the CKMS fee was added without a referendum (something not possible today) and thus this will be the first time the entire full-time undergraduate body will vote on the issue, council at the time did vote in favour and undergrads provided a petition with 2,500 signatures of support. In a statement from Radio Waterloo president Bob Puersten, the $5.50 refundable fee makes up about 90 per cent of the station’s funding. The remainder comes “from several sources, including the general community, through various fundraisers throughout the year,” said Puerton, adding: “All community members at CKMS also pay a $15 fee individually for the privilege to become members. Students who pay their fee are automatically members of CKMS. “We are charitable corporation, meaning that we apply for grants from time to time to support various initiatives and projects, but this funding is not operational and is sporadic.” Puersten also said that although they do not subscribe to the Bureau of Broadcast Measurement due to cost, “[the] general consensus in the industry, I believe, is that a campus station in a college community of our size is that, given the general population of the area we broadcast to, we could have around 2,500 active listeners at any given time.” According to the CKMS website, “CKMS-FM will provide programming that is an alternative not merely for the sake of being different, but with the intent of providing a service to the community.” By and large, this mandate for alternative programming is set not just for CKMS but for all campus radio stations by CRTC. “The commission’s primary objective for the campus radio sector is that it provide programming differing in style and substance from that provided by other elements of the broadcasting system, particularly commercial stations and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). The commission considers that campus stations should add diversity to the broadcasting system by providing alternative programming in both music and spoken word.” Of the CRTC regulations, Puersten said, ”It is what this sector does. It is what campus radio is morally required to fulfill. It is the spirit of the entire endeavour ultimately.” Feds councillor Andrew Falcao was a vocal opponent of the referendum. During the council meeting he said that if the question as put to referendum did pass, the people who want to support the radio station would no longer have the means to do so. “If the vote does pass, those who don’t like CKMS will be speaking for everyone.” President Kevin Royal responded to this line of thought towards the end of the meeting, saying, “I think

Nikoo Shahabi

that if support continued to exist it shouldn’t be facilitated by a tax system but rather a voluntary donation system.” When Imprint solicited Falcao’s response to this position, he said, “From a theoretical approach I might be inclined to agree, but in a real world situation the removal of the CKMS fee would spell the rapid decline of the station, if not the outright death.” Feds councillor Justin Williams reluctantly voiced support for holding a referendum at the council meeting, citing concern that since the referendum was brought about by council and not by a student petition there was no “groundswell” to advocate the yes and no sides of the issue. However, both councilllors Andrey and Falcao have stated they know people interested in heading the Yes and No committees respectively. Also, “Join the YES Committee for the CKMS referendum” and “I support CKMS” groups have already popped up on Facebook. Hopefully in the coming month, students will see some good debate capped off with a firm resolution. mdavenport@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Teach English Overseas Intensive 60-Hour Program Classroom Management Techniques Detailed Lesson Planning Comprehensive Teaching Materials Internationally Recognized Certificate Teacher Placement Service Money Back Guarantee Included Thousands of Satisfied Students

1-800-779-1779 / 416-924-3240

www.oxfordseminars.com

=H7:K7J;IJK:?;I CWha[j_d]CWdW][c[dj

5


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Where are media’s Davids? Friday, January 18, 2008 Vol. 30, No. 23 Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editor-in-chief, Maggie Clark editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Ad Assistant, vacant Sales Assisstant, vacant Volunteer Coordinator, Angela Gaetano Systems Admin. vacant Distribution, Peter Blackman, Rob Blom Interns, Sarah Hewey, Taylor Schnaeringer Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Adam Gardiner president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Jacqueline McKoy vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, Alaa Yassin secretary@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Staff liaison, Rob Blom liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, Michael L. Davenport Lead Proofreader, Eric Gassner Cover Editor, Marc Kimmich News Editor, Travis Myers News Assistant, Marco Baldasaro Opinion Editor, Christine Ogley Opinion Assistant, Monica Harvey Features Editor, Dinh Nguyen Features Assistant, Cait Davidson Arts Editor, Andrew Abela Arts Assistant, Duncan Ramsay Science Editor, Adrienne Raw Science Assistant, Sherif Soliman Sports Editor, Yang Liu Sports Assistant, Olinda Pais Photo Editor, Jenn Serec Photo Assistant, Jamie Damaskinos Graphics Editor, Joyce Hsu Graphics Assistant, Yosef Yip Web Editor, Hoon Choi Web Assistant, vacant Systems Administrator, vacant Sys. Admin. Assistant, Peter Sutherland Production Staff

Chris Miller, Ashley Csanady, Tim Foster, Emma Tarswell, Megan Ng, Tejas Koshy, Guy Halpern, Chantelle McGee, Paul Collier, Jacqueline McKoy, William Chau, Veronica Zarentski, Dragica Stanivuk, Tracey McKenna, Prajakata Patil, Megn Ng, Chantelle McGee, Joanne Leung, Catherine Lau, Paul Collier, Matthew Wiebe, Brian Gashgarian, Scott Houston. Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may also reproduce the material commercially in any format or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has been distributed in an issue of Imprint, or Imprint declares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. One copy per customer. Imprint ISSN 0706-7380. Imprint CDN Pub Mail Product Sales Agreement no. 40065122. Next board meeting: TBA Next staff meeting: Monday, January 21, 2008 12:30 p.m.

When you hear the term “diversity” you might assume it’s being used in reference to a range of quantifiable cultural or intellectual perspectives. But when it comes to diversity in Canadian media, the term often refers to something more all-encompassing: a diversity of corporate owners. This distinction is integral to understanding new regulations put out by the Canadian Radiotelevision and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). Specifically, the CRTC recently banned individuals or corporate entities from owning more than two kinds of media outlet (radio, television, or print) in a single Canadian market. Unfortunately, a measure of confusion followed this story’s initial release. According to The Tyee, the CBC first reported that new CRTC rules stated, “any person or entity can only own two radio stations, television stations, or newspapers in a single market.” This announcement consequently met with a great deal of praise; alternately, its amendment (care of the Canadian Press) reaped tremendous criticism. Why all the fuss? Well, because there’s a huge difference between being able to own two media outlets, period, and being able to monopolize two types of outlet. This is the kind of difference, furthermore, that determines how well other forms of diversity — such as cultural and intellectual diversity — will thrive in Canadian journalism. And it’s a difference, for journalists, that prompts the question: “How much have we really learned from the history of media mergers in Canada?” Take, for instance, the plight of Vancouver, where CanWest owns both of the city’s print dailies, the Province and the Vancouver Sun, as well as the National Post, not to mention 12 of the smaller community papers. Oh, and CanWest has a one third share in the transit paper, Metro. And GlobalTV, the city’s top-rated station? Yeah, CanWest again. This is the same CanWest, by the way, that bought Alliance Atlantis last year, so even with Conrad Black out of the picture this media empire is doing pretty well for itself. Now, you might be asking if all this monopolization is necessarily a bad thing. Some companies argue, for instance, that such mergers are simply necessary in a changing media environment, where traditionally high profit margins are no longer

possible. But if this is true — if these mergers are really about “survival” — we shouldn’t see too many negative changes in terms of sheer product quality. Yet sadly, we do. In 2001, CanWest implemented a policy of uniformity in its metropolitan dailies, such that local editorial boards could not take local stances in their national editorials. Though the company was forced to withdraw this policy after heated controversy, CanWest continued to blacklist, censor, and even fire Canadian journalists for holding and covering differing perspectives on such issues as federal politics, Israel, and the Middle East. Then, in 2006, CanWest gave notice that it was pulling its ten daily papers out of the Canadian Press cooperative (a ten per cent loss of revenue for CP). And in November 2007, both the Vancouver Sun and the Province reported substantial job losses in conjunction with the outsourcing of traditional newsroom work to Hamilton, Ontario. And, as former editorial board member Charles Campbell told Adbusters, the Vancouver Sun in particular gained a reputation for having an “incredibly poisonous” news room environment. Sadly, CRTC’s newest media regulations will do nothing to correct this monopolization, or even to prevent future losses of ownership diversity across Canada. “There’s nothing new in this [regulation],” said Lise Lareau, Canadian Media guild president. “This essentially embodies the status quo.” What then are we, as students, to make of this issue? Entering a social climate still worn thin from the reign of Conrad Black, it’s almost discouraging to see the future of media and telecommunications made so vulnerable to corporate take-over and control. What happened to the age of empowerment? Of technology at last granting us an equal footing and means of broadening our outlook on the world? Whatever happened to each and every one of us being Time magazine’s “Person of the Year”? Yet just in the Waterloo community, I wonder if we’re much better off. Certainly, we have many media outlets, but how dominant or intellectually diverse are their relative stakes? In my January 4, 2007 column I said that Imprint is “dangerously comfortable as the reigning student voice,” and I meant it. If anything, the upcoming CKMS referendum — and how few students know they even

have a campus radio station — just emphasizes this point: students aren’t using all the media outlets available to them to promote the kind of discourse an intellectually vibrant community needs. Then there’s the matter of the Gazette, the UW staff, student, and faculty paper replaced by the Daily Bulletin in 2003, with markedly reduced forms of content and no means for on-site discussion. From what corners of the campus can we hope to hear what professors and other UW staff have to say about on-going projects and university issues? How can we foster change from within if we aren’t even talking effectively with one another? Are we really expected to outsource all of our idea-building to business interests in the surrounding community? Moreover, when innovation does take root in the community it often seems to stem from previous Imprint staff: the online blog, www.atuw. ca, is the brain-child of past editor-in-chief Tim Alamenciak, while community alternative paper Versus was spearheaded by long-past editor-inchief Sandy Atwal. Even The Boar, an emerging UW arts and humanities magazine, arose from the preparatory work of long-time Imprint volunteer Ashley Csanady. These initiatives are by no means lessened by their ties to Imprint (and their successes certainly make for a great hook: Volunteer at Imprint, then change the world!), but are they enough? And what do these initiatives say about the campus community? Surely Imprinters aren’t the only ones knowledgeable enough to fill the gaps on campus — so where is everyone else? To this end, I look forward to the CKMS referendum, as well as the on-going development of FedsPulse. Will either outlet succeed in renewing campus and community discourse? For that matter, will the aforementioned projects by past Imprint staff? Because if we aren’t using other forums for discourse effectively, the worrisome explanation is that we truly are content with one or two voices representing the whole of campus life. And if that’s the case I have just one final question: In light of how Canadian media is faring on the whole these days, are we really prepared for the consequences? mclark@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

letters to the editor

Had a reaction to one of our articles, editorials or columns? Write a letter to the editor at letters@imprint.uwaterloo. ca I recently heard that my favourite Imprint comic, “The Search for Intelligent Life,” was cancelled because it was not funny enough. I am disappointed that the newspaper has decided to cancel the strip for this reason. As an Imprint fee-paying student, I feel that the student population should decide what is funny, not a small group of people. Humour is subjective to the reader, and it is clear that the staff at Imprint do not have a very good sense of it. Now I get to read one-celled comics like “Postscript,” containing a pig, a priest, and a dialogue that makes sense to no one. After apologizing to my retinas for absorbing that atrocious visual, I decided to ask some random people sitting in the SLC for their opinion on the comic. All of the ten people asked, each varying in race, age and gender, disliked the comic. Why would a paper for the students be printing items that the majority of students do not care for? I will be boycotting Imprint, and encouraging others to do the same. The current staff has strayed far from Imprint’s mission statement to “provide University of Waterloo students with the opportunity to learn and gain practical experience in an open and rewarding journalistic environment.” I’d say that one student, Alexander Gurevich, has been subjected to a cruel experience in a closed-minded clique.

GEOLOGY/GEOPHYSICS PETROPHYSICS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS COMPUTER SCIENCE ENGINEERING: CHEMICAL/PROCESS PROCESS CONTROL MECHANICAL CORROSION & MATERIALS PROJECT/FACILITIES MINING

Innovation is a way of life at Shell. We

Great training you can take for granted –

operate at the leading edge – not only in oil,

along with real responsibility. And within

gas and chemicals, but also in renewables

our global business, there will be many

such as wind and solar energy.

opportunities to match your aspirations.

But technical leadership begins with technical

So if you want to achieve more in your

expertise. Which is why we work so hard to

career, get together with Shell. You can

attract and develop people like you – today’s

make your online application right now –

talent and tomorrow’s leaders.

just visit our careers website.

Shell is an Equal Opportunity Employer www.shell.ca/careers

—Mike Sopinka

Re: Feds pass motion for online student fee refunds, Imprint Volume 30, No. 22. In your article, it states Feds president Kevin Royal said Feds has no power over society fees. This is a bold-faced lie. When I served as president of the environmental student society in 2005/2006, I was required to submit a budget to Feds VP admin and finance Renjie Butalid in order to obtain my funding cheque from Feds. Kevin Royal, please stop lying to students. —Angela Freeman

Dear Sherif Soliman and Adrienne Raw; I am a second year science student here at Waterloo, and generally a fan of Imprint. I was, however, very dissatisfied with your recent article titled “Organ Donor Outrage” under the Science section of the January 11 edition. First off, this article clearly demonstrates a bias undermining Health Canada’s standpoint (patient safety) - a respectable student newspaper would not include such biases in a section labelled “Science”. Furthermore, the article is riddled with misleading information. Firstly, 10 per cent of the population is not generally recognized as gay - Dr. Alfred Kinsey published “Sexual Behaviour In The Human Male” in 1948...this report indeed indicated that 10 per cent of males were predominantly homosexual. Recent research (relative: still over 40 years ago) by the U.S. Department see LETTERS, page 8

Find it

The right career direction

7


8

Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

letters Continued from page 7

of Health and Human Sciences indicates that the number is somewhere in the range of 2 to 3 per cent, albeit the MSM population will be slightly higher than this. With any minimal amounts of effort put into research, this mistake could have been avoided - and thus less misleading. The article mentions “information on this issue is lacking...interested citizens seeking clarification find almost no solid information.” It took me approximately 15 seconds to find a website with an abundance of

information on HIV and HIV testing. Any half-educated citizen and almost certainly the majority of the university’s population would also be able to type “HIV testing” into Google and read for themselves why the MSM population is excluded from organ donation. From the point of infection, HIV has a latency period before it can be detected by any modern testing procedures. This is clearly the reason why the extremely high-risk for HIV MSM group should be excluded from donating. Imprint is generally regarded

as a source of reliable information, which obviously helps our student population form opinions. It makes me sick to think that there may be people out there that have been wrongly persuaded into thinking that the gay population is again being treated unfairly by Health Canada. When writing articles, especially when not included in your Opinion section please take five minutes to actually find credible sources of information (this does not include “many online blogs and websites.”)

Pursue Graduate Studies at Western Plan to attend The University of Western Ontario Engineering & Science Research Showcase Date: Friday, January 25, 2008 Place: The London Convention Centre Time: 11:00 - 3:00 p.m. Take the opportunity to talk to current students, researchers and academics who are leaders in: • Materials and Nanotechnology • Environment and Energy • Computing and Information Technology • Biology and Biomedical Sciences • Fluid Mechanics, Mathematics and Modeling • Infrastructure and Natural Disaster Mitigation

REGISTER TODAY: www.uwo.ca/sci/Research_Showcase

—Reed Siemieniuk

Greenhouse gases: one policy Controlling g reenhouse gases (GHG) requires decisive, hard action. Despite consensus in the scientific community, halting and reversing the climate change trend is proving to be a doozy of a problem. It’s an issue with implications that stretch over decades and centuries rather than the months and years that usually guide the hand of politicians. Regardless of what you may think of Ontario’s schizophrenic weather patterns, effects of global warming won’t be felt by most of the world in the shortterm, a fact which makes some of our elected representatives (notably those of the Conservative stance) reluctant to force the economy to comply with regulations that might slow its growth, shrink the job market or make it less competitive internationally. Fears of an economic slowdown led the previous Liberal government in Ottawa to refrain from meaningful emission reducing action until 2005; almost eight years after the Kyoto Accord was created, while the current Conservative government openly states it’s preference for a “made-in-Canada” solution rather than continuing with our Kyoto obligations. Even under the Liberals, it would be nearly impossible for Canada to meet its original targets of reducing GHG emissions to six per cent below 1990 levels by 2012. The Indonesian island of Bali recently played host to the 13th Annual United Nations Conference on Climate Change, from December 3 until Dec. 14. The purpose of the conference in Bali was to lay out a framework for what the global strategy to combat climate change after 2012, the date set by the Kyoto Accord for a new stage of reductions. On December 15, the assembled countries agreed on the “Bali Roadmap,” a plan which sets in motion two years of negotiations before a more binding document is created in 2009. During the negotiations, Canada was cut-up both internationally and at home for its inflexible stance and blunt prioritizing of short-term economic impacts over the risk of irreversible environmental change. Led by federal Minister of the Environment, John Baird, Canada’s negotiators doggedly held on to the idea that any future mandated emission cuts would apply equally to both developed and developing countries, an argument that found little support outside of a small group of countries including the United States, Saudi Arabia and Japan. Obstinate as our representatives were, both they and the United States agreed in the dying hours of the conference to a watered down version of what the EU and other major players originally wanted. The document affirmed the need for strong emission reductions to combat climate change, maintained that there would be different expectations for developed and developing countries, promised funding for reforestation and climate change mitigation projects in the developing world and advocated increased sharing of efficient technologies. Despite sustained resistance from Canada, it also stated that developed

nations should reduce emissions 25-40 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020, although that target is currently non-binding. Canada was derided during the conference for its stubborn insistence on universally applied goals and its refusal to commit to hard targets for emission reduction. In the lead up to the conference, the chair of the Nobel Prize winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change criticized Harper’s government for their inaction. According to Rajendra K. Pachauri, “[t]his particular government has been a government of skeptics. They do not want to do anything about climate change.” During the conference, the Climate Action Network, an organization representing over 400 environmental organizations world wide, awarded Canada and the U.S. jointly with the “Colossal Fossil Award,” for doing the most to impede progress on developing climate change solutions. The argument that developing nations should not be held to the same standard for emission reduction as developed nations has merit; while China is second only to the US in emission levels, it is vastly lower on a per-capita basis. Many critics also argue that it’s fundamentally unjust to tell all nations to reduce the same amount when the developed nations have already had free-rein to industrialize without restrictions, essentially leaving those in the developing world to help pay for mistakes they didn’t cause. However, the fact remains that although China may have low per-capita levels of pollution, it still accounted for 18.8 per cent of carbon dioxide emissions in 2004 according to measurements undertaken for the UN. If climate change is going to be meaningfully addressed, it must be a truly global approach. Rather than excusing developing countries from the rigors of emission reduction, developed nations should be working to accelerate the transfer of efficient technologies to those who need it most and provide funding for implementation. Nations which are still industrializing can benefit from this state of transition by using cleaner technologies from the ground up, rather than expensively retrofitting. If the international community makes funding, expertise and technology available to developing nations there is no reason why emission restrictions can’t be universal, albeit with more flexible timelines. Although it was at times an ugly spectacle, there’s something to be said for the persistent refusal of the Canadian delegation to agree to concrete targets until firm strategies are in place to reach them. While inaction obviously carries its own risks, there’s no point in agreeing on emission targets that we likely won’t reach, as we did with Kyoto. The first stage of Kyoto has resulted in two things for Canada, one good, one bad: we’ve lost our sheen as a progressive policy leader on the international stage, but with any luck the high profile media coverage will galvanize a new push for viable climate change solutions. ghalpern@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

9

Gay.com: C U @ my place 2nite? So, you’re a creep who wants to hook up with a stranger for some nameless man-on-man sex. Unfortunately the late ‘70s are long gone but lucky you, there are still plenty of people out there on the same track as you. But wait, aren’t bathhouses considered passé? Enter Gay.com, the bathhouse of the new millennium, there to service all your notell needs. Even cruising for anonymous sex has gone digital — no more bathroom stalls or city parks for you! Billed as a “social networking” website, the San Francisco (where else) based company is ranked among the top 3,000 sites on the web for traffic, which is no small feat. To give people the impression that there is more to the website than hooking up with randoms, there are also sections devoted to entertainment, news and other fluff. What’s that you say? You need more help? Well, let’s go through this step by step, shall we? With just a few clicks of your mouse you can have someone else’s genitals in your mouth in no time at all! First thing, you’ll have to think up a snappy screen name that will catch the eyes of all the other males online. The trick is to try and cram as much information about yourself into the name as possible. Try to highlight the fact that you are young, supple, open to anything and available right now. Some possibilities are “18_KW4unow6969,” “fun_young_hung” and “luv2suk19.” If you’re still feeling uninspired throw in a “boi” or “twink” to round things out. You also have the opportunity to post a photo. You’ll probably notice later that the trend amongst chatters is body shots ending at the neck, face pictures with bars over the

eyes and straight up cock-shots. Of course, these types of photos are completely understandable. I can only imagine how their wives would react if they were found on a gay chat site. The next step is to enter the chat room for your location. Gay.com’s chat is broken down so that every major (and minor) city in North America and most of the free world has its own room. That’s right, even our very own Kitchener has a room. Make your grand entrance and wait a while. If no one has sent you a private message in the first 15 seconds you should probably check your internet connection. Now you’ve got your first bite, but don’t take it as any sort of personal compliment. The man you’re chatting with is most likely an overweight slob in his 40s with a wife and kids who counts any orifice on your body marginally higher than a hole in the wall. A typical Gay.com greeting isn’t any derivative of hello, it is “STATS?” Short for statistics, it means he wants to know the dimensions of your body and dick. Don’t be shy! Share your height, weight, hair and eye colour and penis length with a complete stranger. If you like what you’ve seen and heard from this person so far it’s time to discuss what you each are looking for. You or the person at the other end of the line might be looking for something very specific. If you aren’t sure what you might like or if you’re a pig who prefers a smorgasbord of sexual acts, be sure to tell your new friend that you’re into “sucking, fucking or whatever.” Remember, there are a lot of sickies out there. Oh, and I almost forgot: be sure to get a new first name

IMPRINT Publications, UW

IMPRINT, the University of Waterloo student newspaper is hiring an Editor-In-Chief for a full-time 13-month contract position beginning March 1, 2008. You will train, manage, motivate and lead a volunteer staff and ensure the print-to-press quality of all content. Must have strong organizational skills, be familiar with Adobe CS2, photo editing packages, layout and design skills and experience with Unix/Linux networks. Interested candidates should mail or deliver resume, clippings and a cover letter to: IMPRINT Publications Hiring Committee Imprint Publications 200 University Ave., W. University of Waterloo, Student Life Centre, room 1116 Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 Deadline is Friday, February 4 at 4:30 p.m.

chen-chen

before you hook up. Finally, be prepared to host since his wife probably doesn’t allow him to have people over while the baby is sleeping. And there you have it, pulling tricks is as simple as that with

the marvels of new technology! Be sure to tell all your friends to sign up for the lukewarm sexual experience of a lifetime. tmyers@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Features

features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

The next great Prime Minister?

Paul Parkman reporter

Kevin Royal is putting his experience as president of the Federation of Students to use on a national level after making the cut on January 10, as one of ten top finalists in this year’s Canada’s Next Great Prime Minister, a contest hosted every year by the CBC. Royal was voted into the top 10 of 144 contestants, ranging in age from 18-25 from all across Canada. Each contestant had to submit a video running under five minutes on YouTube describing their hopes and visions for Canada’s future political sphere and how they would attain these goals on a national level. Royal spoke about a strong sense of community in the Waterloo region, a focus he pursued with his response to the first contest challenge, which required that contestants put their ideals into action. “Being able to give back is very positive — it gives you a chance to practise what you preach,” said Royal in an interview with Imprint. For his challenge response Royal created the Kevin Royal TIE Scholarship, which will be given out over the next four years to a public school student in Waterloo region who shines with regard to technology, innovation, or entrepreneurship. “I’m very idealistic,” said Royal. “Politicians generally raise money solely for their own campaign expenses, but in this contest [my fellow contestants and I] are working for others.” In a pointed spin on the stereotypical political barbecue, Royal recently held a free event in December to raise funds for a future scholarship, matching every dollar raised for a final total of almost $800.

Asked about his inspiration, Royal noted UW president David Johnston and Tim Jackson of Tech Capital, as well as Waterloo region on the whole. “I moved to Waterloo five years ago and was absolutely inspired” said Royal. “When you see people living and preaching the ideals of entrepreneurship and innovation, you can’t help but get excited.” Throughout Royal’s audition video he walks the UW campus talking about technological and intellectual growth and development within the Waterloo community. “Waterloo has become a bastion of intellectual thought, great ideas and great innovation,” said Royal. “Waterloo should absolutely inspire Canada as much as it has already inspired me.” The top 10 contest finalists will be cut down to eight before being sent to Toronto for a series of debates and discussions that will decide the final four. If Royal gets voted as one of the four finalists he will appear on the national CBC program, to be aired March 23. The program consists of a debate between the other finalists, all of whom will be fielding questions from a yet-to-be named panel of former Canadian Prime Ministers held before a studio audience selected from different demographics of Canada. Speaking of his current standing in the competition, Royal commented that he is “very satisfied” with his success to date but added, “If I get into the final four, I know I’ll win.” The winner of the contest will be voted in by the studio audience using hand-held voting machines, and receive $50,000 for the honour. The other three finalists will each receive $5,000. In Royal’s official YouTube statement he notes that one of his ideas

for the contest is “an unprecedented investment in research and technology in Canada.” Royal goes on to say that with help from the Canadian government, he believes that “Canada can be a world leader in the knowledge and intellectual economy.” Royal’s strong video submission has been the primary factor for his

success in the contest so far, but he has also proven himself in follow-up video responses, answering questions from viewers, journalists, and politicians alike. No stranger to Facebook, Royal has also used the social networking site to spread the word about the contest and his work in it. Royal is especially positive

about the changing expectations both this contest’s philanthropic challenges and use of new media espouse. “We have to be hopeful for the future,” said Royal, in regard to heightened expectations for a new and more engaged political generation. “We have some serious problems with the environment [and] with education that need to be addressed. If we don’t, who will?” More information about the contest, including Kevin Royal’s audition video and links to discussion on other candidates can be found at www.cbc. ca/nextprimeminister.

Yosef Yip and Chen Chen

Pushing the limit—no room for fifty-fifty UW female athlete of the year roots her success in the inspiration she draws from her friends and family Cait Davidson assistant features editor

Strong, robust, able-bodied, competitive and spirited. In today’s society, these are all synonyms for an athlete. So what is an athlete? Since last year at the University of Waterloo, the female definition of an athlete was defined by the name Diane Kelly. As a Warrior team player, Kelly became captain of the UW women’s rugby team in her third year at the university. In the April, 2007, athletic banquet, she was awarded the 37th Female Athlete of the Year. Part of her accomplishment was credited to her success at leading the rugby team to victory. As noted in the UW Bulletin last April, the UW women’s rugby team won silver and bronze in the Ontario University Athletics (OUA), and in the fall of 2006 placed fifth in the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) championships. This wasn’t the end of Kelly’s accomplishments in rugby though. This summer she played on Team Ontario for rugby and was able to travel across the country facing different teams. Kelly also travelled to Vancouver for a Team Canada training camp, and was a member of the team that went to Minnesota to

compete against Team USA. She was also chosen as an all-Canadian rugby player in the CIS, making her one of 15 women athletes to be chosen in Canada. Currently in her third year as captain of the UW rugby team, Kelly trains with her younger sister, Lisa Kelly, during her her off-season. Also a student at UW, Kelly’s younger sister is also a captain on the Warrior’s rugby team. One of five children, Kelly is the second oldest child. Having an older brother who plays rugby, Kelly was encouraged by him to try out for the sport in high school. Having a great coach, and an awesome team, Kelly excelled at the sport, and was “hooked.” The fast pace, physical demands as well as the decision making abilities that offer creative freedom on the field encouraged Kelly’s involvement in rugby. The camaraderie of the sport is well known and is a perk and a challenge to the players. “I am close with all the girls on the team. It is a nice support system” said Kelly. The rugby season at the university level is only two months long, and there is often a high turnover of players, due to injuries and graduating girls.

Being really competitive herself, the sport was a stress reliever and forced Kelly to be more focused in all aspects of her life. When asked if rugby ever affected her academics, she replied that her marks were better during the season, than they were in the off-season. She continued to say that when she had two hours before practice to do an assignment, she wouldn’t procrastinate and would get her work finished. While rugby is one of her priorities, Kelly mentioned that school takes priority, and the training schedule and games forced her to become a more accomplished multi-tasker. Kelly also mentioned that she was less likely to go out at night, and became more focused overall. The pressure and responsibility keep her motivated, as well, if she’s capable of pushing herself, she said, “Why not?” As well as training with her sister during the off season, Kelly is involved in other campus recreation events including Powder Puff football. Training with her sister in the off season, allows her to help her sister succeed in the future, after Kelly graduates in April. Kelly is currently in her 4B semester of the science and business program. After she graduates she hopes to pursue a career in pharmaceuticals.

courtesy UW Athletics

Diane Kelly rushing the defense — giving rugby her all. She mentioned that sci/bus allowed her to appreciate the economics of pharmaceuticals and understand the chemistry behind it. After her five years at Waterloo, including a so-far incredibly successful sports career, the Warriors will feel the loss when she graduates in April

2008. From what is seen so far, this accomplished student will most likley continue to make UW pound in the future — outside of her universty career. cdavidson@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Features

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

11

Hitting the books without hurting your budget

the

All it takes to save some serious cash on books is a little foresight: you have to plan a little ahead so that you can have your books shipped to you with enough time to not commit academic suicide through the term. tool to gain empowerment, replenish your dignity and save money, than the internet. The one caveat of buying textbooks online is that it all comes down to timing. Don’t fall victim to “evaluating” the course in the first week or two before deciding that you really want to buy the book. Additionally, don’t even try to convince yourself that the one or two copies of the text on reserve in the library will be sufficient. They won’t. Those books are likely on a three-hour hold, can’t be borrowed, and you’ll have to compete tooth and nail with all the other students in your class, and possibly other sections of that course as well. All it takes to save some serious cash on books is a little foresight; you have to plan a little ahead so that you can have your books shipped to you with enough time to not commit academic suicide through the term. I’ve found that searching a week or two before the start of the term gives ample time.

And with that, here are two fantastic online resources to help you on the textbook hunt:

www. Addall.com If you can’t find your book using this site, it probably isn’t being sold online. Period. This reliable site will compare the prices of your queried books across some 40 online book retailers, from the big guys (including Amazon and Barnes and Noble), to smaller, more specialized operations — including a feature that searches EBay auctions. You can compare every possible factor that you’d ever need to make your purchasing decision, short of a review of the book itself: the book’s price, shipping price, order processing time, shipping time estimates and condition. You can even search in a number of different currencies. Most impressively, Addall goes the extra mile and will list prices in ascending order, starting with and highlighting the cheapest copy. Can we get married?

UW Distinguished Teacher Awards

www.Books4Exchange.com This site is also near and dear to my heart, even if the name is a little misleading. What’s really nice about this operation is that the bookseller is a fellow student, not a faceless business that couldn’t care less about how much you pay. In light of this, prices can be surprisingly low, if not completely reasonable (often at 75 per cent or less of the retail value). The for-students, by-students philosophy means that many textbooks are located in and around university towns in Ontario, so shipping may be incredibly reasonable and faster than expected. There must be tons of online textbooks sites I’ve missed, due to space restrictions. Feel free to send me your favourite sites, and any textbook success stories you may have. Until next time, keep those fists tight!

cte.uwaterloo.ca/awards/

Without a doubt, the most intrusive and frustrating financial evil faced by students is the price of textbooks. Despite the fact that we’ve been through the process time and time again, it is an inevitable shopping trip that never ceases to leave our jaws dropped. When it becomes commonplace for a single textbook to cost $100 or more, we can spend the price of a course’s tuition just on textbooks alone. Perhaps the most frustrating aspect of textbook shopping is that students are often quite powerless in the face of influencing textbook prices. There’s no room for bargaining or sob stories. The textbook publisher doesn’t care if you will have to seriously alter your diet and nutrient intake over the next four months in order to pay for the text. You either buy it, or you don’t. And if that wasn’t bad enough, the sad truth is that in a few months down the road, a new edition of the text will likely be published for the same high price. Even the resale value of your huge purchases is out of your hands. As we’re often caught in the perpetual ebb and flow of being poor and being really, really, Kraft Dinner-club-pack poor, we have every reason to want to find our books with a little bit of money left over, to say nothing of our dignity. Fortunately, there is no better

To nominate your outstanding Instructor contact: Centre for Teaching Excellence MC 4055 Ext. 33857 Nomination Deadline: First Friday in February

isherr@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Introducing our

Bachelor of Education Program

“Our focus is to fully equip teacher

candidates to become faithful educators who can professionally engage the diversity of learners in today’s classrooms.

—Dr. Carla Nelson, Director of the Bachelor of Education Program

A unique, 12-month program that will prepare teachers for certification from the Ontario College of Teachers in the Primary/Junior (Kindergarten to Grade 6) and Junior/Intermediate (Grade 4-10) divisions. Limited enrollment of only 70 students.

www.tyndale.ca/university/education education@tyndale.ca / (416) 218-6757 / 1-877-TYNDALE

Toronto’s Christian University


12

Features

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Asian cheese, if you please Cheese and tofu can be considered distant cousins. They are related because they share similar production methods by way of coagulating milk. Cheese is traditionally made from the curds of cow milk and tofu from soybean milk. There are a variety of tofu textures available, from silken to extra firm. Texture is created by the degree to which producers’ press the curds into blocks. The more pressure placed on the tofu, the firmer the texture becomes. At one end of the spectrum we have silken tofu which is very delicate, custard-like and creamy. It can be used to make puddings or puréed to make soups. Regular tofu can range from firm to extra firm. These tofu varieties are perfect for slicing and dicing and they retain their shape well. Firm and extra firm tofu can be used to make nondairy cheesecake, scrambled tofu, or crumbled into salads. When you modify the production process of tofu, you end up with a different product with a unique taste and texture. For instance, by fermenting tofu you end up with pickled tofu and stinky tofu. The former exposes dried cubed pieces of tofu to aerial bacteria. The cubes are then soaked in brine and will take on the taste of its soaking liquid, which can include vinegar, salt water, Chinese rice wine

and sometimes chilli peppers or sesame oil. The latter has a strong foul odour, but tastes delicious when fried. What gives this soft tofu its distinctive smell is the fermentation process during which it sits in brine composed of amaranth, mustard leaf, bamboo shoots, and at least 10 different types of herbs. We come next to flavoured tofu which can include peanut, almond, mango, and strawberry. It is created by adding sugars and fruit acids. People enjoy it as a cold dessert or blended into smoothies. Egg tofu, a popular savoury item, is made by adding whole eggs to soymilk during the coagulation process. The resulting item is packaged in a clear tube. This yellow-tinted soft tofu can be sliced and enjoy in hotpot dishes. Fried tofu has a distinctive golden yellow colour with a hollow pocket on the inside; the frying removes the moisture content. It has a dry texture and can be enjoyed with sauces or cooked in hot pot dishes. Finally, when you freeze tofu you end up with thousand-layer tofu and Japanese freeze-dried tofu. The former looks like a sponge with many tiny holes created by the freezing process. Freeze dried tofu is suitable as a snack or can be reconstituted in soups and broths. The freezing pro-

Tiffany Li

cess is actually done the traditional way by placing thin slabs of tofu on bamboo trays and allowed to freeze overnight outside. In the morning, the tofu is tied up and left to sway

in the wind to allow the water to evaporate. The tofu then undergoes the “aging process”, which is the point where the tofu’s flavours are concentrated with another round of freezing until completely dry. Tofu is sometimes referred to as “the cheese of Asia” and with its origins stemming from China, it is no wonder that it weaves a solid culinary tradition throughout the country as well as many other East Asian countries. North Americans, for the most part, have not really integrated tofu into their diets. Aside from vegetarian and vegan hubs, you don’t normally see it on menus, despite the fact we know this food is extremely healthy for us and have a

Fried Coconut Tofu Noodle Bowl 8 oz egg noodles 1 medium onion 1 tbsp canola oil 1 large garlic clove, chopped 2 tsp red-curry paste 1 (14-oz) can unsweetened coconut milk (do not use low-fat) 1/4 cup water, 1 tsp salt 2/3 cup soybeans

desire to incorporate more into our mealtimes. The problem is that most of us are mystified by how to prepare and cook it, particularly making it taste good. This recipe will alleviate such concerns because it screams with flavour. Discerning tastes will adore tofu once they try this dish. This tofu wears a crisp coconut layer that gives way to a moist and tender interior. Tofu’s nutritional profile reads like a great book. It is a star performer because it is low in calories, an excellent source of tryptophan, a very good source of manganese, iron, protein, selenium, and a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, just to name a few. tli@uwaterloo.ca

2/3 cup sugar snap peas 3/4 cup baby bok choy 1 cup shitake mushrooms 1 tbsp fish sauce 1/3 cup unsweetened flaked coconut 2 tbsp all- purpose flour 2 tbsp cornstarch, 4 tbsp canola oil 1 (14-oz) package extra-firm

water-packed tofu

Cook noodles in a pot of boiling water, 7-8 minutes for al dente and drain. Meanwhile, cook onion (diced) in oil in a wide 4-quart heavy pot over moderately high heat, stirring occasionally, until pale golden. Reduce heat to moderate, then add garlic and curry paste and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Stir in coconut milk, salt, and 1/4 cup of water and bring to a boil. Stir in vegetables and return to a boil. Cover pot, then reduce heat and cook at a brisk simmer, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. Simmer curry, partially covered, until vegetables are tender, about 3-4 minutes. Add noodles to coat. Remove pot from heat and stir in fish sauce and salt to taste. For the coconut encrusted tofu: Get a shallow dish and mix coconut, flour and cornstarch together. Cut the tofu into 8 rectangular pieces. Pat the tofu dry with a paper towel, sprinkle with salt, then press sides of each piece into the coconut mixture. Heat 2 tbsp oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 4 tofu pieces and cook until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side, adjusting heat as necessary to prevent scorching. Transfer the tofu to the rack-lined baking sheet and place in the oven (at 350F) to keep warm. Heat the remaining 2 tbsp oil in the skillet over medium-high heat; cook the remaining tofu pieces until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side.


Arts Local colour, blood and rust arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Anya Lomako staff reporter

Every time I get the luxury of seeing artists in their studio, I find myself foolishly hopeful to find them there with dirty, greasy hair and eyes glazed over with creative thought, hands covered in specks of paint. In this and only this, Paul Roorda disappointed me. He appeared at the door with a kind, welcoming smile on his face, looking quite normal. But I think any man with three busted beehives hanging in his studio should not have to wear his creativity on his sleeve. And like Roorda said, “Artist is a definition one decides for themselves,” and my archetype has no right affecting any artist. Paul Roorda’s mixed media collection, Where the Pages Once Were, is a mosaic with meaning. It intricately explores and challenges the value of traditional, ritualistic religious experiences in the face of contemporary spirituality. Contradictory and radical, the story of this collection begins in its roots — the materials which deserve as much attention as the subject matter. For this collection, Roorda focused on using natural materials saturated with symbolism to produce artifacts that reflect our ties to nature, religion and history as well as question our separation from them. Both the materials and methods of application are chosen to reflect the repetitive, meditative quality of traditional rituals. Among others, Where the Pages Once Were includes wine, gold, tea, smoke, beeswax, handmade paper, flowers, earth, stones and other religiously themed materials. However, Roorda says it is difficult to find permanent colours when using natural materials in his work: “I had to try and find a way of getting a stronger red — and that’s a trickier thing to find when it’s organic,” he explained, referring to his search for the perfect material to extract red dye from before finally settling on blood powder. Just like blood, beeswax is a recurring, symbolic material in the collection. Firstly, the application of beeswax is a repetitive process, and the end product both protects and preserves the paper. Secondly, it works to give the paper a translucent character, “revealing, protecting and preserving at the same time.”

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

The role of beeswax in Roorda’s work is contradictory, as is his approach to art. In comparing his work to more institutional modes of expression, such as academic writing, he said, “in university writing, you have to come to conclusions, and in my artwork I have the luxury of not coming to a conclusion but to keep asking more questions, to play with contradictions and ideas that have multiple meanings.” This statement embodies Where the Pages Once Were, where sacred bible pages serve as frames for manifestations of its passages through organic ingredients. This way, the distance between people and sacred materials prevalent to traditional religious values is removed, and the sacred object becomes a more active representation of religiousness. Previous to this collection, Roorda contributed to University of Waterloo’s 50-year anniversary by completing a mixed media work titled “Fifty: Upholding Imagination” to mark the occasion. Roorda says that in composing this piece he wanted to present a work that could “deal with history in an institution and the idea of knowledge.” This piece consists of 50 envelopes with encyclopedia excerpts and visual fragments to represent the diversity of faculties at the University of Waterloo, prints of which were presented to the 50 alumni chosen to receive the 50th Anniversary Alumni Award. By the end of the interview, I began to see the clear resemblance between Paul and his art; just like his work, Paul is a man of complex meaning, containing a multitude of identities I could distinguish from seeing him for only an hour; I could see a hint of father, husband, teacher and artist all flourishing in one individual. In short, his collection explores the contradition familiar to humanity on an individual and collective level — the place of tradition in our lives. Paul Roorda’s collection, Where the Pages Once Were, is on display at the Kitchener Rotunda Gallery located inside Kitchener City Hall as part of the artist-in-residence program. Month-long exhibitions are open to the public free of charge and the gallery functions 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. on Sunday. For other collections, visit Paul Roorda’s personal website, www.paulroorda.com. alomako@imprint.com

courtesy of Paul Roorda

Paul Roorda’s showing, Where the Pages Once Were, is on display at the Kitchener Rotunda gallery inside Kitchener City Hall. The mixed media pieces shown here are “Key and Nails (Detail)“ in the upper right, “Genesis and Apocalypse (Detail)“ in the lower left, and “Mark (Miracle)“ in the lower right.


14

Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Movie Review

Dance to this Boney M’s 1978 hit “Rasputin” off in combination with the voices of band’s disarray and seemingly unspecitheir album Night Flight to Venus is a Liz Mitchell and Marcia Barrett. In fied copyright laws. This means that disco classic. If you haven’t heard this turn neither Bobby Farrell or Maizie after 1990, theoretically, there could song there is a good chance you were Williams recorded any of Boney M’s be four bands touring under the title sheltered as a child. It topped charts Music. However, all members were of Boney M at the same time. Let’s in Germany, Austria and Australia and said to perform their own vocals live. hope that in a similar action courts will reached number two on charts in the Although a quick search of Boney M’s also grant each member of those four UK and Switzerland. It also became live performances on YouTube may touring bands the rights to Boney M so that, in due time — if the process well established in North America raise some suspicions. A search on YouTube will also of splitting-up and rights distribu— check it out. “Rasputin” provides a crude reveal why Boney M has been such tion continues — Boney M will have late-life biography of the mysterious a success. Try searching “Boney M- enough members to form a country Russian man named Grigori Rasputin. Daddy Cool.” If you’re lucky you will and perhaps even join the United Historians explain that Rasputin was a find the live performance in which Nations. I don’t want to get carried monk and medicine man that healed Bobby Farrell is wearing what appears away, but if this were to happen there the hemophilia of a boy named Alexei to be a woman’s white blazer (minus is a good chance the world would who was son of Tsar Nicholas II, an undershirt) with white sultan pants find peace in the music and dance emperor and autocrat of the Russians. similar to Aladdin’s in the Disney of Boney M. On October 13, 2007 After providing this service BBC News ran a story — one that had been hard ...“Rasputin” is a song that which explained that the to come by — Rasputin country of Georgia (on bonded with the family and could fit into your next party the boarder of Russia) had gained advisor-like status that resulted in him having playlist. However, if your party hired Marcia Barrett, one of the original Boney M mema strong influence in the bers, to perform a concert politics of Russia. Apparbranches away from Russian in a village near the heart ently this worried the wrong history and more toward of the troubled country’s kind of people and lead to BBC quoted a gang killing of Rasputin slightly humorous sex appeal, battlegrounds. Georgian President Mikhail in 1916. Saakashvili’s explanation There is much uncertry Boney M’s “Daddy Cool” of the idea behind the tainty about Rasputin’s concert. He said, “We hope religious involvement, his sexual relations and his death. Mak- movie Aladdin and a necklace with that we’ll lure out people from their ing his life all the more interesting a dangerous animal’s tooth hanging trenches, force them to drop [their] to read about and evidently to sing from it. It’s a sexy performance. One Kalashnikovs, come here and dance that illustrates the sort of talent that with the others and understand that about as well. Boney M, the brainchild of Ger- got Boney M on tour in the USSR nothing is as nice as peace, nothing man music producer and songwriter despite the government’s ban on songs is as nice as reconciliation.” Peace induced by the sounds of Boney M. Frank Farian was originally comprised like “Rasputin.” Throughout their existence Boney How about that. of four members: Liz Mitchell, Bobby Like much of Boney M’s music, Farrell, Maizie Williams and Marcia M has gone through a number of Barrett. The all-knowing Wikipedia alterations by adding and removing “Rasputin” is a song that could fit into explains that the Boney M sound of members. In 1990 a court ruling your next party playlist. However, if R&B/disco was actually made up of granted each of the four original your party branches away from RusFrank Farian’s studio altered deep members the right to perform their sian history and more toward slightly voice as well as his high falsetto voice own Boney M shows because of the humorous sex appeal, try Boney M’s “Daddy Cool.” If neither are going to fit, try Boney M’s rendition of the African tune, “Malaika.” It’s a relaxed and happy song that can fit into many different social scenes. Whether it be for peace, love, or semi-accurate Russian history, there is a good chance you’ll enjoy one of the many songs Boney M has to offer. ktremblay@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

courtesy popmatters.com

National Treasure: Book of Secrets Jon Turteltaub Jerry Bruckheimer Films

Benjamin Franklin Gates and his energetic, resourceful team of treasure hunters should seriously consider a career in tactical espionage. The only thing less believable than the location of each subsequent clue is the relative ease by which they seem to acquire it. As the sequel to the 2004 hit National Treasure (the Bruckheimer treasure quest not involving pirates), National Treasure: Book of Secrets has our patriotically-named hero looking for more clues, avoiding more bad guys, and breaking-and-entering into increasingly implausible places. The Queen’s chambers? Piece of cake. The Oval Office? No problem. Suddenly, the lock on my door doesn’t seem so reassuring anymore. However, I must admit there is indeed something about treasure that makes history fascinating. For some reason I still remember significant amounts of American history, long after the mystery has been solved and the movie has ended. Are we so yearning of vast riches and materialistic fulfillment, or are we simply trying to satisfy the inexplicable hunger for adventure? While this newfound knowledge may only help me if I end up on an episode of Jeopardy some time in the future, I definitely won’t be forgetting it any time soon. Or at least until midterms.

Purchase a Student Discount Membership and get your movies for half price all term long!

Student Discount Memberships Available Jan 1 - 21.

As far as excitement-filled, puzzlesolving adventure movies go, Book of Secrets certainly does not disappoint. After having his great-great grandfather accused of being the main conspirator in the Lincoln assassination, Ben Gates is on a quest to not only find one of the greatest treasures hidden by the country’s forefathers, but also to clear his own family name. Things start to get hectic when another party interested in the treasure is hot on their trail. Forced for his family’s sake and enticed by his own craving for truth, Gates and his team are catapulted across continents and historic landmarks as time is running out. Nicolas Cage returns as the main protagonist, and while this may not be his finest work to date, he does give a noteworthy performance. If you thought being a treasure hunter in this day and age is practically and financially ridiculous, he could probably make you think otherwise. Also worthy of mention is Justin Bartha, playing the role of techie/hacker/computer guy and Ben’s trusted friend Riley Poole. His witty one-liners and antics are sure to draw a laugh, and help to relieve the constant tension being built up throughout the movie. And with big names like Jon Voight, Helen Mirren and Ed Harris rounding off the list, you can expect quality performances all around. Even though much of the novelty is worn off from the first movie, it has proven that it is still exciting to watch and worth the ticket price, topping the box office for three weeks straight. You can catch it in theatres for about one more week, so hurry. — Rajul Saleh

GOLDEN GLOBE WINNER: Best Original Song NOMINATED FOR 7 BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION AWARDS! BEST FILM, BEST DIRECTOR, BEST ACTOR, BEST WRITER, BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR AND ACTRESS, BEST SONG RATED 14A

INTO THE WILD

Sat & Sun: 4:00pm - Tues: 6:30pm Wed & Thurs: 9:00pm

6 Princess St. W., Waterloo 885-2950 www.princesscinemas.com


Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

15

Conventional comic contraptions When I was a little kid around the age of seven, I grew up with good ol’ Disney animations and Looney Tunes. Naturally, I was always jealous of the characters in the shows. Every time Road Runner zipped through Wile E. Coyote’s boulder-paintings of road tunnels, it

made me want to do that. And I almost tried it, too. Of course, being very much afraid (and sane), I always stopped just before I touched the wall. I love it when a comic or cartoon can implement a really good gag or if an artist/writer can express a unique

sense of humour with even well-worn tools. So I’m going to have a bit of fun this week and share some of my favourite comic motifs, as seen in the world of graphic novels, webcomics and cartoons. (Huh. Would you look at that? I actually used “comic motif ” in my column.) One particular form is the infamous bad pun. This being mostly a literary tool for comedy, it imbues the groaning factor of jokes, complete with witty (or worse, non-witty) phrasing, alliteration, and hyperbole. To those who’ve been reading Mike “Mookie” Terracciano’s Dominic Deegan: Oracle for Hire, you guys know exactly what I mean. Some of the ending lines on Mookie’s comic strips are just — well, it’s just so bad! Yet it helps to accentuate the humour extremely and the lines in the strip build up towards it. It’s jokes like these that make you pissed off at homonyms like “night” and “knight,” yet love them all over again. Another humour motif sometimes used in comics and cartoons is called “breaking the fourth wall.” Again, this may be very familiar to English, drama

and film majors. Imagine that a space within a comic panel is a basic room, the shape of a box, and the audience of the comic can see through one of these walls — the fourth wall — to the interior of the room. Breaking the fourth wall is when the characters in the comic are fully aware of their audience and their own, fabricated existence. This can manifest in very drawn out dialogue, or it can be a simple stare at the audience in the last panel of a page from all of the characters, after they’ve realized they said something out-of-character. I’ve used this method a couple of times myself, having my characters actually talk to me face-to-face, knowing full well what they are. Of course, I’m not the first to do this. Greg Dean’s Real Life (www.reallifecomics.com) does similar, except he usually writes himself as three personas: Greg the character, the actual Greg (making his dialogue come out from the panels as if he’s an overseer), and Greg’s real-world avatar within the comic (the same method I mentioned using). A concept such as this can draw humour and dialogue between characters from all directions. One more concept is something

called “hammerspace”, or “magic satchel.” This device relates back to my envy of the road-tunnel painting; it’s the absurdly infinite space that a character uses to contain objects that would usually not fit in the container, such as a pocket or a purse. The term hammerspace refers to the common use of animated characters drawing out 50-foot mallets out of random containers, such as a change purse or a bag of groceries. This overdose of suspended disbelief is effective for making characters seem more lively and outstanding. Tons of cartoons come to mind, especially Warner Bros.’ and Steven Spielberg’s Animaniacs. Wakko’s gag bag was one of the best things in the cartoon (except for the historical jingles). You’d be amazed how original oldhat techniques can be in the right hands. (And it helps when you haven’t seen them in a while.) I’ve mentioned this before, but it bears repeating: the method may not be original anymore, but the method for using that method can still create an entirely new concept. ptrinh@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

STUDENT SPECIAL! JOIN TODAY!

3 MONTHS FOR

204!

$

*

Lose Weight, Feel Great & Live Longer! GoodLife makes it all possible.

1-800-597-1FIT or visit goodlifefitness.com 01 18 08 �

SUBJECT TO CLASSIFICATION

*When joining, you will be required to pay $204 + applicable tax. Membership expires 3 months from date of purchase. Must be 18 years of age or older and show valid student ID. Platinum and platinum plus clubs excluded. Offer ends January 31st, 2008. Other restrictions may apply, see club for details.


16

Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Gaming companies go for the green Final franchise-ity, super merchandising and world of ware-craft We’ve all fallen victim to the marketing ploys of our favourite industry brands. Even without more incentive than the product itself, we consumers have a tendency to believe that if a company makes one thing great, everything else they produce must also be great too, and our purchases reflect that mentality very well. In gaming, one aspect of this trend is commonly known as “fanboy-dom” and can result in blind allegiance to any given producer, game maker, or even series to the point that the consumer may not even know the purpose of their obsession anymore. While this is an extreme case of what I’m trying to get at, we all have our fan-boy moments, and those moments are what industry businessmen market towards. There are three big culprits who take advantage of our need to fill the merchandising gap left by non-gaming (or in some cases, our obsession with playing), with gaming-related paraphernalia: Square Enix (Squenix), Nintendo and Blizzard. Squenix, in all its glory, has built a huge following from its classic and long running series and standalone titles, such as Final Fantasy, Kingdom Hearts, Chrono Trigger and Dragon Quest. While adoration may be deserved from this RPGgiant’s video games, what should be analyzed closer are the marketing tactics. The obvious point here would be to make light of their wide range of collectible plush toys, key chains,

necklaces and other various trinkets. We all know that Mario Party CVII is for a little piece of childhood. On the note of grasping wallets, However, something more unique probably inevitable at some point in that comes to mind is their general the future, but I’m sure most of us can one of the most multi-dimensional attempt to pull game elements out agree that Nintendo needs to broaden culprits in the franchising game these into the real world. To help kick off their gaming horizons to encapsulate days is definitely Blizzard, most nothe release of Final Fantasy XII, as more than what a little red plumber, tably with their line of purchaseables well as to help further franchise prof- green elf-boy or mechano-suit wearing for World of Warcraft (WoW). For its, Squenix released a line of energy gal can offer us. Unfortunately, one the sake of simplification, let’s negate drinks based on the most common of the biggest things that helps keep the fact that subscribers to WoW pay “potion” vials from the game itself. Nintendo on this seemingly never- a monthly fee to even play the game This collection of bottled gaming es- ending cycle is the meaning behind after their initial purchase, since this is sence includes drinks titled “potion,” their product. Nintendo sells nostalgia the case in most MMOs. Instead, what “elixir,” “ether” and other memorable to those who have grown with it and Blizzard really excels at is their marketing of products in the real world potent potables. Coupled with a that tie into the game itself. With media campaign (www.youtube. com/watch?v=BG0gm_hdu5I) ...there will always be incentives of receiving special loot or items in the actual game, WoW’s that depicted people who drank the drinks performing tasks one people looking to revisit merchandise flies off the shelf into hands of those hoping to win would normally experience in Final their youth, allowing the the MMO lottery. On the simplest Fantasy, Square Enix’s ploy is a good example of how to mix an easily new ways for Nintendo of these levels lies the World of Warcraft trading card game. While recognizable aspect of gameplay to grasp onto our wallets a game unto itself based on the into a marketable product. MMO predecessor, the card packs Another really successful franfor a little piece of purchased for this game also have chising company (though arguably a chance to contain a special loot overdone these days) is Nintendo. childhood. card that can offer an extremely Over the years, this nostalgic rare item to the lucky person who producer has developed so much merchandise that chances are any item those that are new to it, a playful yet finds one. Not only is this incentive that you think of to buy has Mario, almost familiar (thanks to their mar- enough to purchase the cards, but Link or some other immensely popu- keting) realm to indulge in. While the add in the additional game they can lar character’s face on it — and I’m fluffy Kirbys continue to line our walls develop, and the fact that any found sure we can all think of quite a few and various genres of Mario games loot cards could lead to real world ridiculous examples of this even from continue on our shelves, it cannot be money through EBay due to their rarour own experiences. While they have denied how well Nintendo has caught ity, and right off the bat, Blizzard has been extremely successful at what us in its grasp. Though we may not us by the purse strings. More recently, they do, the flooding of the gaming constantly indulge in them, these Dell and Blizzard have also teamed merchandise industry by Nintendo is relics of gaming have infiltrated our up to offer a WoW computer (www. something that quickly feels overdone. hearts and thus Nintendo can never dell.com/content/topics/segtopic. really lose, since there will always be aspx/m1730_wow?c=us&cs=19&l= people looking to revisit their youth, allowing new ways for Nintendo to grasp onto our wallets in exchange

en&s=dhs&dgc=EM&cid=26383&l id=601037). Complete with its own array of rare loot, collectables and even a behind the scenes DVD of the making of WoW, this computer is almost a means of a euphoric high for true Warcraft addicts. Finally, one of the biggest and hottest topics in Blizzard’s franchising arsenal is their “Figure Print.” Give any player the option to have an action figure made of their very own in-game character and you have a recipe for increased game subscriptions and purchasing of other franchise products. All in all, with this scenario, Blizzard has effectively helped to create itself a bait and hook to keep rolling in the dough till the next big MMO can bring it down. Chocobo and Companion Cube plushies, Halo 3 action figures and novelty DS cases have all either graced our desks or our minds in one form of another in our indulgence of idolized franchises. Even if we deny their existence in our lives, there is not a single true gamer who cannot deny they’d love to have even just one piece of their favourite game’s merchandise. Nothing says gaming status like your very own plushie pet cactuar or 1up mushroom piggie bank, right? jrickert@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

live? o t lace p a r g fo n i k Loo

Look no further... Benefits from choosing WCRI: - Minutes walk from UW campus, - Lower than market fees, - On-site laundry and maintenance, - Regular organized social events, - And much more. Don’t miss out on a great housing experience. Apply now! Applications are accepted year-round. Seniority deadlines are always: - March 1st for Fall, - October 1st for Winter, and - February 1st for Spring.

WCRI: A whole new way to live together! Contact us today for more information or to arrange a tour. web: www.wcri.coop e-mail: info@wcri.coop phone: 519-884-3670 address: 268 Phillip Street, Waterloo

YoseF Yip


Distractions

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Crossword

1

2

3

4

5

14

Tim Foster

6

18

Down 1. Cervical cancer tests 2. Storage towers 3. Unreactive

Sudoku 2

21

6 1 5 2 9 5

2 7

25

35

36

Saw you dancing with your friends at Caesar’s on Saturday, I’m sure you saw me standing with my buddy off

12

13

26

27

28

29

brand our campus radio station CKMS.

32

What is a hip new name for the station?

39

41

42

40

43

44

46

47

49

50 54 59

60

61

48 51

55 62

52

57

63 66

67

68

69

34. Muslim god 35. Not “I am” 37. Becomes acquainted with 39. Mid-sized car 42. Hockey player Bobby 43. Considers 44. Deliver legal papers to 45. Religious officials 48. Donkey noise 50. Halts 52. Bone cavities 53.Vietnam war photographer Catherine 55. About the mouth 57. Fathers 58. Money dispenser 59. 21st Greek letter 60. Creative skill 61. Withdrawn from active service 63. Accountancy student’s goal (US)

“The Shit.”

Justin Andrushko & Tom Bruce 1B recreation and business and 4A arts and business

“Loo radio.”

Carina Francioso 2B fine arts

Jan. 11 solutions

Tim Foster

2

53

56

65

4. Height 5. Soft and light 6.Ventilate 7. String winder 8. Harmonious sounds 9. Jam, jelly, and honey 10. Golf ball stand 11. Irish militants 12. Make something go away 13. Cunning 18. System for finding survivors lost at sea by triangulating an explosive sound 22. Naval group 24.Yellow parts of eggs 26. Take a chair 27. Shawl 28. Strong chemical bond type 29. Stream 31. Nephew’s sister 33. Raises

by Mark Kimmich

45

64

1 8

You have been commissioned to re-

37

tfoster@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

9

9

7 9 1 1 2 2 4 8 9 8 6 5

Missed Connections My name is Alastair Lahtinen, I am broadcasting on all AM frequencies. I am a survivor living in Waterloo. I haven’t seen another person in three years. I will be at the SLC great hall every Friday at 1PM in a red sweater with a rainbow. If you are out there, if anyone is out there... I can provide food... I can provide shelter... I can provide security. If there is anyone out there, anybody... please... you are not alone.

11

22

31

38

8 3

6 9 3 5

24 30

34

10

19

23

58

9 16

20

33

8

15

17

Across 1. Precede omegas 5. Agricultural locale 9. Controversies 14. Deep South denial 15. Position of something else 16. Danger 17. Delights 19. Prepared 20. Somewhat (2 wds) 21. Hitpoint 23. Hidebound 25. Best of the past 30. Silky synthetic 32. Newspaper boss 33. One thickness of something 36. Chalky rock 38. UN labour organization 39. Clay pigeon 40. Untruth 41. Reemit of light 44. Mote 46. ____ and feathered 47. Compound of oxygenjoined alkyl groups 49. Nepalese mountaineers 51. Sequential occurrences 54. Archaic, until 56. Made to match 58. Separate 62. Classical band 64. Trois in English 65. Affectionate, father 66. Stepped 67. Oversized glove 68. Slang, shredded cabbage 69. Utters

7

17

to the side. I went to get a drink, and when I came back you were gone. I didn’t even get a chance to get your name. I’ll be sure to keep my eyes open in case I see you again, hopefully you’ll do the same. Hey #3, I really thought we hit it off last term. Let me know, am I crazy? Or is there something between us? I see you from time to time on campus, I know you don’t see me. I’m too shy to talk to you, but I know you are in the Gamer’s Club, I used to go on occasion because I knew you were

3 9 2 4 6 5 7 8 1 S C R A P E

P A E L L A

C H B E C R R A G S

E T U I

7 5 4 2 1 8 9 3 6

8 1 6 9 3 7 2 4 5

1 8 7 5 2 9 4 6 3

A S A C R R A T G U M N I E A T S R N T T R I A R A C L A Y T E H A V D A L E A L L I L E S S Y

6 4 9 3 7 1 8 5 2 N G E E D O N E E M R I H A T A L T E R L A M E N O C R T P I S H O E N A

5 2 3 8 4 6 1 7 9

9 7 5 1 8 3 6 2 4

P E A U L P E S B I S N E D U G S U T E R S Y S

4 3 8 6 9 2 5 1 7 A L T A R I T S E L F

C O S T

2 6 1 7 5 4 3 9 8 E P E E

N E E D E R

“I would name it after myself.”

3B kinesiology

1B biology

Tracy Smith & Cheryl Patten

Deana Bettencourt

D E A D

P H I S O N I C S R I F F L E

“What’s that?”

E R R A T A

“The radio station that no one listens to.” Taylor Gordon

“SJU radio — ‘cause then it would be cool.” Laura Deyell & Steph Martyres

“Jessica.”

“Hip Nation — as if.”

4B computer science

4B religious studies and 4A english

there. When I see you I can only think dirty thoughts. I don’t expect any reactions from you though, and don’t be scared, I’m not stalking you. You just seem to pop up all the time and I had to tell someone how I was feeling. Looking forward to laying my eyes on you again soon. — Desperate Dreamer Missed a connection? Wanna break the ice? Email mkimmich@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Jessica Wong & Gunwoo Wang 3B statistics and Master’s student, system design engineering

Brittany DuQuesnay 4B history


Science

science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Delving into engineering design 2008 Design Project Symposium showcases innovative projects from UW students Adrienne Raw science editor

The 2008 Design Project Symposium will showcase innovative projects from UW’s electrical and computer engineering (ECE) students on Wednesday, January 23. A total of 60 interactive projects will be presented in the DC first floor from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. “The symposium showcases the many skills and talents of our students,” said Dr. William Bishop, fourth-year design project co-ordinator. Bishop, a faculty member in the ECE department, has consulted on over 20 projects during his five years working with design projects, helping students select topics and guiding them through the engineering design process. The Design Project Symposium is an opportunity for students to have their hard work displayed and appreciated. “Often, family and friends attend the symposium so it provides a convenient forum for students to explain their work to the many people who have supported them in their studies,” said Bishop. On the day of the symposium, the top design project team receives the Infusion Cup, a trophy and $2,000 prize awarded to the team that creates and presents the best overall design project. The Infusion Cup is provided through sponsorship by Infusion Development and its sister company Infusion Angels, located in the Waterloo Research and Technology Park. The event, now in its eighth year, is the culmination of an intensive design project course sequence for more

than 250 senior undergraduates. “The symposium is the final stage in a long process,” said Bishop. “In preparation for the symposium, our students learn about real-world engineering design and analysis through the design project.” The design project series of courses consists of three courses beginning with an introduction to the requirements of the engineering design projects and the formation of fourperson teams. The final-year course of the program challenges students to work in teams to identify and address a specific design problem. This year’s projects include a prototype automatic transmission system for a bicycle, a machine that automatically detects and picks up garbage and a system that would help rescuers locate avalanche victims faster. The symposium itself also serves to test and teach students. Projects are presented through both a poster and a seminar, which are widely used formats at trade shows and conferences. The 20-minute seminars run throughout the morning and afternoon and are grouped into topics ranging from entertainment systems to medical devices and systems. Poster presentations include display boards and project prototypes set up where interested member of the public can ask questions. “Arguably,” said Bishop, “the symposium also evaluates the professional development of our students, through their interactions with visitors and reviewers.” The symposium is a high profile event that attracts attention from local media as well as media outside the

COURTESY CHRIS HUGHES

ECE students stand with their 2006 Design Project Symposium poster presentations. The above Automated Blackjack Dealer featured on Daily Planet’s 2006 feature on the symposium. province. The 2006 Design Project Symposium was featured on Daily Planet in a segment showcasing the Automated Blackjack Dealer, one of the 2006 projects. The local community is also attracted to the event. “It is not uncommon for local companies to send representatives to the symposium to recruit our students,” said Bishop.

The symposium is open to the general public. “Visitors of all ages are welcome to attend the symposium and are welcome to ask questions of our students.” Bishop hopes UW student and off-campus visitors will take ad-

vantage of the opportunity to come see the work of the ECE students. Further information is available at the ECE Design Projects website: http://eceprojects.uwaterloo.ca. araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

photos courtesy chris hughes

TOP 8 LIFE-CHANGING TRIPS FOR 2008

Mitch Martel Full-time laboratory technician and part-time Bachelor of Science student at Athabasca University.

Need a prerequisite, extra credits? Have a scheduling conflict? Your choice Choose from over 700 distance or online courses to complement your studies at your home university. Your terms Start courses anytime of the year and study at home, or wherever you may find yourself. Take the first step Talk to your academic advisor to make sure courses will transfer, then visit our website or call to register.

Finally, a university that’s all about you. Canada’s leader in distance and online education.

www.athabascau.ca 1-800-788-9041

1. Volunteer in incredible Ghana 2. Italian courses in Florence 3. Australian Surf School 4. Photo Vietnam with a professional 5. River cruise through the Amazon 6. Polar Bears up close 7. Climb Kilimanjaro (you can!) 8. Thai Cooking courses in Bangkok Call us for all the life-changing details!

University Shops Plaza 170 University Ave. W (519) 886-0400 1-888-FLY-CUTS (359-2887)

Canada’s Student Travel Experts

www.travelcuts.com


Science

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

19

Help a brother out, pass the Monistat Anyone who has ever had a yeast infection knows that, despite the cheese-related jokes, it is no laughing matter. In fact, it is a lying down matter, since the irritation in the genital area is usually too bothersome to walk to the pharmacy. This in mind, next time your boyfriend asks you to help him out in a trying and difficult time, be understanding and pass him the Monistat. Surprised? Don’t be. Yeast infec-

tions don’t discriminate between the sexes; they are caused by overgrowth of a naturally occurring fungus in the body — Candida. Therefore, when a yeast infection occurs, the key to regaining health is to restore the Candida balance rather than remove it from your body in its entirety. This fungus is prevalent in both genders — and therefore creates a possibility for both males and females to develop a yeast infection. What is the cause of yeast infec-

tions? In Ontario, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care suggests that “tight clothing, severe obesity, warm weather, stress, antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, diabetes, and steroids can all cause increased numbers of yeast.” Birth control can change microbial flora population in the body, allowing the naturally occurring Candida levels to fluctuate, and possibly reach a harmful level. The same is true for antibiotics,

joyce hsu

which affect the body’s immune defence. This is why taking probiotic health supplements is an important part of antibiotic health treatments — they keep the microbial levels in your body balanced. Since the infection can be spread through sexual contact, it is recommended to refrain from sexual activity while you have an infection as you can pass it onto your partner, and they back to you, thus lengthening the recovery period. In this case abstinence isn’t hard to sustain, as with genital irritation typically comes painful intercourse which no amount of lube or foreplay can resolve. If you suspect you may have a yeast infection, it is important to seek professional medical attention immediately. This will help you get rid of the infection as fast as possible. Some of the symptoms of yeast infections include irritation, swelling and painful intercourse. When diagnosed with a yeast infection, it is very important to alter your clothing patterns while symptoms persist. If you are fond of tightly-fitted underwear, switch to loose boxers for the period of the infection; this will make it harder for the bacteria to multiply, as in a warm, cramped environment the chances of survival are much greater. Less isn’t necessarily more; don’t fail to wear underwear if you plan on wearing rough pant fabric such as denim — this will cause friction with an already sensitive area, causing further irritation. Going commando with pyjama bottoms is a very wise choice while symptoms persist. Medicinally, antifungal creams are typically the most effective and efficient method of yeast infection treatment. These are applied topically to the affected area until symptoms die out, and are available in pharmacies without a prescription. There are more natural treatment options as well, as common herbs such as cinnamon, oregano, Echinacea and tea tree oil are common yeast fighters and can be combined with other antifungal methods under the guidance of a homeopathic advisor. Body and Health Canada suggests three easy to live by suggestions for staying free of yeast infections. First of all, the old saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away,” needs an update to include yogurt in the regimen. A cup of yogurt a day is rich in Lactobacillus acidophilus, an active bacteria, can help keep the microbial flora in your body level. Secondly, modifying your wardrobe to avoid pants snug around the groin area can decrease the risk of yeast infections by getting rid of Candida’s favourite environment — warm,

Yeast Infection Symptoms Female Yeast Infection Symptoms • Vaginal irritation • Vaginal itching • Heightened genital sensitivity • Burning sensation • Redness of genital area • Genital swelling • Painful intercourse • White, clumpy vaginal discharge

Male Yeast Infection Symptoms • Irritation and soreness of the head of the penis • Heightened genital sensitivity • Severe itching in the head of the penis • Redness of genital area • Small blisters on the head of the penis • Painful intercourse • White, clumpy discharge cramped spaces. Also, cotton undergarments also tend to cause less vaginal irritation than synthetic ones. Lastly, it is important to keep the genital area clean and dry, making it difficult for the yeast to find an environment to flourish in. Seeing how the symptoms of yeast infections are so pungent, following these simple steps to keeping your genital health in check is a fair deal. alomako@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

USE YOUR WATCARD 465 PHILLIP STREET LOCATION ONLY LIMITED TIME OFFER

746-6893

at 160 University Ave., W., (at Phillip St.)WATERLOO 519-886-6490 www.bignight.ca


Sports

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Warriors start the year with a bang Yang Liu sports editor

The men’s volleyball team has had a season that can be described as one of peaks and valleys. A superb 4-1 high to start the season was brought to a humbling low after getting trounced in consecutive games by the OUA number one McMaster Marauders and the OUA number two Guelph Gryphons. Since then the Warriors have failed to gain any traction as they skid along with the pack, failing to register consecutive wins since October. They however, managed to head into the break on a winning note, with a 3-1 victory in Toronto over the UofT Blues. The Warriors hoped that the new year would bring more consistency to their game and that they would be able to separate themselves from the second tier of the OUA. This past weekend, they had just that chance with rematches against York and UofT at home in the PAC. UW had previously lost to York in their second-last match before the winter break. This would be their opportunity to not only avenge the earlier loss, but to put some distance between themselves and a team just half a game behind them in the standings at 6-5. Waterloo and York were locked in a tight battle in the first set, trading points until late when two service aces by Tyler Vivian allowed the Warriors to pull away to a 25-22 victory. The second set was a story of York dominance at the net, with Waterloo’s mistakes allowing York to take the lead midway in the set which they did not relinquish. Four errant serves by the Warriors contributed to their 22-25 defeat in the second set. The third set did not start well either for the Warriors as York jumped out to a 7-3 lead. Deft passing in the offensive

Johnny Tang

The men’s volleyball team practise their spikes after two big wins on the weekend against York and Toronto at home. end allowed York to dominate with spike after spike kill, and Waterloo never really finding the rhythm in their end, allowed York to win 25-18 and put the Warriors on the edge. However, the Warriors would not roll over even though all the momentum was in York’s court. The Warriors pounced on York early in the fourth set

jumping out to a 10-3 lead and never looking back as every aspect of their game was in sync, routing York 25-12 to force a final set. With the crowd now pumped from the abrupt shift in tide in the Warriors favour, the final set was undoubtedly a very tight, nerve wrecking battle, as both teams matched each

other serve for serve, block for block, point for point. With the game tied at 13-13, and the players feeding off the crowd’s tangible energy, the Warriors made an impressive frontcourt block to end the game at match point. See VOLLEYBALL, page 22

Untangling the complexities of cricket

photos by tom ellis

Two English teams duel in a one-day test match at Lords Cricket Ground. Tom Ellis staff reporter

The game of cricket has long failed to register on the plasma television screens of the average North American. Many would be surprised to learn that the U.S. and Canada have their own cricket teams, with the latter taking part in the 2007 International Cricket Council World Cup. While, there is no doubt many reasons that cricket has failed to capture the public’s imagination, the main reason the game has not caught on is because of the lack of understanding of the rules and the way the game is played. The question most often posed is how can two teams play for five days and the match end up in a tie? Beginning with the basics, a game of cricket is contested between two teams of 11 players. It begins with a coin toss to determine which

side has the choice of batting or bowling first. Basically, the object of cricket is to score the highest number of runs while batting, and to concede the fewest runs possible while bowling the other team out. The bowling team can get the opposition out, also known as ‘taking their wickets,’ in a number of ways such as through a catch, a run out or by hitting the stumps. As such, it can be seen as comparable to baseball, but the similarities end there. Runs are scored by the two batsmen running between the sets of stumps (also known as the wickets) at either ends of the pitch. Six runs are scored if the ball crosses the boundary rope at the edge of the field from the air, and four if it bounces before crossing. Like any sport, cricket has many technical terms which require explanation to aid understanding and promote enjoyment while watch-

Lords Cricket Ground situated in London, England is a world renowned field. ing. The first is an “over” which refers to the six balls bowled by a bowler (pitcher) before he must be replaced by a team mate. There is no limit to the number of overs bowled in test cricket, but it is against the rules to bowl two consecutive overs. For those bowled over by confusing terms, the BBC Sport website, as well as numerous others, offers more detailed explanations and fixture listings. Cricket was first played in England and became the national sport during the 18th Century. Australia is the dominant force in world cricket, leading both the test and one day rankings, closely followed by India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan amongst others. There are three formats of cricket. Test matches last for five days and each side has two innings to bat and bowl twice. One-day cricket

is the one with limited overs used in the World Cup. Each team bats for 50 overs, striving to score as many runs as possible, and looking to limit the runs scored by the opposition when bowling. The third form, also the newest and most exciting version of cricket is called 20/Twenty. In this form of the game, each side only has 20 overs in which to score runs, and it is this form of the game that has the greatest potential to attract the interest of non-cricketing nations as it is far more intense and fast-paced thanks to both limits in time and overs. It is much more suited to North American viewers as it manages to create a loud and exhilarating atmosphere, ending with each match offering a guaranteed, but hotly debated result. tellis@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Sports

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

21

Fighting the winter blues You open the blinds and all you can see outside is a dreary gray. You think to yourself: Okay, let’s sleep for another hour. By the time you wake up three hours later, a blinding snow storm has hit and all desire to go outside and run errands has been drained from you. The Canadian winter is a harsh and unforgiving mistress. At times it just feels easier to shut yourself in your room and relax in your pajamas. We all want to live balanced and active lives, but apathy hits us the hardest especially as the days get shorter and colder. Staying active may seem like a huge challenge, especially when the sidewalk to the gym is all icy and it’s ten below outside. Plopping on the couch to watch Heroes is far easier than braving the

cold to run on a treadmill. However, during winter (more than ever), getting out of the house and staying active is a priority not only for your physical health, but for your mental health. Fighting the temptation to stay inside means maintaining a diverse set of interests and activities that have a social and physical component beyond finger flexing for the clicking of your remote control. According to the American Psychiatric Association, nearly one in ten adults suffer from some form of depression. A survey conducted by the American College Health Association found that among students however, nearly 15 per cent reported suffering from depression in the last year. For students depression can not

only destroy your social life but your academic goals as well. As depression can interfere with concentration,your ability to think clearly and cause you to lose interest in all previously enjoyed activities. Those who exercise regularly and lead an active lifestyle are far less likely to suffer from depression than sedentary people. A study published in Psychosomatic Medicine now shows that depression can set in once regular exercise ceases. Exercise decreases stress and inflamation, which are believed to be possible causes of depression. Getting adequate sunlight during winter may be another factor in preventing the onset of symptoms. Studies by the National Institute of Health in Bethesda, Maryland discovered that even 30

minutes of vigorous exercise three times a week may be able to stave off depression. But it’s not all about just solitary exercise at the gym; playing pick-up basketball or volleyball with friends works just the same. The real point is finding time to get out of the house and do things which burn off calories and keep you both physically and mentally occupied. Whether that be dancing up a storm at a club, organizing a fundraiser for a charity, or even volunteering at your friendly school paper (hint hint). Even if you’re up to your neck in schoolwork, your body will thank you for it 30 years down the road with sustained good health.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., hosted by Sandy Churchmach, registered dietitian. For info, location call 519743-9091. Sunday, January 27, 2008 Come walk or skate in support of the Alzheimer Society, “Manulife Walk for Memories” from 2 to 4 p.m., Waterloo Memorial Rec Complex. Registration begins at 1 p.m. Register online at www.walkformemories.ca or call 519-742-1422. Wednesday, January 30, 2008 Ladies WOW Fun Seminar Series – 6:30 to 10 p.m. at the Arthur and area Community Centre. For more info call Wendy at 519-342-4029 or wsmith@wisemoove.com. Saturday, February 16, 2008 Women’s Crisis Services of Waterloo Region is proud to present “Hockey Night in Waterloo Region with NHL hockey legend Darryl Sittler,” at St. George Banquet Hall, 665 King Street N, Waterloo. Call 519-653-8966, ext 239 or shelly.friesen@wcswr. org for more info.

e-mail youth@kitchener.ca. Distress Line Volenteers Wanted - Canadian Mental Health Association is seeking caring volunteers to provide supportive listening and crisis deescalation to callers living in Waterloo Region. Please call 519-744-7645, ext 300.

CO-OP/CAREER SERVICES

Campus Bulletin “Morning Drive Radio Show” – 6:30 to 9 a.m., www.ckmsfm.ca >click on webcast, for the latest news, traffic, school closures, interviews and a great mix of music! To get your important events on the air, e-mail morningdrivel@yahoo. ca. If you have an interesting person that CKMS should interview call 519-884-2567 between 6:30 to 9 a.m....qualify for a prize! Win $1000, $500 or $200 award. UW, UWO, WLU, or U of G students. Submit transcript, cover letter, and two technical communication samples. Deadline February 29, 2008. Go to http://www.stc-soc.org/awards/thiessenaward. php. Doon Heritage Crossroads – February is workshop month – needlework, candlewick embroidery and genealogy. Call 519-748-1914 for info. Exchanges for undergraduates and graduates – 2008/09 academic years: Ontario/Rhone-Alpes, France, Ontario/Baden-Wurtemberg, Germany and Ontario/Maharastra-Goa, India. Scholarships available, for applications/deadlines please contact Maria Lango, ext 33999. MICEFA, Paris, France and the Chinese University of Hong Kong – internal deadline: March 17, 2008. For information and application forms contact Maria Lango, International Programs, Waterloo International, Needles Hall 1101, room 1113, ext 33999 or by e-mail mlango@uwaterloo.ca.

UPCOMING

Saturday, January 19, 2008 “Heads Up for Healthier Brains” – January is Alzheimer Awareness Month – Public Education Forums – what is dementia? What is Alzheimer’s disease? To be discussed from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Sunnyside Home, Heritage Hall, 247 Franklin St., N., Kitchener. RSVP to Alzheimer Society of KitchenerWaterloo at 519-742-1422. Tuesday, January 22, 2008 Volunteer/Internship Fair – Come out and meet representatives from a variety of local agencies to find out about volunteering opportunities of all kinds. Also, talk with representatives recruiting interns for very specific projects: setting up research, planning projects, preparing presentations, writing reports, performing data evaluations, planning events, managing a database, marketing for the organization — just to name a few. Join us between 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Life Centre, Great Hall. Renowned baroque violinist Linda Melsted performs music by J.S. Bach at 8 p.m. at the Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick Street, Kitchener. On January 24 she will be performing at the Guelph Youth Music Centre, 75 Cardigan Street, Guelph. For info on these events call 519-578-1570 or 877-520-2408 or tberns@magma.ca. Executive positions available – UW Alternative Fuels Team technical and business positions. Recruitment and information meeting at 5:30 p.m., SLC Multi-Purpose room. For info email recruit@uwaft. com. Thursday, January 24, 2008 Learning Disabilities Association of K-W is hosting a workshop “Healthy Habits for Effective Learning”

CHURCH SERVICE

St. Bede’s chapel at Renison College offers worship on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. or take a break mid-week with a brief silence followed by Celtic noon prayers on Wednesdays. Come and walk the labyrinth the second Thursday of each month, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more info contact Megan at 519-884-4404, ext 28604 or www.renison. uwaterloo.ca/ministry-centre.

STUDENT AWARDS FINANCIAL AID 2nd floor, Needles Hall, ext 33583. Please refer to safa.uwaterloo.ca to view the current loan pick up procedures and full listing of scholarships and awards. January 25: Final OSAP application deadline (with reduced funding) for fall and winter term. Deadline to submit Signature Pages and supporting documentation for fall and winter term. Last day to submit OSAP Rollover Form to add winter term to fall only term.

VOLUNTEER

Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence. One to three hours a week commitment. Call Canadian Mental Health 519-744-7645, ext 229. City of Waterloo, 519-888-6488 or volunteer@ city.waterloo.on.ca has the following volunteer opportunities: “55+ MC for Friday Flicks and Hosts/Hostesses” – for afternoon drop-in programs. Call for more info. “Uptown Country: Print and Publications Designer and Website Designer” needed now until June. “Buskers Carnival: Logistics Coordinator and Director of Corporate Sponsorship” needed for this high-profile festival. Volunteer Action Centre, 519-742-8610 or www.volunteerkw.ca, has many opportunities available – visit the website or call today! The Kitchener Youth Action Council is currently seeking volunteers aged 14-24 who are concerned about issues facing youth and young adults across Kitchener. For more info

COUNSELLING SERVICES English Language Proficiency Program (ELPP) – all workshops are scduled bertween 9:30 and 11:30 a.m.. Monday, January 21 or Tuesday, January 22 – “Essay Writing.” Monday, January 28 or Tuesday, Janaury 29 – “Sentence Structure.” For more info/registration call 519-888-4567, ext 32655 or kmaclean@ uwaterloo.ca or ext 33245.

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Tuesday, January 22: “Exploring Your Personality Type (Part 1)” – two-session workshop. 2 to 3:30 p.m., TC 1112. “Starting Your Own Business: The Basics” – this workshop will help you assess your readiness to start a business venture. Only 20 spots available. 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC 1208. Wednesday, January 23: “Career Exploration and Decision Making” – this workshop will increase your understanding. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., TC 1112. “Are You Thinking About An International Experience?” – dreaming of going abroad to study or work? This workshop is for you. 3 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Thursday, January 24: “Career Interest Assessment” – 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., TC 1112.

Classifieds HELP WANTED

Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, K-W Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. We’ve got what you’re looking for – let’s make 2008 your best summer yet – Camp Wayne, northeast Pennsylvania, USA. Counselor-specialists for all Land and Water Sports Inc. Tennis, golf, basketball, baseball, football, martial arts, soccer, outdoor adventure, camping, mountain biking, climbing/ropes, roller hockey, archery, rocketry, water-ski, wakeboard, sailing, canoe/kayaking, fine artstheatre, ceramics, woodworking, drawing, painting, CDL drivers. RN’s for our Health Centre. Let’s get the ball rolling now! Online application www.campwayne.com ; info@ campwayne.com ; 1-888-549-2963. Summer of your life! Camp Wayne for Girls – children’s sleep-away camp, Northeast Pennsylvania (6/21 - 8/17/08). If you love children and want a caring fun environment we need counselors and program directors for: tennis, swimming, golf, gymnastics, cheerleading, drama, high and low ropes, camping/nature, team sports, waterskiing, sailing, painting/ drawing, ceramics, silkscreen, printmaking, batik, jewelry, calligraphy, photography, sculpture, guitar, aerobics, self-defense video, piano. Other staff: administrative, CDL driver (21+), nurses (RN’s and nursing students), bookkeeper, mother’s helper. On campus interviews January 31. Select the camp that selects the best staff! Call 1-215-944-3069 or apply on-line at www.campwaynegirls.com. Have the summer of your life at a prestigious coed sleepaway camp in the beautiful Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania, two and a half hours from NY City. We’re seeking counselors who can teach any team and individual sports; tennis, gymnastics, horseback riding, mountain biking, theatre, tech theatre, circus,

magic, arts and crafts, pioneering, climbing tower, water sports, music, dance or science. Great salaries and perks. Plenty of free time. Internships available for many majors. Interviews on February 6. Apply online at www.islandlake.com. Call 1-800-869-6083 between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time on weekdays for more information. info@islandlake.com.

HOUSING Attention Cambridge School of Architecture students! Live conveniently and comfortably right across the street from school in this beautifully renovated apartment. 4, 8 and 12-month leases available with excellent signing bonuses and rental incentives! Call Darlene or Joanne at 519-7461411 for more details. Two to seven bedroom houses available for May or September. Over 300 options! Houses or apartments, large rooms, back yards, free laundry and parking, bright and many newly renovated. Showings starting now so don’t delay! www.domushousing.com or call 519-572-0278. Four/five bedroom house for rent. Close to UW. Call 1-905-509-3284 or e-mail gord010@sympatico.ca.

SERVICES Med school interview? Practice makes perfect. Half-day seminars by former chair of admissions at a Canadian medical school. Improve skills/confidence. E-mail: cmsac@rogers.com.

COURSE INFO SP-100 Forest Firefighting course to be held in London, Ontario March 12-16, 2008 and Waterloo, Ontario March 19-23, 2008. Course will be held during evening hours during the week. To register, please call Wildfire Specialists Inc., 2233 Radar Road, Suite 5, Hanmer, Ontario, P3P 1R2, toll free 1-877-381-5849. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources accredited. No guarantee of employment.

DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M. FOR CLASSIFIEDS AND CAMPUS BULLETIN, SLC, room 1116 or ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


22 Sports Men’s V-ball solidly third place continued from page 20

On the following play, Tyler Vivian completed the comeback with a spike kill over two outstretched York defenders. Waterloo won the set 15-13 and the match 3-2, avenging their earlier loss to York. The following night saw another rematch, this time against the 3-9 UofT Blues. Various miscues by the Warriors allowed UofT to stay in the game, despite a weak digging game by UofT and many miscues on the Blues part. Waterloo did buckle down to win

LSAT MCAT GMAT GRE

Preparation Seminars Complete 30-Hour Seminars Proven Test-Taking Strategies Personalized Professional Instruction Comprehensive Study Materials Simulated Practice Exams Free Repeat Policy Personal Tutoring Available Thousands of Satisfied Students

Oxford Seminars

1-800-779-1779 / 416-924-3240 www.oxfordseminars.com

the set 25-22. The second set showed a Warriors team that found its rhythm with the passing game, allowing them to take advantage of a weak Toronto libero. The Warriors cruised to a 2519 victory, taking firm control of the match. The third set was one of swings in momentum with, UofT seizing the lead at 16-12 with a 5-0 run. Waterloo would later storm back with a 6-0 run of their own, to take the lead 18-16. The two teams traded points for a while, but Waterloo capitalized on several UofT miscues to get to match point at 24-20. However, Waterloo could not put the game away, and allowed UofT to even the game at 24-24. What proceeded was five match points for Waterloo in which they could not put UofT away. Finally, with the score at 29-28, Waterloo’s offence clicked with a spike kill into Toronto’s backcourt to squeak out the set 30-28 and the match 3-0. “It wasn’t our best game tonight,” said head coach Chris Lawson. “We’re still trying to work on the mental part of the game, learning how to deal with tense moments.” Waterloo has another showdown this weekend against McMaster and Guelph, the number OUA one and two teams which humbled them earlier in the season. “We’re just gonna work on mental concentration and take it one game at a time,” said Lawson. If they can steal a win this weekend against either Guelph or McMaster, Waterloo will cement its status as an elite OUA team.

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Warriors battered by Badgers

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Rocky choi

Cam McIntyre goes for the dunk over the outstreched Brock defender. Waterloo lost the game 81-67 to drop to last place in the OUA West division. They also dropped the game on January 12 to Western 95-70 to fall to 4-8.

;8Ggi\gXi\jle`m\ij`kp^iX[lXk\jn`k_c`d`k\[fief kiX`e`e^`eXZZflek`e^]fi\ekip`ekfXgif]\jj`feXc XZZflek`e^[\j`^eXk`fe:8#:>8#:D8fi:G8`ek_\LJ %


Sports

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Men’s Hockey OUA Mid West Division

Brock York Guelph UOIT

GP 21 21 21 20

W L 13 5 9 9 8 12 4 13

T OTL PTS 0 3 29 0 3 21 1 0 17 0 3 11

Far West Division GP W L T OTL PTS 19 13 3 0 3 29 Western 29 Lakehead 18 14 3 0 1 28 Waterloo 20 14 6 0 0 20 13 6 0 1 27 Laurier 20 4 14 0 1 9 Windsor

Men’s Volleyball OUA McMaster Guelph Waterloo Western Queen’s York Ryerson Windsor Laurier Toronto RMC

Women’s Hockey OUA Laurier Toronto Guelph Windsor Queen’s Western York Brock Waterloo UOIT

GP 19 19 19 21 21 20 20 21 19 21

W L T OTL PTS 0 34 17 1 1 1 31 15 3 0 0 28 14 5 0 1 22 10 9 1 0 21 8 8 5 0 18 7 9 4 1 18 7 9 3 0 14 4 11 6 5 11 3 0 13 5 2 1 17 1

GP 13 13 14 12 12 13 12 12 13 14 12

W L GF GA 13 0 39 7 10 3 32 18 9 5 33 23 8 4 31 21 7 5 28 19 7 6 29 24 6 6 23 21 4 8 14 27 3 10 16 33 3 11 17 35 0 12 2 36

PTS 26 20 18 16 14 14 12 8 6 6 0

Women’s Basketball OUA West Division GP McMaster 13 Western 13 Laurier 13 Brock 13 Lakehead 14 Windsor 13 Waterloo 13 Guelph 14

W 13 10 9 8 7 7 6 5

L 0 3 4 5 7 6 7 9

PF 977 954 860 854 869 926 852 898

PA 633 873 790 827 905 816 840 948

Women’s Volleyball OUA

Men’s Basketball OUA

East Division

West Division

GP Waterloo 12 McMaster 12 Western 13 Laurier 13 Brock 14 Guelph 12 Windsor 13

W 10 9 9 8 7 5 2

L 2 3 4 5 7 7 11

GF 31 29 31 27 26 21 12

GA 16 12 17 19 28 23 35

PTS 20 18 18 16 14 10 4

GP 11 Brock 11 Guelph Windsor 11 Lakehead 12 11 Laurier McMaster 11 Western 11 Waterloo 12

W 7 7 7 6 5 5 5 4

L 4 4 4 6 6 6 6 8

PF 918 869 897 911 796 834 880 842

PA 805 820 752 874 774 837 848 912

PTS 26 20 18 16 14 14 12 10

Game Recaps

Game Recaps

Men’s Hockey

Women’s Volleyball

Friday, January 11 Toronto 2 Waterloo 5

Friday, January 11 Waterloo defeats Lakehead 3-0

Sunday January 13 Ryerson 4 Waterloo 3

Men’s Volleyball

Women’s Hockey

Friday, January 11 Waterloo defeats York 3-2

Saturday, January 12 Laurier 5 Waterloo 0

PTS 14 14 14 12 10 10 10 8

Men’s Hockey

Waterloo vs. Western 2:00 p.m. Saturday, January 19 Waterloo vs. Windsor 2:00 p.m. Sunday, January 20

Waterloo vs. Lakehead 7:30 p.m. Friday, January 25

CIF Arena

Sunday, January 13 Laurier 5 Waterloo 1

Track and Field

Men’s Basketball

27th Annual Can Am Classic at Windsor, Ontario

Saturday, January 12 Western 95 Waterloo 70

Women’s 4x400m relay 4th Place 4:07:73

Women’s Basketball

Men’s 4x400m relay 4th place 3:32:37

Saturday, January12 Western 94 Waterloo 81

Men’s 4x800m relay 4th place 8:11:21

Fast & Free Delivery

402 King St., N.

884-8000

Godzilla Deal

2 X-Large Great Pizzas 3 Fabulous Toppings on each Add 1 lb. wings for $3.99

$17.49 Men’s Basketball

Super Blah-Buster

PAC Main Gym

Waterloo vs. Guelph 8:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 23

3 Great Pizzas 3 Fabulous Toppings on each 3 Free Dipping Sauces

$21.99 Large $25.99 X-Large $28.99

Medium

Early Bird Special

Women’s Basketball

University of Waterloo Campus

Saturday, January 12 Waterloo defeats Toronto 3-0

Waterloo

Women’s Hockey CIF Arena

23

$19.49 Large $22.49 X-Large $25.49

2 Great Pizzas, 3 Fabulous Toppings 1 lb. Chicken Wings 1 Garlic Bread,4 Cans of Pepsi www.twicethedealpizza.com

Medium

PAC Main Gym

Waterloo vs. Guelph 6:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 23

Basketball

Presents

January 23

07 THIS WEEK IN 08 ATHLETICS

sfm km .

LI S T ca

www.c

sfm km .

vs vs Western Western Mustangs Mustangs 2:00 2:00 PM, PM, UW UW CIF CIF Arena Arena

LI V EN E

www.c

January 19

LI S T ca

LI V EN E

vs Guelph Gryphons [W] 6:00 PM, [M] 8:00 PM PAC Gym

January 20

gowarriorsgo.ca

vs vs Windsor Windsor Lancers Lancers 2:00 2:00 PM, PM, UW UW CIF CIF Arena Arena

WARRIOR

Registered trademarks of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under license. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2005

gowarriorsgo.ca gowarriorsgo.ca

[W] HOCKEY

gowarriorsgo.ca

Athletes of the Week Tyler Vivian - Volleyball Tyler, a 3rd year Kinesiology student from Mitchell, Ontario led the Warriors to two victories over York and Toronto this past weekend. On Friday against York, Tyler had 12 kills and a team high 17 points in a 5-set win over York. On Saturday vs. the Varsity Blues he added 11 kills and 14 points in a straight set victory. The two wins has moved Waterloo (9-5) into third place in the OUA standings with 18 points.

IMPRINT | JANUARY 18

Bojana Josipovic - Volleyball

Bojana, a 3rd year Sociology student from Kitchener, Ontario led the Warriors to a straight set victory over the visiting Lakehead Thunderwolves Friday night. She posted a team high of 15 points with top stats in total kills (14) and total digs (10) to lead the Warriors to a dominating win. Bojana is now ranked 3rd in Ontario and 8th in Canada statistically.


Impr int The university of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Friday, January 18, 2008

Beeswax and blood

the art of Paul Roorda, page 13

imprint . uwaterloo . ca

vol 30, no 23

Will the next PM be a Warrior? CBC puts Feds president on shortlist for Canada’s Next Prime Minister, page 10

Referendum on our radio Michael L. Davenport assistant editor-in-chief

It was “finally time to raise the profile of the station,” CKMS manager Heather Majaury was reported saying at the station’s 30th anniversary celebration last October. While it now appears she may get her wish, the upcoming student referendum on CKMS’ student fee (from which the station draws most of its funding) probably isn’t what she had in mind. The issue of this particular student fee was brought to the forefront at the most recent Feds council meeting January 13. Science councillor Sam Andrey introduced a motion that would put the CKMS fee to a referendum. The motion passed 17 for, 2 against, and 3 abstaining after a lengthy and multi-faceted debate. When student voters hit the polls this coming February to elect their next Feds representatives, they will also be asked, “Do you support the removal of the $5.50 per term fee for CKMS, the campus community radio station at the University of Waterloo, effective the fall term of 2008?” “My motion is not a judgment of the quality of CKMS,” Andrey said while introducing the motion. “CKMS will have the opportunity to defend themselves during the referendum by heading the No committee.” Any “defending,” however, must be done by full time undergraduates, as people who aren’t Feds members aren’t allowed to participate in referendum proceedings. This is a significant detail; several of the current CKMS volunteers are not undergraduate students but rather members of the community. There are a few reasons this issue was brought up now. First, according to Andrey, of the three external organizations that are funded by refundable fees (the other two being

Ryan Kane mans the helm during some of CKMS’ regular programming. WPRIG and Imprint) CKMS is the one students complain about the most. “I think it’s been a long standing idea that CKMS didn’t represent what students wanted in a radio station,” said Andrey. “I would say I got about five complaints without prompting, and once I got on the bandwagon of finding out if people listened to it, I didn’t get any support until [the night before the council meeting].” It was also pointed out during the council meeting that of the three fees which go to external organizations, the CKMS fee is the highest. The second reason is one of pure economics and logistics. Holding

referenda alongside Feds’ elections is cheaper and reduces the risk that a referendum doesn’t make quorum. (The “Yes” side of the referendum must receive a majority of the vote as well as at least 7 per cent support among eligible voters to be considered binding.) The remaining issue is somewhat more complex than the usual referendum on a refundable fee. Though all have different takes on the matter, councillor Andrey, Feds president Kevin Royal, and councillor Andrew Falcao have all confirmed that Feds has been playing with the idea of running its own radio station. Andrey said the idea went back a couple of months,

while Royal said the thought goes back a couple of years. Royal’s report to council this month read, “There is a long-standing concern from students that the service provided by the campus radio station is disappointing, and that Feds should consider cutting the financial resources allotted to CKMS on behalf of the student body. To that end...I think there is strong merit in a comparative analysis of what we could provide should the Feds choose to run its own radio station.” In response to Imprint queries, Royal said that Feds run radio is merely an idea at present and the referendum itself is a “student-led initiative regarding the accountability of [CKMS], which

Jenn Serec

is independent.” Falcao, who was the most vocal opponent of the referendum during the council meeting, remains apprehensive about Feds’ motives. “It may not be true and I like to think that it isn’t, but this issue can be interpreted as an attempt to pave the way for Feds Radio. It’s suspicious that in the last few weeks, and in president Royal’s council report the idea of Feds Radio has been brought up, and that this motion comes only a month after the passing of Policy 24, before it can be implemented.” See CKMS, page 5

Women’s volleyball team routs Lakehead Yang Liu sports editor

The women’s volleyball team has been perched atop the OUA west division all year long, including a 7-0 run to start the season. However, a tough, straight set loss right before the holidays to east division leader Toronto, was a bitter pill to swallow. The women Warriors have come back home to start the new year after a stretch of six grueling games on the road. “Feels good to be back home, the team is full of confidence and driven,” said head coach Gabriele Jobst.

After a long month and a half layoff, the Warriors began their 2008 campaign with a visit from the 4-7 Lakehead Thunderwolves. Showing now signs of rust, the Warriors quickly jumped all over Lakehead with deft passing and several major spike kills to take a commanding 12-4 lead in the first set. The defensive game too, did not seem to have deteriorated from the long layoff, as Waterloo would come up with several big blocks that killed Lakehead rallies. The Warriors waltzed to a 25-15 first set victory. The second set once again began

with the Warriors on a run, as they jumped out to a 6-1 lead. However, a few miscues and errant serves allowed Lakehead to close the gap down to one at 9-8. However, a very vocal cheering section in the stands energized the home team, as the Warriors pulled away with strong play at the net, creating lots of second opportunity spikes on offence. Bojana Josipovic brought the crowd to their feet with a spike kill over two outstretched Lakehead defenders to end the second set. Waterloo won the set 25-17. With the momentum firmly in the

Warrior’s court, the Thunderwolves came out in the third set looking visibly dejected which showed in their play at the net. The Warriors once again jumped out to a commanding 13-4 lead behind dominance at the net and several kills from their front court. The Warriors were put it in cruise control to win the third set 25-14 and the match 3-0. “Our passing and volleying were really good tonight,” said Jobst after the game. “Gaby [Lesniak] and Bojana [Josipovic] especially were great for us, but the whole team played great.” Josipovic led all play-

ers in the game with 14 kills and 15 points, while Lesniak had 10 kills and 11 points. Looking ahead, the Warriors have a showdown against the surging second place McMaster Marauders this weekend. The two teams will duke it out for the OUA west division lead at McMaster on Saturday. Coach Jobst, however, is not worried, “We’ll prepare for Mac just like we prepare for anyone else. I think we’re a strong enough team to get to the OUA finals.” yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


News

news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Former UW student files lawsuit Student blames UofT for botched transfer Taylor Schnaeringer intern

Adam Rogers filed a lawsuit this month against University of Toronto for $5 million, after a mix up at the Mississauga campus which took place in 2007. Rogers, who was a third year student at the University of Waterloo, requested a transfer to University of Toronto Mississauga campus where he planned to graduate. After applying for the transfer he received a notice of rejection from UTM informing him that he was not accepted. Soon afterwards Rogers received a letter from UTM’s Schreiberwood residence offering him housing that was only for current students. Rogers assumed that UTM had made a mistake and he had been granted late acceptance and subsequently planned his move to Mississauga. Rogers then signed a lease, which the residence took, then he, along with his then-pregnant wife Erica Rogers and their three children made the move. Rogers said that, “If my status wasn’t confirmed, they would have denied the lease and I would have said fine.” Upon arriving at UTM and being informed that he was not a student, he then filed a series of appeals for admission. After the second appeal was denied September 6, Rogers was informed that he and his family could

no longer stay in the residence. Rogers lost his full-time student status and his student loans, which were the main source of income for he and his family. Rogers said that he did not have enough money to move back to Waterloo and his family has been forced to live in poverty. Rogers protested the removal of his family in late September and was denied, the university then began the eviction process. During the eviction ruling the Landlord and Tenant board decided that the situation did not result from an administrative error. “The tenants [the Rogers] moved into a rental unit that is intended for student housing, knowing full well that the male tenant had been denied admission to the university,” the ruling argued. Rogers appealed the eviction again but was denied December 7. VP Internal and Services of the University of Toronto Students’ Union, Ahmad Kahn, supported Rogers and condemned the university for handling the situation the way they did. “The issue is not on whether Adam is a student or not. It is about the fact that the Rogers family has been put into an uncompromising situation by the university,” said Kahn. The Rogers have had their fourth child and are living off a small amount of income from the Child Tax Benefit and the charity of their

friends and family. Rogers has not paid the university rent because he says he cannot afford it. Erica Rogers said, “It breaks my heart when my children complain they are hungry, but I have to tell them we have nothing to eat. It hurts

me to tell them they can’t play in the snow because we cannot afford winter clothes for them. Why should our children have to suffer so dearly for the university’s mistakes?” The Rogers eldest daughter, who is five, cannot attend school due to their financial situation. Rogers has made an undisclosed settlement offer to UTM but has not heard back as of yet. Rogers told

press, “UofT and I have something in common. They do not want me here, and I do not want to be here,” he said. Director of marketing and communications for UTM, Jane Stirling, said that UTM could not comment directly on this case. UTM has until the end of January to file a defence. tschnaeringer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Yosef Yip

Campus conflicts spur Facebook groups Sarah Hewey intern

Of the online applications and social networking websites available to be used for political purposes, Facebook has proved to be a popular medium and tool for public outreach and availability of candidates. Outside of the federal and provincial government, student politicians running for positions with the Federation of Students here at UW have found a home in the new media. Facebook and blogging are coming to the forefront of the online race to generate popularity and nominate candidates. A quick search of “Feds election” in the University of Waterloo network on Facebook brings up 10 groups dedicated to nomination of candidates, support of declared runners and the process of the election. In fact, group “officers” have taken on a new role: that of current Feds members pledging their support to those running. Outside of Facebook, student blogs are springing to life with running commentaries of the electoral process and interesting speculation that can’t be found in the traditional media. In the past, Facebook groups and online activity have documented issues in and around campus, such as the still controversial U-Pass. Students lined up on both sides of the debate in their respective groups, the numbers of which have since dwindled, but over 300 students are still currently members of the three largest groups surrounding the debate. In the group “Vote No on the Bus Pass” over 200 posts were made on the discussion board. For those students in favour of the U-Pass, results and statistics from the culminating vote

were posted alongside the referendum question posed to all who were eligible to vote. This information being so readily available once again enforced to students on the “binding” nature of the U-Pass vote itself. Students on the opposing viewpoint posted various concerns and complaints in regards to the referendum question itself, namely, the issue of the non-refundable student fee being somewhat clouded. Another campus issue that warranted the attention of the internet was the long- ranging debate over the presence of fraternities and sororities on campus. Online discussion boards gave students a forum to discuss their discontent with the exclusivity and supposed humiliation surrounding on-campus fraternity groups. For those students out there still deciding whether or not to run for a Feds position time is running out. Nominations for the election close on February 12 at 4:30 pm. In keeping with the web-savvy elections of previous years, nomination packages for interested parties are available for all positions online at www.Feds.ca. Elections for undergraduate arts, environmental studies, mathematics, science and atlarge Senate positions are all being held from February 12 to 14, and at the same time students will be able to vote about the hot button issue of the CKMS referendum. The radio station referendum is also being thrashed out online with Facebook groups, mainly those against the proposed removal of the student fee. For students, Facebook and blogging has become an outlet, a forum in which opinions and viewpoints can be expressed in an open

Mackenzie Keast

and unthreatening manner. Also, the idea of unity and inclusiveness is an issue is not only appealing, but also increases awareness and speaks volumes to other Facebook fanatics. But does it work? According to Facebook, there are currently more than 61 million active users logging in on a regular basis, a number that doubles every six months. Currently, an average of 250,000 new registrations have

occurred per day since January 2007, with an average of three per cent weekly growth. Of those statistics, 28,709 members belong to the University of Waterloo network. With that number of individuals perusing the web, social networks are bound to grow, and people are paying attention. shewey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


4

News

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Campus and community events JANUARY 21

Monday 7:00 p.m. “Carbon Trading: Solution to Climate Change or Corporate Resource Grab” @ Arts Lecture Hall – room 116

Join us for a conversation with author Larry Lohmann about climate change, privatization and power. NAA-A0A0 BLACK

JANUARY 21

Monday 2:30 p.m. — 4:00 p.m. “Ref Works” @ FLEX Lab, 3rd Floor, Dana Porter Library

Learn to manage your references, create bibliographies quickly and easily, and format your paper in your choice of citation styles all with this handy and free web-based tool.

JANUARY 22

Tuesday 11:00 a.m. — 2:00 p.m. “Volunteer/Internship Fair” @ SLC Great Hall

JANUARY 22

Tuesday 3:00 p.m. “Meeting to form ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ referendum committees” @ SLC room 2134

JANUARY 23

Wednesday 12:30 pm —1:20 p.m. “Noon Hour Concert Series” @ CGUC Chapel

Volunteer/Internship Fair. The Noon Hour Concert Learn about a wide variety Show up to join either a series sponsored by the committee of volunteer and internship “Yes” or “No”Jan. 878118A01_FCB 09, 2008 University of Waterloo Muin order to help the student _N27493 opportunities inTD theCanada K-W Trust_Student Banking sic Department at Conrad body make an educated area. Register at Grebel University College 28_0018_N27493_A1_ST decision in the upcoming www.careerservices.uwaterpresents performances by loo.ca/about/VolunteerFair Federation of Students ref- local and international talent. erendum on the CKMS fee. These free concerts are preApplication.asp sented in the fall and winter terms and feature classical, jazz, world music, and contemporary works. Noon Hour Concerts take place on most Wednesdays, 12:30 to 1:20pm, in the CGUC Chapel.

JANUARY 23

Wednesday 9:00 a.m. — 8:00 p.m. “Engineering Design Project Symposium” @ Davis Centre

The symposium showcases the innovation and talent of our upper-year students in electrical and computer Engineering. Student design groups will be presenting prototype designs, poster presentations, and seminars throughout the day. Alumni and friends of the university are welcome to attend anytime during the event.

JANUARY 23

Bank with no monthly fee by getting a Value Plus Account for Students. For details visit tdcanadatrust.com/free

Wednesday 4:00 pm “The Reading Series at St. Jerome’s” @ STJ 3012

Join us for a reading by Tamas Dobozy from his latest book Last Notes and Other Stories (HarperCollins, 2005), which has been widely and glowingly reviewed. He currently teaches in the Department of English and Film Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University, in Waterloo. Admission is free.


News

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

CKMS: Station could lose funding Continued from cover

The notion of Feds starting their own radio station is somewhat ironic, considering the station now known as CKMS started out as a group funded by Feds. CKMS only gained bureaucratic autonomy from Feds in 1977 as a condition for being granted a broadcasting license from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunication Commission (CRTC). In 1978 the portion of the Feds fee which funded the station was rolled into its own fee, the fee at the focus of this debate. While students against the fee have pointed out that the CKMS fee was added without a referendum (something not possible today) and thus this will be the first time the entire full-time undergraduate body will vote on the issue, council at the time did vote in favour and undergrads provided a petition with 2,500 signatures of support. In a statement from Radio Waterloo president Bob Puersten, the $5.50 refundable fee makes up about 90 per cent of the station’s funding. The remainder comes “from several sources, including the general community, through various fundraisers throughout the year,” said Puerton, adding: “All community members at CKMS also pay a $15 fee individually for the privilege to become members. Students who pay their fee are automatically members of CKMS. “We are charitable corporation, meaning that we apply for grants from time to time to support various initiatives and projects, but this funding is not operational and is sporadic.” Puersten also said that although they do not subscribe to the Bureau of Broadcast Measurement due to cost, “[the] general consensus in the industry, I believe, is that a campus station in a college community of our size is that, given the general population of the area we broadcast to, we could have around 2,500 active listeners at any given time.” According to the CKMS website, “CKMS-FM will provide programming that is an alternative not merely for the sake of being different, but with the intent of providing a service to the community.” By and large, this mandate for alternative programming is set not just for CKMS but for all campus radio stations by CRTC. “The commission’s primary objective for the campus radio sector is that it provide programming differing in style and substance from that provided by other elements of the broadcasting system, particularly commercial stations and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). The commission considers that campus stations should add diversity to the broadcasting system by providing alternative programming in both music and spoken word.” Of the CRTC regulations, Puersten said, ”It is what this sector does. It is what campus radio is morally required to fulfill. It is the spirit of the entire endeavour ultimately.” Feds councillor Andrew Falcao was a vocal opponent of the referendum. During the council meeting he said that if the question as put to referendum did pass, the people who want to support the radio station would no longer have the means to do so. “If the vote does pass, those who don’t like CKMS will be speaking for everyone.” President Kevin Royal responded to this line of thought towards the end of the meeting, saying, “I think

Nikoo Shahabi

that if support continued to exist it shouldn’t be facilitated by a tax system but rather a voluntary donation system.” When Imprint solicited Falcao’s response to this position, he said, “From a theoretical approach I might be inclined to agree, but in a real world situation the removal of the CKMS fee would spell the rapid decline of the station, if not the outright death.” Feds councillor Justin Williams reluctantly voiced support for holding a referendum at the council meeting, citing concern that since the referendum was brought about by council and not by a student petition there was no “groundswell” to advocate the yes and no sides of the issue. However, both councilllors Andrey and Falcao have stated they know people interested in heading the Yes and No committees respectively. Also, “Join the YES Committee for the CKMS referendum” and “I support CKMS” groups have already popped up on Facebook. Hopefully in the coming month, students will see some good debate capped off with a firm resolution. mdavenport@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Teach English Overseas Intensive 60-Hour Program Classroom Management Techniques Detailed Lesson Planning Comprehensive Teaching Materials Internationally Recognized Certificate Teacher Placement Service Money Back Guarantee Included Thousands of Satisfied Students

1-800-779-1779 / 416-924-3240

www.oxfordseminars.com

=H7:K7J;IJK:?;I CWha[j_d]CWdW][c[dj

5


Features

features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

The next great Prime Minister?

Paul Parkman reporter

Kevin Royal is putting his experience as president of the Federation of Students to use on a national level after making the cut on January 10, as one of ten top finalists in this year’s Canada’s Next Great Prime Minister, a contest hosted every year by the CBC. Royal was voted into the top 10 of 144 contestants, ranging in age from 18-25 from all across Canada. Each contestant had to submit a video running under five minutes on YouTube describing their hopes and visions for Canada’s future political sphere and how they would attain these goals on a national level. Royal spoke about a strong sense of community in the Waterloo region, a focus he pursued with his response to the first contest challenge, which required that contestants put their ideals into action. “Being able to give back is very positive — it gives you a chance to practise what you preach,” said Royal in an interview with Imprint. For his challenge response Royal created the Kevin Royal TIE Scholarship, which will be given out over the next four years to a public school student in Waterloo region who shines with regard to technology, innovation, or entrepreneurship. “I’m very idealistic,” said Royal. “Politicians generally raise money solely for their own campaign expenses, but in this contest [my fellow contestants and I] are working for others.” In a pointed spin on the stereotypical political barbecue, Royal recently held a free event in December to raise funds for a future scholarship, matching every dollar raised for a final total of almost $800.

Asked about his inspiration, Royal noted UW president David Johnston and Tim Jackson of Tech Capital, as well as Waterloo region on the whole. “I moved to Waterloo five years ago and was absolutely inspired” said Royal. “When you see people living and preaching the ideals of entrepreneurship and innovation, you can’t help but get excited.” Throughout Royal’s audition video he walks the UW campus talking about technological and intellectual growth and development within the Waterloo community. “Waterloo has become a bastion of intellectual thought, great ideas and great innovation,” said Royal. “Waterloo should absolutely inspire Canada as much as it has already inspired me.” The top 10 contest finalists will be cut down to eight before being sent to Toronto for a series of debates and discussions that will decide the final four. If Royal gets voted as one of the four finalists he will appear on the national CBC program, to be aired March 23. The program consists of a debate between the other finalists, all of whom will be fielding questions from a yet-to-be named panel of former Canadian Prime Ministers held before a studio audience selected from different demographics of Canada. Speaking of his current standing in the competition, Royal commented that he is “very satisfied” with his success to date but added, “If I get into the final four, I know I’ll win.” The winner of the contest will be voted in by the studio audience using hand-held voting machines, and receive $50,000 for the honour. The other three finalists will each receive $5,000. In Royal’s official YouTube statement he notes that one of his ideas

for the contest is “an unprecedented investment in research and technology in Canada.” Royal goes on to say that with help from the Canadian government, he believes that “Canada can be a world leader in the knowledge and intellectual economy.” Royal’s strong video submission has been the primary factor for his

success in the contest so far, but he has also proven himself in follow-up video responses, answering questions from viewers, journalists, and politicians alike. No stranger to Facebook, Royal has also used the social networking site to spread the word about the contest and his work in it. Royal is especially positive

about the changing expectations both this contest’s philanthropic challenges and use of new media espouse. “We have to be hopeful for the future,” said Royal, in regard to heightened expectations for a new and more engaged political generation. “We have some serious problems with the environment [and] with education that need to be addressed. If we don’t, who will?” More information about the contest, including Kevin Royal’s audition video and links to discussion on other candidates can be found at www.cbc. ca/nextprimeminister.

Yosef Yip and Chen Chen

Pushing the limit—no room for fifty-fifty UW female athlete of the year roots her success in the inspiration she draws from her friends and family Cait Davidson assistant features editor

Strong, robust, able-bodied, competitive and spirited. In today’s society, these are all synonyms for an athlete. So what is an athlete? Since last year at the University of Waterloo, the female definition of an athlete was defined by the name Diane Kelly. As a Warrior team player, Kelly became captain of the UW women’s rugby team in her third year at the university. In the April, 2007, athletic banquet, she was awarded the 37th Female Athlete of the Year. Part of her accomplishment was credited to her success at leading the rugby team to victory. As noted in the UW Bulletin last April, the UW women’s rugby team won silver and bronze in the Ontario University Athletics (OUA), and in the fall of 2006 placed fifth in the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) championships. This wasn’t the end of Kelly’s accomplishments in rugby though. This summer she played on Team Ontario for rugby and was able to travel across the country facing different teams. Kelly also travelled to Vancouver for a Team Canada training camp, and was a member of the team that went to Minnesota to

compete against Team USA. She was also chosen as an all-Canadian rugby player in the CIS, making her one of 15 women athletes to be chosen in Canada. Currently in her third year as captain of the UW rugby team, Kelly trains with her younger sister, Lisa Kelly, during her her off-season. Also a student at UW, Kelly’s younger sister is also a captain on the Warrior’s rugby team. One of five children, Kelly is the second oldest child. Having an older brother who plays rugby, Kelly was encouraged by him to try out for the sport in high school. Having a great coach, and an awesome team, Kelly excelled at the sport, and was “hooked.” The fast pace, physical demands as well as the decision making abilities that offer creative freedom on the field encouraged Kelly’s involvement in rugby. The camaraderie of the sport is well known and is a perk and a challenge to the players. “I am close with all the girls on the team. It is a nice support system” said Kelly. The rugby season at the university level is only two months long, and there is often a high turnover of players, due to injuries and graduating girls.

Being really competitive herself, the sport was a stress reliever and forced Kelly to be more focused in all aspects of her life. When asked if rugby ever affected her academics, she replied that her marks were better during the season, than they were in the off-season. She continued to say that when she had two hours before practice to do an assignment, she wouldn’t procrastinate and would get her work finished. While rugby is one of her priorities, Kelly mentioned that school takes priority, and the training schedule and games forced her to become a more accomplished multi-tasker. Kelly also mentioned that she was less likely to go out at night, and became more focused overall. The pressure and responsibility keep her motivated, as well, if she’s capable of pushing herself, she said, “Why not?” As well as training with her sister during the off season, Kelly is involved in other campus recreation events including Powder Puff football. Training with her sister in the off season, allows her to help her sister succeed in the future, after Kelly graduates in April. Kelly is currently in her 4B semester of the science and business program. After she graduates she hopes to pursue a career in pharmaceuticals.

courtesy UW Athletics

Diane Kelly rushing the defense — giving rugby her all. She mentioned that sci/bus allowed her to appreciate the economics of pharmaceuticals and understand the chemistry behind it. After her five years at Waterloo, including a so-far incredibly successful sports career, the Warriors will feel the loss when she graduates in April

2008. From what is seen so far, this accomplished student will most likley continue to make UW pound in the future — outside of her universty career. cdavidson@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Features

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

11

Hitting the books without hurting your budget

the

All it takes to save some serious cash on books is a little foresight: you have to plan a little ahead so that you can have your books shipped to you with enough time to not commit academic suicide through the term. tool to gain empowerment, replenish your dignity and save money, than the internet. The one caveat of buying textbooks online is that it all comes down to timing. Don’t fall victim to “evaluating” the course in the first week or two before deciding that you really want to buy the book. Additionally, don’t even try to convince yourself that the one or two copies of the text on reserve in the library will be sufficient. They won’t. Those books are likely on a three-hour hold, can’t be borrowed, and you’ll have to compete tooth and nail with all the other students in your class, and possibly other sections of that course as well. All it takes to save some serious cash on books is a little foresight; you have to plan a little ahead so that you can have your books shipped to you with enough time to not commit academic suicide through the term. I’ve found that searching a week or two before the start of the term gives ample time.

And with that, here are two fantastic online resources to help you on the textbook hunt:

www. Addall.com If you can’t find your book using this site, it probably isn’t being sold online. Period. This reliable site will compare the prices of your queried books across some 40 online book retailers, from the big guys (including Amazon and Barnes and Noble), to smaller, more specialized operations — including a feature that searches EBay auctions. You can compare every possible factor that you’d ever need to make your purchasing decision, short of a review of the book itself: the book’s price, shipping price, order processing time, shipping time estimates and condition. You can even search in a number of different currencies. Most impressively, Addall goes the extra mile and will list prices in ascending order, starting with and highlighting the cheapest copy. Can we get married?

UW Distinguished Teacher Awards

www.Books4Exchange.com This site is also near and dear to my heart, even if the name is a little misleading. What’s really nice about this operation is that the bookseller is a fellow student, not a faceless business that couldn’t care less about how much you pay. In light of this, prices can be surprisingly low, if not completely reasonable (often at 75 per cent or less of the retail value). The for-students, by-students philosophy means that many textbooks are located in and around university towns in Ontario, so shipping may be incredibly reasonable and faster than expected. There must be tons of online textbooks sites I’ve missed, due to space restrictions. Feel free to send me your favourite sites, and any textbook success stories you may have. Until next time, keep those fists tight!

cte.uwaterloo.ca/awards/

Without a doubt, the most intrusive and frustrating financial evil faced by students is the price of textbooks. Despite the fact that we’ve been through the process time and time again, it is an inevitable shopping trip that never ceases to leave our jaws dropped. When it becomes commonplace for a single textbook to cost $100 or more, we can spend the price of a course’s tuition just on textbooks alone. Perhaps the most frustrating aspect of textbook shopping is that students are often quite powerless in the face of influencing textbook prices. There’s no room for bargaining or sob stories. The textbook publisher doesn’t care if you will have to seriously alter your diet and nutrient intake over the next four months in order to pay for the text. You either buy it, or you don’t. And if that wasn’t bad enough, the sad truth is that in a few months down the road, a new edition of the text will likely be published for the same high price. Even the resale value of your huge purchases is out of your hands. As we’re often caught in the perpetual ebb and flow of being poor and being really, really, Kraft Dinner-club-pack poor, we have every reason to want to find our books with a little bit of money left over, to say nothing of our dignity. Fortunately, there is no better

To nominate your outstanding Instructor contact: Centre for Teaching Excellence MC 4055 Ext. 33857 Nomination Deadline: First Friday in February

isherr@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Introducing our

Bachelor of Education Program

“Our focus is to fully equip teacher

candidates to become faithful educators who can professionally engage the diversity of learners in today’s classrooms.

—Dr. Carla Nelson, Director of the Bachelor of Education Program

A unique, 12-month program that will prepare teachers for certification from the Ontario College of Teachers in the Primary/Junior (Kindergarten to Grade 6) and Junior/Intermediate (Grade 4-10) divisions. Limited enrollment of only 70 students.

www.tyndale.ca/university/education education@tyndale.ca / (416) 218-6757 / 1-877-TYNDALE

Toronto’s Christian University


12

Features

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Asian cheese, if you please Cheese and tofu can be considered distant cousins. They are related because they share similar production methods by way of coagulating milk. Cheese is traditionally made from the curds of cow milk and tofu from soybean milk. There are a variety of tofu textures available, from silken to extra firm. Texture is created by the degree to which producers’ press the curds into blocks. The more pressure placed on the tofu, the firmer the texture becomes. At one end of the spectrum we have silken tofu which is very delicate, custard-like and creamy. It can be used to make puddings or puréed to make soups. Regular tofu can range from firm to extra firm. These tofu varieties are perfect for slicing and dicing and they retain their shape well. Firm and extra firm tofu can be used to make nondairy cheesecake, scrambled tofu, or crumbled into salads. When you modify the production process of tofu, you end up with a different product with a unique taste and texture. For instance, by fermenting tofu you end up with pickled tofu and stinky tofu. The former exposes dried cubed pieces of tofu to aerial bacteria. The cubes are then soaked in brine and will take on the taste of its soaking liquid, which can include vinegar, salt water, Chinese rice wine

and sometimes chilli peppers or sesame oil. The latter has a strong foul odour, but tastes delicious when fried. What gives this soft tofu its distinctive smell is the fermentation process during which it sits in brine composed of amaranth, mustard leaf, bamboo shoots, and at least 10 different types of herbs. We come next to flavoured tofu which can include peanut, almond, mango, and strawberry. It is created by adding sugars and fruit acids. People enjoy it as a cold dessert or blended into smoothies. Egg tofu, a popular savoury item, is made by adding whole eggs to soymilk during the coagulation process. The resulting item is packaged in a clear tube. This yellow-tinted soft tofu can be sliced and enjoy in hotpot dishes. Fried tofu has a distinctive golden yellow colour with a hollow pocket on the inside; the frying removes the moisture content. It has a dry texture and can be enjoyed with sauces or cooked in hot pot dishes. Finally, when you freeze tofu you end up with thousand-layer tofu and Japanese freeze-dried tofu. The former looks like a sponge with many tiny holes created by the freezing process. Freeze dried tofu is suitable as a snack or can be reconstituted in soups and broths. The freezing pro-

Tiffany Li

cess is actually done the traditional way by placing thin slabs of tofu on bamboo trays and allowed to freeze overnight outside. In the morning, the tofu is tied up and left to sway

in the wind to allow the water to evaporate. The tofu then undergoes the “aging process”, which is the point where the tofu’s flavours are concentrated with another round of freezing until completely dry. Tofu is sometimes referred to as “the cheese of Asia” and with its origins stemming from China, it is no wonder that it weaves a solid culinary tradition throughout the country as well as many other East Asian countries. North Americans, for the most part, have not really integrated tofu into their diets. Aside from vegetarian and vegan hubs, you don’t normally see it on menus, despite the fact we know this food is extremely healthy for us and have a

Fried Coconut Tofu Noodle Bowl 8 oz egg noodles 1 medium onion 1 tbsp canola oil 1 large garlic clove, chopped 2 tsp red-curry paste 1 (14-oz) can unsweetened coconut milk (do not use low-fat) 1/4 cup water, 1 tsp salt 2/3 cup soybeans

desire to incorporate more into our mealtimes. The problem is that most of us are mystified by how to prepare and cook it, particularly making it taste good. This recipe will alleviate such concerns because it screams with flavour. Discerning tastes will adore tofu once they try this dish. This tofu wears a crisp coconut layer that gives way to a moist and tender interior. Tofu’s nutritional profile reads like a great book. It is a star performer because it is low in calories, an excellent source of tryptophan, a very good source of manganese, iron, protein, selenium, and a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, just to name a few. tli@uwaterloo.ca

2/3 cup sugar snap peas 3/4 cup baby bok choy 1 cup shitake mushrooms 1 tbsp fish sauce 1/3 cup unsweetened flaked coconut 2 tbsp all- purpose flour 2 tbsp cornstarch, 4 tbsp canola oil 1 (14-oz) package extra-firm

water-packed tofu

Cook noodles in a pot of boiling water, 7-8 minutes for al dente and drain. Meanwhile, cook onion (diced) in oil in a wide 4-quart heavy pot over moderately high heat, stirring occasionally, until pale golden. Reduce heat to moderate, then add garlic and curry paste and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Stir in coconut milk, salt, and 1/4 cup of water and bring to a boil. Stir in vegetables and return to a boil. Cover pot, then reduce heat and cook at a brisk simmer, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. Simmer curry, partially covered, until vegetables are tender, about 3-4 minutes. Add noodles to coat. Remove pot from heat and stir in fish sauce and salt to taste. For the coconut encrusted tofu: Get a shallow dish and mix coconut, flour and cornstarch together. Cut the tofu into 8 rectangular pieces. Pat the tofu dry with a paper towel, sprinkle with salt, then press sides of each piece into the coconut mixture. Heat 2 tbsp oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 4 tofu pieces and cook until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side, adjusting heat as necessary to prevent scorching. Transfer the tofu to the rack-lined baking sheet and place in the oven (at 350F) to keep warm. Heat the remaining 2 tbsp oil in the skillet over medium-high heat; cook the remaining tofu pieces until golden brown, about 2 minutes per side.


Arts Local colour, blood and rust arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Anya Lomako staff reporter

Every time I get the luxury of seeing artists in their studio, I find myself foolishly hopeful to find them there with dirty, greasy hair and eyes glazed over with creative thought, hands covered in specks of paint. In this and only this, Paul Roorda disappointed me. He appeared at the door with a kind, welcoming smile on his face, looking quite normal. But I think any man with three busted beehives hanging in his studio should not have to wear his creativity on his sleeve. And like Roorda said, “Artist is a definition one decides for themselves,” and my archetype has no right affecting any artist. Paul Roorda’s mixed media collection, Where the Pages Once Were, is a mosaic with meaning. It intricately explores and challenges the value of traditional, ritualistic religious experiences in the face of contemporary spirituality. Contradictory and radical, the story of this collection begins in its roots — the materials which deserve as much attention as the subject matter. For this collection, Roorda focused on using natural materials saturated with symbolism to produce artifacts that reflect our ties to nature, religion and history as well as question our separation from them. Both the materials and methods of application are chosen to reflect the repetitive, meditative quality of traditional rituals. Among others, Where the Pages Once Were includes wine, gold, tea, smoke, beeswax, handmade paper, flowers, earth, stones and other religiously themed materials. However, Roorda says it is difficult to find permanent colours when using natural materials in his work: “I had to try and find a way of getting a stronger red — and that’s a trickier thing to find when it’s organic,” he explained, referring to his search for the perfect material to extract red dye from before finally settling on blood powder. Just like blood, beeswax is a recurring, symbolic material in the collection. Firstly, the application of beeswax is a repetitive process, and the end product both protects and preserves the paper. Secondly, it works to give the paper a translucent character, “revealing, protecting and preserving at the same time.”

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

The role of beeswax in Roorda’s work is contradictory, as is his approach to art. In comparing his work to more institutional modes of expression, such as academic writing, he said, “in university writing, you have to come to conclusions, and in my artwork I have the luxury of not coming to a conclusion but to keep asking more questions, to play with contradictions and ideas that have multiple meanings.” This statement embodies Where the Pages Once Were, where sacred bible pages serve as frames for manifestations of its passages through organic ingredients. This way, the distance between people and sacred materials prevalent to traditional religious values is removed, and the sacred object becomes a more active representation of religiousness. Previous to this collection, Roorda contributed to University of Waterloo’s 50-year anniversary by completing a mixed media work titled “Fifty: Upholding Imagination” to mark the occasion. Roorda says that in composing this piece he wanted to present a work that could “deal with history in an institution and the idea of knowledge.” This piece consists of 50 envelopes with encyclopedia excerpts and visual fragments to represent the diversity of faculties at the University of Waterloo, prints of which were presented to the 50 alumni chosen to receive the 50th Anniversary Alumni Award. By the end of the interview, I began to see the clear resemblance between Paul and his art; just like his work, Paul is a man of complex meaning, containing a multitude of identities I could distinguish from seeing him for only an hour; I could see a hint of father, husband, teacher and artist all flourishing in one individual. In short, his collection explores the contradition familiar to humanity on an individual and collective level — the place of tradition in our lives. Paul Roorda’s collection, Where the Pages Once Were, is on display at the Kitchener Rotunda Gallery located inside Kitchener City Hall as part of the artist-in-residence program. Month-long exhibitions are open to the public free of charge and the gallery functions 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. on Sunday. For other collections, visit Paul Roorda’s personal website, www.paulroorda.com. alomako@imprint.com

courtesy of Paul Roorda

Paul Roorda’s showing, Where the Pages Once Were, is on display at the Kitchener Rotunda gallery inside Kitchener City Hall. The mixed media pieces shown here are “Key and Nails (Detail)“ in the upper right, “Genesis and Apocalypse (Detail)“ in the lower left, and “Mark (Miracle)“ in the lower right.


14

Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Movie Review

Dance to this Boney M’s 1978 hit “Rasputin” off in combination with the voices of band’s disarray and seemingly unspecitheir album Night Flight to Venus is a Liz Mitchell and Marcia Barrett. In fied copyright laws. This means that disco classic. If you haven’t heard this turn neither Bobby Farrell or Maizie after 1990, theoretically, there could song there is a good chance you were Williams recorded any of Boney M’s be four bands touring under the title sheltered as a child. It topped charts Music. However, all members were of Boney M at the same time. Let’s in Germany, Austria and Australia and said to perform their own vocals live. hope that in a similar action courts will reached number two on charts in the Although a quick search of Boney M’s also grant each member of those four UK and Switzerland. It also became live performances on YouTube may touring bands the rights to Boney M so that, in due time — if the process well established in North America raise some suspicions. A search on YouTube will also of splitting-up and rights distribu— check it out. “Rasputin” provides a crude reveal why Boney M has been such tion continues — Boney M will have late-life biography of the mysterious a success. Try searching “Boney M- enough members to form a country Russian man named Grigori Rasputin. Daddy Cool.” If you’re lucky you will and perhaps even join the United Historians explain that Rasputin was a find the live performance in which Nations. I don’t want to get carried monk and medicine man that healed Bobby Farrell is wearing what appears away, but if this were to happen there the hemophilia of a boy named Alexei to be a woman’s white blazer (minus is a good chance the world would who was son of Tsar Nicholas II, an undershirt) with white sultan pants find peace in the music and dance emperor and autocrat of the Russians. similar to Aladdin’s in the Disney of Boney M. On October 13, 2007 After providing this service BBC News ran a story — one that had been hard ...“Rasputin” is a song that which explained that the to come by — Rasputin country of Georgia (on bonded with the family and could fit into your next party the boarder of Russia) had gained advisor-like status that resulted in him having playlist. However, if your party hired Marcia Barrett, one of the original Boney M mema strong influence in the bers, to perform a concert politics of Russia. Apparbranches away from Russian in a village near the heart ently this worried the wrong history and more toward of the troubled country’s kind of people and lead to BBC quoted a gang killing of Rasputin slightly humorous sex appeal, battlegrounds. Georgian President Mikhail in 1916. Saakashvili’s explanation There is much uncertry Boney M’s “Daddy Cool” of the idea behind the tainty about Rasputin’s concert. He said, “We hope religious involvement, his sexual relations and his death. Mak- movie Aladdin and a necklace with that we’ll lure out people from their ing his life all the more interesting a dangerous animal’s tooth hanging trenches, force them to drop [their] to read about and evidently to sing from it. It’s a sexy performance. One Kalashnikovs, come here and dance that illustrates the sort of talent that with the others and understand that about as well. Boney M, the brainchild of Ger- got Boney M on tour in the USSR nothing is as nice as peace, nothing man music producer and songwriter despite the government’s ban on songs is as nice as reconciliation.” Peace induced by the sounds of Boney M. Frank Farian was originally comprised like “Rasputin.” Throughout their existence Boney How about that. of four members: Liz Mitchell, Bobby Like much of Boney M’s music, Farrell, Maizie Williams and Marcia M has gone through a number of Barrett. The all-knowing Wikipedia alterations by adding and removing “Rasputin” is a song that could fit into explains that the Boney M sound of members. In 1990 a court ruling your next party playlist. However, if R&B/disco was actually made up of granted each of the four original your party branches away from RusFrank Farian’s studio altered deep members the right to perform their sian history and more toward slightly voice as well as his high falsetto voice own Boney M shows because of the humorous sex appeal, try Boney M’s “Daddy Cool.” If neither are going to fit, try Boney M’s rendition of the African tune, “Malaika.” It’s a relaxed and happy song that can fit into many different social scenes. Whether it be for peace, love, or semi-accurate Russian history, there is a good chance you’ll enjoy one of the many songs Boney M has to offer. ktremblay@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

courtesy popmatters.com

National Treasure: Book of Secrets Jon Turteltaub Jerry Bruckheimer Films

Benjamin Franklin Gates and his energetic, resourceful team of treasure hunters should seriously consider a career in tactical espionage. The only thing less believable than the location of each subsequent clue is the relative ease by which they seem to acquire it. As the sequel to the 2004 hit National Treasure (the Bruckheimer treasure quest not involving pirates), National Treasure: Book of Secrets has our patriotically-named hero looking for more clues, avoiding more bad guys, and breaking-and-entering into increasingly implausible places. The Queen’s chambers? Piece of cake. The Oval Office? No problem. Suddenly, the lock on my door doesn’t seem so reassuring anymore. However, I must admit there is indeed something about treasure that makes history fascinating. For some reason I still remember significant amounts of American history, long after the mystery has been solved and the movie has ended. Are we so yearning of vast riches and materialistic fulfillment, or are we simply trying to satisfy the inexplicable hunger for adventure? While this newfound knowledge may only help me if I end up on an episode of Jeopardy some time in the future, I definitely won’t be forgetting it any time soon. Or at least until midterms.

Purchase a Student Discount Membership and get your movies for half price all term long!

Student Discount Memberships Available Jan 1 - 21.

As far as excitement-filled, puzzlesolving adventure movies go, Book of Secrets certainly does not disappoint. After having his great-great grandfather accused of being the main conspirator in the Lincoln assassination, Ben Gates is on a quest to not only find one of the greatest treasures hidden by the country’s forefathers, but also to clear his own family name. Things start to get hectic when another party interested in the treasure is hot on their trail. Forced for his family’s sake and enticed by his own craving for truth, Gates and his team are catapulted across continents and historic landmarks as time is running out. Nicolas Cage returns as the main protagonist, and while this may not be his finest work to date, he does give a noteworthy performance. If you thought being a treasure hunter in this day and age is practically and financially ridiculous, he could probably make you think otherwise. Also worthy of mention is Justin Bartha, playing the role of techie/hacker/computer guy and Ben’s trusted friend Riley Poole. His witty one-liners and antics are sure to draw a laugh, and help to relieve the constant tension being built up throughout the movie. And with big names like Jon Voight, Helen Mirren and Ed Harris rounding off the list, you can expect quality performances all around. Even though much of the novelty is worn off from the first movie, it has proven that it is still exciting to watch and worth the ticket price, topping the box office for three weeks straight. You can catch it in theatres for about one more week, so hurry. — Rajul Saleh

GOLDEN GLOBE WINNER: Best Original Song NOMINATED FOR 7 BROADCAST FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION AWARDS! BEST FILM, BEST DIRECTOR, BEST ACTOR, BEST WRITER, BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR AND ACTRESS, BEST SONG RATED 14A

INTO THE WILD

Sat & Sun: 4:00pm - Tues: 6:30pm Wed & Thurs: 9:00pm

6 Princess St. W., Waterloo 885-2950 www.princesscinemas.com


Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

15

Conventional comic contraptions When I was a little kid around the age of seven, I grew up with good ol’ Disney animations and Looney Tunes. Naturally, I was always jealous of the characters in the shows. Every time Road Runner zipped through Wile E. Coyote’s boulder-paintings of road tunnels, it

made me want to do that. And I almost tried it, too. Of course, being very much afraid (and sane), I always stopped just before I touched the wall. I love it when a comic or cartoon can implement a really good gag or if an artist/writer can express a unique

sense of humour with even well-worn tools. So I’m going to have a bit of fun this week and share some of my favourite comic motifs, as seen in the world of graphic novels, webcomics and cartoons. (Huh. Would you look at that? I actually used “comic motif ” in my column.) One particular form is the infamous bad pun. This being mostly a literary tool for comedy, it imbues the groaning factor of jokes, complete with witty (or worse, non-witty) phrasing, alliteration, and hyperbole. To those who’ve been reading Mike “Mookie” Terracciano’s Dominic Deegan: Oracle for Hire, you guys know exactly what I mean. Some of the ending lines on Mookie’s comic strips are just — well, it’s just so bad! Yet it helps to accentuate the humour extremely and the lines in the strip build up towards it. It’s jokes like these that make you pissed off at homonyms like “night” and “knight,” yet love them all over again. Another humour motif sometimes used in comics and cartoons is called “breaking the fourth wall.” Again, this may be very familiar to English, drama

and film majors. Imagine that a space within a comic panel is a basic room, the shape of a box, and the audience of the comic can see through one of these walls — the fourth wall — to the interior of the room. Breaking the fourth wall is when the characters in the comic are fully aware of their audience and their own, fabricated existence. This can manifest in very drawn out dialogue, or it can be a simple stare at the audience in the last panel of a page from all of the characters, after they’ve realized they said something out-of-character. I’ve used this method a couple of times myself, having my characters actually talk to me face-to-face, knowing full well what they are. Of course, I’m not the first to do this. Greg Dean’s Real Life (www.reallifecomics.com) does similar, except he usually writes himself as three personas: Greg the character, the actual Greg (making his dialogue come out from the panels as if he’s an overseer), and Greg’s real-world avatar within the comic (the same method I mentioned using). A concept such as this can draw humour and dialogue between characters from all directions. One more concept is something

called “hammerspace”, or “magic satchel.” This device relates back to my envy of the road-tunnel painting; it’s the absurdly infinite space that a character uses to contain objects that would usually not fit in the container, such as a pocket or a purse. The term hammerspace refers to the common use of animated characters drawing out 50-foot mallets out of random containers, such as a change purse or a bag of groceries. This overdose of suspended disbelief is effective for making characters seem more lively and outstanding. Tons of cartoons come to mind, especially Warner Bros.’ and Steven Spielberg’s Animaniacs. Wakko’s gag bag was one of the best things in the cartoon (except for the historical jingles). You’d be amazed how original oldhat techniques can be in the right hands. (And it helps when you haven’t seen them in a while.) I’ve mentioned this before, but it bears repeating: the method may not be original anymore, but the method for using that method can still create an entirely new concept. ptrinh@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

STUDENT SPECIAL! JOIN TODAY!

3 MONTHS FOR

204!

$

*

Lose Weight, Feel Great & Live Longer! GoodLife makes it all possible.

1-800-597-1FIT or visit goodlifefitness.com 01 18 08 �

SUBJECT TO CLASSIFICATION

*When joining, you will be required to pay $204 + applicable tax. Membership expires 3 months from date of purchase. Must be 18 years of age or older and show valid student ID. Platinum and platinum plus clubs excluded. Offer ends January 31st, 2008. Other restrictions may apply, see club for details.


16

Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Gaming companies go for the green Final franchise-ity, super merchandising and world of ware-craft We’ve all fallen victim to the marketing ploys of our favourite industry brands. Even without more incentive than the product itself, we consumers have a tendency to believe that if a company makes one thing great, everything else they produce must also be great too, and our purchases reflect that mentality very well. In gaming, one aspect of this trend is commonly known as “fanboy-dom” and can result in blind allegiance to any given producer, game maker, or even series to the point that the consumer may not even know the purpose of their obsession anymore. While this is an extreme case of what I’m trying to get at, we all have our fan-boy moments, and those moments are what industry businessmen market towards. There are three big culprits who take advantage of our need to fill the merchandising gap left by non-gaming (or in some cases, our obsession with playing), with gaming-related paraphernalia: Square Enix (Squenix), Nintendo and Blizzard. Squenix, in all its glory, has built a huge following from its classic and long running series and standalone titles, such as Final Fantasy, Kingdom Hearts, Chrono Trigger and Dragon Quest. While adoration may be deserved from this RPGgiant’s video games, what should be analyzed closer are the marketing tactics. The obvious point here would be to make light of their wide range of collectible plush toys, key chains,

necklaces and other various trinkets. We all know that Mario Party CVII is for a little piece of childhood. On the note of grasping wallets, However, something more unique probably inevitable at some point in that comes to mind is their general the future, but I’m sure most of us can one of the most multi-dimensional attempt to pull game elements out agree that Nintendo needs to broaden culprits in the franchising game these into the real world. To help kick off their gaming horizons to encapsulate days is definitely Blizzard, most nothe release of Final Fantasy XII, as more than what a little red plumber, tably with their line of purchaseables well as to help further franchise prof- green elf-boy or mechano-suit wearing for World of Warcraft (WoW). For its, Squenix released a line of energy gal can offer us. Unfortunately, one the sake of simplification, let’s negate drinks based on the most common of the biggest things that helps keep the fact that subscribers to WoW pay “potion” vials from the game itself. Nintendo on this seemingly never- a monthly fee to even play the game This collection of bottled gaming es- ending cycle is the meaning behind after their initial purchase, since this is sence includes drinks titled “potion,” their product. Nintendo sells nostalgia the case in most MMOs. Instead, what “elixir,” “ether” and other memorable to those who have grown with it and Blizzard really excels at is their marketing of products in the real world potent potables. Coupled with a that tie into the game itself. With media campaign (www.youtube. com/watch?v=BG0gm_hdu5I) ...there will always be incentives of receiving special loot or items in the actual game, WoW’s that depicted people who drank the drinks performing tasks one people looking to revisit merchandise flies off the shelf into hands of those hoping to win would normally experience in Final their youth, allowing the the MMO lottery. On the simplest Fantasy, Square Enix’s ploy is a good example of how to mix an easily new ways for Nintendo of these levels lies the World of Warcraft trading card game. While recognizable aspect of gameplay to grasp onto our wallets a game unto itself based on the into a marketable product. MMO predecessor, the card packs Another really successful franfor a little piece of purchased for this game also have chising company (though arguably a chance to contain a special loot overdone these days) is Nintendo. childhood. card that can offer an extremely Over the years, this nostalgic rare item to the lucky person who producer has developed so much merchandise that chances are any item those that are new to it, a playful yet finds one. Not only is this incentive that you think of to buy has Mario, almost familiar (thanks to their mar- enough to purchase the cards, but Link or some other immensely popu- keting) realm to indulge in. While the add in the additional game they can lar character’s face on it — and I’m fluffy Kirbys continue to line our walls develop, and the fact that any found sure we can all think of quite a few and various genres of Mario games loot cards could lead to real world ridiculous examples of this even from continue on our shelves, it cannot be money through EBay due to their rarour own experiences. While they have denied how well Nintendo has caught ity, and right off the bat, Blizzard has been extremely successful at what us in its grasp. Though we may not us by the purse strings. More recently, they do, the flooding of the gaming constantly indulge in them, these Dell and Blizzard have also teamed merchandise industry by Nintendo is relics of gaming have infiltrated our up to offer a WoW computer (www. something that quickly feels overdone. hearts and thus Nintendo can never dell.com/content/topics/segtopic. really lose, since there will always be aspx/m1730_wow?c=us&cs=19&l= people looking to revisit their youth, allowing new ways for Nintendo to grasp onto our wallets in exchange

en&s=dhs&dgc=EM&cid=26383&l id=601037). Complete with its own array of rare loot, collectables and even a behind the scenes DVD of the making of WoW, this computer is almost a means of a euphoric high for true Warcraft addicts. Finally, one of the biggest and hottest topics in Blizzard’s franchising arsenal is their “Figure Print.” Give any player the option to have an action figure made of their very own in-game character and you have a recipe for increased game subscriptions and purchasing of other franchise products. All in all, with this scenario, Blizzard has effectively helped to create itself a bait and hook to keep rolling in the dough till the next big MMO can bring it down. Chocobo and Companion Cube plushies, Halo 3 action figures and novelty DS cases have all either graced our desks or our minds in one form of another in our indulgence of idolized franchises. Even if we deny their existence in our lives, there is not a single true gamer who cannot deny they’d love to have even just one piece of their favourite game’s merchandise. Nothing says gaming status like your very own plushie pet cactuar or 1up mushroom piggie bank, right? jrickert@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

live? o t lace p a r g fo n i k Loo

Look no further... Benefits from choosing WCRI: - Minutes walk from UW campus, - Lower than market fees, - On-site laundry and maintenance, - Regular organized social events, - And much more. Don’t miss out on a great housing experience. Apply now! Applications are accepted year-round. Seniority deadlines are always: - March 1st for Fall, - October 1st for Winter, and - February 1st for Spring.

WCRI: A whole new way to live together! Contact us today for more information or to arrange a tour. web: www.wcri.coop e-mail: info@wcri.coop phone: 519-884-3670 address: 268 Phillip Street, Waterloo

YoseF Yip


Distractions

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Crossword

1

Tim Foster

17

Across 1. Precede omegas 5. Agricultural locale 9. Controversies 14. Deep South denial 15. Position of something else 16. Danger 17. Delights 19. Prepared 20. Somewhat (2 wds) 21. Hitpoint 23. Hidebound 25. Best of the past 30. Silky synthetic 32. Newspaper boss 33. One thickness of something 36. Chalky rock 38. UN labour organization 39. Clay pigeon 40. Untruth 41. Reemit of light 44. Mote 46. ____ and feathered 47. Compound of oxygenjoined alkyl groups 49. Nepalese mountaineers 51. Sequential occurrences 54. Archaic, until 56. Made to match 58. Separate 62. Classical band 64. Trois in English 65. Affectionate, father 66. Stepped 67. Oversized glove 68. Slang, shredded cabbage 69. Utters Down 1. Cervical cancer tests 2. Storage towers 3. Unreactive

Sudoku 2

2

6 1 5 2 9 5

2 7

4

5

14

6

21 24 30 34

Saw you dancing with your friends at Caesar’s on Saturday, I’m sure you saw me standing with my buddy off

11

12

13

26

27

28

29

22 25

31

35

36

38

10

19

42

44

46

47 50 54 59

60

61

48 51

55 62

52

57

63 66

67

68

69

34. Muslim god 35. Not “I am” 37. Becomes acquainted with 39. Mid-sized car 42. Hockey player Bobby 43. Considers 44. Deliver legal papers to 45. Religious officials 48. Donkey noise 50. Halts 52. Bone cavities 53.Vietnam war photographer Catherine 55. About the mouth 57. Fathers 58. Money dispenser 59. 21st Greek letter 60. Creative skill 61. Withdrawn from active service 63. Accountancy student’s goal (US)

“The Shit.”

Justin Andrushko & Tom Bruce 1B recreation and business and 4A arts and business

“Loo radio.”

Carina Francioso 2B fine arts

Jan. 11 solutions

Tim Foster

2

53

56

65

4. Height 5. Soft and light 6.Ventilate 7. String winder 8. Harmonious sounds 9. Jam, jelly, and honey 10. Golf ball stand 11. Irish militants 12. Make something go away 13. Cunning 18. System for finding survivors lost at sea by triangulating an explosive sound 22. Naval group 24.Yellow parts of eggs 26. Take a chair 27. Shawl 28. Strong chemical bond type 29. Stream 31. Nephew’s sister 33. Raises

by Mark Kimmich

45

64

1 8

What is a hip new name for the station?

40

43

49

brand our campus radio station CKMS.

32

39

41

You have been commissioned to re-

37

tfoster@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

9

9

7 9 1 1 2 2 4 8 9 8 6 5

Missed Connections My name is Alastair Lahtinen, I am broadcasting on all AM frequencies. I am a survivor living in Waterloo. I haven’t seen another person in three years. I will be at the SLC great hall every Friday at 1PM in a red sweater with a rainbow. If you are out there, if anyone is out there... I can provide food... I can provide shelter... I can provide security. If there is anyone out there, anybody... please... you are not alone.

9

18

23

58

8

16

20

33

7

15

8 3

6 9 3 5

3

17

to the side. I went to get a drink, and when I came back you were gone. I didn’t even get a chance to get your name. I’ll be sure to keep my eyes open in case I see you again, hopefully you’ll do the same. Hey #3, I really thought we hit it off last term. Let me know, am I crazy? Or is there something between us? I see you from time to time on campus, I know you don’t see me. I’m too shy to talk to you, but I know you are in the Gamer’s Club, I used to go on occasion because I knew you were

3 9 2 4 6 5 7 8 1 S C R A P E

P A E L L A

C H B E C R R A G S

E T U I

7 5 4 2 1 8 9 3 6

8 1 6 9 3 7 2 4 5

1 8 7 5 2 9 4 6 3

A S A C R R A T G U M N I E A T S R N T T R I A R A C L A Y T E H A V D A L E A L L I L E S S Y

6 4 9 3 7 1 8 5 2 N G E E D O N E E M R I H A T A L T E R L A M E N O C R T P I S H O E N A

5 2 3 8 4 6 1 7 9

9 7 5 1 8 3 6 2 4

P E A U L P E S B I S N E D U G S U T E R S Y S

4 3 8 6 9 2 5 1 7 A L T A R I T S E L F

C O S T

2 6 1 7 5 4 3 9 8 E P E E

N E E D E R

“I would name it after myself.”

3B kinesiology

1B biology

Tracy Smith & Cheryl Patten

Deana Bettencourt

D E A D

P H I S O N I C S R I F F L E

“What’s that?”

E R R A T A

“The radio station that no one listens to.” Taylor Gordon

“SJU radio — ‘cause then it would be cool.” Laura Deyell & Steph Martyres

“Jessica.”

“Hip Nation — as if.”

4B computer science

4B religious studies and 4A english

there. When I see you I can only think dirty thoughts. I don’t expect any reactions from you though, and don’t be scared, I’m not stalking you. You just seem to pop up all the time and I had to tell someone how I was feeling. Looking forward to laying my eyes on you again soon. — Desperate Dreamer Missed a connection? Wanna break the ice? Email mkimmich@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Jessica Wong & Gunwoo Wang 3B statistics and Master’s student, system design engineering

Brittany DuQuesnay 4B history


Science

science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Delving into engineering design 2008 Design Project Symposium showcases innovative projects from UW students Adrienne Raw science editor

The 2008 Design Project Symposium will showcase innovative projects from UW’s electrical and computer engineering (ECE) students on Wednesday, January 23. A total of 60 interactive projects will be presented in the DC first floor from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. “The symposium showcases the many skills and talents of our students,” said Dr. William Bishop, fourth-year design project co-ordinator. Bishop, a faculty member in the ECE department, has consulted on over 20 projects during his five years working with design projects, helping students select topics and guiding them through the engineering design process. The Design Project Symposium is an opportunity for students to have their hard work displayed and appreciated. “Often, family and friends attend the symposium so it provides a convenient forum for students to explain their work to the many people who have supported them in their studies,” said Bishop. On the day of the symposium, the top design project team receives the Infusion Cup, a trophy and $2,000 prize awarded to the team that creates and presents the best overall design project. The Infusion Cup is provided through sponsorship by Infusion Development and its sister company Infusion Angels, located in the Waterloo Research and Technology Park. The event, now in its eighth year, is the culmination of an intensive design project course sequence for more

than 250 senior undergraduates. “The symposium is the final stage in a long process,” said Bishop. “In preparation for the symposium, our students learn about real-world engineering design and analysis through the design project.” The design project series of courses consists of three courses beginning with an introduction to the requirements of the engineering design projects and the formation of fourperson teams. The final-year course of the program challenges students to work in teams to identify and address a specific design problem. This year’s projects include a prototype automatic transmission system for a bicycle, a machine that automatically detects and picks up garbage and a system that would help rescuers locate avalanche victims faster. The symposium itself also serves to test and teach students. Projects are presented through both a poster and a seminar, which are widely used formats at trade shows and conferences. The 20-minute seminars run throughout the morning and afternoon and are grouped into topics ranging from entertainment systems to medical devices and systems. Poster presentations include display boards and project prototypes set up where interested member of the public can ask questions. “Arguably,” said Bishop, “the symposium also evaluates the professional development of our students, through their interactions with visitors and reviewers.” The symposium is a high profile event that attracts attention from local media as well as media outside the

COURTESY CHRIS HUGHES

ECE students stand with their 2006 Design Project Symposium poster presentations. The above Automated Blackjack Dealer featured on Daily Planet’s 2006 feature on the symposium. province. The 2006 Design Project Symposium was featured on Daily Planet in a segment showcasing the Automated Blackjack Dealer, one of the 2006 projects. The local community is also attracted to the event. “It is not uncommon for local companies to send representatives to the symposium to recruit our students,” said Bishop.

The symposium is open to the general public. “Visitors of all ages are welcome to attend the symposium and are welcome to ask questions of our students.” Bishop hopes UW student and off-campus visitors will take ad-

vantage of the opportunity to come see the work of the ECE students. Further information is available at the ECE Design Projects website: http://eceprojects.uwaterloo.ca. araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

photos courtesy chris hughes

TOP 8 LIFE-CHANGING TRIPS FOR 2008

Mitch Martel Full-time laboratory technician and part-time Bachelor of Science student at Athabasca University.

Need a prerequisite, extra credits? Have a scheduling conflict? Your choice Choose from over 700 distance or online courses to complement your studies at your home university. Your terms Start courses anytime of the year and study at home, or wherever you may find yourself. Take the first step Talk to your academic advisor to make sure courses will transfer, then visit our website or call to register.

Finally, a university that’s all about you. Canada’s leader in distance and online education.

www.athabascau.ca 1-800-788-9041

1. Volunteer in incredible Ghana 2. Italian courses in Florence 3. Australian Surf School 4. Photo Vietnam with a professional 5. River cruise through the Amazon 6. Polar Bears up close 7. Climb Kilimanjaro (you can!) 8. Thai Cooking courses in Bangkok Call us for all the life-changing details!

University Shops Plaza 170 University Ave. W (519) 886-0400 1-888-FLY-CUTS (359-2887)

Canada’s Student Travel Experts

www.travelcuts.com


Science

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

19

Help a brother out, pass the Monistat Anyone who has ever had a yeast infection knows that, despite the cheese-related jokes, it is no laughing matter. In fact, it is a lying down matter, since the irritation in the genital area is usually too bothersome to walk to the pharmacy. This in mind, next time your boyfriend asks you to help him out in a trying and difficult time, be understanding and pass him the Monistat. Surprised? Don’t be. Yeast infec-

tions don’t discriminate between the sexes; they are caused by overgrowth of a naturally occurring fungus in the body — Candida. Therefore, when a yeast infection occurs, the key to regaining health is to restore the Candida balance rather than remove it from your body in its entirety. This fungus is prevalent in both genders — and therefore creates a possibility for both males and females to develop a yeast infection. What is the cause of yeast infec-

tions? In Ontario, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care suggests that “tight clothing, severe obesity, warm weather, stress, antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, diabetes, and steroids can all cause increased numbers of yeast.” Birth control can change microbial flora population in the body, allowing the naturally occurring Candida levels to fluctuate, and possibly reach a harmful level. The same is true for antibiotics,

joyce hsu

which affect the body’s immune defence. This is why taking probiotic health supplements is an important part of antibiotic health treatments — they keep the microbial levels in your body balanced. Since the infection can be spread through sexual contact, it is recommended to refrain from sexual activity while you have an infection as you can pass it onto your partner, and they back to you, thus lengthening the recovery period. In this case abstinence isn’t hard to sustain, as with genital irritation typically comes painful intercourse which no amount of lube or foreplay can resolve. If you suspect you may have a yeast infection, it is important to seek professional medical attention immediately. This will help you get rid of the infection as fast as possible. Some of the symptoms of yeast infections include irritation, swelling and painful intercourse. When diagnosed with a yeast infection, it is very important to alter your clothing patterns while symptoms persist. If you are fond of tightly-fitted underwear, switch to loose boxers for the period of the infection; this will make it harder for the bacteria to multiply, as in a warm, cramped environment the chances of survival are much greater. Less isn’t necessarily more; don’t fail to wear underwear if you plan on wearing rough pant fabric such as denim — this will cause friction with an already sensitive area, causing further irritation. Going commando with pyjama bottoms is a very wise choice while symptoms persist. Medicinally, antifungal creams are typically the most effective and efficient method of yeast infection treatment. These are applied topically to the affected area until symptoms die out, and are available in pharmacies without a prescription. There are more natural treatment options as well, as common herbs such as cinnamon, oregano, Echinacea and tea tree oil are common yeast fighters and can be combined with other antifungal methods under the guidance of a homeopathic advisor. Body and Health Canada suggests three easy to live by suggestions for staying free of yeast infections. First of all, the old saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away,” needs an update to include yogurt in the regimen. A cup of yogurt a day is rich in Lactobacillus acidophilus, an active bacteria, can help keep the microbial flora in your body level. Secondly, modifying your wardrobe to avoid pants snug around the groin area can decrease the risk of yeast infections by getting rid of Candida’s favourite environment — warm,

Yeast Infection Symptoms Female Yeast Infection Symptoms • Vaginal irritation • Vaginal itching • Heightened genital sensitivity • Burning sensation • Redness of genital area • Genital swelling • Painful intercourse • White, clumpy vaginal discharge

Male Yeast Infection Symptoms • Irritation and soreness of the head of the penis • Heightened genital sensitivity • Severe itching in the head of the penis • Redness of genital area • Small blisters on the head of the penis • Painful intercourse • White, clumpy discharge cramped spaces. Also, cotton undergarments also tend to cause less vaginal irritation than synthetic ones. Lastly, it is important to keep the genital area clean and dry, making it difficult for the yeast to find an environment to flourish in. Seeing how the symptoms of yeast infections are so pungent, following these simple steps to keeping your genital health in check is a fair deal. alomako@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

USE YOUR WATCARD 465 PHILLIP STREET LOCATION ONLY LIMITED TIME OFFER

746-6893

at 160 University Ave., W., (at Phillip St.)WATERLOO 519-886-6490 www.bignight.ca


Sports

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Warriors start the year with a bang Yang Liu sports editor

The men’s volleyball team has had a season that can be described as one of peaks and valleys. A superb 4-1 high to start the season was brought to a humbling low after getting trounced in consecutive games by the OUA number one McMaster Marauders and the OUA number two Guelph Gryphons. Since then the Warriors have failed to gain any traction as they skid along with the pack, failing to register consecutive wins since October. They however, managed to head into the break on a winning note, with a 3-1 victory in Toronto over the UofT Blues. The Warriors hoped that the new year would bring more consistency to their game and that they would be able to separate themselves from the second tier of the OUA. This past weekend, they had just that chance with rematches against York and UofT at home in the PAC. UW had previously lost to York in their second-last match before the winter break. This would be their opportunity to not only avenge the earlier loss, but to put some distance between themselves and a team just half a game behind them in the standings at 6-5. Waterloo and York were locked in a tight battle in the first set, trading points until late when two service aces by Tyler Vivian allowed the Warriors to pull away to a 25-22 victory. The second set was a story of York dominance at the net, with Waterloo’s mistakes allowing York to take the lead midway in the set which they did not relinquish. Four errant serves by the Warriors contributed to their 22-25 defeat in the second set. The third set did not start well either for the Warriors as York jumped out to a 7-3 lead. Deft passing in the offensive

Johnny Tang

The men’s volleyball team practise their spikes after two big wins on the weekend against York and Toronto at home. end allowed York to dominate with spike after spike kill, and Waterloo never really finding the rhythm in their end, allowed York to win 25-18 and put the Warriors on the edge. However, the Warriors would not roll over even though all the momentum was in York’s court. The Warriors pounced on York early in the fourth set

jumping out to a 10-3 lead and never looking back as every aspect of their game was in sync, routing York 25-12 to force a final set. With the crowd now pumped from the abrupt shift in tide in the Warriors favour, the final set was undoubtedly a very tight, nerve wrecking battle, as both teams matched each

other serve for serve, block for block, point for point. With the game tied at 13-13, and the players feeding off the crowd’s tangible energy, the Warriors made an impressive frontcourt block to end the game at match point. See VOLLEYBALL, page 22

Untangling the complexities of cricket

photos by tom ellis

Two English teams duel in a one-day test match at Lords Cricket Ground. Tom Ellis staff reporter

The game of cricket has long failed to register on the plasma television screens of the average North American. Many would be surprised to learn that the U.S. and Canada have their own cricket teams, with the latter taking part in the 2007 International Cricket Council World Cup. While, there is no doubt many reasons that cricket has failed to capture the public’s imagination, the main reason the game has not caught on is because of the lack of understanding of the rules and the way the game is played. The question most often posed is how can two teams play for five days and the match end up in a tie? Beginning with the basics, a game of cricket is contested between two teams of 11 players. It begins with a coin toss to determine which

side has the choice of batting or bowling first. Basically, the object of cricket is to score the highest number of runs while batting, and to concede the fewest runs possible while bowling the other team out. The bowling team can get the opposition out, also known as ‘taking their wickets,’ in a number of ways such as through a catch, a run out or by hitting the stumps. As such, it can be seen as comparable to baseball, but the similarities end there. Runs are scored by the two batsmen running between the sets of stumps (also known as the wickets) at either ends of the pitch. Six runs are scored if the ball crosses the boundary rope at the edge of the field from the air, and four if it bounces before crossing. Like any sport, cricket has many technical terms which require explanation to aid understanding and promote enjoyment while watch-

Lords Cricket Ground situated in London, England is a world renowned field. ing. The first is an “over” which refers to the six balls bowled by a bowler (pitcher) before he must be replaced by a team mate. There is no limit to the number of overs bowled in test cricket, but it is against the rules to bowl two consecutive overs. For those bowled over by confusing terms, the BBC Sport website, as well as numerous others, offers more detailed explanations and fixture listings. Cricket was first played in England and became the national sport during the 18th Century. Australia is the dominant force in world cricket, leading both the test and one day rankings, closely followed by India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan amongst others. There are three formats of cricket. Test matches last for five days and each side has two innings to bat and bowl twice. One-day cricket

is the one with limited overs used in the World Cup. Each team bats for 50 overs, striving to score as many runs as possible, and looking to limit the runs scored by the opposition when bowling. The third form, also the newest and most exciting version of cricket is called 20/Twenty. In this form of the game, each side only has 20 overs in which to score runs, and it is this form of the game that has the greatest potential to attract the interest of non-cricketing nations as it is far more intense and fast-paced thanks to both limits in time and overs. It is much more suited to North American viewers as it manages to create a loud and exhilarating atmosphere, ending with each match offering a guaranteed, but hotly debated result. tellis@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Sports

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

21

Fighting the winter blues You open the blinds and all you can see outside is a dreary gray. You think to yourself: Okay, let’s sleep for another hour. By the time you wake up three hours later, a blinding snow storm has hit and all desire to go outside and run errands has been drained from you. The Canadian winter is a harsh and unforgiving mistress. At times it just feels easier to shut yourself in your room and relax in your pajamas. We all want to live balanced and active lives, but apathy hits us the hardest especially as the days get shorter and colder. Staying active may seem like a huge challenge, especially when the sidewalk to the gym is all icy and it’s ten below outside. Plopping on the couch to watch Heroes is far easier than braving the

cold to run on a treadmill. However, during winter (more than ever), getting out of the house and staying active is a priority not only for your physical health, but for your mental health. Fighting the temptation to stay inside means maintaining a diverse set of interests and activities that have a social and physical component beyond finger flexing for the clicking of your remote control. According to the American Psychiatric Association, nearly one in ten adults suffer from some form of depression. A survey conducted by the American College Health Association found that among students however, nearly 15 per cent reported suffering from depression in the last year. For students depression can not

only destroy your social life but your academic goals as well. As depression can interfere with concentration,your ability to think clearly and cause you to lose interest in all previously enjoyed activities. Those who exercise regularly and lead an active lifestyle are far less likely to suffer from depression than sedentary people. A study published in Psychosomatic Medicine now shows that depression can set in once regular exercise ceases. Exercise decreases stress and inflamation, which are believed to be possible causes of depression. Getting adequate sunlight during winter may be another factor in preventing the onset of symptoms. Studies by the National Institute of Health in Bethesda, Maryland discovered that even 30

minutes of vigorous exercise three times a week may be able to stave off depression. But it’s not all about just solitary exercise at the gym; playing pick-up basketball or volleyball with friends works just the same. The real point is finding time to get out of the house and do things which burn off calories and keep you both physically and mentally occupied. Whether that be dancing up a storm at a club, organizing a fundraiser for a charity, or even volunteering at your friendly school paper (hint hint). Even if you’re up to your neck in schoolwork, your body will thank you for it 30 years down the road with sustained good health.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., hosted by Sandy Churchmach, registered dietitian. For info, location call 519743-9091. Sunday, January 27, 2008 Come walk or skate in support of the Alzheimer Society, “Manulife Walk for Memories” from 2 to 4 p.m., Waterloo Memorial Rec Complex. Registration begins at 1 p.m. Register online at www.walkformemories.ca or call 519-742-1422. Wednesday, January 30, 2008 Ladies WOW Fun Seminar Series – 6:30 to 10 p.m. at the Arthur and area Community Centre. For more info call Wendy at 519-342-4029 or wsmith@wisemoove.com. Saturday, February 16, 2008 Women’s Crisis Services of Waterloo Region is proud to present “Hockey Night in Waterloo Region with NHL hockey legend Darryl Sittler,” at St. George Banquet Hall, 665 King Street N, Waterloo. Call 519-653-8966, ext 239 or shelly.friesen@wcswr. org for more info.

e-mail youth@kitchener.ca. Distress Line Volenteers Wanted - Canadian Mental Health Association is seeking caring volunteers to provide supportive listening and crisis deescalation to callers living in Waterloo Region. Please call 519-744-7645, ext 300.

CO-OP/CAREER SERVICES

Campus Bulletin “Morning Drive Radio Show” – 6:30 to 9 a.m., www.ckmsfm.ca >click on webcast, for the latest news, traffic, school closures, interviews and a great mix of music! To get your important events on the air, e-mail morningdrivel@yahoo. ca. If you have an interesting person that CKMS should interview call 519-884-2567 between 6:30 to 9 a.m....qualify for a prize! Win $1000, $500 or $200 award. UW, UWO, WLU, or U of G students. Submit transcript, cover letter, and two technical communication samples. Deadline February 29, 2008. Go to http://www.stc-soc.org/awards/thiessenaward. php. Doon Heritage Crossroads – February is workshop month – needlework, candlewick embroidery and genealogy. Call 519-748-1914 for info. Exchanges for undergraduates and graduates – 2008/09 academic years: Ontario/Rhone-Alpes, France, Ontario/Baden-Wurtemberg, Germany and Ontario/Maharastra-Goa, India. Scholarships available, for applications/deadlines please contact Maria Lango, ext 33999. MICEFA, Paris, France and the Chinese University of Hong Kong – internal deadline: March 17, 2008. For information and application forms contact Maria Lango, International Programs, Waterloo International, Needles Hall 1101, room 1113, ext 33999 or by e-mail mlango@uwaterloo.ca.

UPCOMING

Saturday, January 19, 2008 “Heads Up for Healthier Brains” – January is Alzheimer Awareness Month – Public Education Forums – what is dementia? What is Alzheimer’s disease? To be discussed from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Sunnyside Home, Heritage Hall, 247 Franklin St., N., Kitchener. RSVP to Alzheimer Society of KitchenerWaterloo at 519-742-1422. Tuesday, January 22, 2008 Volunteer/Internship Fair – Come out and meet representatives from a variety of local agencies to find out about volunteering opportunities of all kinds. Also, talk with representatives recruiting interns for very specific projects: setting up research, planning projects, preparing presentations, writing reports, performing data evaluations, planning events, managing a database, marketing for the organization — just to name a few. Join us between 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Life Centre, Great Hall. Renowned baroque violinist Linda Melsted performs music by J.S. Bach at 8 p.m. at the Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick Street, Kitchener. On January 24 she will be performing at the Guelph Youth Music Centre, 75 Cardigan Street, Guelph. For info on these events call 519-578-1570 or 877-520-2408 or tberns@magma.ca. Executive positions available – UW Alternative Fuels Team technical and business positions. Recruitment and information meeting at 5:30 p.m., SLC Multi-Purpose room. For info email recruit@uwaft. com. Thursday, January 24, 2008 Learning Disabilities Association of K-W is hosting a workshop “Healthy Habits for Effective Learning”

CHURCH SERVICE

St. Bede’s chapel at Renison College offers worship on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. or take a break mid-week with a brief silence followed by Celtic noon prayers on Wednesdays. Come and walk the labyrinth the second Thursday of each month, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more info contact Megan at 519-884-4404, ext 28604 or www.renison. uwaterloo.ca/ministry-centre.

STUDENT AWARDS FINANCIAL AID 2nd floor, Needles Hall, ext 33583. Please refer to safa.uwaterloo.ca to view the current loan pick up procedures and full listing of scholarships and awards. January 25: Final OSAP application deadline (with reduced funding) for fall and winter term. Deadline to submit Signature Pages and supporting documentation for fall and winter term. Last day to submit OSAP Rollover Form to add winter term to fall only term.

VOLUNTEER

Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence. One to three hours a week commitment. Call Canadian Mental Health 519-744-7645, ext 229. City of Waterloo, 519-888-6488 or volunteer@ city.waterloo.on.ca has the following volunteer opportunities: “55+ MC for Friday Flicks and Hosts/Hostesses” – for afternoon drop-in programs. Call for more info. “Uptown Country: Print and Publications Designer and Website Designer” needed now until June. “Buskers Carnival: Logistics Coordinator and Director of Corporate Sponsorship” needed for this high-profile festival. Volunteer Action Centre, 519-742-8610 or www.volunteerkw.ca, has many opportunities available – visit the website or call today! The Kitchener Youth Action Council is currently seeking volunteers aged 14-24 who are concerned about issues facing youth and young adults across Kitchener. For more info

COUNSELLING SERVICES English Language Proficiency Program (ELPP) – all workshops are scduled bertween 9:30 and 11:30 a.m.. Monday, January 21 or Tuesday, January 22 – “Essay Writing.” Monday, January 28 or Tuesday, Janaury 29 – “Sentence Structure.” For more info/registration call 519-888-4567, ext 32655 or kmaclean@ uwaterloo.ca or ext 33245.

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Tuesday, January 22: “Exploring Your Personality Type (Part 1)” – two-session workshop. 2 to 3:30 p.m., TC 1112. “Starting Your Own Business: The Basics” – this workshop will help you assess your readiness to start a business venture. Only 20 spots available. 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC 1208. Wednesday, January 23: “Career Exploration and Decision Making” – this workshop will increase your understanding. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., TC 1112. “Are You Thinking About An International Experience?” – dreaming of going abroad to study or work? This workshop is for you. 3 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208. Thursday, January 24: “Career Interest Assessment” – 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., TC 1112.

Classifieds HELP WANTED

Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, K-W Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. We’ve got what you’re looking for – let’s make 2008 your best summer yet – Camp Wayne, northeast Pennsylvania, USA. Counselor-specialists for all Land and Water Sports Inc. Tennis, golf, basketball, baseball, football, martial arts, soccer, outdoor adventure, camping, mountain biking, climbing/ropes, roller hockey, archery, rocketry, water-ski, wakeboard, sailing, canoe/kayaking, fine artstheatre, ceramics, woodworking, drawing, painting, CDL drivers. RN’s for our Health Centre. Let’s get the ball rolling now! Online application www.campwayne.com ; info@ campwayne.com ; 1-888-549-2963. Summer of your life! Camp Wayne for Girls – children’s sleep-away camp, Northeast Pennsylvania (6/21 - 8/17/08). If you love children and want a caring fun environment we need counselors and program directors for: tennis, swimming, golf, gymnastics, cheerleading, drama, high and low ropes, camping/nature, team sports, waterskiing, sailing, painting/ drawing, ceramics, silkscreen, printmaking, batik, jewelry, calligraphy, photography, sculpture, guitar, aerobics, self-defense video, piano. Other staff: administrative, CDL driver (21+), nurses (RN’s and nursing students), bookkeeper, mother’s helper. On campus interviews January 31. Select the camp that selects the best staff! Call 1-215-944-3069 or apply on-line at www.campwaynegirls.com. Have the summer of your life at a prestigious coed sleepaway camp in the beautiful Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania, two and a half hours from NY City. We’re seeking counselors who can teach any team and individual sports; tennis, gymnastics, horseback riding, mountain biking, theatre, tech theatre, circus,

magic, arts and crafts, pioneering, climbing tower, water sports, music, dance or science. Great salaries and perks. Plenty of free time. Internships available for many majors. Interviews on February 6. Apply online at www.islandlake.com. Call 1-800-869-6083 between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time on weekdays for more information. info@islandlake.com.

HOUSING Attention Cambridge School of Architecture students! Live conveniently and comfortably right across the street from school in this beautifully renovated apartment. 4, 8 and 12-month leases available with excellent signing bonuses and rental incentives! Call Darlene or Joanne at 519-7461411 for more details. Two to seven bedroom houses available for May or September. Over 300 options! Houses or apartments, large rooms, back yards, free laundry and parking, bright and many newly renovated. Showings starting now so don’t delay! www.domushousing.com or call 519-572-0278. Four/five bedroom house for rent. Close to UW. Call 1-905-509-3284 or e-mail gord010@sympatico.ca.

SERVICES Med school interview? Practice makes perfect. Half-day seminars by former chair of admissions at a Canadian medical school. Improve skills/confidence. E-mail: cmsac@rogers.com.

COURSE INFO SP-100 Forest Firefighting course to be held in London, Ontario March 12-16, 2008 and Waterloo, Ontario March 19-23, 2008. Course will be held during evening hours during the week. To register, please call Wildfire Specialists Inc., 2233 Radar Road, Suite 5, Hanmer, Ontario, P3P 1R2, toll free 1-877-381-5849. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources accredited. No guarantee of employment.

DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M. FOR CLASSIFIEDS AND CAMPUS BULLETIN, SLC, room 1116 or ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


22 Sports Men’s V-ball solidly third place continued from page 20

On the following play, Tyler Vivian completed the comeback with a spike kill over two outstretched York defenders. Waterloo won the set 15-13 and the match 3-2, avenging their earlier loss to York. The following night saw another rematch, this time against the 3-9 UofT Blues. Various miscues by the Warriors allowed UofT to stay in the game, despite a weak digging game by UofT and many miscues on the Blues part. Waterloo did buckle down to win

LSAT MCAT GMAT GRE

Preparation Seminars Complete 30-Hour Seminars Proven Test-Taking Strategies Personalized Professional Instruction Comprehensive Study Materials Simulated Practice Exams Free Repeat Policy Personal Tutoring Available Thousands of Satisfied Students

Oxford Seminars

1-800-779-1779 / 416-924-3240 www.oxfordseminars.com

the set 25-22. The second set showed a Warriors team that found its rhythm with the passing game, allowing them to take advantage of a weak Toronto libero. The Warriors cruised to a 2519 victory, taking firm control of the match. The third set was one of swings in momentum with, UofT seizing the lead at 16-12 with a 5-0 run. Waterloo would later storm back with a 6-0 run of their own, to take the lead 18-16. The two teams traded points for a while, but Waterloo capitalized on several UofT miscues to get to match point at 24-20. However, Waterloo could not put the game away, and allowed UofT to even the game at 24-24. What proceeded was five match points for Waterloo in which they could not put UofT away. Finally, with the score at 29-28, Waterloo’s offence clicked with a spike kill into Toronto’s backcourt to squeak out the set 30-28 and the match 3-0. “It wasn’t our best game tonight,” said head coach Chris Lawson. “We’re still trying to work on the mental part of the game, learning how to deal with tense moments.” Waterloo has another showdown this weekend against McMaster and Guelph, the number OUA one and two teams which humbled them earlier in the season. “We’re just gonna work on mental concentration and take it one game at a time,” said Lawson. If they can steal a win this weekend against either Guelph or McMaster, Waterloo will cement its status as an elite OUA team.

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Warriors battered by Badgers

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Rocky choi

Cam McIntyre goes for the dunk over the outstreched Brock defender. Waterloo lost the game 81-67 to drop to last place in the OUA West division. They also dropped the game on January 12 to Western 95-70 to fall to 4-8.

;8Ggi\gXi\jle`m\ij`kp^iX[lXk\jn`k_c`d`k\[fief kiX`e`e^`eXZZflek`e^]fi\ekip`ekfXgif]\jj`feXc XZZflek`e^[\j`^eXk`fe:8#:>8#:D8fi:G8`ek_\LJ %


Sports

Imprint, Friday, January 18, 2008

Men’s Hockey OUA Mid West Division

Brock York Guelph UOIT

GP 21 21 21 20

W L 13 5 9 9 8 12 4 13

T OTL PTS 0 3 29 0 3 21 1 0 17 0 3 11

Far West Division GP W L T OTL PTS 19 13 3 0 3 29 Western 29 Lakehead 18 14 3 0 1 28 Waterloo 20 14 6 0 0 20 13 6 0 1 27 Laurier 20 4 14 0 1 9 Windsor

Men’s Volleyball OUA McMaster Guelph Waterloo Western Queen’s York Ryerson Windsor Laurier Toronto RMC

Women’s Hockey OUA Laurier Toronto Guelph Windsor Queen’s Western York Brock Waterloo UOIT

GP 19 19 19 21 21 20 20 21 19 21

W L T OTL PTS 0 34 17 1 1 1 31 15 3 0 0 28 14 5 0 1 22 10 9 1 0 21 8 8 5 0 18 7 9 4 1 18 7 9 3 0 14 4 11 6 5 11 3 0 13 5 2 1 17 1

GP 13 13 14 12 12 13 12 12 13 14 12

W L GF GA 13 0 39 7 10 3 32 18 9 5 33 23 8 4 31 21 7 5 28 19 7 6 29 24 6 6 23 21 4 8 14 27 3 10 16 33 3 11 17 35 0 12 2 36

PTS 26 20 18 16 14 14 12 8 6 6 0

Women’s Basketball OUA West Division GP McMaster 13 Western 13 Laurier 13 Brock 13 Lakehead 14 Windsor 13 Waterloo 13 Guelph 14

W 13 10 9 8 7 7 6 5

L 0 3 4 5 7 6 7 9

PF 977 954 860 854 869 926 852 898

PA 633 873 790 827 905 816 840 948

Women’s Volleyball OUA

Men’s Basketball OUA

East Division

West Division

GP Waterloo 12 McMaster 12 Western 13 Laurier 13 Brock 14 Guelph 12 Windsor 13

W 10 9 9 8 7 5 2

L 2 3 4 5 7 7 11

GF 31 29 31 27 26 21 12

GA 16 12 17 19 28 23 35

PTS 20 18 18 16 14 10 4

GP 11 Brock 11 Guelph Windsor 11 Lakehead 12 11 Laurier McMaster 11 Western 11 Waterloo 12

W 7 7 7 6 5 5 5 4

L 4 4 4 6 6 6 6 8

PF 918 869 897 911 796 834 880 842

PA 805 820 752 874 774 837 848 912

PTS 26 20 18 16 14 14 12 10

Game Recaps

Game Recaps

Men’s Hockey

Women’s Volleyball

Friday, January 11 Toronto 2 Waterloo 5

Friday, January 11 Waterloo defeats Lakehead 3-0

Sunday January 13 Ryerson 4 Waterloo 3

Men’s Volleyball

Women’s Hockey

Friday, January 11 Waterloo defeats York 3-2

Saturday, January 12 Laurier 5 Waterloo 0

PTS 14 14 14 12 10 10 10 8

Men’s Hockey

Waterloo vs. Western 2:00 p.m. Saturday, January 19 Waterloo vs. Windsor 2:00 p.m. Sunday, January 20

Waterloo vs. Lakehead 7:30 p.m. Friday, January 25

CIF Arena

Sunday, January 13 Laurier 5 Waterloo 1

Track and Field

Men’s Basketball

27th Annual Can Am Classic at Windsor, Ontario

Saturday, January 12 Western 95 Waterloo 70

Women’s 4x400m relay 4th Place 4:07:73

Women’s Basketball

Men’s 4x400m relay 4th place 3:32:37

Saturday, January12 Western 94 Waterloo 81

Men’s 4x800m relay 4th place 8:11:21

Fast & Free Delivery

402 King St., N.

884-8000

Godzilla Deal

2 X-Large Great Pizzas 3 Fabulous Toppings on each Add 1 lb. wings for $3.99

$17.49 Men’s Basketball

Super Blah-Buster

PAC Main Gym

Waterloo vs. Guelph 8:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 23

3 Great Pizzas 3 Fabulous Toppings on each 3 Free Dipping Sauces

$21.99 Large $25.99 X-Large $28.99

Medium

Early Bird Special

Women’s Basketball

University of Waterloo Campus

Saturday, January 12 Waterloo defeats Toronto 3-0

Waterloo

Women’s Hockey CIF Arena

23

$19.49 Large $22.49 X-Large $25.49

2 Great Pizzas, 3 Fabulous Toppings 1 lb. Chicken Wings 1 Garlic Bread,4 Cans of Pepsi www.twicethedealpizza.com

Medium

PAC Main Gym

Waterloo vs. Guelph 6:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 23

Basketball

Presents

January 23

07 THIS WEEK IN 08 ATHLETICS

sfm km .

LI S T ca

www.c

sfm km .

vs vs Western Western Mustangs Mustangs 2:00 2:00 PM, PM, UW UW CIF CIF Arena Arena

LI V EN E

www.c

January 19

LI S T ca

LI V EN E

vs Guelph Gryphons [W] 6:00 PM, [M] 8:00 PM PAC Gym

January 20

gowarriorsgo.ca

vs vs Windsor Windsor Lancers Lancers 2:00 2:00 PM, PM, UW UW CIF CIF Arena Arena

WARRIOR

Registered trademarks of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under license. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2005

gowarriorsgo.ca gowarriorsgo.ca

[W] HOCKEY

gowarriorsgo.ca

Athletes of the Week Tyler Vivian - Volleyball Tyler, a 3rd year Kinesiology student from Mitchell, Ontario led the Warriors to two victories over York and Toronto this past weekend. On Friday against York, Tyler had 12 kills and a team high 17 points in a 5-set win over York. On Saturday vs. the Varsity Blues he added 11 kills and 14 points in a straight set victory. The two wins has moved Waterloo (9-5) into third place in the OUA standings with 18 points.

IMPRINT | JANUARY 18

Bojana Josipovic - Volleyball

Bojana, a 3rd year Sociology student from Kitchener, Ontario led the Warriors to a straight set victory over the visiting Lakehead Thunderwolves Friday night. She posted a team high of 15 points with top stats in total kills (14) and total digs (10) to lead the Warriors to a dominating win. Bojana is now ranked 3rd in Ontario and 8th in Canada statistically.

Imprint_2008-01-18_v30_i23  

F riday , J anuary 18, 2008 Ryan Kane mans the helm during some of CKMS’ regular programming. See CKMS, page 5 Yang Liu Michael L. Davenport...

Advertisement