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Impr int The university of Waterloo’s official student newspaper

Friday, January 11, 2008

vol 30, no 22

Closure at last for loved ones

imprint . uwaterloo . ca

Organ donation sparks controversy Health Canada in hot water, page 20

Man accused of murdering UW student pleads guilty, page 3

WORKS IN PROGRESS

Photos by Jenn Serec

Campus construction Different route for an ongoing process UW refugee program Michael L. Davenport assistant editor-in-chief

Despite initial delays in getting the actual renovations started, construction for Feds eXpress remains on schedule and the store is still due to open January 28. The Quantum-Nano Centre has also been a slow starter. As of September 2006, construction was supposed to have started within the following year. The green is as of yet unmarred by construction, but the first step is finally underway: excavating the Bombshelter patio for the construction of a service tunnel (see above centre-top). Meanwhile, according to the school of accountancy website the extension to Hagey Hall (see above left) is due to be completed in March of this year, with classes starting as soon as May. In July 2006, UW owned a giant sand pit on the corner of King and Victoria streets. That sand

pit has since blossomed into a beautiful building (see above right), which will eventually house UW’s future pharmacy students. The building isn’t complete yet, but the first pharmacy students arrived on campus this term. The Photovoltaic Research Centre (PRC) is also due to open this year. Originally it was to open in fall of 2008, but UW’s research and technology park website says the “first phase [is] opening winter 2008.” PRC is already on new copies of our campus map. Current construction on campus also includes an addition both the optometry building (see above centre-bottom) and PAS. With even more construction slated to commence this year (“Engineering 5,” to be built between East Campus Hall and Ring Road) hardhats and steel-toed boots don’t look to be disappearing from our campus anytime soon. mdavenport@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Sarah Hewey intern

In December, 2007, Feds Student Council motioned against creating a student fee to fund the University of Waterloo World University Service of Canada (UW WUSC) Student Refugee Program, an organization that allows university students to support and fund the immigration and integration of one or two refugees into a post-secondary institution. The program, which was founded in 1978, also provides funding for living costs, school supplies, and other necessary expenses. Since the inception of the program in 2000, UW has hosted two Kenyan student refugees: Tariku Kebede and Samuel Banti, both members of the Kakuma refugee camp. Funding to support tuition waivers and accommodation for

the refugees was provided through donations from a variety of groups on campus, including the UW President’s Office, VP Academic Office, Renison English Language Institute, St. Paul’s United College, Federation of Students and the Faculty of Science Foundation. This past year, the issue of how to fund WUSC’s further efforts — possibly through a refundable student fee — came into question. Council’s debate focused on how to implement a fee, and whether or not it is the right approach for WUSC. According to Feds vice president internal Darcy Higgins, some councilors did not disagree with the spirit of the program, but rather, the fee itself and how to administer it. In particular said Higgins, “There were things to be worked out in terms of the refund.”

L E T S M A K E A D E A L ! Sign up in the SLC Jan 14-18 From 11am-3pm QUIT SMOKING AND WIN $600 REV: Jan 14th V1: Jan 15th from 5-7pm Check www.leavethepackbehind.org for details

See WUSC, page 3


News

news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Wild weather for Waterloo region

jamie damaskinos

sherif soliman

The city is still recovering from the flurry of nasty weather that struck on January 9. Meanwhile, a student ignores the “Bridge Closed” sign over a flooded Laurel Creek.

WUSC: Feds encourages other options for refugee support Continued from cover

An argument raised against the fee was that it only passively involves students in the group’s efforts. Students associated with the WUSC program, particularly those members of the various on-campus colleges that have hosted the refugees, argue that the program develops relations between UW students and refugees, due in part to the fundraising required to bring the refugees to UW. Some fear that having the program solely funded by a student fee will endanger that relationship in the future. Despite the majority of council supporting WUSC morally, bureau-

cratic details keep council from holding a referendum for the creation of a WUSC levy. The group is not recognized under Feds due to its unfinalized constitution, which, according to Higgins, “would have to be complete for Feds to even consider implementing a fee on their behalf.” The group has, however, been working with Feds’ research assistant Rick Theis to help create a concrete plan for their governance. Kabil Rahaman, who is heavily involved in WUSC, hopes that Feds will approve the group’s constitution some time in the near future. To date, the program has been funded by the groups such as the Rotary Club of Grand River and the

Faculty of Science Foundation. Other groups have donated gifts-in-kind, such as St. Paul’s United College residence donation. Even though the program is healthy at the moment, Rahaman hoped that a small fee of $1 per person would help the group bring more refugees to campus and fund those students for a longer period of time. Currently, a variety of humanitarian-focused groups, such as UW World Vision, exist on campus with fundraising as their primary mandate. WUSC could potentially secure more funding if they were to pursue partnerships with those groups. shewey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Johnston’s report due; Harper cleared of conflict Travis Myers news editor

The federal ethics commissioner has come to the conclusion that Prime Minister Stephen Harper is not in a conflict of interest as a result of the Schreiber affair exploding during his term in office, or for having a vested interest in protecting his own reputation after being named in a related affidavit. Harper has made continual statements that it is impossible to avoid

such a conflict of interest, even with University of Waterloo President David Johnston standing as an independent third party in the matter. Johnston, whose report on the matter is due to be filed this Friday, has been acting as a nonpartisan third party in this matter since November 2007 in what has quickly become one of Canada’s most explosive political scandals in recent memory. The Liberal and NDP parties have both been insisting over the past weeks that the report cannot suggest passing

over an inquiry altogether, although Harper has suggested he would not mind if it did, reinforcing his claim of conflict. However, Harper did recently take steps to distance his government from the scandal by requesting that his Ministers no longer have contact with Mulroney. The results Johnston’s eagerlyawaited report will be covered by Imprint’s website when the news breaks on Friday, January 11. tmyers@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Closure at last for the friends and family of Ardeth Wood

Travis Myers news editor

Chris Myers pled guilty on Tuesday, January 8 to the 2003 murder of 27year-old University of Waterloo philosophy grad student, Ardeth Wood. Myers received a sentence of 25 years in prison and the possibility of parole after ten years. Over the past four years many Ottawa and Waterloo residents have anxiously awaited the capture and trial of the man who commited this dispicable act of cruelty — not only on his victim, but also her family and friends — and these results help bring an end to the ongoing tumult of their lives since Wood’s death. Wood was visiting her parents in Ottawa on August 6, 2003 when she went for a bike ride from which she would never return. After a five-day search involving 150 people, including seven of her University of Waterloo friends and classmates, a woman’s body was found near Green’s Creek bike trail close to the bicycle that Wood was riding. Although the official cause of death was drowning, police didn’t believe it to be an accident. Witnesses described a man who was seen with Wood that day. Despite a $50,000 reward the case remained cold for two years. Then on October 20, 2005, police announced that they had

arrested a man in connection with the murder. Myers, then a 25-yearold unemployed man from Ottawa, was incarcerated for a case of sexual assault in North Bay. Similarities between the two crimes were noticed by police investigators and consequently they believed Myers to be a serial rapist. Myers has spent 26 months in jail awaiting trial. This time will be put towards his sentence allowing him to apply for parole as early as 2015. Wood has left a positive legacy behind, having a special memorial edition of Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy made, featuring works by Wood herself and themes she had explored in her studies of philosophy. There is also an annual award given by the philosophy department in her honour, known as the Ardeth Wood Memorial Graduate Bursary. Upon hearing of the murderer’s 2005 capture, members of the philosophy department told Imprint that she was “an outstanding young woman whose positive thinking, keen mind and strong work ethic eagerly embraced a non-traditional area of study.” This admission of guilt and sentencing brings Ardeth’s family, friends and the university one step closer to closure in this heinous murder and great loss. tmyers@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


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News

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Passing grade awarded to U-Pass and GRT

David Yip

Although some students are finding the new U-Pass system confusing, this rider is having no trouble taking UW’s newest bus route to Keats Way. Marco McCullum Baldasaro assistant news editor

While there have certainly been occasions of over-crowding, both Grand River Transit and Feds agree that overall, the September 2007 implementation of the U-Pass has gone well. “[The] general sentiment has been very positive and students have been very pleased with the U-Pass program at UW,” said Feds president Kevin Royal. “The numbers I’ve seen through the U-Pass Working Group have shown such a high level of usage

that clearly the program is being well received at UW.” It’s immediately obvious to anyone who has used the transit system prior to the inception of the U-Pass that since September, the number of riders is up. “There have been instances of congestion,” said Gethyn Beniston, the Region of Waterloo’s transit planner. Overall though, “[it] has gone very well,” he said. Grand River Transit had not anticipated the noon-hour bus rush, an instant headache to anyone who has experienced it. GRT discovered

early on that as a result of the increase in demand, an extra peak time developed. “It hadn’t been expected,” said Beniston. Modifications to the original changes in service were made as a result. As of January, additional Route 12 busses have formally been added to the changes implemented at the beginning of the fall term. Prior to January, GRT had simply been slotting in extra busses to meet demand as it arose. And to those temporarily left out of the U-Pass as it stands, change is on its way.

“Without question, by the summer 2008 term, co-op and regular students will be able to opt-in to the U-Pass program when working in Waterloo region,” said Royal. “I commend a number of directors, especially director Aho (engineering) and director Neal (St. Jerome’s) for supporting me in making that part of negotiations a dealbreaker.” In regard to the proposed swipe card system, originally positioned as a potential replacement to the simple but vulnerable flashing of the WatCard as a means of entry, an upgrade is still in the works. “At this point, it’s still uncertain whether we will continue the current procedure, implement a swipe card system, or implement other possibilities,” said Royal. While happy to have the U-Pass, some new student users are finding it difficult to navigate through route maps and timetables. “It’s confusing to figure out the schedule,” said Serge Koloupaev, a math and actuarial science student,

“but the buses aren’t too busy or crowded on my routes.” Maps of GRT bus routes are available for free in the Student Life Centre on the wall across from the CIBC bank machine near the turnkey desk. Additional bus and route info is available online at www.grt.ca. For students still at a loss to effectively navigate the available route maps and schedules, expect a GRT interactive trip planner to be available online soon. “The system is currently in testing,” said Beniston, “but will be rolling out this winter.” Expect it to be similar to the system used by the City of Brampton. Grand River Transit is holding three feedback sessions in January to discuss proposed changes, new rural services, and plans to create a region-wide specialized service. Check out www.kwnow.ca for more information. mbaldasaro@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Hiring Committee Members Needed Three UW students are needed to assist with the hiring of Imprint’s 2008-2009 Editor-In-Chief. You cannot be a current applicant for the E-I-C position or have collected your Imprint fee refund for the Winter term 2008.

465 PHILLIP STREET LOCATION ONLY LIMITED TIME OFFER

746-6893

Please e-mail Imprint’s President at: agardiner@imprint.uwaterloo.ca or drop in to Imprint’s office, SLC, room 1116. Deadline is Friday, January 11, 2008 3:30 p.m.


News

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Feds pass motion for online student fee refunds Affected student services not forewarned about official Feds lobbying position Dinh Nguyen staff reporter

Without consulting any of the affected parties, the Federation of Students passed a motion to create the Online Refundable Ancillary Fee Opt Out system, or “Policy 24”, on November 25, 2007. The policy, as its name suggests, would allow students to obtain their student fee refunds from a nonstudent society, non-endowment online service, as opposed to collecting them in person. The parties potentially affected if such system were to be implemented (WPIRG, CKMS, and Imprint) were neither notified nor brought into the discussion by Feds, prior to or after the motion’s passing. WPIRG expressed a general negative feeling towards the issue. “[WPIRG is] not against refund, but it was shocking and insulting that the organization was not consulted about Policy 24.” According to WPIRG memberat-large Asha Philar, implementing an online opt-out system would have an extremely negative effect on the organization because it is mainly funded by student fees. She cites the results seen when Queen’s University switched to an online opt-out system. OPIRGkin, Queen’s version of WPIRG, found its funding suffered greatly when the system came into place. They now make enough money to continue running, but can barely afford to do anything else. If this were to happen to WPIRG,

the group would be unable to bring in guest speakers such as David Suzuki and Stephen Lewis to UW, as well as host events such as Car Free Day and the Human Rights Conference. The human rights, environment, leadership-based non-profit organization is also concerned that the three groups affected by Policy 24 make up the lowest fees on the tuition statement. Students pay $5.50 for CKMS, $4.75, for WPIRG, and $3.30 for Imprint, a total of less than $15 per term. WPIRG also feels that, had the three parties affected by Policy 24 been consulted prior to it being passed, Feds would have had a better planned motion. They feel that it is already far easier for students to get their refunds from themselves, CKMS and Imprint, than it is to get refunds from most endowment groups. Endowment groups are spread throughout campus, and most will issue cheques after a refund request has been processed. Meanwhile, two out of the three parties affected by Policy 24 are in the SLC and offer an instant refund. President Kevin Royal said that, because Feds has no power over their students’ fees, society groups and endowment groups were not included in Policy 24. “Societies and, by extension, endowments, are independently managed by autonomous organizations as outlined in the Federation of Students Societies Agreement. It is for that reason that the development of Policy 24 excluded

those fees,” said Royal. Like WPIRG, Imprint also believes that if such a system as Policy 24 were implemented, their organization would suffer greatly. Said Adam Gardiner, president of Imprint, “I fully believe that every student should have the right to be as involved or uninvolved as they wish with the organizations on campus. But I also think students should consider the important services, such as Imprint, that many of their fees support. As a not-for-profit organization, Imprint’s budget must be carefully calculated to break even with the amount of income we receive; if the amount of student fees collected was to suddenly decrease, it could have significant consequences on our operational expenses, and in the long term, our ability to grow as an organization that benefits the UW community.” CKMS was unable to give a formal statement. Though Feds has passed the motion, Policy 24 is as of yet just the student government’s official lobbying position, and will only take effect after relevant administrative decisions. In order to implement such a system, a massive change to refund procedures will have to occur; the effort involved makes it difficult for an online opt-out system to be enstated. When asked about Policy 24, the majority of students were not aware of what it was. Though most students agree with the principle of having an

online opt-out system believing it will make it easier for them to get refunds, they also agree that Feds should have consulted the affected parties and invited them into the discussion before passing such a motion. “I can see why the organizations affected by [Policy 24] may be upset,” said Susie Roma, 2B psychology. “I don’t think it is fair or professionally sound for Feds to pass such a motion without contacting the affected groups.” “If they make it that easy then everyone will do it. It’s going to destroy the groups. It’s unfair to the group to have something big like that [Policy 24] affect them and not being there,” said another student, Dave Amorim, 3B biology. According to Royal, it was expressed that UW admin had no major problems with the principle of introducing an online opt-out refund system. Implementing such change is, however, not high on their list of priorities. UW vicepresident administration and finance Dennis Huber responded with a similar statement: “As Kevin has indicated, the university will not be committing any resources in the near term to analyzing the impacts (cost, business processes, etc) of such change. If, in the future, the university decides to commit resources to reviewing the option, a consultation process will be undertaken with the affected stakeholders.”

The Fees WPIRG — $4.75 This fee goes towards the Waterloo Public Interest Research Group, looking for answers in environmental and social justice + CKMS — $5.50 This fee goes to support the campus radio station + Imprint — $3.30 This fee goes towards producing the official student newspaper of the university ________________ =

$13.55

dnguyen@imprint.uwaterloo.com

It could be you...

Applications for Spring 2008, Fall 2008, and Winter 2009 are now available online!

WWW.HOUSING.UWATERLOO.CA

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News

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Campus and community events Stephanie Mara on piano. For more information contact: www.grebel.uwaterloo.ca/music

JANUARY 9-11

JANUARY 11

JANUARY 14

FASS 2008 auditions for this years show, “Global Warming: Kiss Your FASS Goodbye,” All faculty, alumni, students, and staff are welcome, FASS will hit the stage February 7-9, 2008.

The Islamic Information Centre will be setting up an information booth for those curious about Islam. Check out uwislam.com or email info@ uwislam.com

Clinic begins and runs two days. The Monday clinic will run again from January 23- Family day 25. You can make an appointment at the Turnkey Desk now. Family day holiday is Monday February 18, UW offices and services will be closed due to reading week.

JANUARY 10-19

7:30 p.m. God Keep Our Land @ Siegfried Hall

Wednesday 6:00 - 9:00 p.m. Kiss Your FASS Goodbye auditions @ Hagey room 334

Thursday Waterloo Region Rapid Transit meetings

Waterloo Region Rapid Transit is having open meetings to discuss the rankings, routes and technologies available to be used. The meetings began Thursday at locations around Waterloo. Further meetings will be held January 13 in Cambridge, January 12 and 15 in Kitchener, then again in Waterloo on the 17 and 19.

Friday 11:00-3:00 Islamic Information Centre booth @ SLC

St. Jerome’s University dean Myroslaw Tataryn will be giving the Waterloo Catholic School board lecture. This lecture will compare the early 20th century rhetoric of nation building in Canada to the contemporary discussion and will demonstrate how little has changed.

IMPRINT Publications, UW

IMPRINT, the University of Waterloo student newspaper is hiring an Editor-In-Chief for a full-time 13-month contract position beginning March 1, 2008. You will train, manage, motivate and lead a volunteer staff and ensure the print-to-press quality of all content. Must have strong organizational skills, be familiar with Adobe CS2, photo editing packages, layout and design skills and experience with Unix/Linux networks. Interested candidates should mail or deliver resume, clippings and a cover letter to: IMPRINT Publications Hiring Committee Imprint Publications 200 University Ave., W. University of Waterloo, Student Life Centre, room 1116 Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 Deadline is Friday, January 25 at 4:30 p.m.

Monday By appointment Blood Donor Clinic @ SLC Great Hall

FEBRUARY 18

JANUARY 16

Wednesday 12:30-1:20 Berners and Bohme @ Conrad Grebel

Free Noon Hour concert entitled Berners and Bohme: Music for Trumpet and Piano/ Piano Four Hands will taking place on Wednesday, January 16 at Conrad Grebel University College Chapel located on 140 Westmount Rd. N. Waterloo. It begins at 12:30 and runs until 1:20, with performers like Guy Few on trumpet, piano and voice along with

ALSO Wednesdays 3:30 - 5:00 @ Chemistry room 160 The Web Clinic is for people of all different skills and knowledge to work on their websites. You can get contact information from: mfagan@uwaterloo.ca Wednesdays 7:15 - 8:30 PAS room 3005 GLOW’s weekly discussion groups have moved to a new place.


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Readers, rise up Friday, January 11, 2008 Vol. 30, No. 22 Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editor-in-chief, Maggie Clark editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Ad Assistant, vacant Sales Assisstant, vacant Volunteer Coordinator, Angela Gaetano Systems Admin. vacant Distribution, Peter Blackman, Rob Blom Interns, Sarah Hewey, Taylor Schnaeringer Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Adam Gardiner president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Jacqueline McKoy vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, Alaa Yassin secretary@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Staff liaison, Rob Blom liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, Michael L. Davenport Lead Proofreader, vacant Cover Editor, Marc Kimmich News Editor, vacant News Assistant, Marco Baldasaro Opinion Editor, Christine Ogley Opinion Assistant, Monica Harvey Features Editor, Dinh Nguyen Features Assistant, Cait Davidson Arts Editor, Andrew Abela Arts Assistant, Duncan Ramsay Science Editor, Adrienne Raw Science Assistant, Sherif Soliman Sports Editor, Yang Liu Sports Assistant, Olinda Pais Photo Editor, Jenn Serec Photo Assistant, Jamie Damaskinos Graphics Editor, Joyce Hsu Graphics Assistant, vacant Web Editor, Hoon Choi Web Assistant, vacant Systems Administrator, vacant Sys. Admin. Assistant, Peter Sutherland Production Staff

Ashley Csanady, Tim Foster, Chris Miller, Eric Gassner, Keegan Tremblay, Emma Tarswell, Mo Janga, Rajul saleh, Megan Ng, Tejas Koshy, Guy Halpern, Ashley Fournier, Bethany Sehl, Chantelle McGee, Taylor Schnaeringer, Paul Collier Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may also reproduce the material commercially in any format or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has been distributed in an issue of Imprint, or Imprint declares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. One copy per customer. Imprint ISSN 0706-7380. Imprint CDN Pub Mail Product Sales Agreement no. 40065122. Next board meeting: TBA Next staff meeting: Monday, January 14, 2008 12:30 p.m.

April fools 2007 was a bad day to be associated with The Gazette, the University of Western Ontario’s campus newspaper. While a great many student papers (Imprint included) publish an annual spoof issue, The Gazette crossed a line with a joke article, entitled “Labia Majora Carnage,” that depicts the light-hearted rape of prominent student activist, Jenna Owsianik (Jennifer Ostrich in the article), by London police chief Murray Faulkner (explicitly mentioned). So UWO students were understandably outraged when this issue hit their campus stands. In a lacklustre apology The Gazette’s editorial board claimed they were producing satire, but among the numerous blog posts,

forum comments, letters to the editor, and general media reports produced in the days to follow, consensus held that such “humour” only further degraded an already heavily marginalized campus population — and was therefore unacceptable. Compounding the problem was that the article, written under the pseudonym “Xavier,” came after the campus women’s centre spent a year campaigning for The Gazette to become a more accountable and representative student voice. Jenna Owsianik was one of the most vocal members of this campaign, a fact unfortunately suggesting that the offending spoof article was printed more out of spite and a need to vent than

An Imprint reader’s To-Do list for change:

1. DO

Let Imprint know if you have reason to believe that something in the paper has been plagiarized, or is just factually inaccurate. While we are clearly on guard for mistakes ourselves, it helps to know that you, our readers, are watching us too, just waiting for the next slip-up. (It gives us the incentive to do better!)

2. DO

Write letters to the editor. Anonymous, five-word posts on the website have their uses, but to further real student discussion — to let us know how you really feel about campus issues and our reporting of them — nothing beats a signed, well-thought-out argument in the Opinion section. So hit us where it hurts already — right between the printed pages.

3. DO

Send press releases or leads to Imprint. We’d love nothing more than to cover as diverse and representative a campus culture as possible, so if you’re involved in community events, clubs, or projects you can help by dropping us a line. We can’t guarantee coverage of everything, but having a broader sense of the campus community helps us make better use of what resources we do have.

4. DO Exercise your rights. If you’re concerned about how Imprint is performing tell it to us straight. And if you catch us in the midst of severe ethical infractions, start a petition and talk to Feds. Disagreement is healthy; but maintaining an open, receptive media forum is even more so. Keep us from growing soft!

from genuine appeals for broadening student discourse through humour. Certainly, The Gazette may have felt as if it were the marginalized party, having to field ongoing criticism from a very outspoken campus group. But even granting that term’s editorial board so much leniency, my conviction toward their actions — not to mention their abysmal apology — remains the same: Suck it up. Just as it is a campus newspaper’s responsibility to represent its student body as effectively as possible, so too is it the responsibility of students to hold all their forms of representation accountable. And so — forgive me, fellow Warriors, for I am about to sin — while April 2007 was a bad month to be associated with The Gazette, it was also a very impressive time to be a Western student. Why? Because when UWO students were misrepresented to the extent that their learning environment felt “poisoned” they took action. They wrote letters to the editor, posted on blogs, rallied community support, contacted their university, and alerted the media. (And to get a sense of their response time, by April 10 there were articles in the National Post, Toronto Star, Maclean’s and The Globe & Mail.) Moreover, dissatisfied with the simple study group proposed by The Gazette to mend ties, students got their University Student Council to donate a reparative sum equivalent to the spoof issue’s printing costs to the Sexual Assault Centre in London. Furthermore, prior to this spoof issue The Gazette evidently had no code of ethics — a shocker for me, considering how much better I sleep knowing the Canadian Association of Journalists’ Code of Ethics sets an inspiring standard for all Canadian publications. But after all these student protests, The Gazette finally drew up its own, diversity-friendly code of ethics. And established more effective accountability mechanisms. And set out procedures for removing the editor-in-chief by student petition, should the need ever arise. Most striking of all, though, is that when UWO implemented emergency policy changes to control The Gazette’s print run — effectively removing the paper’s autonomy from the university — students stood up for the principles behind the paper: namely, the importance of maintaining a distinct student voice. Even while condemning one reprehensible decision of The Gazette, student allegiance remained with the goal of the organization as a whole — their own goal, that is, of proper, independent representation. So while I don’t anticipate UW students requiring such dire responses to the content of this paper, I’ll be honest: It helps to believe that if something ever went grievously wrong with our campus media, UW students would be just as vocal as their UWO “brethren.” Tell me now: am I right? editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


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Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Do you have an Opinion?

I guarantee that your friends are tired of hearing it; start writing it down for Imprint instead and your friends might come back. Do people walk too slow? Is income tax the biggest scam ever? We need 100-200 words on whatever you care about. Send it to opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca. Because everyone should hear what you have to say.


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Gaydar? So, we’re back at school for the winter term. You’ll probably find yourself out at Chapters looking for the one or two books on your list that are out of stock at the campus bookstore. While going through the checkout line with your purchases you might just notice the cashier. There is something just a little… “off ” about him. You take a closer look. His tight pants and lime green Lacoste shirt on underneath his employee smock. His blonde highlights and gel sculpted spiky hair. His designer glasses and moisturized skin. Is that a hint of lipgloss? Your first guess about this hypothetical worker? Well, obviously, he’s gay. If you yourself are of the homo persuasion, or are a woman with more gay fans than Blondie, you might credit your guess to a little thing called “gaydar.” But what is gaydar exactly? For those outside of the know, some people believe it is the inherent ability homosexuals have to sense one of their own kind — even those who don’t yet know themselves. Just like everything else that was once exclusive to gay men, women who watch too much Sex and the City have appropriated this term and think they too can sniff out the queers. Others say they get “a vibe” from people, and some gay girls also claim to have a “lesbi-dar”. Is it really possible that there is some ancient mystical force used by gay men and wannabe-fag-hags to tell who is, and isn’t, gay? Is there still some

undiscovered gay-ray in the spectrum of light that can only be perceived by the homosexual eye? Not only are these concepts completely ridiculous, but there is also no way they are possible. Why, you ask? Well, if we just look at this through the lens of logic it’s not hard to figure out just what gaydar really is. Let’s come back to our hypothetical Chapters employee, shall we? We assumed that he was gay simply based on his description. The reason for this was because I described him as a 100 per cent stereotype: the well treated hair and skin; the designer clothes; working at a bookstore; not to mention the is-he-or-isn’t-he lipgloss. I’m sure if I had described a lumberjack, we wouldn’t have come to the same conclusion. So, then, how does gaydar work in less extreme cases, when the homo in question isn’t a lisping queen? When we get right down to it, the backbone of gaydar is good old fashioned detective work. Both consciously and unconsciously, those who claim to have gaydar are looking for small signs and signals that someone is gay, often by finding something stereotypical about the person in question. Maybe our cashier is outwardly very butch, but has a lot of neon coloured earrings, maybe that guy in your French class talks a little too much about Kylie Minogue’s new album, or maybe your housemate has a compulsion to keep the place clean. The gay and hag brains are constantly collecting small bits of information like this, which brings them to the conclusion that someone is gay. Of course, none of the aforementioned “tells” equate to having same-sex leanings. Punk guys have earrings, techno fans like Kylie, and who knows, your housemate is probably a closet germaphobe. Gaydar is far from being an exact science, which is why you’ve got to be careful about who you accuse of being gay. The only tried and true way to know if someone is gay or not is simply to ask them. Yes, gaydar isn’t all that reliable at all - after all, just because Stephen Harper wears makeup at press conferences doesn’t mean he’s a homo, now does it? tmyers@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Features

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Green — not just a colour; also a trend

joyce hsu

Bethany Delleman reporter

With climate change and the accumulation of waste always looming in the back of our minds, the environment has become a hot topic from here to Hollywood to the UK. Everyone is trying to do a little extra to stop those greenhouse gases from entering our precious atmosphere. The fashion world is

trying too, and they have some great ideas on how you can have a green wardrobe. Seasalt, a company that makes clothing and other products, works with entirely organic and recycled materials. According to their website 8, 000 chemicals may be applied to cotton before it becomes the material we all know and love. These include pesticides used by farmers in the growing of cotton. By using cotton grown organically, Seasalt hopes to reduce debt on farms, prevent the pollution caused by run-off, and reduce pesticide related injuries. The company also uses organic jute for the same reasons. Rayon, the first man-made fiber which imitates silk, is having a detrimental effect on the world’s forests since it is composed of wood fibers. Producers have begun to offer an alternative; soy silk. It is made from the by-products of tofu production and apparently also contains all the properties that make rayon so popular. This fiber, unlike rayon, is natural and biodegradable. Polar fleece is another economically-friendly material. This man-made fabric was created in 1979 to be a lighter alternative for wool. All those who have worn polar fleece know that it is a light and very warm fabric that now dominates a lot of our winter apparel. This fabric is made of plastic, but it is recycled plastic. The bottled water bottles that many people at university drink by the case are turned into polar fleece when recycled. A disadvantage of this product is its plastic derivatives: it will melt when exposed to extreme heat. On the other side of the spectrum, some companies have been going so far as to offer corn, bamboo, and hemp as alternative clothing choices. One company creates clothing, towels, and yarn all out of bamboo which has the basic properties of grass. Consumers should learn to be skeptical though; some options might not deliver all that they seem to promise. I per-

sonally would be a little wary of hemp, which traditionally is a very tough fabric that would be more itchy than wool if you wore it. However when hemp is mixed with other materials such as cotton, it makes a durable and comfortable addition to your wardrobe. The biggest concern may be how stylish these clothes are. Ecologists were never noted for their fashion sense. Yet many designers have caught on to this new green fad and are creating clothing using safer options. Freetrade clothing is also growing in popularity, using the same ideas as free-trade coffee. The clothing feels, wears, and washes the same as the fabrics we are used to but it is much better for our world. It may seem too easy, and perhaps it is. Green fabrics and styles aren’t going to reverse climate change or stop the use of pesticide and its negative effects, but it is a start. To save our world we need to think about the environment in every aspect of our lives, and this is an area we have been ignoring. These fabrics may be harder to find, and a little more expensive, but in the long run the benefits for the environment and for you are usually worth it. We had better worry about clothing and fashion now while we still can live and breath on this planet we call our own. Green fashion seems to be becoming a more and more of a popular trend. New designers and design schools are pushing it to become, well more fashionable. Below are some places and ideas that can help you dress eco-consciously:

Sharkah Chakra This environmentally friendly clothing shop can only be found in the UK. However, shoppers may also visit their online store at www. sharkahchakra.com, or google them to find

other sites that sell their products. Currently Sharkah Chakra makes hand woven denim clothing produced from the cotton fields of West Africa. They employ third world Fairtrade cotton farmers, indigo farmers, indigo dyeing craftsmen, hand loom weavers, tailors and laundry masters to create their products. Their merchandise, while expensive (a pair of jeans costs around $290), are worth the cost when you consider the good you’re doing for environment and the people of poorer nations. Not only are these jeans environmentally friendly, they’re fair trade.

Seasalt As previously mentioned, Seasalt creates their products entirely from organic and recycled materials. Compared to Sharkah Chakra, they are far more economically friendly and offer a wider variety of clothing. Anything from sweaters to shirts to scarves can be purchased. All the prices are listed in pounds, and their stores are located in England. However you can find them online at www.seasaltcornwall.co.uk.

Chopper Couture For something a little closer to home shop at Chopper Couture. With four locations in Toronto, thay makes clothes that have an urban flavour. Sweaters, shirts and skirts are all manufactured from bamboo. Most of their clothes are made either from bamboo and/or organic cotton. The Chopper Couture website advertises that their clothing is fashionable and looks expensive, like Egyptian cotton. For more information on location, prices and online shopping, visit www.choppercouture.com.

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Distractions

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Crossword

1 13

14

Tim Foster

17

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Across 1. Health resort 4. Vocalized music 8. Walked back and forth 13. Auto 14. Motto 16. Get a sneaky marriage 17. Enrl. 18. Pay the price 19. Perplexed (2 wds) 20. Graduates 22. Imitated 24. Ruffles 25. More fully developed 26. Win a reward 27. Porky’s sign-off, “___ all folks!” 29. 21st Greek letter 32. Judicial examination 34. Shaggy humped bovine 36. Qualities 41. Tie a rope to a cleat 42. Defined tracks 43. Before the flat-screen 44. Revise 46. European eagle 50. Chaos 52. Less pretty 54. Emergency condition (2 wds) 57. To experience discomfort 58. In the slightest degree 59. Fencing field 61. American food safety agency 62. Cunning 63. Tillers 64. Allow 65. Wimp 66. Negative votes 67. Long, unique time period Down 1. Abrasion

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If you were on a crowded bus, how would you maintain your personal space?

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by Mark Kimmich

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2. French rice and seafood dish 3. Debater 4. Scarce 5. Aesthetically interesting 6. Reeves’ hacker handle 7. Vote for a new parliament (2 wds) 8. Archaic bell noise 9. Religious podium 10. Price 11. Heavy fencing sword 12. Very salty sea 15. Resign from office 21. Repeated phrase 23. ____ and downs 28. Head decoration 29. 23rd Greek letter 30. Cum ____ ergo propter ___ 31. ____ and outs

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33. Beam 34. Mad cow dis. 35. Neuter reflexive 36. Canadian public broadcaster 37. Not him 38. Common newsgroup root 39. Jogged 40. Diligence 44. Night before 45. Transform 47. Fancy card shuffle 48. One who requires 49. Printing mistake 50. Large room 51. Bowling Locale 53. Estimate 54. Tattered clothing 55. Ornamental bag 56. Stage 60. Salt water body

“Try to stand at a place where there are less people.”

“Fart!!!”

Thomas Cardiff

2B environmental science

Tina Wang

4B actuarial science

tfoster@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Jan. 4 solutions

Tim Foster

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T A C I T

O D O R E D

D E L A N O

M E L A G I C O M B D I E A C R H E E L S D

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Missed Connections You were in my poli sci 101 tutorial and I noticed you looking at me from across the table, I didn’t get a chance to tell you how I felt before the term ended but I saw you jumping over the barriers to get on the bridge on campus the other day. Would you like to jump into my bed sometime?

I was doing my weekly midnight grocery run at Sobey’s when I saw you eyeing the deli sandwiches. I noticed your UW track pants and fell in love with my little warrior princess. I was wearing a red thick woolen sweater, and I think that you noticed it, and me, too. Xena, can I be your Gabrielle?

You are in my Phil 100 class at AL 124. You pretended to look at the prof, but I knew you were looking past him directly into my heart. Now just say HELLO! ;)

Parlez-vous francais? Je croix que oui.You know who you are, my slice of Parisian paradise. French is a romance language after all, so this shouldn’t be difficile.

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3 5 6 2 7 9 8 1 4

O N O R H U I N N D E I S S T P O U N T E E D

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S H A I T A N S

C U T T Y

S A V S E T S R I M P A S E

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A N T N C H U R A S L A F I F H E A T E R E A C R O L A N R P O S T O S P A N P R I S E A N C T S

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2 9 7 1 5 6 4 8 3

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B R A S S A R D

M E R E

T Y P E W V R O I L T E S Y R I E E M O N E A N N R A I

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W E N D

“Flying elbows!” Laura Fockler 4B languages

“Isolate myself and look straight ahead.” Michelle L. Smith 2B political science

E L Y

S U D A N

5 7 4 9 3 1 2 6 8

“Listen to music.” Kaylin Liznick

2B biomedical science

“By looking as dangerous as possible.” Caustan De Riggs 4B environment and business

You always steal the computer I like at the SJU library right after our class together. Stop looking at me, and stop doing it. I used to see you on the iXpress, then bus #35. I can say that you have the most beautiful eyes I have ever seen! If you would like to have coffee, just search Shafa on Facebook.

“I wouldn’t.”

Ana Gutovic 4B english Missed a connection? Wanna break the ice? Email mkimmich@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

“Turn my iPod up and look out the window.” Aiden Stevenson 1B arts and business


Arts

arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Musical talent just beyond your front lawn

courtesy revive

courtesy porcelain

Cambridge local band Revive (left) plans to release a debut album this spring. Kitchener pop rock group Porcelain (right) will be playing the Boathouse on February 9. Monica Harvey staff reporter

The first time I saw Revive play was in a small bar in Cambridge hosting a show for a few bands. While most of the bands were entertaining, Revive was able to distinguish themselves in both their music and the quality of their performance despite the sketchy venue. The band is quite talented and is an example of how talent and technique can give way to limitless creativity. It is always daring to compare a new band to other significant bands in music, but Revive has a sound and vibe like Nine Inch Nails and Tool. Other musical influences in the past and present sounds like they could be Alexisonfire, Pink Floyd and Mute Math. The band consists of five members: Dan Rochester on vocals, Steve Dallner on guitar, Jeff Brown on drums, Mike Lewis on guitar and Marc MacAulay on bass. Started in 2004, the band has undergone many transformations, including changing members and sounds. Originally, the band had a more hardcore punk feel but has recently decided to go in a more experimental and progressive direction. “We used to be more of a ‘hardcore’ driven band with a mix of vocals and screaming but we decided to change our style up to only have singing” said Brown.

The band has only recorded a few songs, all of which are available for download on their MySpace page at www.myspace.com/revive. Due to the evolution of the music, the band isn’t rushing to the recording studio. “Our main focus right now is playing lots of shows to try and get some exposure throughout Ontario,” said Brown. “We will be focusing our efforts through the winter to complete a full length album in the spring. We still have about four more tracks to write before thinking about recording.” Revive is constantly playing live and has three upcoming shows: two in Toronto on January 10 at the Rivoli, and on January 17 at Lennie B’s and one in Kitchener on February 22 at the Circus Room. The band also recently competed in “Bodog Battle,” where hundreds of bands from across Canada “battled” for a $1 million contract with Bodog Music. Revive was one of the bands out of 883 which made it to the live audition stage after submitting their song “20 out of 40.” You can find more information about the band at their myspace page or from their Facebook group “Revive.” “Revive is a band that you must listen to more than once to fully appreciate and understand the music… to be noticed, a band must do something different with their sound,” said Brown. mharvey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Monica Harvey staff reporter

When asked what genre Porcelain belongs to, the answer of the lead vocalist Adam Krulicki and lead guitarist Jim Mathers was very surprising: “Pop.” While pop is not necessarily a genre, and could be anything from dancing boy bands to blonde country singers, in terms of where the band is going and how they feel about sharing their music “pop” is actually the best description. “Porcelain” is the name of a Moby song from his album Play released in 1999. Play was the first album in history to have all its tracks commercially licensed. The particular track was chosen for the name of the band, because it also happens to be the place you end up after a hard night of drinking. The commercialization of music isn’t new but the attitude and motivations behind it are changing. “There used to be a stigma attached to selling out, but the music industry is changing” said Mathers. Commercialization of the band and their music is important but for the exposure not the money: “I want everyone to hear our music, not just people who can find it,” said Krulicki. The band is also conscious of maintaining the integrity of their image while going mainstream. “I think car insurance companies rip people off so I would never lend a song to them, but I do believe strongly in old people having sex, so I

would give a song to Viagra,” said Krulicki. The music of Porcelain can be loosely described as pop-rock and have been compared to other bands such as Broken Social Scene and Oasis with other apparent influences including The Beatles, Underworld, The Cure and The Killers. The band has recorded a self-titled EP which contains six songs all recorded and produced by the band in the Kruliki basement. Their music has been described as sounding like “nothing ever heard before, but something so familiar.” Currently, the band has five members: Adam Krulicki as lead vocals, his brother Chad Krulicki on keyboard, Jim Mathers as lead guitarist, James Bisch on drums and Jeff Bell on bass. The band is currently working on their first full length album in the studio and will be playing a show February 9, 2008 at the Boathouse in Kitchener. The intentional commercialization of art while maintaining the honour of the music may seem like a paradox, but you can’t deny the artistic spirit of the band who proclaims that “good music is ageless and timeless.” Discrediting a band for their desire to be popular is ironically the same as liking a band because they are. It should be about the music and doing whatever it takes to get it out there. We can expect great things from Porcelain, a band that is willing to do that. mharvey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

It’s kind of like a union, but not Facebook is an online community which a large majority of you university students know. While some of you couldn’t wait to meet up with your classmates after the winter holidays had come and gone, some stayed in contact through Facebook and already made plans with friends during the holiday. It keeps people together. Facebook groups also keep friends close to each other, because of interests they share. But like I used to ask myself before I joined Facebook, “What’s the point of online communities and groups?” The same could be said for some of the online webcomic communities out there. There are quite a few groups out there that, while not as easy to customize and use as Facebook or MySpace, create a whole set of networks between each other. These groups are pretty much like small unions and today I’ll explain two types of webcomic communities: webcomichosting networks and webcomic organizations or “portals.”

With webcomic-hosting networks, the creators offer web-space for an aspiring webcomic artist to post his or her work online on a massive number of servers. Usually, these services are free, and they allow a broad range of tools and resources to make the site easier to manage, such as an automated and/or pre-made archive system for the artist’s collection of comics. The number of hosts is pretty big, so if you want to start a webcomic, choosing one of these hosts is an available option. The more common of these free networks include Smack Jeeves and Drunk Duck which offers a rating and comment system for each posted comic, and Webcomics Nation which can host many comic series and/or shorts per artist. The most common community known as Comic Genesis. Once known as Keenspace, Comic Genesis has held an extensive library of different works from amateur to semi-pro webcomic artists and writers since 2000. Based on my own personal experience, it also has

some of the most customizable options available for creating and designing a free-hosted webcomic site. Some of my favourite webcomicists have come from Comic Genesis and have continued to go on to approach bigger goals, such as Nina Matsumoto from Saturnalia, who has recently done some work with Matt Groening’s Bongo Comics. Michael “Mookie” Terracciano from Dominic Deegan: Oracle for Hire has gone from being hosted on Comic Genesis to ZeStuff, a geek-related online retail shop. Before ZeStuff, however, Terracciano was hosted for a long time on Comic Genesis’ parent site called Keenspot, which brings me to my discussion of webcomic portals. Webcomic portals, organizations and syndicates are usually more focused groups of webcomic artists. They can range from a large network of works (such as Keenspot) to a small community of artists (such as Blank Label Comics and Dayfree Press). These

communities also have a stronger tendency to hold on to their name as a professional brand name or goal. One example of this is Tomgeeks, a recently new syndicate that consists of women webcomicists that promote geek culture and make comics under genres such as fantasy and sci-fi. If you read a good number of webcomics, it’s likely that it falls under a community of other webcomics, sharing similar ventures and plans. Of course, the average hardcore hipster may consider this kind of grouping as selling out, but it’s usually quite the opposite. Like many artists from the past, webcomicists share a very modern-bohemian lifestyle and network; even the most introverted of webcomicists chat with fellow artists and writers. Webcomic communities just make that chatting easier and unlike other online network communities, there’s less of a necessity to take a MySpace angle shot. ptrinh@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


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Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Musical guidelines Welcome to the year 2008: no robots, whatever the genre is. I’m not stating no flying cars and chances are you’re that there is a sudden everyone-listennot the leader of a foreign planet to-everything revolution. Rather, I am — what a drag. But as musical group suggesting that people are enjoying Semisonic teaches with their 1998 more diverse listening with the help single “Closing Time,” “every new of the internet. That said, this colbeginning comes from some other umn will embrace a genre-unspecific beginning’s end.” Thus, we move movement by offering one song each forward into a new year — robots week — perhaps unheard of or forgotten — which seeks to diversify and flying cars be damned. For music lovers the world is a your music library. To kick-start the new year, and to good place right now. The internet has become a listener-friendly haven encourage the quest for new music, with the widespread use of peer-to- here are three guidelines to accepting peer downloading and the creation new songs. The first guideline: listen to new tunes of tools such as MySpace and YouTube. Prior to the Internet, a university on your own. If you’re curious about an student’s listening was restricted to Enya song you overheard earlier in the the radio and their personal music day, but know your friends will think library was shaped accordingly. To- it’s lame, listen to it when you’re alone day, listening is dependent on your later. If you try to flick it on when schedule and the variety of bands your friends are with you, you’re only available to you is seemingly limitless. going to be met with disappointment The result from this phenomenon is when they tell you an extremely diverse music culture. Consequently, the university crowd today differs from previous generations. Currently, one music genre does not represent our generation. Hippies and punks formed their identity around music and music catered to their identity — this is generally unheard of now. Although there are miniature cliques of hardcore loyalists who walk and talk a certain genre, nothing seems comparable to the highly populated movements of the before. Most listeners now do not identify with one genre but seem to sample various genres. As a result, one person will have hip-hop, country and alternative music on a single play list. This leaves our music industry looking like some sort of musical soup, where different ingredients act as different genres and they all co-exist, waiting to be ingested by the music loving audience. This in itself may be our movement. Perhaps the seemingly genreless listeners of today are forming a mass of open-minded people who enjoy music

Enya is music for wienies. Guideline number two: nod your head and frequently back-up the song lyrics by saying “yeah” or “uh-huh.” It’s sort of like reassuring yourself that what you’re listening to is totally cool. Hip-hop artist DMX does this sort of thing right in the middle of his own songs. Guideline three: dance in the mirror. If you’re dancing to it then it has to be cool. Just don’t tell anyone. Following these three guidelines will put you on the right path and have you heading toward a healthy and diverse music collection. Not to mention that all three guidelines, when put together, make for a pretty sweet Friday night. ktremblay@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

joyce hsu

Blood, greed and oil

courtesy allocine.com

There Will Be Blood Paul Thomas Anderson Ghoulardi Film Company

When a movie is called great, it can mean two different things. In almost all cases, it means that it has a clever plot, fresh visuals, and inspired acting — all of which are coherently orchestrated under articulate direction. A second, much, much rarer case is this one — when the film delivers on a level above and beyond a typical “great” movie; ensuring that critics and scholars will still be studying and debating its various merits many decades after its release. There Will Be Blood — I say this without a hint of doubt — belongs firmly in the second category.  Adapted from Upton Sinclair’s 1927 novel Oil! by the film’s director Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood follows the story of Daniel Plainview, a turn-of-the-century California oil prospector and Eli Sunday, a teenage preacher and “spiritual healer” who quickly becomes his nemesis. The tension between the two quickly builds up after Plainview, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, purchases land rich with oil from Sunday’s father.  The young preacher’s manipulative tactics to wrangle as much “donation” out of the oil well, and the speculator’s burning ambition and almost pathological fixation on achieving great affluence, locks the two characters into a battle of ego.  The story ends twenty-odd years later in a violent eruption of hate and rage, which makes clear Anderson

wanted the title to be taken literally as well as metaphorically.  The movie is a big departure from his previous works — it is a single character-driven period picture set in the countryside as opposed to multi-character driven picture set in the modern Los Angeles or Reno. One could argue Anderson’s Punch-Drunk Love was also single character-driven. It told the story of the main character, Barry, through words and actions of his sisters and his love interest Lena — quite a difference from There Will Be Blood where everything about Plainview is revealed through his words, actions, and charisma.  More importantly, There Will Be Blood is the first movie by Anderson with a distinct style, which cannot quite be traced back to another movie. Anderson’s Hard Eight borrowed the dark, moody modern noir style from Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Ficton, Boogie Nights used a long Steadicam shots very similar to ones used in Martin Scorsese’s Goodfellas, and Punch-Drunk Love’s blue and red colour palette was an obvious homage to JeanLuc Godard’s A Woman Is a Woman.  There may be some disagreements about the importance of Anderson’s bold new film in the still very young medium of motion pictures and I may be completely wrong in thinking There Will Be Blood is destined to be a subject of scholarly study for decades to come (though I doubt it). However, one thing is completely clear — Paul Thomas Anderson has joined the ranks of American cinematic masters. — Hoon Choi

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Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Book Review

Memorize the Faith: And Most Anything Else Dr. Kevin Vost Sophia Institute Press

Some books are great because of the quality of the writing. Some books are great because of the content or message they convey. Some books are great because of the reputation they garner, and over time, come to be considered classics. Dr. Kevin Vost has written a book that fits the first two categories and only time will tell about the third. The author, who has done both graduate work and doctorate work on memory has written this book as a tool to help Catholics memorize their faith. It is, however, so much more than that. It can be used by any serious academic to help them memorize, to think more creatively, and plan and execute research and papers. If you read the book for the techniques taught alone, it will be an invaluable asset for any student. According to Dr. Vost, “the text and illustrations have been structured in such a way that if you read slowly and carefully, look at the pictures and follow the instructions, by the time you finish, you’ll be able to remember and name the Ten Commandments, the Seven Capital Sins, the Seven Virtues, the Nine Beatitudes, the Seven Sacraments, the Twenty Mysteries of the Rosary. If you are ambitious enough, you can even learn the names of the forty-six books of the Old Testament and the twentyseven books of the New Testament. All of these in order, both forward and backward!” Through the processes, he uses a

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method of memorization that traces its roots and origins to the ancient Greek poet Simonides and the philosopher Aristotle to Marcus Tullius Cicero. These techniques were then taught and practiced by the Doctors of the Catholic Church, St. Albert the Great (the “Universal Doctor”) and St. Thomas Aquinas. These techniques are collectively known as mnemonics. Through the progression of learning memorization skills, you will develop greater abilities and strengths in these areas: organization, imagination and concentration. There is so much we still do not understand about the human brain, but we do know that the more we use the brain, the more we can strengthen these abilities. It can also be retrained after injury. Studies that have been done on surgery patients, Alzheimer’s patients and others show that working the brain can help fight disease. Vost’s techniques will help the reader to organize thoughts and thought processes more clearly, use the imagination to stretch the brain, and work it out in new and different ways. Then, the concentration involved in the first two activities, combined with repetition, can lead to memory skills that will serve you for a lifetime. Vost writes in a fun and engaging manner. This book is written with many target groups in mind. He writes for practitioners of the Catholic faith that want to memorize the lists he gives above, and many, many more. He writes for a younger audience who wish to understand their faith. He writes for all students who need the skills presented in this book to help them learn to be better students and scholars. The greatest strength of this book is Dr. Vost’s background in research, practice in implementing these systems in the field of psychology, and his love for his religious tradition. The weakness of the book is that the memorization techniques, tips and tricks are so great you will have to study Catholicism to learn them. An added bonus is that at the end of each chapter is a toolbox called “Memory Master Tips and Facts.” These boxes help you apply the material in an easier fashion. Therefore, I would say that this is a great book for the old and for the young in the faith. It is also a good resource for any academic or lifelong learner. — Steven McEvoy

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Ring in the New We’re still feeling the waves of what’s been touted as the best year for gaming since the golden age of Nintendo, and already it’s time to look at what 2008 and beyond will do for gaming. Looking back at the year of triumphs that has just passed, it is quite overwhelming to think of all that happened within that seemingly short span of 365 days. The vast number of blockbuster games, creative jaunts and time-wasting casual games that have graced our screens are enough to have made 2007 burst with gaming goodness — I’m still surprised it didn’t. Games such as Bioshock helped us to feel a new level of immersion, creepiness and artistic gaming style since System Shock. Sim City Societies helped us to discover a whole new side of simulation games (until Spore comes out) and how dynamic algorithms can truly change the way a game develops. We also discovered that Mario could still be fun and mostly original in Super Mario Galaxy. Games like Warhawk showed us that the six-axis controller can make conventional gameplay step easily into the nex-gen. Rock Band let us see that we could find something more addictive than Guitar Hero and Dance Dance Revolution combined — and at a decent cost. The Orange Box truly proved that you can have a package of games and have every one contained within be amazing. On that note, Portal showed how a four hour game can still be mind-blowing and more than satisfactory — even if the cake is a lie. All in all, 2008 will have some trouble pulling out from the shadow of its predecessor — but I have hope. With the beginning of 2008 already overshadowed by such biggies as Call of Duty 4 and Rock Band, it’s important

to look forward to see what lies on the horizon that may outdo the giants of 2007. One thing I’d hope to see in 2008 is for Nintendo to come up with some more original titles. As it stands now, Nintendo’s success suffers from constant rehashing of other games or by their overused signature characters. While Super Mario Galaxy was certainly a step in the right direction, I’d hope to see them taking that same initiative and originality to new and exciting levels with new characters and mechanics. As great as Mario is, we need to have some other guys who are of this new generation of gaming hanging around with him.

With the beginning of 2008 already overshadowed...it’s important to look forward to see what lies on the horizon Another thing that was set forth in 2007 that I can’t wait to see developed is the start of more dynamic algorithms put into games. As I said before Sim City Societies helped to show how a game would learn and adapt to your gameplay based on how you built your city. Spore, which will be ideally released this year, promises to take this mechanic and blow it out of the water. The entire course of the game is determined as you play it. Forget Fable, this game will focus not only on your character but on the entire world around you, from the microscopic right on through to the cosmic. Creating your own big bang is only a few months away.

Along the same lines as this dynamic game, I’m incredibly excited to see the artsy side of games come out to shine. Starting with the dreary, creepy and enthralling Bioshock, and continuing on through to 2008’s soon to be released LittleBigPlanet (LBP). This game cries out a new realm of gaming style and fun that, in this generation, we have yet to truly experience. Between the use of the six-axis and the integrated multiplayer designing, LBP is expected to help us discover level-making, social networking, artistic mechanics and a multitude of other elements all within a single title that’ll make you forget about My Beautiful Katamari. How can we not be excited? The artsy-ness will continue with such epic titles to be released such as Metal Gear Solid IV and Grand Theft Auto IV. Both of these games are on the docket as mind-blowing in their graphic style and details. Pictures have circulated comparing the graphics of GTA IV to that of the real New York City, thereby creating some rather convincing composites. As always, MGS is setting out to prove that they can jump on the bandwagon of the nex-gen graphics engines by the demo videos that have been circulating. Of course, there are a multitude of other things to look forward to this year, some namely of which are Super Smash Bros: Brawl, Mario Kart Wii and Fallout 3. It’s impossible to scope what 2008 may bring so early in the year. All I can say is, peel away from your current treasures every once in a while, and start to plan out your purchases for the year. You may soon learn that 2008 is planning on stepping up to jump the bar that this past year has set. jrickert@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Science

science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Organ donor outrage

New Health Canada policy restricts organ donation by MSMs

joyce hsu

Sherif Soliman assistant science

Adrienne Raw science editor

Another controversy concerning Health Canada is brewing. Last year, it was blood donation. This time, it’s organ donation. A new Health Canada policy that went into effect December 7, 2007 will exclude organ donations from any man who has had sexual relations with another man since 1977. The policy is reminiscent of an earlier controversy concerning blood donation by males falling into the same category. That earlier controversy centered on the Health Canada policy that excluded any man who’d had sex with another men since 1977 from donating blood. Health Canada policy provoked intense debate, particularly at the university level. Several campus newspapers, including UW’s own Imprint, expressed their outrage at this policy. Imprint staff reporter Travis Myers wrote the article, “A bloody outrage,” concerning the policy that is, in his words, “homophobic, ignorant thinking.” A writer from the University of Regina’s student newspaper, The Carillon, similarly pointed out that this policy excludes an estimated 10 per cent of the population — the 10 per cent that is generally recognized as being homosexual. Western’s daily student newspaper, The Gazette, ran an article discussing a November visit to campus by Canadian Blood Services (CBS) in which the agency unsuccessfully defended its MSM (men who have had sex with men) policy. Student reactions ranged from hushed protest to public campaigns to definitive action.

A campaign launched last spring at Concordia University called on CBS and Héma-Québec to change their discriminatory policies. The student council at McGill University banned blood drives from campus. As of November 30, the King’s University College students’ union was considering banning CBS from campus because of policies it sees as homophobic. National newspapers and magazines such as Maclean’s and The Vancouver Sun, driven largely by campus newspaper coverage and student interest, picked up the blood donation story in November and January respectively. The Maclean’s article in late November, which focused on student response to the issue, included a reference to Myers’ article. Meanwhile, according to The Vancouver Sun, student groups are actively pressing CBS to end the ban on blood donation from sexually active gay men. The new organ donor restrictions have prompted even more response from both student and national sources. Health Canada’s reasoning for this new policy change is the same as for their blood donation restrictions: to decrease the risks of transplanting organs with HIV, hepatitis, etc. Their policy, originally outlined in the June 2007 edition, Volume 141, No. 13 of the Canada Gazette Part 2, states that donor suitability (or unsuitability) is based on the criteria set out in the Canada Standards Association document in the section titled “Donor Screening.” This document is available only by purchase. The “Donor Screening” section discusses in-depth the process used to identify disease transmission and high-risk behaviour. According to Health Canada, these high risk behaviours include the following: • males who have had sexual contact with other males in the last five years

• anyone who has engaged in any prostitution in the last five years • anyone who has used any non-medical intravenous drugs • anyone who has had tattoos or any bodypiercings where the possibility of shared instruments exists • anyone incarcerated for more than 72 consecutive hours in the last year The most controversial of these regulations is the first one. Critics point out that MSM relations are not the only source of HIV/AIDS, the major concern driving the Health Canada regulations. They also note that sexual activity between two males does not automatically mean that the individuals have HIV/AIDS. Others demand to know why doctors can’t employ one of the commonly used tests that detect HIV/AIDS. Any blood or organ donation is screened for diseases and infections before being used, regardless of the donor’s sexual history. While this process does not eliminate 100 per cent of the risk, it does equalize safe sources and potentially at-risk sources. Health Canada intends to tighten the screening process. Family members and relatives will be questioned about the donor’s sexual and social history and practices, in an attempt to uncover any other reason why the donor should be rejected. The recent policy change also raises many concerns with organ donation facilities, as well as patients or people who would potentially need organ transplants in the future. According to CBC News, Dr. Gary Levy, head of Canada’s largest organ transplant program at Toronto’s University Health Network, Health Canada had not informed them of this new policy concerning organ donation. Many other transplant programs across Canada have stated that since there was no formal introduction of the

regulations, they intend to continue to consider all potential donors. Patients will feel the greatest effects of the new policy. Levy estimates that around seven of the yearly 100 donors at his Toronto hospital will be rejected due to the new regulations. Many online blogs and websites have expressed concerns on how this will negatively affect availability of organs for transplants. Health Canada mentions on its own website that Canada has one of the lowest rates of organ donation among industrialized nations, with 147 Canadians dying in the same year that 2,000 were waiting for organs which could not be provided. Currently, there are thousands of Canadians waiting for organs. Information on this issue is lacking: hospitals and transplant centers are confused, and interested citizens seeking clarification find almost no solid information. To many, this suggests that Health Canada trying to avoid another mass public outrage. This confusion is exacerbated by a recent statement by the Trilliam Gift of Life Network (TGLN), the organization responsible for organ and tissue donation in Ontario. TGLN’s Chief Medical Officer of Transplant, Dr. Gary Levy, said in a press statement on January 4: “We don’t exclude anyone from being an organ donor.” Health Canada is tightening regulations on organ donation and excluding a growing portion of society from eligibility to donate. Their actions, clearly demonstrating how unaffected they are by the community protests against their policies, might be interpreted by many as discriminatory and homophobic. ssoliman@imprint.uwaterloo.ca araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Science

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Adrienne Raw science editor

Researchers find infant planetary giant

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany recently reported the discovery of the youngest ever planet to be found. With a mass 3,115 times that of Earth and 9.8 times that of Jupiter, the planet, called TW Hya b, is classified as a giant planet. Its age of less than 10 million years old, however, makes it an infant in astrological terms. At the same time on Earth, primates were splitting into two lines, apes and Old World monkeys, one of which (the apes) would later evolve into modern day humans. Before the discovery of TW Hya b, the youngest planet identified was an estimated 100 million years old. TW Hya b orbits an infant star, called TW Hydrae (TW Hya), in a solar system that is still being formed from cosmic dust and gas. The new planet orbits its star at a distance of 3.7 million miles and takes just over three-and-a-half days to complete an orbit. Scientists estimate that the infant planet formed shortly after the star’s birth, and that other planets are likely still forming within the new system. The discovery of TW Hya b is expected to provide insights into the formation of solar systems. Atom-thick carbon sheets are superconductive

Graphene, atom-thick sheets of carbon arranged in a hexagon pattern, have the potential to provide the greatest room-temperature con-

21

ductivity of any material including gold, silicon, gallium arsenide and carbon nanotubes. The ease with which electrons can travel could allow the development of super-fast microelectronics. The mobility of charge in a semiconductor is called the electronic quality and governs the transfer speed that material can provide to electronics. According to researchers’ calculations, graphene has an electronic quality at roomtemperature of over 23 times that of gallium arsenide, the material currently used in cellphones. Prototype devices have already been created using graphene, but scientists have yet to develop a method that would allow them to easily produce the material in large enough quantities to be used commercially. Science debunks widely accepted assumption about intelligence

One of the most widely accepted assumptions about the aging process is that the human brain is at its most powerful between the ages of 18 and 26, during the height of youth, and that mental ability decreases with age. New research led by Lars Larsen, a psychologist at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, however, seems to contradict this assumption. Larsen’s research involved a comparison of the records of 4,300 American ex-servicemen. These men were given rigorous intelligence test when they joined the military at about 20 years old. The same servicemen were re-tested two decades later. Results of the study show that intelligence, instead of peaking during youth, remains relatively steady and, in some areas,

The Science Podium Science is looking for two opposing articles of about 500 words on a science issue. The issue: Is there a scientific basis for the ban on blood and/or organ donations by men who have had sex with other men? If you’re interested in writing either in favour or opposed to this issue, please contact us: science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

gets sharper as people grow older. Verbal skills increase for at least two decades beyond the age of 20, while arithmetic skills remain constant. A likely reason for the improvement in verbal skills is experience; older

people have had to solve many more social and practical problems than younger ones. The results of Larsen’s research have demonstrated to scientists that real changes in intelligence are much more complex

than previously realized. — with files from The Times and NewScientist araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


22

Science

science Book review

The Trouble with Physics Lee Smolin Mariner Books

In The Trouble with Physics, UW adjunct Prof. Lee Smolin sets for himself a daunting task: making the history of, and problems with, string theory accessible to the average reader. This is especially

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008 difficult because the development of string theory over the past 30 years has been highly mathematical, with little advancement directly tied to lab experimentation. How, then, to chart its progress and pitfalls without devolving into the minutiae of special geometries, quantum mechanics and general cosmology? And, yet, Smolin knows both when to explain and when to bow out of such detailed discourse, allowing for a more overarching story about fundamental physics, the pursuit of unification and the price of human investments in science to emerge in its stead. Arguing that string theory is being pursued in ways that threaten the integrity of science as a whole, Smolin develops a striking case study of a field in crisis. String theory, in Smolin’s view, does not even have the luxury of being one theory — manifesting more as a landscape of theories numbering at least in the ten thousands, and requiring up to 11 dimensions and hundreds of variables to account for the added forces and geometries. And, as string theory has produced no useful predictions, with non-falsifiability finagling itself into more recent, multiverse manifestations, Smolin finds

the deficit of resources and manpower dedicated to other unification theories alarming. So not surprisingly, what arises most prominently in The Trouble with Physics is the human aspect of contemporary fundamental physics — the allure of elegant solutions and aesthetically pleasing ideas; the dangers of “groupthink;” and above all the difficulty involved in walking away from a lifetime of work. This is not, however, to suggest that Smolin’s book should be taken as the last word on contemporary unification theories. In fact, I strongly encourage interested readers to follow up their reading of Smolin’s text with a trip to the internet, where he and other distinguished physicists deliberate on Smolin’s more technical argumentation. But beyond the debate about who is “right” in regards to string theory, there lies the equally complex question of human fallibility — and even if Smolin is not wholly correct in his technical argumentation, his urging that physicists address the way they are doing science proves a telling read. Smolin reminds readers that even Einstein, for all his genius, was still so much a part of his era’s cultural paradigm that he could not readily

accept all the logical extensions of general relativity. I find it fascinating how difficult the pursuit of scientific truth can be even for those who have committed their whole lives to its cause. Smolin was also criticized for his choice of medium — with some scientists claiming that if he felt string theory was wrong he should be directing his arguments solely to other scientists, and not the general community. Of all the heated exchanges that arose from Smolin’s book, these were for me the most striking. Certainly, it is extremely difficult to make the history of higher level physics accessible to a general audience, while at the same time avoiding oversimplification of the issues at hand, but I would also argue that works like The Trouble with Physics serve as gateways to whole bodies of further research, sparking public interest in such under-acknowledged fields and ensuring that, even if string theory does prove a dead end in the years to come, the dedication of so many quantum cosmologists and mathematicians will not go unnoticed — or wasted.

28 or Tuesday, Janaury 29 – “Sentence Structure.” For more info/registration call 519-888-4567, ext 32655 or kmaclean@uwaterloo.ca or ext 33245.

p.m., TC 1112. “Starting Your Own Business: The Basics” – this workshop will help you assess your readiness to start a business venture. Only 20 spots available. 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC 1208. Wednesday, January 23: “Career Exploration and Decision Making” – this workshop will increase your understanding. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., TC 1112. “Are You Thinking About An International Experience?” – dreaming of going abroad to study or work? This workshop is for you. 3 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208.

— Maggie Clark

Campus Bulletin ANNOUNCEMENTS

“Morning Drive Radio Show” – 6:30 to 9 a.m., www.ckmsfm.ca >click on webcast, for the latest news, traffic, school closures, interviews and a great mix of music! To get your important events on the air, e-mail morningdrivel@ yahoo.ca. If you have an interesting person that CKMS should interview call 519-884-2567 between 6:30 to 9 a.m....qualify for a prize! Win $1000, $500 or $200 award. UW, UWO, WLU, or U of G students. Submit transcript, cover letter, and two technical communication samples. Deadline February 29, 2008. Go to http://www.stc-soc.org/awards/thiessenaward. php.

UPCOMING

Thursday, January 17, 2008 Cross Cultures Perspectives Dialogue presents “Raising Children” at 6 p.m. at Kitchener Public Library, Main Branch auditorium-lower level, 85 Queen Street, Kitchener. For info call 519-748-9520 or crosscultures@bellnet.ca. Saturday, January 19, 2008 “Heads Up for Healthier Brains” – January is Alzheimer Awareness Month – Public Education Forums – what is dementia? What is Alzheimer’s disease? To be discussed from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Sunnyside Home, Heritage Hall, 247 Franklin St., N., Kitchener. RSVP to Alzheimer Society of KitchenerWaterloo at 519-742-1422. Tuesday, January 22, 2008 Volunteer/Internship Fair – Come out and meet representatives from a variety of local agencies to find out about volunteering opportunities of all kinds. Also, talk with representatives recruiting interns for very specific projects: setting up research, planning projects, preparing presentations, writing reports, performing data evaluations, planning events, managing a database, marketing for the organization - just to name a few. Join us between 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Life Centre, Great Hall. Renowned baroque violinist Linda Melsted performs music by J.S. Bach at 8 p.m. at the Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick Street, Kitchener. On January 24 she will be performing at the Guelph Youth Music Centre, 75 Cardigan Street, Guelph. For info on these events call 519-578-1570 or 877-520-2408 or tberns@magma.ca. Thursday, January 24, 2008 Learning Disabilities Association of K-W is hosting a workshop “Healthy Habits for Effective Learning” from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., hoted by Sandy Churchmach, registered dietitian. For info, location call 519743-9091. Wednesday, January 30, 2008 Ladies WOW Fun Seminar Series – 6:30 to 10 p.m. at the Arthur and area Community Centre. For more info call Wendy at 519-342-4029 or wsmith@wisemoove.com. Saturday, February 16, 2008 Women’s Crisis Services of Waterloo Region is proud to present “Hockey Night in Waterloo Region with NHL hockey legend Darryl Sittler,” at St. George Banquet Hall, 665 King Street N, Waterloo.

Call 519-653-8966, ext 239 or shelly.friesen@wcswr. org for more info.

CHURCH SERVICE St. Bede’s chapel at Renison College offers worship on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. or take a break mid-week with a brief silence followed by Celtic noon prayers on Wednesdays. Come and walk the labyrinth the second Thursday of each month, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more info contact Megan at 519-884-4404, ext 28604 or www.renison. uwaterloo.ca/ministry-centre.

STUDENT AWARDS FINANCIAL AID

2nd floor, Needles Hall, ext 33583. Loan release will begin on Wednesday, January 2/08. In an effort to decrease waiting times, the office will continue to use a time ticket system. Time tickets will be given out each day, throughout the day and will be released for more than one day at a time. Out of province students may come at any time, beginning January 2. Please check our website, safa.uwaterloo.ca for more info, a full listing of scholarships and awards. Remember: you must have your Social Insurance card and Watcard, or government issued photo ID, to pick up your funding.

VOLUNTEER

Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence. One to three hours a week commitment. Call Canadian Mental Health 519-744-7645, ext 229. City of Waterloo, 519-888-6488 or volunteer@ city.waterloo.on.ca has the following volunteer opportunities: “55+ MC for Friday Flicks and Hosts/Hostesses” – for afternoon drop-in programs. Call for more info. “Uptown Country: Print and Publications Designer and Website Designer” needed now until June. “Buskers Carnival: Logistics Coordinator and Director of Corporate Sponsorship” needed for this high-profile festival. Volunteer Action Centre, 519-742-8610 or www.volunteerkw.ca, has many opportunities available – call today! The Kitchener Youth Action Council is currently seeking volunteers aged 14-24 who are concerned about issues facing youth and young adults across Kitchener. For more info e-mail youth@kitchener.ca. Distress Line Volenteers Wanted - Canadian Mental Health Association is seeking caring volunteers to provide supportive listening and crisis deescalation to callers living in Waterloo Region. Please call 519-744-7645, ext 300.

COUNSELLING SERVICES English Language Proficiency Program (ELPP) – all workshops are scheduled between 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. Monday, January 14 or Tuesday, January 15 – “SelfAssessment.” Monday, January 21 or Tuesday, January 22 – “Essay Writing.” Monday, January

CO-OP/CAREER SERVICES Monday, January 14: “Networking 101” – learn how to apply successful networking strategies in your daily life. 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC 1208. Tuesday, January 22: “Exploring Your Personality Type (Part 1)” – two-session workshop. 2 to 3:30

Classifieds HELP WANTED

Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, K-W Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. We’ve got what you’re looking for – let’s make 2008 your best summer yet – Camp Wayne, northeast Pennsylvania, USA. Counselor-specialists for all Land and Water Sports Inc. Tennis, golf, basketball, baseball, football, martial arts, soccer, outdoor adventure, camping, mountain biking, climbing/ropes, roller hockey, archery, rocketry, water-ski, wakeboard, sailing, canoe/kayaking, fine artstheatre, ceramics, woodworking, drawing, painting, CDL drivers. RN’s for our Health Centre. Let’s get the ball rolling now! Online application www.campwayne.com ; info@ campwayne.com ; 1-888-549-2963. Summer of your life! Camp Wayne for Girls – children’s sleep-away camp, Northeast Pennsylvania (6/21 - 8/17/08). If you love children and want a caring fun environment we need counselors and program directors for: tennis, swimming, golf, gymnastics, cheerleading, drama, high and low ropes, camping/nature, team sports, waterskiing, sailing, painting/ drawing, ceramics, silkscreen, printmaking, batik, jewelry, calligraphy, photography, sculpture, guitar, aerobics, self-defense video, piano. Other staff: administrative, CDL driver (21+), nurses (RN’s and nursing students), bookkeeper, mother’s helper. On campus interviews January 31. Select the camp that selects the best staff! Call 1-215-944-3069 or apply on-line at www.campwaynegirls.com. Extend-A-Family part-time positions – providing in-home and community support to individuals with developmental/physical challenges in a variety of programs. Providers will be reliable, energetic and committed. $12.48/ hour. If interested, please contact Recruitment at 519-741-0190, ext 248 or via e-mail kcressman@eafwr.on.ca. Website: www.eafwr. on.ca. Have the summer of your life at a prestigious coed sleepaway camp in the beautiful Pocono

Mountains of Pennsylvania, two and a half hours from NY City. We’re seeking counselors who can teach any team and individual sports; tennis, gymnastics, horseback riding, mountain biking, theatre, tech theatre, circus, magic, arts and crafts, pioneering, climbing tower, water sports, music, dance or science. Great salaries and perks. Plenty of free time. Internships available for many majors. Interviews on February 6. Apply online at www.islandlake. com. Call 1-800-869-6083 between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time on weekdays for more information. info@islandlake.com.

HOUSING Attention Cambridge School of Architecture students! Live conveniently and comfortably right across the street from school in this beautifully renovated apartment. 4, 8 and 12-month leases available with excellent signing bonuses and rental incentives! Call Jelena at 519-746-1411 for more details. Two to seven bedroom houses available for May or September. Over 300 options! Houses or apartments, large rooms, back yards, free laundry and parking, bright and many newly renovated. Showings starting now so don’t delay! www.domushousing.com or call 519-572-0278. Awesome “real” houses – seven large bedrooms, two kitchens, two baths, at 423 and 426 Tamarack Drive. Eight minute walk to WLU, 12 minutes to UW, close to beer and grocery stores, lots of parking, free laundry, large yards, deck – must see! $399+/bedroom/month. Call 519-575-6313 or 519-575-6321.

COURSE INFO SP-100 Forest Firefighting course to be held in London, Ontario March 12-16, 2008 and Waterloo, Ontario March 19-23, 2008. Course will be held during evening hours during the week. To register, please call Wildfire Specialists Inc., 2233 Radar Road, Suite 5, Hanmer, Ontario, P3P 1R2, toll free 1-877-381-5849. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources accredited. No guarantee of employment.

DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M. FOR CLASSIFIEDS AND CAMPUS BULLETIN submissions, SLC room 1116 or ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Sports

sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Warriors sweep through Kingston Yang Liu sports editor

The Warrior men’s hockey team surged to within a point of first place in the OUA far west division this past weekend with a pair of wins against the teams from Kingston: Queen’s and RMC. Playing in, arguably, the toughest division in the OUA, the Warriors success so far this season has been laudable, as they now sit 13-5 and within striking distance of the division-leading Western Mustangs. The Warriors began their weekend set with a match-up against the Queen’s Golden Gaels last Friday night in Napanee, Ontario. The first period was one of rough play as the two teams combined for eight penalties and 24 minutes of penalty time. Waterloo found itself shorthanded five times in the period but bore down shorthanded and did not concede a goal. Jordan Brenner gave the Warriors the lead late in the first period with his eighth goal of the season. The Warriors took a 1-0 lead into the dressing room at the end of the first. The second period saw little action until the last four minutes when Dave Philpott put the Warriors ahead 2-0 but the Golden Gaels would respond with a tally of their own with 1:14 left in the period cutting the lead to one. The Warriors however, refused to give up their lead pulling away in the third, with goals from Kyle Pellerin and David Edgeworth, to take a commanding 4-1 lead. Shane Hart added an empty netter as the Warriors cruised to a 5-2 victory. Goalie Jimmy Bernier took the win with 37 saves on the night. The following night, Waterloo took on the other team from Kingston: the RMC Paladins. Coming off the high of a win from the previous night, the Warriors needed to re-focus against the 7-9 Paladins. Things did not get off to a good start as the Paladins took the all-important first goal with a power play tally from Josh Fudge. The Warriors evened the game with two seconds left in first period with a goal from Doug Spooner. Brian Mulholland would then notch his first goal of the season to give the Warriors the lead late in the second period.

Richard Lu

A Warrior player streaks down the ice in the midst of a fast break. The Warriors beat both Queen’s and RMC by scores of 5-2. The Warriors built on this lead in the final frame, as they pulled away with three goals in the first three minutes. Kevin Hurley and Shane Hart each contributed with a powerplay goal on route to a 5-2 victory by the Warriors over the Paladins. Mark Hartman also had a goal and an assist on the night and goalie

Jimmy Bernier picked up another win with a 22 save effort. Previous to the weekend sweep of the Kingston teams, Waterloo had entered the CIS national rankings at tenth place. The Warriors now have the second most wins in the OUA, behind only UQTR, which leads

the pack with 14 wins. This weekend, the Warriors have home games against Toronto and Ryerson in the CIF arena, as they look to leap ahead of Western for first place in the OUA far west division.

Yang Liu

The Warriors would not be fazed as they seized the momentum late in the fourth quarter and prevailed with a nail-biting 88-86 victory, pulling them within one game of .500. Dan White had a career night with 25 points and two rebounds. The following night, the Warriors squared off once again against the Thunderwolves, looking for the two game road sweep. Unlike the previous night, the Warriors would be icecold shooting from the field. Lakehead took advantage of an anemic Waterloo offense and jumped out to a 20-15 lead in the first. In the second quarter, the Thunderwolves extended their lead to thirteen points, while Waterloo remained completely icy shooting from the field, managing just ten points. Dan White’s hot hand managed to get the Warriors’ offense back on track in the third as they actually outscored the Thunderwolves. However, the Thunderwolves would pull away for good in the fourth, cruising to a 87-68 point win and avenging the previous night’s loss. White, with his 29 points in the game, managed to top his previous career high which he set the night before. The weekend series split against Lakehead dropped the Warriors back into last place, but they still remain only one game out of second place with more than half the season left to play.

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Men’s basketball split weekend series sports editor

Rocky Choi

Ben Frisby attempts a three-pointer as teammate David Burnett looks on.

The Warriors headed into the new year having won three of their last four games, which greatly improved team morale after a brutal 0-4 start. Waterloo had a chance to ring in the year by climbing back to .500 with a pair of games against the Lakehead Thunderwolves. Despite stumbling out of the starting gate, Waterloo is still in the hunt for a playoff spot as the OUA west remains a mass of mediocrity with just one game separating second place from last. Playing on the road at the aptly named Thunderdome, the Warriors started strong in their Friday night game against Lakehead. The Warriors pulled ahead early with a strong 10-0 run in the first quarter and finished with a 20-12 lead, thanks to some blistering shooting from the field. In the second quarter, the Warriors defensive game broke down as the Thunderwolves torched the Warriors from the field shooting over 60 per cent that quarter. The fast paced action of that quarter saw the two teams put up a combined 58 points. Lakehead however, got the better end of that, putting up 31 points to tie the game going into halftime at 43-43. The beginning of the third quarter saw a “seesaw” battle between the Warriors and Lakehead for momentum and the lead with the two teams trading baskets up and down the court. The Thunderwolves, prevailed exiting the third with a four point lead.

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


24

Sports

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Warrior Wrap-up

Men’s Hockey OUA Far West Division GP Western 17 Waterloo 18 Lakehead 16 Laurier 18 Windsor 18

W 12 13 11 11 3

L 2 5 5 6 14

T OTL PTS 27 3 0 1 26 0 25 0 0 23 1 0 7 1 0

Women’s Hockey OUA GP Laurier 17 Toronto 17 17 Guelph Windsor 19 Queen’s 19 York 18 Western 18 Waterloo 17 Brock 17 UOIT 17

W 15 13 12 9 8 7 6 5 4 1

L 1 3 5 8 8 8 8 9 11 15

T OTL PTS 1 0 30 0 1 27 0 0 24 1 1 20 3 0 19 3 0 17 4 0 16 3 0 13 4 0 12 1 5 2

Cheerleading Saturday, December 1, 2007 Waterloo finished 3rd at the University national cheerleading championship

Men’s Volleyball OUA GP McMaster 12 12 Guelph Waterloo 12 10 Western 10 Queen’s 11 York 10 Ryerson 10 Windsor 12 Laurier 11 Toronto 10 RMC

W L 12 0 10 2 7 5 6 4 6 4 6 5 5 5 3 7 3 9 2 9 0 10

GF 36 31 27 23 25 24 19 11 14 13 1

GA 6 15 21 16 19 19 17 23 29 29 30

PTS 24 20 14 12 12 12 10 6 6 4 0

W L 9 2 7 3 7 4 7 4 5 5 5 6 0 11

GF 28 26 25 23 21 19 6

GA 16 11 15 16 20 24 33

W 11 9 8 6 6 6 6 5

L 0 2 3 6 5 5 5 7

PF 816 800 732 750 718 711 782 778

PA 511 713 671 777 704 678 681 794

Friday, January 4 Queen’s 2 Waterloo 5

PTS 22 18 16 12 12 12 12 10

Saturday, January 5 RMC 2 Waterloo 5

PTS 18 14 14 14 10 10 0

GP Guelph 9 Brock 9 Windsor 9 Lakehead 10 McMaster 9 9 Laurier Waterloo 9 Western 10

W 7 5 5 5 4 4 4 4

L 2 4 4 5 5 5 5 6

PF 713 750 785 736 657 687 705 716

PA 648 659 735 621 648 684 736 693

Waterloo vs. York 8:00 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11

Women’s Hockey

Waterloo vs. Toronto 8:00 p.m. Saturday, January 12

Saturday, January 5 Windsor 0 Waterloo 1

Men’s Basketball

Women’s Volleyball

Friday, January 4 Waterloo 88 Lakehead 86

West Division

East Division GP 11 10 11 11 10 11 11

GP McMaster 11 Western 11 Laurier 11 Lakehead 12 Brock 11 Waterloo 11 Windsor 11 Guelph 12

Men’s Volleyball Main PAC Gym

Men’s Hockey

West Division

Men’s Basketball OUA

Women’s Volleyball OUA

Waterloo McMaster Western Laurier Guelph Brock Windsor

Game Recaps

Women’s Basketball OUA

PTS 14 10 10 10 8 8 8 8

Main PAC Gym

Saturday, January 5 Lakehead 87 Waterloo 68

Women’s Basketball Saturday, January 5 Windsor 66 Waterloo 59

Waterloo vs. Lakehead 6:00 p.m. Friday, January 11

Women’s Hockey CIF Arena

Waterloo vs. Laurier 2:00 p.m. Sunday, January 13

Men’s Hockey CIF Arena Waterloo vs. Brock 7:30 p.m. Friday, January 11 Waterloo vs. Ryerson 7:30 p.m. Sunday, January 13

[M] Hockey

Presents

January 11, 2008 vs Uof T Varsity Blues 7:30 PM, CIF Arena

07 THIS WEEK IN 08 ATHLETICS

sfm km .

January 11

January 13, 2008 vs Ryerson Rams 7:30 PM, CIF Arena

vs York Lions 8:00 PM, PAC Gym

January 12

gowarriorsgo.ca

vs Toronto Varsity Blues 6:00 PM, PAC Gym

WARRIOR

Registered trademarks of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under license. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2005

gowarriorsgo.ca gowarriorsgo.ca

www.c

LI S T ca

LI V EN E

[W] Volleyball January 11, 2008 vs Lakehead 6:00 PM, PAC Gym

[W] Hockey January 13, 2008 vs WLU Golden Hawks 2:00 PM, CIF Arena

[M] VOLLEYBALL

Athletes of the Week Jordan Brenner - Hockey Jordan, a 4th year Arts student from Waterloo, Ontario led the Warriors to two road wins this past weekend against Queen's and RMC. On Friday night against the Golden Gaels, Jordan scored one goal and added an assist in a 5-2 win. On Saturday, Jordan had one assist but was instrumental on both the powerplay and penalty kill units. The four points has moved Waterloo within one point of first place Western in the OUA Far West division.

IMPRINT | JANUARY 11

Jo-Ann Scott - Hockey

Jo-Ann, a 3rd year History student from New Dundee, Ontario, scored the lone goal for Waterloo in a 1-0 Warrior win vs. the visiting Windsor Lancers Saturday night at the CIF Arena. Jo-Ann made a tremendous individual effort driving by two defenseman before scoring her third goal of the season.


News

news@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Wild weather for Waterloo region

jamie damaskinos

sherif soliman

The city is still recovering from the flurry of nasty weather that struck on January 9. Meanwhile, a student ignores the “Bridge Closed” sign over a flooded Laurel Creek.

WUSC: Feds encourages other options for refugee support Continued from cover

An argument raised against the fee was that it only passively involves students in the group’s efforts. Students associated with the WUSC program, particularly those members of the various on-campus colleges that have hosted the refugees, argue that the program develops relations between UW students and refugees, due in part to the fundraising required to bring the refugees to UW. Some fear that having the program solely funded by a student fee will endanger that relationship in the future. Despite the majority of council supporting WUSC morally, bureau-

cratic details keep council from holding a referendum for the creation of a WUSC levy. The group is not recognized under Feds due to its unfinalized constitution, which, according to Higgins, “would have to be complete for Feds to even consider implementing a fee on their behalf.” The group has, however, been working with Feds’ research assistant Rick Theis to help create a concrete plan for their governance. Kabil Rahaman, who is heavily involved in WUSC, hopes that Feds will approve the group’s constitution some time in the near future. To date, the program has been funded by the groups such as the Rotary Club of Grand River and the

Faculty of Science Foundation. Other groups have donated gifts-in-kind, such as St. Paul’s United College residence donation. Even though the program is healthy at the moment, Rahaman hoped that a small fee of $1 per person would help the group bring more refugees to campus and fund those students for a longer period of time. Currently, a variety of humanitarian-focused groups, such as UW World Vision, exist on campus with fundraising as their primary mandate. WUSC could potentially secure more funding if they were to pursue partnerships with those groups. shewey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Johnston’s report due; Harper cleared of conflict Travis Myers news editor

The federal ethics commissioner has come to the conclusion that Prime Minister Stephen Harper is not in a conflict of interest as a result of the Schreiber affair exploding during his term in office, or for having a vested interest in protecting his own reputation after being named in a related affidavit. Harper has made continual statements that it is impossible to avoid

such a conflict of interest, even with University of Waterloo President David Johnston standing as an independent third party in the matter. Johnston, whose report on the matter is due to be filed this Friday, has been acting as a nonpartisan third party in this matter since November 2007 in what has quickly become one of Canada’s most explosive political scandals in recent memory. The Liberal and NDP parties have both been insisting over the past weeks that the report cannot suggest passing

over an inquiry altogether, although Harper has suggested he would not mind if it did, reinforcing his claim of conflict. However, Harper did recently take steps to distance his government from the scandal by requesting that his Ministers no longer have contact with Mulroney. The results Johnston’s eagerlyawaited report will be covered by Imprint’s website when the news breaks on Friday, January 11. tmyers@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Closure at last for the friends and family of Ardeth Wood

Travis Myers news editor

Chris Myers pled guilty on Tuesday, January 8 to the 2003 murder of 27year-old University of Waterloo philosophy grad student, Ardeth Wood. Myers received a sentence of 25 years in prison and the possibility of parole after ten years. Over the past four years many Ottawa and Waterloo residents have anxiously awaited the capture and trial of the man who commited this dispicable act of cruelty — not only on his victim, but also her family and friends — and these results help bring an end to the ongoing tumult of their lives since Wood’s death. Wood was visiting her parents in Ottawa on August 6, 2003 when she went for a bike ride from which she would never return. After a five-day search involving 150 people, including seven of her University of Waterloo friends and classmates, a woman’s body was found near Green’s Creek bike trail close to the bicycle that Wood was riding. Although the official cause of death was drowning, police didn’t believe it to be an accident. Witnesses described a man who was seen with Wood that day. Despite a $50,000 reward the case remained cold for two years. Then on October 20, 2005, police announced that they had

arrested a man in connection with the murder. Myers, then a 25-yearold unemployed man from Ottawa, was incarcerated for a case of sexual assault in North Bay. Similarities between the two crimes were noticed by police investigators and consequently they believed Myers to be a serial rapist. Myers has spent 26 months in jail awaiting trial. This time will be put towards his sentence allowing him to apply for parole as early as 2015. Wood has left a positive legacy behind, having a special memorial edition of Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy made, featuring works by Wood herself and themes she had explored in her studies of philosophy. There is also an annual award given by the philosophy department in her honour, known as the Ardeth Wood Memorial Graduate Bursary. Upon hearing of the murderer’s 2005 capture, members of the philosophy department told Imprint that she was “an outstanding young woman whose positive thinking, keen mind and strong work ethic eagerly embraced a non-traditional area of study.” This admission of guilt and sentencing brings Ardeth’s family, friends and the university one step closer to closure in this heinous murder and great loss. tmyers@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


4

News

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Passing grade awarded to U-Pass and GRT

David Yip

Although some students are finding the new U-Pass system confusing, this rider is having no trouble taking UW’s newest bus route to Keats Way. Marco McCullum Baldasaro assistant news editor

While there have certainly been occasions of over-crowding, both Grand River Transit and Feds agree that overall, the September 2007 implementation of the U-Pass has gone well. “[The] general sentiment has been very positive and students have been very pleased with the U-Pass program at UW,” said Feds president Kevin Royal. “The numbers I’ve seen through the U-Pass Working Group have shown such a high level of usage

that clearly the program is being well received at UW.” It’s immediately obvious to anyone who has used the transit system prior to the inception of the U-Pass that since September, the number of riders is up. “There have been instances of congestion,” said Gethyn Beniston, the Region of Waterloo’s transit planner. Overall though, “[it] has gone very well,” he said. Grand River Transit had not anticipated the noon-hour bus rush, an instant headache to anyone who has experienced it. GRT discovered

early on that as a result of the increase in demand, an extra peak time developed. “It hadn’t been expected,” said Beniston. Modifications to the original changes in service were made as a result. As of January, additional Route 12 busses have formally been added to the changes implemented at the beginning of the fall term. Prior to January, GRT had simply been slotting in extra busses to meet demand as it arose. And to those temporarily left out of the U-Pass as it stands, change is on its way.

“Without question, by the summer 2008 term, co-op and regular students will be able to opt-in to the U-Pass program when working in Waterloo region,” said Royal. “I commend a number of directors, especially director Aho (engineering) and director Neal (St. Jerome’s) for supporting me in making that part of negotiations a dealbreaker.” In regard to the proposed swipe card system, originally positioned as a potential replacement to the simple but vulnerable flashing of the WatCard as a means of entry, an upgrade is still in the works. “At this point, it’s still uncertain whether we will continue the current procedure, implement a swipe card system, or implement other possibilities,” said Royal. While happy to have the U-Pass, some new student users are finding it difficult to navigate through route maps and timetables. “It’s confusing to figure out the schedule,” said Serge Koloupaev, a math and actuarial science student,

“but the buses aren’t too busy or crowded on my routes.” Maps of GRT bus routes are available for free in the Student Life Centre on the wall across from the CIBC bank machine near the turnkey desk. Additional bus and route info is available online at www.grt.ca. For students still at a loss to effectively navigate the available route maps and schedules, expect a GRT interactive trip planner to be available online soon. “The system is currently in testing,” said Beniston, “but will be rolling out this winter.” Expect it to be similar to the system used by the City of Brampton. Grand River Transit is holding three feedback sessions in January to discuss proposed changes, new rural services, and plans to create a region-wide specialized service. Check out www.kwnow.ca for more information. mbaldasaro@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Hiring Committee Members Needed Three UW students are needed to assist with the hiring of Imprint’s 2008-2009 Editor-In-Chief. You cannot be a current applicant for the E-I-C position or have collected your Imprint fee refund for the Winter term 2008.

465 PHILLIP STREET LOCATION ONLY LIMITED TIME OFFER

746-6893

Please e-mail Imprint’s President at: agardiner@imprint.uwaterloo.ca or drop in to Imprint’s office, SLC, room 1116. Deadline is Friday, January 11, 2008 3:30 p.m.


News

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Feds pass motion for online student fee refunds Affected student services not forewarned about official Feds lobbying position Dinh Nguyen staff reporter

Without consulting any of the affected parties, the Federation of Students passed a motion to create the Online Refundable Ancillary Fee Opt Out system, or “Policy 24”, on November 25, 2007. The policy, as its name suggests, would allow students to obtain their student fee refunds from a nonstudent society, non-endowment online service, as opposed to collecting them in person. The parties potentially affected if such system were to be implemented (WPIRG, CKMS, and Imprint) were neither notified nor brought into the discussion by Feds, prior to or after the motion’s passing. WPIRG expressed a general negative feeling towards the issue. “[WPIRG is] not against refund, but it was shocking and insulting that the organization was not consulted about Policy 24.” According to WPIRG memberat-large Asha Philar, implementing an online opt-out system would have an extremely negative effect on the organization because it is mainly funded by student fees. She cites the results seen when Queen’s University switched to an online opt-out system. OPIRGkin, Queen’s version of WPIRG, found its funding suffered greatly when the system came into place. They now make enough money to continue running, but can barely afford to do anything else. If this were to happen to WPIRG,

the group would be unable to bring in guest speakers such as David Suzuki and Stephen Lewis to UW, as well as host events such as Car Free Day and the Human Rights Conference. The human rights, environment, leadership-based non-profit organization is also concerned that the three groups affected by Policy 24 make up the lowest fees on the tuition statement. Students pay $5.50 for CKMS, $4.75, for WPIRG, and $3.30 for Imprint, a total of less than $15 per term. WPIRG also feels that, had the three parties affected by Policy 24 been consulted prior to it being passed, Feds would have had a better planned motion. They feel that it is already far easier for students to get their refunds from themselves, CKMS and Imprint, than it is to get refunds from most endowment groups. Endowment groups are spread throughout campus, and most will issue cheques after a refund request has been processed. Meanwhile, two out of the three parties affected by Policy 24 are in the SLC and offer an instant refund. President Kevin Royal said that, because Feds has no power over their students’ fees, society groups and endowment groups were not included in Policy 24. “Societies and, by extension, endowments, are independently managed by autonomous organizations as outlined in the Federation of Students Societies Agreement. It is for that reason that the development of Policy 24 excluded

those fees,” said Royal. Like WPIRG, Imprint also believes that if such a system as Policy 24 were implemented, their organization would suffer greatly. Said Adam Gardiner, president of Imprint, “I fully believe that every student should have the right to be as involved or uninvolved as they wish with the organizations on campus. But I also think students should consider the important services, such as Imprint, that many of their fees support. As a not-for-profit organization, Imprint’s budget must be carefully calculated to break even with the amount of income we receive; if the amount of student fees collected was to suddenly decrease, it could have significant consequences on our operational expenses, and in the long term, our ability to grow as an organization that benefits the UW community.” CKMS was unable to give a formal statement. Though Feds has passed the motion, Policy 24 is as of yet just the student government’s official lobbying position, and will only take effect after relevant administrative decisions. In order to implement such a system, a massive change to refund procedures will have to occur; the effort involved makes it difficult for an online opt-out system to be enstated. When asked about Policy 24, the majority of students were not aware of what it was. Though most students agree with the principle of having an

online opt-out system believing it will make it easier for them to get refunds, they also agree that Feds should have consulted the affected parties and invited them into the discussion before passing such a motion. “I can see why the organizations affected by [Policy 24] may be upset,” said Susie Roma, 2B psychology. “I don’t think it is fair or professionally sound for Feds to pass such a motion without contacting the affected groups.” “If they make it that easy then everyone will do it. It’s going to destroy the groups. It’s unfair to the group to have something big like that [Policy 24] affect them and not being there,” said another student, Dave Amorim, 3B biology. According to Royal, it was expressed that UW admin had no major problems with the principle of introducing an online opt-out refund system. Implementing such change is, however, not high on their list of priorities. UW vicepresident administration and finance Dennis Huber responded with a similar statement: “As Kevin has indicated, the university will not be committing any resources in the near term to analyzing the impacts (cost, business processes, etc) of such change. If, in the future, the university decides to commit resources to reviewing the option, a consultation process will be undertaken with the affected stakeholders.”

The Fees WPIRG — $4.75 This fee goes towards the Waterloo Public Interest Research Group, looking for answers in environmental and social justice + CKMS — $5.50 This fee goes to support the campus radio station + Imprint — $3.30 This fee goes towards producing the official student newspaper of the university ________________ =

$13.55

dnguyen@imprint.uwaterloo.com

It could be you...

Applications for Spring 2008, Fall 2008, and Winter 2009 are now available online!

WWW.HOUSING.UWATERLOO.CA

5


6

News

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Campus and community events Stephanie Mara on piano. For more information contact: www.grebel.uwaterloo.ca/music

JANUARY 9-11

JANUARY 11

JANUARY 14

FASS 2008 auditions for this years show, “Global Warming: Kiss Your FASS Goodbye,” All faculty, alumni, students, and staff are welcome, FASS will hit the stage February 7-9, 2008.

The Islamic Information Centre will be setting up an information booth for those curious about Islam. Check out uwislam.com or email info@ uwislam.com

Clinic begins and runs two days. The Monday clinic will run again from January 23- Family day 25. You can make an appointment at the Turnkey Desk now. Family day holiday is Monday February 18, UW offices and services will be closed due to reading week.

JANUARY 10-19

7:30 p.m. God Keep Our Land @ Siegfried Hall

Wednesday 6:00 - 9:00 p.m. Kiss Your FASS Goodbye auditions @ Hagey room 334

Thursday Waterloo Region Rapid Transit meetings

Waterloo Region Rapid Transit is having open meetings to discuss the rankings, routes and technologies available to be used. The meetings began Thursday at locations around Waterloo. Further meetings will be held January 13 in Cambridge, January 12 and 15 in Kitchener, then again in Waterloo on the 17 and 19.

Friday 11:00-3:00 Islamic Information Centre booth @ SLC

St. Jerome’s University dean Myroslaw Tataryn will be giving the Waterloo Catholic School board lecture. This lecture will compare the early 20th century rhetoric of nation building in Canada to the contemporary discussion and will demonstrate how little has changed.

IMPRINT Publications, UW

IMPRINT, the University of Waterloo student newspaper is hiring an Editor-In-Chief for a full-time 13-month contract position beginning March 1, 2008. You will train, manage, motivate and lead a volunteer staff and ensure the print-to-press quality of all content. Must have strong organizational skills, be familiar with Adobe CS2, photo editing packages, layout and design skills and experience with Unix/Linux networks. Interested candidates should mail or deliver resume, clippings and a cover letter to: IMPRINT Publications Hiring Committee Imprint Publications 200 University Ave., W. University of Waterloo, Student Life Centre, room 1116 Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 Deadline is Friday, January 25 at 4:30 p.m.

Monday By appointment Blood Donor Clinic @ SLC Great Hall

FEBRUARY 18

JANUARY 16

Wednesday 12:30-1:20 Berners and Bohme @ Conrad Grebel

Free Noon Hour concert entitled Berners and Bohme: Music for Trumpet and Piano/ Piano Four Hands will taking place on Wednesday, January 16 at Conrad Grebel University College Chapel located on 140 Westmount Rd. N. Waterloo. It begins at 12:30 and runs until 1:20, with performers like Guy Few on trumpet, piano and voice along with

ALSO Wednesdays 3:30 - 5:00 @ Chemistry room 160 The Web Clinic is for people of all different skills and knowledge to work on their websites. You can get contact information from: mfagan@uwaterloo.ca Wednesdays 7:15 - 8:30 PAS room 3005 GLOW’s weekly discussion groups have moved to a new place.


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Readers, rise up Friday, January 11, 2008 Vol. 30, No. 22 Student Life Centre, Room 1116 University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editor-in-chief, Maggie Clark editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Advertising & Production Manager, Laurie Tigert-Dumas ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca General Manager, Catherine Bolger cbolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Ad Assistant, vacant Sales Assisstant, vacant Volunteer Coordinator, Angela Gaetano Systems Admin. vacant Distribution, Peter Blackman, Rob Blom Interns, Sarah Hewey, Taylor Schnaeringer Board of Directors board@imprint.uwaterloo.ca President, Adam Gardiner president@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Vice-president, Jacqueline McKoy vp@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Treasurer, Lu Jiang treasurer@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Secretary, Alaa Yassin secretary@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Staff liaison, Rob Blom liaison@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Editorial Staff Assistant Editor, Michael L. Davenport Lead Proofreader, vacant Cover Editor, Marc Kimmich News Editor, vacant News Assistant, Marco Baldasaro Opinion Editor, Christine Ogley Opinion Assistant, Monica Harvey Features Editor, Dinh Nguyen Features Assistant, Cait Davidson Arts Editor, Andrew Abela Arts Assistant, Duncan Ramsay Science Editor, Adrienne Raw Science Assistant, Sherif Soliman Sports Editor, Yang Liu Sports Assistant, Olinda Pais Photo Editor, Jenn Serec Photo Assistant, Jamie Damaskinos Graphics Editor, Joyce Hsu Graphics Assistant, vacant Web Editor, Hoon Choi Web Assistant, vacant Systems Administrator, vacant Sys. Admin. Assistant, Peter Sutherland Production Staff

Ashley Csanady, Tim Foster, Chris Miller, Eric Gassner, Keegan Tremblay, Emma Tarswell, Mo Janga, Rajul saleh, Megan Ng, Tejas Koshy, Guy Halpern, Ashley Fournier, Bethany Sehl, Chantelle McGee, Taylor Schnaeringer, Paul Collier Imprint is the official student newspaper of the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprint is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication in any edition of Imprint. Imprint may also reproduce the material commercially in any format or medium as part of the newspaper database, Web site or any other product derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content, including articles, letters, photos and graphics, will grant Imprint first publication rights of their submitted material, and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any other publication or group until such time as the material has been distributed in an issue of Imprint, or Imprint declares their intent not to publish the material. The full text of this agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs, letters or advertising. Material may not be published, at the discretion of Imprint, if that material is deemed to be libelous or in contravention with Imprint’s policies with reference to our code of ethics and journalistic standards. Imprint is published every Friday during fall and winter terms, and every second Friday during the spring term. Imprint reserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. One copy per customer. Imprint ISSN 0706-7380. Imprint CDN Pub Mail Product Sales Agreement no. 40065122. Next board meeting: TBA Next staff meeting: Monday, January 14, 2008 12:30 p.m.

April fools 2007 was a bad day to be associated with The Gazette, the University of Western Ontario’s campus newspaper. While a great many student papers (Imprint included) publish an annual spoof issue, The Gazette crossed a line with a joke article, entitled “Labia Majora Carnage,” that depicts the light-hearted rape of prominent student activist, Jenna Owsianik (Jennifer Ostrich in the article), by London police chief Murray Faulkner (explicitly mentioned). So UWO students were understandably outraged when this issue hit their campus stands. In a lacklustre apology The Gazette’s editorial board claimed they were producing satire, but among the numerous blog posts,

forum comments, letters to the editor, and general media reports produced in the days to follow, consensus held that such “humour” only further degraded an already heavily marginalized campus population — and was therefore unacceptable. Compounding the problem was that the article, written under the pseudonym “Xavier,” came after the campus women’s centre spent a year campaigning for The Gazette to become a more accountable and representative student voice. Jenna Owsianik was one of the most vocal members of this campaign, a fact unfortunately suggesting that the offending spoof article was printed more out of spite and a need to vent than

An Imprint reader’s To-Do list for change:

1. DO

Let Imprint know if you have reason to believe that something in the paper has been plagiarized, or is just factually inaccurate. While we are clearly on guard for mistakes ourselves, it helps to know that you, our readers, are watching us too, just waiting for the next slip-up. (It gives us the incentive to do better!)

2. DO

Write letters to the editor. Anonymous, five-word posts on the website have their uses, but to further real student discussion — to let us know how you really feel about campus issues and our reporting of them — nothing beats a signed, well-thought-out argument in the Opinion section. So hit us where it hurts already — right between the printed pages.

3. DO

Send press releases or leads to Imprint. We’d love nothing more than to cover as diverse and representative a campus culture as possible, so if you’re involved in community events, clubs, or projects you can help by dropping us a line. We can’t guarantee coverage of everything, but having a broader sense of the campus community helps us make better use of what resources we do have.

4. DO Exercise your rights. If you’re concerned about how Imprint is performing tell it to us straight. And if you catch us in the midst of severe ethical infractions, start a petition and talk to Feds. Disagreement is healthy; but maintaining an open, receptive media forum is even more so. Keep us from growing soft!

from genuine appeals for broadening student discourse through humour. Certainly, The Gazette may have felt as if it were the marginalized party, having to field ongoing criticism from a very outspoken campus group. But even granting that term’s editorial board so much leniency, my conviction toward their actions — not to mention their abysmal apology — remains the same: Suck it up. Just as it is a campus newspaper’s responsibility to represent its student body as effectively as possible, so too is it the responsibility of students to hold all their forms of representation accountable. And so — forgive me, fellow Warriors, for I am about to sin — while April 2007 was a bad month to be associated with The Gazette, it was also a very impressive time to be a Western student. Why? Because when UWO students were misrepresented to the extent that their learning environment felt “poisoned” they took action. They wrote letters to the editor, posted on blogs, rallied community support, contacted their university, and alerted the media. (And to get a sense of their response time, by April 10 there were articles in the National Post, Toronto Star, Maclean’s and The Globe & Mail.) Moreover, dissatisfied with the simple study group proposed by The Gazette to mend ties, students got their University Student Council to donate a reparative sum equivalent to the spoof issue’s printing costs to the Sexual Assault Centre in London. Furthermore, prior to this spoof issue The Gazette evidently had no code of ethics — a shocker for me, considering how much better I sleep knowing the Canadian Association of Journalists’ Code of Ethics sets an inspiring standard for all Canadian publications. But after all these student protests, The Gazette finally drew up its own, diversity-friendly code of ethics. And established more effective accountability mechanisms. And set out procedures for removing the editor-in-chief by student petition, should the need ever arise. Most striking of all, though, is that when UWO implemented emergency policy changes to control The Gazette’s print run — effectively removing the paper’s autonomy from the university — students stood up for the principles behind the paper: namely, the importance of maintaining a distinct student voice. Even while condemning one reprehensible decision of The Gazette, student allegiance remained with the goal of the organization as a whole — their own goal, that is, of proper, independent representation. So while I don’t anticipate UW students requiring such dire responses to the content of this paper, I’ll be honest: It helps to believe that if something ever went grievously wrong with our campus media, UW students would be just as vocal as their UWO “brethren.” Tell me now: am I right? editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


8

Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Do you have an Opinion?

I guarantee that your friends are tired of hearing it; start writing it down for Imprint instead and your friends might come back. Do people walk too slow? Is income tax the biggest scam ever? We need 100-200 words on whatever you care about. Send it to opinion@imprint.uwaterloo.ca. Because everyone should hear what you have to say.


Opinion

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Gaydar? So, we’re back at school for the winter term. You’ll probably find yourself out at Chapters looking for the one or two books on your list that are out of stock at the campus bookstore. While going through the checkout line with your purchases you might just notice the cashier. There is something just a little… “off ” about him. You take a closer look. His tight pants and lime green Lacoste shirt on underneath his employee smock. His blonde highlights and gel sculpted spiky hair. His designer glasses and moisturized skin. Is that a hint of lipgloss? Your first guess about this hypothetical worker? Well, obviously, he’s gay. If you yourself are of the homo persuasion, or are a woman with more gay fans than Blondie, you might credit your guess to a little thing called “gaydar.” But what is gaydar exactly? For those outside of the know, some people believe it is the inherent ability homosexuals have to sense one of their own kind — even those who don’t yet know themselves. Just like everything else that was once exclusive to gay men, women who watch too much Sex and the City have appropriated this term and think they too can sniff out the queers. Others say they get “a vibe” from people, and some gay girls also claim to have a “lesbi-dar”. Is it really possible that there is some ancient mystical force used by gay men and wannabe-fag-hags to tell who is, and isn’t, gay? Is there still some

undiscovered gay-ray in the spectrum of light that can only be perceived by the homosexual eye? Not only are these concepts completely ridiculous, but there is also no way they are possible. Why, you ask? Well, if we just look at this through the lens of logic it’s not hard to figure out just what gaydar really is. Let’s come back to our hypothetical Chapters employee, shall we? We assumed that he was gay simply based on his description. The reason for this was because I described him as a 100 per cent stereotype: the well treated hair and skin; the designer clothes; working at a bookstore; not to mention the is-he-or-isn’t-he lipgloss. I’m sure if I had described a lumberjack, we wouldn’t have come to the same conclusion. So, then, how does gaydar work in less extreme cases, when the homo in question isn’t a lisping queen? When we get right down to it, the backbone of gaydar is good old fashioned detective work. Both consciously and unconsciously, those who claim to have gaydar are looking for small signs and signals that someone is gay, often by finding something stereotypical about the person in question. Maybe our cashier is outwardly very butch, but has a lot of neon coloured earrings, maybe that guy in your French class talks a little too much about Kylie Minogue’s new album, or maybe your housemate has a compulsion to keep the place clean. The gay and hag brains are constantly collecting small bits of information like this, which brings them to the conclusion that someone is gay. Of course, none of the aforementioned “tells” equate to having same-sex leanings. Punk guys have earrings, techno fans like Kylie, and who knows, your housemate is probably a closet germaphobe. Gaydar is far from being an exact science, which is why you’ve got to be careful about who you accuse of being gay. The only tried and true way to know if someone is gay or not is simply to ask them. Yes, gaydar isn’t all that reliable at all - after all, just because Stephen Harper wears makeup at press conferences doesn’t mean he’s a homo, now does it? tmyers@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

9


10

Opinion

Pursue Graduate Studies at Western Plan to attend The University of Western Ontario Engineering & Science Research Showcase Date: Friday, January 25, 2008 Place: The London Convention Centre Time: 11:00 - 3:00 p.m. Take the opportunity to talk to current students, researchers and academics who are leaders in: • Materials and Nanotechnology • Environment and Energy • Computing and Information Technology • Biology and Biomedical Sciences • Fluid Mechanics, Mathematics and Modeling • Infrastructure and Natural Disaster Mitigation

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

letters Bathrooms: everyone uses one, sometimes more than three times a day, and everyone has one choice: either the men’s or the women’s bathroom. From an early age a boy and a girl know the difference; they know which bathroom to use. That is why I am baffled why so many women on our campus actually believe a boy would enter the women’s bathroom. About nine out of ten times, the female student body I “bump” into at the restroom, second guess their whereabouts. Which usually leaves them running for the door to check for the stick “female” figure with that lovely white dress. Once they realize they are in the right bathroom, they second guess if I’m a male or female. Which to me is pretty funny just because I get to reassure the girl, that yes both of us are women, and yes both of us have boobs. But everytime I wonder, do you actually think a male would casually walk into a women’s bathroom, take a piss, wash and dry their hands and casually walk out? I don’t know any men who would do that. Come on girls! Open your eyes and minds! Just ‘cause a girl isn’t wearing any make up, doesn’t have long hair, or isn’t bitching about her boyfriend on the way to the stall, that doesn’t mean she’s not a girl! On the other hand, I also wondered why UW doesn’t have any genderneutral bathrooms. Gender and labels are being thrown around all the time. Getting mistaken for the opposite sex can be funny at times, but it can also get a little serious. The bathroom is a place where only one specific gender is allowed, it’s a safety net, so don’t worry girls! No boy is going to come in. And that goes the same for you boys out there, I doubt a girl is going to come into your bathroom. I would like to end with a quote by Tribe 8: “Excuse me, sir? Over by the stall? Um, wrong bathroom. Men’s is down the hall. So I pull up my shirt to prove I’m the right gender. But the looks they’re giving me are anything but tender.”

REGISTER TODAY:

—Ela Ponikiewska

www.uwo.ca/sci/Research_Showcase How to get your own column in Imprint 1. Be smart. (or not. yeah, not so 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

much.) Know the Opinion Editors. (okay, well, I guess that’s not really essential... at all..) Watch Colbert daily. Steal his ideas. Have opinions about .. things. Write them down. Clearly. In fact narrow your opinions down to some kind of theme or specialty. Submit 3 sample column articles, 500 ish words, and a letter stating you want to be a columnist for a term. Also tell us what you plan to write about, your column’s premise.

It’s that easy!!! You could pick up chicks! Or dudes! By being that identifiable columnist cad around campus! Think Carrie Bradshaw... or not.

Send to: editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Now! The final due date is: Sunday, January 13, 2008


Features

features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

through foreign eyes

Sri Lanka: Tsunami, terror and tourism?

Tom Ellis staff reporter

Located just off the south east coast of India lies the tropical paradise of Sri Lanka, seen as the ultimate destination for travellers and holiday -makers alike. The oval-shaped isle referred to as a “tear drop in the Indian Ocean,” has endured much distress over the past decade. In March 2007 my first experience of island life took place over 5, 000 miles away in London’s Heathrow Airport. The PA system in the departure lounge announced our flight would be delayed by several hours following the first airborne attack on the Colombo airport by the LTTE, or Tamil Tigers as they are commonly known. Confusion and concern was evident both on the faces of those surrounding me, and on those waiting in the arrivals area of Bandaranaike International Airport. On leaving the airport situated just outside the capital city of Colombo, in one of the many air-conditioned minivans which serve as luxury taxis, the level of security became immediately apparent. Most striking were the vast numbers of armed soldiers behind sandbags scanning the oncoming traffic. This high level of security is understandable though, due to the increasingly violent nature of ethnic tension between the majority Singhalese and minority Tamil populations. Additional soldiers with automatic weapons can be seen lurking on the majority of the street corners in Colombo always on the lookout for suspicious behaviour. Yet even with such an emphasis on security, this week saw the assassination of DM Dassanayake, the minister for nation

building in a road side bomb attack. As such, Foreign Affairs Canada advises against all “non-essential travel” to the island, but as was explained to me before travelling, the general consensus is to only avoid travelling north of the A12 road, where government and Tamil soldiers are locked in constant battle. Many would be put off by such stories but as I found out during my travels around the beautiful country, there is much to view and do. Colombo boasts many beautiful hotels where people can take advantage of cheap rooms due to reduced demand, shops selling a wide range of items, and tourist favourites such as the many marketplaces. Based on personal experience I would say it is necessary to haggle extensively, as prices are greatly inflated for foreigners. One disappointing yet understandable restriction I found was the prohibition of photography at nearly all locations in Colombo, leaving a gap in my photo collection. Fortunately there are no such restrictions across the rest of the island where the diverse landscape offers stunning photo opportunities. To my mind the beaches looked like something straight from a clichéd postcard with their pure white sands, turquoise waters, gentle waves and palm trees offering the only shade from the powerful sun. The beaches along the south and west of the island seemed to offer the best places to swim and sun bathe, yet I was warned by friendly local residents to only swim on beaches with hotels, due to the risk of riptides and other water hazards in surrounding areas. Sadly, the most serious water hazard of all, tsunamis, are well known across the island as on Boxing Day

2004 a tsunami killed over 30,000 Sri Lankans. While travelling by bus between Colombo and Bentota, a small tourist village along the coastal path, it was clear to see just why the death toll was so high. Even three years after the devastation is still clear and it made me wonder as to where the vast sums of money raised really ended up. Houses are built right on the sandy beaches and low-lying land around it, from whatever materials are available, and are as such no match for powerful waves. Concerning the rebuilding that has taken place, I was worried by the number of houses rebuilt in exactly the same locations, suggesting that any future disaster could have an equally awful death toll. The highlight of my travel was a visit to the famous elephant orphanage at Pinnawela, where for a few dollars I had the opportunity of a life time to get close to and watch the elephants. The elephants came in all shapes and sizes, such as one elephant left blind after a hunting accident, and another with only three legs after standing on a land mine. The highlight of the day was watching the elephants trample down the dirt track to a large river where they sprayed water and bathed in the warm waters. Sri Lanka is truly a tropical paradise in every sense, yet the ethnic tension hurts the country in many ways, from the high number of lives lost in the conflict to the bad international press it receives. My trip showed a friendly, diverse and exciting country with much to offer, yet sadly for political reasons many people will likely miss out on the adventure of a lifetime. tellis@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

photos by Tom Ellis

The highlight of Ellis’ trip was a visit to the elephant orphanage, where for a few dollars he had the opportunity of a lifetime, getting up-close-and-personal with the elephants.


12

Features

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Chocolate for the stars Well, the writers’ strike has forced the Golden Globes to cancel, and die-hard movie fans like myself are quite devastated to hear about these developments.  To get through this potential crisis, I have devised a list of movies for the fine connoisseur of food and food-related movies. To celebrate the international aspect of movie making, the list I have compiled tries to encompass as many different regions as possible.  I adore these movies not only for their rich story lines but also for their ability to reel me in with on-screen gastronomical feasts, and seeing how the food they enjoy is rooted in their culture and intertwines their lives. First up is Bella Martha (Mostly Martha) a German romantic comedy about a talented chef in Germany named Martha Klein. Her life suddenly changes when she is left to care for her niece when her sister dies. We follow her story and how she balances her culinary passions and looking after her niece. You may be more familiar with the American remake of this 2001 film, No Reservations, starring Catherine Zeta-Jones. Ang Lee directed 1994’s Yin shi nan nu (Eat Drink Man Woman), a Mandarin spoken comedy about Chef Chu, a father living with his three grown daughters. Everyone in the household is pulled into a series of unforseen events when the middle daughter encounters some

unexpected things in her life. It is also interesting to note that this film was nominated for an Oscar and won several awards at independent film festivals around the world. Oscar winner for best foreign language film, Babettes gæstebud (Babette’s Feast) is a Danish film, whose movie setting is in Denmark in the 19th century. It is about two sisters dealing with their father’s passing. The father was a beloved protestant pastor of a small village and the daughters commemorate his death by hold-

I adore these movies ... for their ability to reel me in with on-screen gastronomical feasts ing a feast in his honour. They ask Babette, a foreigner and Catholic, to prepare the feast. When one of the guests is revealed to be a general of the Swedish court, he reveals his connection to one of the sisters, as well as Babette’s true identity. Big Night is an Italian film about two brothers who own a failing Italian restaurant. Although Primo is a talented chef, he is overshadowed by the nearby restaurant, Pascal’s. Primo and Secondo (who works at

the front of the house) try to save their operation by hosting a jazz benefit and pull out all the stops with a feast of a lifetime. This film was also a heavy winner at several international film festivals. Japan’s Tampopo is a comedy about trucker Goro who assists restauranteur Tampopo in opening a fast food noodle restaurant. The main storyline is full of laughs and even weaves in small side stories which carry themes about the importance of food. Tampopo was a winner at the Japanese film academy as well as at the Mainichi Film Concours. Como agua para chocolate (Like Water for Chocolate) is a Mexican film that holds a special place in my memory here at the university. In first year, I took Spanish 102 and our professor gave us a treat at the end of the term by showing us this movie in class. Not only was I able to understand the Spanish they spoke onscreen better, but that I also got to marvel at all the delicious foods the characters feasted on. The story focuses on Pedro and Tita. Their love faces many obstacles due, in part, to Tita’s mother and her strict observance of their Mexican traditions. This 1992 film was highly praised in many international film festivals, receiving a total of 21 awards. To round up this gastronomical feast for the eyes is Chocolat, an American film about what else? Chocolate. More specifically, the story is about single mother, Vianne, who opens up a chocolate shop in a small French village. She and her little shop soon become intertwined with many of the villagers’ lives and the unwilling antagonist of the town’s mayor. It only seems appropriate that I leave you with a chocolate recipe. I requested this recipe from a chef in Europe who made the dessert because it was so darned good and decadent. The surprising aspect was that it was listed as the ‘lighter’ choice on the menu. This recipe uses two ounce ramekins, but if you don’t have any you could just as well make the desserts in a regular-sized muffin tin. tli@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Directions : Chocolate Decadence 1/2 cup plus 3 tbsp granulated sugar 1/4 cup 2 per cent milk 2 tbsp plus 2 tsp unsweetened cocoa 11/2 tbsp unsalted butter 1/2 oz unsweetened chocolate, chopped 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract 1 large egg white, beaten 5 tbsp all-purpose flour 1/8 tsp salt 8 tsp semi-sweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly coat 4 (2 oz) ramekins with cooking spray and sprinkle 3/4 tsp sugar into each of the ramekins, shaking and turning to coat. Set the ramekins aside. Combine 1/2 cup plus 2 tbsp sugar, milk and cocoa in a small saucepan, stirring well with a whisk. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Cook 30 seconds, or until the sugar dissolves, stirring constantly. Remove mixture from heat; add butter and ½ oz unsweetened chocolate. Stir until the chocolate and butter dissolve and mixture is smooth. Let cool for 10 minutes, then add the vanilla and mix in the egg. Combine the flour and salt in a small bowl and add this to the chocolate mixture. Stir until just blended. Spoon 2 tbsp of the chocolate mixture into each prepared ramekin and top each with 2 tsp of chocolate chips. Bake for 20 minutes or until barely set. Cool for 10 minutes on a wire rack. Invert onto dessert plates. Serve warm.


Features

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Megan Ng

Life behind the scenes of FASS

reporter

Get your ass to FASS fast ­— that is, if you’re looking to engage yourself with a little bit of theatrics and quite possibly, a lot of fun. What exactly is FASS you might be asking? In a nutshell, over 100 individuals sourced from UW’s very own faculty, alumni, staff, and students. What started out as a talent show for different faculty groups in 1962 has evolved itself into UW’s longest-running amateur theatre group, having entertained audiences for 46 years. FASS president, Albert O’Connor said, “The longevity of FASS is amazing. I think the most interesting is how long it has been around. It’s changed year to year, but it’s been around a long time.” Each year FASS has a different theme, which it showcases at UW’s Humanities Theatre. In previous years they have reflected satires and parodies of everything from Shakespearean plays to comic strips. This year’s theme, “Global Warming: Kiss Your FASS Goodbye!”, touches on our current environmental troubles. FASS is also proud to introduce a new creative staff to fashion this year’s theme, with Russ Wong as director, Anita Kilgour as stage manager, and Mo Musbah as technical director — each individual having ample experience with FASS but diving into new roles to keep the experience fresh. Countless hours are spent in rehearsals cracking jokes and eating pizza, as well as in group outings, so aside from getting to exercise your acting and singings chops, FASS also gives you a great opportunity

to forge some life-long friendships and possibly even some romantic relationships. “Over the years [FASS] has spawned a lot of relationships, and a few of them have lasted a long time” said Heather Macdonald, a long-time participant of FASS. For Alice Pfeifer, FASS will always hold a very special place in her heart as it instigated the meeting between her and the love of her life. “My husband Steve Hanov was a 4B computer science co-op student when I was a 1B arts student with no major. I decided to join FASS Theatre Company in 2003 on a whim and there he was. He was tall, handsome and took my breath away.” Three years later, the couple is married and still very happily in love post FASS-life. Since its begining, FASS has also grown to become a community about building strong friendships. Several parties are thrown for volunteers, one at the end of each week of rehersal. Even after leaving FASS, you might find it hard to completely pull yourself from the theatre. Audiences and actors can look forward to “Heckle Nights,” which take place on the late night showing every Friday. These evenings are designated for FASS alumni and others familiar with the group to come into the audience to heckle and jab at the performers on stage, while performers are expected to be kept on their toes and even offer the occasional witty rebuttal. Despite the fact that FASS has been criticized for lacklustre scripts

13

Michael L. Davenport

Actors put on makeup as they get ready for a performance of FASS 2007, “The Seven Silly Sins.” in the past, and though the production is unlikely to ever be nominated for a Tony Award, the point of the program lies more in providing unconventional entertainment.

Auditions are being held Wednesday to Friday (January 9-11) from 6pm to 9pm at Hagey Hall in Room 334. They are seeking singers, dancers, and of course, actors. Arrive in

comfortable clothing and expect to devote at least 45 minutes for the auditions to complete. For more information about FASS, check out www.fass.uwaterloo.ca.

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10

Opinion

Pursue Graduate Studies at Western Plan to attend The University of Western Ontario Engineering & Science Research Showcase Date: Friday, January 25, 2008 Place: The London Convention Centre Time: 11:00 - 3:00 p.m. Take the opportunity to talk to current students, researchers and academics who are leaders in: • Materials and Nanotechnology • Environment and Energy • Computing and Information Technology • Biology and Biomedical Sciences • Fluid Mechanics, Mathematics and Modeling • Infrastructure and Natural Disaster Mitigation

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

letters Bathrooms: everyone uses one, sometimes more than three times a day, and everyone has one choice: either the men’s or the women’s bathroom. From an early age a boy and a girl know the difference; they know which bathroom to use. That is why I am baffled why so many women on our campus actually believe a boy would enter the women’s bathroom. About nine out of ten times, the female student body I “bump” into at the restroom, second guess their whereabouts. Which usually leaves them running for the door to check for the stick “female” figure with that lovely white dress. Once they realize they are in the right bathroom, they second guess if I’m a male or female. Which to me is pretty funny just because I get to reassure the girl, that yes both of us are women, and yes both of us have boobs. But everytime I wonder, do you actually think a male would casually walk into a women’s bathroom, take a piss, wash and dry their hands and casually walk out? I don’t know any men who would do that. Come on girls! Open your eyes and minds! Just ‘cause a girl isn’t wearing any make up, doesn’t have long hair, or isn’t bitching about her boyfriend on the way to the stall, that doesn’t mean she’s not a girl! On the other hand, I also wondered why UW doesn’t have any genderneutral bathrooms. Gender and labels are being thrown around all the time. Getting mistaken for the opposite sex can be funny at times, but it can also get a little serious. The bathroom is a place where only one specific gender is allowed, it’s a safety net, so don’t worry girls! No boy is going to come in. And that goes the same for you boys out there, I doubt a girl is going to come into your bathroom. I would like to end with a quote by Tribe 8: “Excuse me, sir? Over by the stall? Um, wrong bathroom. Men’s is down the hall. So I pull up my shirt to prove I’m the right gender. But the looks they’re giving me are anything but tender.”

REGISTER TODAY:

—Ela Ponikiewska

www.uwo.ca/sci/Research_Showcase How to get your own column in Imprint 1. Be smart. (or not. yeah, not so 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

much.) Know the Opinion Editors. (okay, well, I guess that’s not really essential... at all..) Watch Colbert daily. Steal his ideas. Have opinions about .. things. Write them down. Clearly. In fact narrow your opinions down to some kind of theme or specialty. Submit 3 sample column articles, 500 ish words, and a letter stating you want to be a columnist for a term. Also tell us what you plan to write about, your column’s premise.

It’s that easy!!! You could pick up chicks! Or dudes! By being that identifiable columnist cad around campus! Think Carrie Bradshaw... or not.

Send to: editor@imprint.uwaterloo.ca Now! The final due date is: Sunday, January 13, 2008


Features

features@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

through foreign eyes

Sri Lanka: Tsunami, terror and tourism?

Tom Ellis staff reporter

Located just off the south east coast of India lies the tropical paradise of Sri Lanka, seen as the ultimate destination for travellers and holiday -makers alike. The oval-shaped isle referred to as a “tear drop in the Indian Ocean,” has endured much distress over the past decade. In March 2007 my first experience of island life took place over 5, 000 miles away in London’s Heathrow Airport. The PA system in the departure lounge announced our flight would be delayed by several hours following the first airborne attack on the Colombo airport by the LTTE, or Tamil Tigers as they are commonly known. Confusion and concern was evident both on the faces of those surrounding me, and on those waiting in the arrivals area of Bandaranaike International Airport. On leaving the airport situated just outside the capital city of Colombo, in one of the many air-conditioned minivans which serve as luxury taxis, the level of security became immediately apparent. Most striking were the vast numbers of armed soldiers behind sandbags scanning the oncoming traffic. This high level of security is understandable though, due to the increasingly violent nature of ethnic tension between the majority Singhalese and minority Tamil populations. Additional soldiers with automatic weapons can be seen lurking on the majority of the street corners in Colombo always on the lookout for suspicious behaviour. Yet even with such an emphasis on security, this week saw the assassination of DM Dassanayake, the minister for nation

building in a road side bomb attack. As such, Foreign Affairs Canada advises against all “non-essential travel” to the island, but as was explained to me before travelling, the general consensus is to only avoid travelling north of the A12 road, where government and Tamil soldiers are locked in constant battle. Many would be put off by such stories but as I found out during my travels around the beautiful country, there is much to view and do. Colombo boasts many beautiful hotels where people can take advantage of cheap rooms due to reduced demand, shops selling a wide range of items, and tourist favourites such as the many marketplaces. Based on personal experience I would say it is necessary to haggle extensively, as prices are greatly inflated for foreigners. One disappointing yet understandable restriction I found was the prohibition of photography at nearly all locations in Colombo, leaving a gap in my photo collection. Fortunately there are no such restrictions across the rest of the island where the diverse landscape offers stunning photo opportunities. To my mind the beaches looked like something straight from a clichéd postcard with their pure white sands, turquoise waters, gentle waves and palm trees offering the only shade from the powerful sun. The beaches along the south and west of the island seemed to offer the best places to swim and sun bathe, yet I was warned by friendly local residents to only swim on beaches with hotels, due to the risk of riptides and other water hazards in surrounding areas. Sadly, the most serious water hazard of all, tsunamis, are well known across the island as on Boxing Day

2004 a tsunami killed over 30,000 Sri Lankans. While travelling by bus between Colombo and Bentota, a small tourist village along the coastal path, it was clear to see just why the death toll was so high. Even three years after the devastation is still clear and it made me wonder as to where the vast sums of money raised really ended up. Houses are built right on the sandy beaches and low-lying land around it, from whatever materials are available, and are as such no match for powerful waves. Concerning the rebuilding that has taken place, I was worried by the number of houses rebuilt in exactly the same locations, suggesting that any future disaster could have an equally awful death toll. The highlight of my travel was a visit to the famous elephant orphanage at Pinnawela, where for a few dollars I had the opportunity of a life time to get close to and watch the elephants. The elephants came in all shapes and sizes, such as one elephant left blind after a hunting accident, and another with only three legs after standing on a land mine. The highlight of the day was watching the elephants trample down the dirt track to a large river where they sprayed water and bathed in the warm waters. Sri Lanka is truly a tropical paradise in every sense, yet the ethnic tension hurts the country in many ways, from the high number of lives lost in the conflict to the bad international press it receives. My trip showed a friendly, diverse and exciting country with much to offer, yet sadly for political reasons many people will likely miss out on the adventure of a lifetime. tellis@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

photos by Tom Ellis

The highlight of Ellis’ trip was a visit to the elephant orphanage, where for a few dollars he had the opportunity of a lifetime, getting up-close-and-personal with the elephants.


12

Features

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Chocolate for the stars Well, the writers’ strike has forced the Golden Globes to cancel, and die-hard movie fans like myself are quite devastated to hear about these developments.  To get through this potential crisis, I have devised a list of movies for the fine connoisseur of food and food-related movies. To celebrate the international aspect of movie making, the list I have compiled tries to encompass as many different regions as possible.  I adore these movies not only for their rich story lines but also for their ability to reel me in with on-screen gastronomical feasts, and seeing how the food they enjoy is rooted in their culture and intertwines their lives. First up is Bella Martha (Mostly Martha) a German romantic comedy about a talented chef in Germany named Martha Klein. Her life suddenly changes when she is left to care for her niece when her sister dies. We follow her story and how she balances her culinary passions and looking after her niece. You may be more familiar with the American remake of this 2001 film, No Reservations, starring Catherine Zeta-Jones. Ang Lee directed 1994’s Yin shi nan nu (Eat Drink Man Woman), a Mandarin spoken comedy about Chef Chu, a father living with his three grown daughters. Everyone in the household is pulled into a series of unforseen events when the middle daughter encounters some

unexpected things in her life. It is also interesting to note that this film was nominated for an Oscar and won several awards at independent film festivals around the world. Oscar winner for best foreign language film, Babettes gæstebud (Babette’s Feast) is a Danish film, whose movie setting is in Denmark in the 19th century. It is about two sisters dealing with their father’s passing. The father was a beloved protestant pastor of a small village and the daughters commemorate his death by hold-

I adore these movies ... for their ability to reel me in with on-screen gastronomical feasts ing a feast in his honour. They ask Babette, a foreigner and Catholic, to prepare the feast. When one of the guests is revealed to be a general of the Swedish court, he reveals his connection to one of the sisters, as well as Babette’s true identity. Big Night is an Italian film about two brothers who own a failing Italian restaurant. Although Primo is a talented chef, he is overshadowed by the nearby restaurant, Pascal’s. Primo and Secondo (who works at

the front of the house) try to save their operation by hosting a jazz benefit and pull out all the stops with a feast of a lifetime. This film was also a heavy winner at several international film festivals. Japan’s Tampopo is a comedy about trucker Goro who assists restauranteur Tampopo in opening a fast food noodle restaurant. The main storyline is full of laughs and even weaves in small side stories which carry themes about the importance of food. Tampopo was a winner at the Japanese film academy as well as at the Mainichi Film Concours. Como agua para chocolate (Like Water for Chocolate) is a Mexican film that holds a special place in my memory here at the university. In first year, I took Spanish 102 and our professor gave us a treat at the end of the term by showing us this movie in class. Not only was I able to understand the Spanish they spoke onscreen better, but that I also got to marvel at all the delicious foods the characters feasted on. The story focuses on Pedro and Tita. Their love faces many obstacles due, in part, to Tita’s mother and her strict observance of their Mexican traditions. This 1992 film was highly praised in many international film festivals, receiving a total of 21 awards. To round up this gastronomical feast for the eyes is Chocolat, an American film about what else? Chocolate. More specifically, the story is about single mother, Vianne, who opens up a chocolate shop in a small French village. She and her little shop soon become intertwined with many of the villagers’ lives and the unwilling antagonist of the town’s mayor. It only seems appropriate that I leave you with a chocolate recipe. I requested this recipe from a chef in Europe who made the dessert because it was so darned good and decadent. The surprising aspect was that it was listed as the ‘lighter’ choice on the menu. This recipe uses two ounce ramekins, but if you don’t have any you could just as well make the desserts in a regular-sized muffin tin. tli@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Directions : Chocolate Decadence 1/2 cup plus 3 tbsp granulated sugar 1/4 cup 2 per cent milk 2 tbsp plus 2 tsp unsweetened cocoa 11/2 tbsp unsalted butter 1/2 oz unsweetened chocolate, chopped 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract 1 large egg white, beaten 5 tbsp all-purpose flour 1/8 tsp salt 8 tsp semi-sweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly coat 4 (2 oz) ramekins with cooking spray and sprinkle 3/4 tsp sugar into each of the ramekins, shaking and turning to coat. Set the ramekins aside. Combine 1/2 cup plus 2 tbsp sugar, milk and cocoa in a small saucepan, stirring well with a whisk. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Cook 30 seconds, or until the sugar dissolves, stirring constantly. Remove mixture from heat; add butter and ½ oz unsweetened chocolate. Stir until the chocolate and butter dissolve and mixture is smooth. Let cool for 10 minutes, then add the vanilla and mix in the egg. Combine the flour and salt in a small bowl and add this to the chocolate mixture. Stir until just blended. Spoon 2 tbsp of the chocolate mixture into each prepared ramekin and top each with 2 tsp of chocolate chips. Bake for 20 minutes or until barely set. Cool for 10 minutes on a wire rack. Invert onto dessert plates. Serve warm.


Features

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Megan Ng

Life behind the scenes of FASS

reporter

Get your ass to FASS fast ­— that is, if you’re looking to engage yourself with a little bit of theatrics and quite possibly, a lot of fun. What exactly is FASS you might be asking? In a nutshell, over 100 individuals sourced from UW’s very own faculty, alumni, staff, and students. What started out as a talent show for different faculty groups in 1962 has evolved itself into UW’s longest-running amateur theatre group, having entertained audiences for 46 years. FASS president, Albert O’Connor said, “The longevity of FASS is amazing. I think the most interesting is how long it has been around. It’s changed year to year, but it’s been around a long time.” Each year FASS has a different theme, which it showcases at UW’s Humanities Theatre. In previous years they have reflected satires and parodies of everything from Shakespearean plays to comic strips. This year’s theme, “Global Warming: Kiss Your FASS Goodbye!”, touches on our current environmental troubles. FASS is also proud to introduce a new creative staff to fashion this year’s theme, with Russ Wong as director, Anita Kilgour as stage manager, and Mo Musbah as technical director — each individual having ample experience with FASS but diving into new roles to keep the experience fresh. Countless hours are spent in rehearsals cracking jokes and eating pizza, as well as in group outings, so aside from getting to exercise your acting and singings chops, FASS also gives you a great opportunity

to forge some life-long friendships and possibly even some romantic relationships. “Over the years [FASS] has spawned a lot of relationships, and a few of them have lasted a long time” said Heather Macdonald, a long-time participant of FASS. For Alice Pfeifer, FASS will always hold a very special place in her heart as it instigated the meeting between her and the love of her life. “My husband Steve Hanov was a 4B computer science co-op student when I was a 1B arts student with no major. I decided to join FASS Theatre Company in 2003 on a whim and there he was. He was tall, handsome and took my breath away.” Three years later, the couple is married and still very happily in love post FASS-life. Since its begining, FASS has also grown to become a community about building strong friendships. Several parties are thrown for volunteers, one at the end of each week of rehersal. Even after leaving FASS, you might find it hard to completely pull yourself from the theatre. Audiences and actors can look forward to “Heckle Nights,” which take place on the late night showing every Friday. These evenings are designated for FASS alumni and others familiar with the group to come into the audience to heckle and jab at the performers on stage, while performers are expected to be kept on their toes and even offer the occasional witty rebuttal. Despite the fact that FASS has been criticized for lacklustre scripts

13

Michael L. Davenport

Actors put on makeup as they get ready for a performance of FASS 2007, “The Seven Silly Sins.” in the past, and though the production is unlikely to ever be nominated for a Tony Award, the point of the program lies more in providing unconventional entertainment.

Auditions are being held Wednesday to Friday (January 9-11) from 6pm to 9pm at Hagey Hall in Room 334. They are seeking singers, dancers, and of course, actors. Arrive in

comfortable clothing and expect to devote at least 45 minutes for the auditions to complete. For more information about FASS, check out www.fass.uwaterloo.ca.

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Features

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Green — not just a colour; also a trend

joyce hsu

Bethany Delleman reporter

With climate change and the accumulation of waste always looming in the back of our minds, the environment has become a hot topic from here to Hollywood to the UK. Everyone is trying to do a little extra to stop those greenhouse gases from entering our precious atmosphere. The fashion world is

trying too, and they have some great ideas on how you can have a green wardrobe. Seasalt, a company that makes clothing and other products, works with entirely organic and recycled materials. According to their website 8, 000 chemicals may be applied to cotton before it becomes the material we all know and love. These include pesticides used by farmers in the growing of cotton. By using cotton grown organically, Seasalt hopes to reduce debt on farms, prevent the pollution caused by run-off, and reduce pesticide related injuries. The company also uses organic jute for the same reasons. Rayon, the first man-made fiber which imitates silk, is having a detrimental effect on the world’s forests since it is composed of wood fibers. Producers have begun to offer an alternative; soy silk. It is made from the by-products of tofu production and apparently also contains all the properties that make rayon so popular. This fiber, unlike rayon, is natural and biodegradable. Polar fleece is another economically-friendly material. This man-made fabric was created in 1979 to be a lighter alternative for wool. All those who have worn polar fleece know that it is a light and very warm fabric that now dominates a lot of our winter apparel. This fabric is made of plastic, but it is recycled plastic. The bottled water bottles that many people at university drink by the case are turned into polar fleece when recycled. A disadvantage of this product is its plastic derivatives: it will melt when exposed to extreme heat. On the other side of the spectrum, some companies have been going so far as to offer corn, bamboo, and hemp as alternative clothing choices. One company creates clothing, towels, and yarn all out of bamboo which has the basic properties of grass. Consumers should learn to be skeptical though; some options might not deliver all that they seem to promise. I per-

sonally would be a little wary of hemp, which traditionally is a very tough fabric that would be more itchy than wool if you wore it. However when hemp is mixed with other materials such as cotton, it makes a durable and comfortable addition to your wardrobe. The biggest concern may be how stylish these clothes are. Ecologists were never noted for their fashion sense. Yet many designers have caught on to this new green fad and are creating clothing using safer options. Freetrade clothing is also growing in popularity, using the same ideas as free-trade coffee. The clothing feels, wears, and washes the same as the fabrics we are used to but it is much better for our world. It may seem too easy, and perhaps it is. Green fabrics and styles aren’t going to reverse climate change or stop the use of pesticide and its negative effects, but it is a start. To save our world we need to think about the environment in every aspect of our lives, and this is an area we have been ignoring. These fabrics may be harder to find, and a little more expensive, but in the long run the benefits for the environment and for you are usually worth it. We had better worry about clothing and fashion now while we still can live and breath on this planet we call our own. Green fashion seems to be becoming a more and more of a popular trend. New designers and design schools are pushing it to become, well more fashionable. Below are some places and ideas that can help you dress eco-consciously:

Sharkah Chakra This environmentally friendly clothing shop can only be found in the UK. However, shoppers may also visit their online store at www. sharkahchakra.com, or google them to find

other sites that sell their products. Currently Sharkah Chakra makes hand woven denim clothing produced from the cotton fields of West Africa. They employ third world Fairtrade cotton farmers, indigo farmers, indigo dyeing craftsmen, hand loom weavers, tailors and laundry masters to create their products. Their merchandise, while expensive (a pair of jeans costs around $290), are worth the cost when you consider the good you’re doing for environment and the people of poorer nations. Not only are these jeans environmentally friendly, they’re fair trade.

Seasalt As previously mentioned, Seasalt creates their products entirely from organic and recycled materials. Compared to Sharkah Chakra, they are far more economically friendly and offer a wider variety of clothing. Anything from sweaters to shirts to scarves can be purchased. All the prices are listed in pounds, and their stores are located in England. However you can find them online at www.seasaltcornwall.co.uk.

Chopper Couture For something a little closer to home shop at Chopper Couture. With four locations in Toronto, thay makes clothes that have an urban flavour. Sweaters, shirts and skirts are all manufactured from bamboo. Most of their clothes are made either from bamboo and/or organic cotton. The Chopper Couture website advertises that their clothing is fashionable and looks expensive, like Egyptian cotton. For more information on location, prices and online shopping, visit www.choppercouture.com.

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Distractions

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Crossword

1 13

14

Tim Foster

17

18

Across 1. Health resort 4. Vocalized music 8. Walked back and forth 13. Auto 14. Motto 16. Get a sneaky marriage 17. Enrl. 18. Pay the price 19. Perplexed (2 wds) 20. Graduates 22. Imitated 24. Ruffles 25. More fully developed 26. Win a reward 27. Porky’s sign-off, “___ all folks!” 29. 21st Greek letter 32. Judicial examination 34. Shaggy humped bovine 36. Qualities 41. Tie a rope to a cleat 42. Defined tracks 43. Before the flat-screen 44. Revise 46. European eagle 50. Chaos 52. Less pretty 54. Emergency condition (2 wds) 57. To experience discomfort 58. In the slightest degree 59. Fencing field 61. American food safety agency 62. Cunning 63. Tillers 64. Allow 65. Wimp 66. Negative votes 67. Long, unique time period Down 1. Abrasion

3

20

4

6 1 9

4 6 5

6

10

11

12

16 19

27

If you were on a crowded bus, how would you maintain your personal space?

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37

28

29

33

34

38

39

41

30

31

35

40

by Mark Kimmich

42

43

44 50 55

45

46

51

52

56

58

59

62

63

2. French rice and seafood dish 3. Debater 4. Scarce 5. Aesthetically interesting 6. Reeves’ hacker handle 7. Vote for a new parliament (2 wds) 8. Archaic bell noise 9. Religious podium 10. Price 11. Heavy fencing sword 12. Very salty sea 15. Resign from office 21. Repeated phrase 23. ____ and downs 28. Head decoration 29. 23rd Greek letter 30. Cum ____ ergo propter ___ 31. ____ and outs

49

60

61 64

3

2

33. Beam 34. Mad cow dis. 35. Neuter reflexive 36. Canadian public broadcaster 37. Not him 38. Common newsgroup root 39. Jogged 40. Diligence 44. Night before 45. Transform 47. Fancy card shuffle 48. One who requires 49. Printing mistake 50. Large room 51. Bowling Locale 53. Estimate 54. Tattered clothing 55. Ornamental bag 56. Stage 60. Salt water body

“Try to stand at a place where there are less people.”

“Fart!!!”

Thomas Cardiff

2B environmental science

Tina Wang

4B actuarial science

tfoster@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

4 2 8 6 9

67

Jan. 4 solutions

Tim Foster

9

48

53

66

1

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65

5

9

25

32

54

8

22

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36

7 15

21

8 1 8

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Sudoku

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2

15

T A C I T

O D O R E D

D E L A N O

M E L A G I C O M B D I E A C R H E E L S D

4 3

Missed Connections You were in my poli sci 101 tutorial and I noticed you looking at me from across the table, I didn’t get a chance to tell you how I felt before the term ended but I saw you jumping over the barriers to get on the bridge on campus the other day. Would you like to jump into my bed sometime?

I was doing my weekly midnight grocery run at Sobey’s when I saw you eyeing the deli sandwiches. I noticed your UW track pants and fell in love with my little warrior princess. I was wearing a red thick woolen sweater, and I think that you noticed it, and me, too. Xena, can I be your Gabrielle?

You are in my Phil 100 class at AL 124. You pretended to look at the prof, but I knew you were looking past him directly into my heart. Now just say HELLO! ;)

Parlez-vous francais? Je croix que oui.You know who you are, my slice of Parisian paradise. French is a romance language after all, so this shouldn’t be difficile.

7 4 2 8 1 5 9 3 6

3 5 6 2 7 9 8 1 4

O N O R H U I N N D E I S S T P O U N T E E D

8 1 9 6 4 3 5 2 7

S H A I T A N S

C U T T Y

S A V S E T S R I M P A S E

4 6 5 3 8 2 7 9 1

A N T N C H U R A S L A F I F H E A T E R E A C R O L A N R P O S T O S P A N P R I S E A N C T S

1 3 8 4 9 7 6 5 2

2 9 7 1 5 6 4 8 3

9 2 3 7 6 8 1 4 5

B R A S S A R D

M E R E

T Y P E W V R O I L T E S Y R I E E M O N E A N N R A I

6 8 1 5 2 4 3 7 9

W E N D

“Flying elbows!” Laura Fockler 4B languages

“Isolate myself and look straight ahead.” Michelle L. Smith 2B political science

E L Y S U D A N

5 7 4 9 3 1 2 6 8

“Listen to music.” Kaylin Liznick

2B biomedical science

“By looking as dangerous as possible.” Caustan De Riggs 4B environment and business

You always steal the computer I like at the SJU library right after our class together. Stop looking at me, and stop doing it. I used to see you on the iXpress, then bus #35. I can say that you have the most beautiful eyes I have ever seen! If you would like to have coffee, just search Shafa on Facebook.

“I wouldn’t.”

Ana Gutovic 4B english Missed a connection? Wanna break the ice? Email mkimmich@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

“Turn my iPod up and look out the window.” Aiden Stevenson 1B arts and business


Arts

arts@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Musical talent just beyond your front lawn

courtesy revive

courtesy porcelain

Cambridge local band Revive (left) plans to release a debut album this spring. Kitchener pop rock group Porcelain (right) will be playing the Boathouse on February 9. Monica Harvey staff reporter

The first time I saw Revive play was in a small bar in Cambridge hosting a show for a few bands. While most of the bands were entertaining, Revive was able to distinguish themselves in both their music and the quality of their performance despite the sketchy venue. The band is quite talented and is an example of how talent and technique can give way to limitless creativity. It is always daring to compare a new band to other significant bands in music, but Revive has a sound and vibe like Nine Inch Nails and Tool. Other musical influences in the past and present sounds like they could be Alexisonfire, Pink Floyd and Mute Math. The band consists of five members: Dan Rochester on vocals, Steve Dallner on guitar, Jeff Brown on drums, Mike Lewis on guitar and Marc MacAulay on bass. Started in 2004, the band has undergone many transformations, including changing members and sounds. Originally, the band had a more hardcore punk feel but has recently decided to go in a more experimental and progressive direction. “We used to be more of a ‘hardcore’ driven band with a mix of vocals and screaming but we decided to change our style up to only have singing” said Brown.

The band has only recorded a few songs, all of which are available for download on their MySpace page at www.myspace.com/revive. Due to the evolution of the music, the band isn’t rushing to the recording studio. “Our main focus right now is playing lots of shows to try and get some exposure throughout Ontario,” said Brown. “We will be focusing our efforts through the winter to complete a full length album in the spring. We still have about four more tracks to write before thinking about recording.” Revive is constantly playing live and has three upcoming shows: two in Toronto on January 10 at the Rivoli, and on January 17 at Lennie B’s and one in Kitchener on February 22 at the Circus Room. The band also recently competed in “Bodog Battle,” where hundreds of bands from across Canada “battled” for a $1 million contract with Bodog Music. Revive was one of the bands out of 883 which made it to the live audition stage after submitting their song “20 out of 40.” You can find more information about the band at their myspace page or from their Facebook group “Revive.” “Revive is a band that you must listen to more than once to fully appreciate and understand the music… to be noticed, a band must do something different with their sound,” said Brown. mharvey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Monica Harvey staff reporter

When asked what genre Porcelain belongs to, the answer of the lead vocalist Adam Krulicki and lead guitarist Jim Mathers was very surprising: “Pop.” While pop is not necessarily a genre, and could be anything from dancing boy bands to blonde country singers, in terms of where the band is going and how they feel about sharing their music “pop” is actually the best description. “Porcelain” is the name of a Moby song from his album Play released in 1999. Play was the first album in history to have all its tracks commercially licensed. The particular track was chosen for the name of the band, because it also happens to be the place you end up after a hard night of drinking. The commercialization of music isn’t new but the attitude and motivations behind it are changing. “There used to be a stigma attached to selling out, but the music industry is changing” said Mathers. Commercialization of the band and their music is important but for the exposure not the money: “I want everyone to hear our music, not just people who can find it,” said Krulicki. The band is also conscious of maintaining the integrity of their image while going mainstream. “I think car insurance companies rip people off so I would never lend a song to them, but I do believe strongly in old people having sex, so I

would give a song to Viagra,” said Krulicki. The music of Porcelain can be loosely described as pop-rock and have been compared to other bands such as Broken Social Scene and Oasis with other apparent influences including The Beatles, Underworld, The Cure and The Killers. The band has recorded a self-titled EP which contains six songs all recorded and produced by the band in the Kruliki basement. Their music has been described as sounding like “nothing ever heard before, but something so familiar.” Currently, the band has five members: Adam Krulicki as lead vocals, his brother Chad Krulicki on keyboard, Jim Mathers as lead guitarist, James Bisch on drums and Jeff Bell on bass. The band is currently working on their first full length album in the studio and will be playing a show February 9, 2008 at the Boathouse in Kitchener. The intentional commercialization of art while maintaining the honour of the music may seem like a paradox, but you can’t deny the artistic spirit of the band who proclaims that “good music is ageless and timeless.” Discrediting a band for their desire to be popular is ironically the same as liking a band because they are. It should be about the music and doing whatever it takes to get it out there. We can expect great things from Porcelain, a band that is willing to do that. mharvey@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

It’s kind of like a union, but not Facebook is an online community which a large majority of you university students know. While some of you couldn’t wait to meet up with your classmates after the winter holidays had come and gone, some stayed in contact through Facebook and already made plans with friends during the holiday. It keeps people together. Facebook groups also keep friends close to each other, because of interests they share. But like I used to ask myself before I joined Facebook, “What’s the point of online communities and groups?” The same could be said for some of the online webcomic communities out there. There are quite a few groups out there that, while not as easy to customize and use as Facebook or MySpace, create a whole set of networks between each other. These groups are pretty much like small unions and today I’ll explain two types of webcomic communities: webcomichosting networks and webcomic organizations or “portals.”

With webcomic-hosting networks, the creators offer web-space for an aspiring webcomic artist to post his or her work online on a massive number of servers. Usually, these services are free, and they allow a broad range of tools and resources to make the site easier to manage, such as an automated and/or pre-made archive system for the artist’s collection of comics. The number of hosts is pretty big, so if you want to start a webcomic, choosing one of these hosts is an available option. The more common of these free networks include Smack Jeeves and Drunk Duck which offers a rating and comment system for each posted comic, and Webcomics Nation which can host many comic series and/or shorts per artist. The most common community known as Comic Genesis. Once known as Keenspace, Comic Genesis has held an extensive library of different works from amateur to semi-pro webcomic artists and writers since 2000. Based on my own personal experience, it also has

some of the most customizable options available for creating and designing a free-hosted webcomic site. Some of my favourite webcomicists have come from Comic Genesis and have continued to go on to approach bigger goals, such as Nina Matsumoto from Saturnalia, who has recently done some work with Matt Groening’s Bongo Comics. Michael “Mookie” Terracciano from Dominic Deegan: Oracle for Hire has gone from being hosted on Comic Genesis to ZeStuff, a geek-related online retail shop. Before ZeStuff, however, Terracciano was hosted for a long time on Comic Genesis’ parent site called Keenspot, which brings me to my discussion of webcomic portals. Webcomic portals, organizations and syndicates are usually more focused groups of webcomic artists. They can range from a large network of works (such as Keenspot) to a small community of artists (such as Blank Label Comics and Dayfree Press). These

communities also have a stronger tendency to hold on to their name as a professional brand name or goal. One example of this is Tomgeeks, a recently new syndicate that consists of women webcomicists that promote geek culture and make comics under genres such as fantasy and sci-fi. If you read a good number of webcomics, it’s likely that it falls under a community of other webcomics, sharing similar ventures and plans. Of course, the average hardcore hipster may consider this kind of grouping as selling out, but it’s usually quite the opposite. Like many artists from the past, webcomicists share a very modern-bohemian lifestyle and network; even the most introverted of webcomicists chat with fellow artists and writers. Webcomic communities just make that chatting easier and unlike other online network communities, there’s less of a necessity to take a MySpace angle shot. ptrinh@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


18

Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Musical guidelines Welcome to the year 2008: no robots, whatever the genre is. I’m not stating no flying cars and chances are you’re that there is a sudden everyone-listennot the leader of a foreign planet to-everything revolution. Rather, I am — what a drag. But as musical group suggesting that people are enjoying Semisonic teaches with their 1998 more diverse listening with the help single “Closing Time,” “every new of the internet. That said, this colbeginning comes from some other umn will embrace a genre-unspecific beginning’s end.” Thus, we move movement by offering one song each forward into a new year — robots week — perhaps unheard of or forgotten — which seeks to diversify and flying cars be damned. For music lovers the world is a your music library. To kick-start the new year, and to good place right now. The internet has become a listener-friendly haven encourage the quest for new music, with the widespread use of peer-to- here are three guidelines to accepting peer downloading and the creation new songs. The first guideline: listen to new tunes of tools such as MySpace and YouTube. Prior to the Internet, a university on your own. If you’re curious about an student’s listening was restricted to Enya song you overheard earlier in the the radio and their personal music day, but know your friends will think library was shaped accordingly. To- it’s lame, listen to it when you’re alone day, listening is dependent on your later. If you try to flick it on when schedule and the variety of bands your friends are with you, you’re only available to you is seemingly limitless. going to be met with disappointment The result from this phenomenon is when they tell you an extremely diverse music culture. Consequently, the university crowd today differs from previous generations. Currently, one music genre does not represent our generation. Hippies and punks formed their identity around music and music catered to their identity — this is generally unheard of now. Although there are miniature cliques of hardcore loyalists who walk and talk a certain genre, nothing seems comparable to the highly populated movements of the before. Most listeners now do not identify with one genre but seem to sample various genres. As a result, one person will have hip-hop, country and alternative music on a single play list. This leaves our music industry looking like some sort of musical soup, where different ingredients act as different genres and they all co-exist, waiting to be ingested by the music loving audience. This in itself may be our movement. Perhaps the seemingly genreless listeners of today are forming a mass of open-minded people who enjoy music

Enya is music for wienies. Guideline number two: nod your head and frequently back-up the song lyrics by saying “yeah” or “uh-huh.” It’s sort of like reassuring yourself that what you’re listening to is totally cool. Hip-hop artist DMX does this sort of thing right in the middle of his own songs. Guideline three: dance in the mirror. If you’re dancing to it then it has to be cool. Just don’t tell anyone. Following these three guidelines will put you on the right path and have you heading toward a healthy and diverse music collection. Not to mention that all three guidelines, when put together, make for a pretty sweet Friday night. ktremblay@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

joyce hsu

Blood, greed and oil

courtesy allocine.com

There Will Be Blood Paul Thomas Anderson Ghoulardi Film Company

When a movie is called great, it can mean two different things. In almost all cases, it means that it has a clever plot, fresh visuals, and inspired acting — all of which are coherently orchestrated under articulate direction. A second, much, much rarer case is this one — when the film delivers on a level above and beyond a typical “great” movie; ensuring that critics and scholars will still be studying and debating its various merits many decades after its release. There Will Be Blood — I say this without a hint of doubt — belongs firmly in the second category.  Adapted from Upton Sinclair’s 1927 novel Oil! by the film’s director Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood follows the story of Daniel Plainview, a turn-of-the-century California oil prospector and Eli Sunday, a teenage preacher and “spiritual healer” who quickly becomes his nemesis. The tension between the two quickly builds up after Plainview, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, purchases land rich with oil from Sunday’s father.  The young preacher’s manipulative tactics to wrangle as much “donation” out of the oil well, and the speculator’s burning ambition and almost pathological fixation on achieving great affluence, locks the two characters into a battle of ego.  The story ends twenty-odd years later in a violent eruption of hate and rage, which makes clear Anderson

wanted the title to be taken literally as well as metaphorically.  The movie is a big departure from his previous works — it is a single character-driven period picture set in the countryside as opposed to multi-character driven picture set in the modern Los Angeles or Reno. One could argue Anderson’s Punch-Drunk Love was also single character-driven. It told the story of the main character, Barry, through words and actions of his sisters and his love interest Lena — quite a difference from There Will Be Blood where everything about Plainview is revealed through his words, actions, and charisma.  More importantly, There Will Be Blood is the first movie by Anderson with a distinct style, which cannot quite be traced back to another movie. Anderson’s Hard Eight borrowed the dark, moody modern noir style from Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Ficton, Boogie Nights used a long Steadicam shots very similar to ones used in Martin Scorsese’s Goodfellas, and Punch-Drunk Love’s blue and red colour palette was an obvious homage to JeanLuc Godard’s A Woman Is a Woman.  There may be some disagreements about the importance of Anderson’s bold new film in the still very young medium of motion pictures and I may be completely wrong in thinking There Will Be Blood is destined to be a subject of scholarly study for decades to come (though I doubt it). However, one thing is completely clear — Paul Thomas Anderson has joined the ranks of American cinematic masters. — Hoon Choi

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Arts

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Book Review

Memorize the Faith: And Most Anything Else Dr. Kevin Vost Sophia Institute Press

Some books are great because of the quality of the writing. Some books are great because of the content or message they convey. Some books are great because of the reputation they garner, and over time, come to be considered classics. Dr. Kevin Vost has written a book that fits the first two categories and only time will tell about the third. The author, who has done both graduate work and doctorate work on memory has written this book as a tool to help Catholics memorize their faith. It is, however, so much more than that. It can be used by any serious academic to help them memorize, to think more creatively, and plan and execute research and papers. If you read the book for the techniques taught alone, it will be an invaluable asset for any student. According to Dr. Vost, “the text and illustrations have been structured in such a way that if you read slowly and carefully, look at the pictures and follow the instructions, by the time you finish, you’ll be able to remember and name the Ten Commandments, the Seven Capital Sins, the Seven Virtues, the Nine Beatitudes, the Seven Sacraments, the Twenty Mysteries of the Rosary. If you are ambitious enough, you can even learn the names of the forty-six books of the Old Testament and the twentyseven books of the New Testament. All of these in order, both forward and backward!” Through the processes, he uses a

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method of memorization that traces its roots and origins to the ancient Greek poet Simonides and the philosopher Aristotle to Marcus Tullius Cicero. These techniques were then taught and practiced by the Doctors of the Catholic Church, St. Albert the Great (the “Universal Doctor”) and St. Thomas Aquinas. These techniques are collectively known as mnemonics. Through the progression of learning memorization skills, you will develop greater abilities and strengths in these areas: organization, imagination and concentration. There is so much we still do not understand about the human brain, but we do know that the more we use the brain, the more we can strengthen these abilities. It can also be retrained after injury. Studies that have been done on surgery patients, Alzheimer’s patients and others show that working the brain can help fight disease. Vost’s techniques will help the reader to organize thoughts and thought processes more clearly, use the imagination to stretch the brain, and work it out in new and different ways. Then, the concentration involved in the first two activities, combined with repetition, can lead to memory skills that will serve you for a lifetime. Vost writes in a fun and engaging manner. This book is written with many target groups in mind. He writes for practitioners of the Catholic faith that want to memorize the lists he gives above, and many, many more. He writes for a younger audience who wish to understand their faith. He writes for all students who need the skills presented in this book to help them learn to be better students and scholars. The greatest strength of this book is Dr. Vost’s background in research, practice in implementing these systems in the field of psychology, and his love for his religious tradition. The weakness of the book is that the memorization techniques, tips and tricks are so great you will have to study Catholicism to learn them. An added bonus is that at the end of each chapter is a toolbox called “Memory Master Tips and Facts.” These boxes help you apply the material in an easier fashion. Therefore, I would say that this is a great book for the old and for the young in the faith. It is also a good resource for any academic or lifelong learner. — Steven McEvoy

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Ring in the New We’re still feeling the waves of what’s been touted as the best year for gaming since the golden age of Nintendo, and already it’s time to look at what 2008 and beyond will do for gaming. Looking back at the year of triumphs that has just passed, it is quite overwhelming to think of all that happened within that seemingly short span of 365 days. The vast number of blockbuster games, creative jaunts and time-wasting casual games that have graced our screens are enough to have made 2007 burst with gaming goodness — I’m still surprised it didn’t. Games such as Bioshock helped us to feel a new level of immersion, creepiness and artistic gaming style since System Shock. Sim City Societies helped us to discover a whole new side of simulation games (until Spore comes out) and how dynamic algorithms can truly change the way a game develops. We also discovered that Mario could still be fun and mostly original in Super Mario Galaxy. Games like Warhawk showed us that the six-axis controller can make conventional gameplay step easily into the nex-gen. Rock Band let us see that we could find something more addictive than Guitar Hero and Dance Dance Revolution combined — and at a decent cost. The Orange Box truly proved that you can have a package of games and have every one contained within be amazing. On that note, Portal showed how a four hour game can still be mind-blowing and more than satisfactory — even if the cake is a lie. All in all, 2008 will have some trouble pulling out from the shadow of its predecessor — but I have hope. With the beginning of 2008 already overshadowed by such biggies as Call of Duty 4 and Rock Band, it’s important

to look forward to see what lies on the horizon that may outdo the giants of 2007. One thing I’d hope to see in 2008 is for Nintendo to come up with some more original titles. As it stands now, Nintendo’s success suffers from constant rehashing of other games or by their overused signature characters. While Super Mario Galaxy was certainly a step in the right direction, I’d hope to see them taking that same initiative and originality to new and exciting levels with new characters and mechanics. As great as Mario is, we need to have some other guys who are of this new generation of gaming hanging around with him.

With the beginning of 2008 already overshadowed...it’s important to look forward to see what lies on the horizon Another thing that was set forth in 2007 that I can’t wait to see developed is the start of more dynamic algorithms put into games. As I said before Sim City Societies helped to show how a game would learn and adapt to your gameplay based on how you built your city. Spore, which will be ideally released this year, promises to take this mechanic and blow it out of the water. The entire course of the game is determined as you play it. Forget Fable, this game will focus not only on your character but on the entire world around you, from the microscopic right on through to the cosmic. Creating your own big bang is only a few months away.

Along the same lines as this dynamic game, I’m incredibly excited to see the artsy side of games come out to shine. Starting with the dreary, creepy and enthralling Bioshock, and continuing on through to 2008’s soon to be released LittleBigPlanet (LBP). This game cries out a new realm of gaming style and fun that, in this generation, we have yet to truly experience. Between the use of the six-axis and the integrated multiplayer designing, LBP is expected to help us discover level-making, social networking, artistic mechanics and a multitude of other elements all within a single title that’ll make you forget about My Beautiful Katamari. How can we not be excited? The artsy-ness will continue with such epic titles to be released such as Metal Gear Solid IV and Grand Theft Auto IV. Both of these games are on the docket as mind-blowing in their graphic style and details. Pictures have circulated comparing the graphics of GTA IV to that of the real New York City, thereby creating some rather convincing composites. As always, MGS is setting out to prove that they can jump on the bandwagon of the nex-gen graphics engines by the demo videos that have been circulating. Of course, there are a multitude of other things to look forward to this year, some namely of which are Super Smash Bros: Brawl, Mario Kart Wii and Fallout 3. It’s impossible to scope what 2008 may bring so early in the year. All I can say is, peel away from your current treasures every once in a while, and start to plan out your purchases for the year. You may soon learn that 2008 is planning on stepping up to jump the bar that this past year has set. jrickert@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

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Science

science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Organ donor outrage

New Health Canada policy restricts organ donation by MSMs

joyce hsu

Sherif Soliman assistant science

Adrienne Raw science editor

Another controversy concerning Health Canada is brewing. Last year, it was blood donation. This time, it’s organ donation. A new Health Canada policy that went into effect December 7, 2007 will exclude organ donations from any man who has had sexual relations with another man since 1977. The policy is reminiscent of an earlier controversy concerning blood donation by males falling into the same category. That earlier controversy centered on the Health Canada policy that excluded any man who’d had sex with another men since 1977 from donating blood. Health Canada policy provoked intense debate, particularly at the university level. Several campus newspapers, including UW’s own Imprint, expressed their outrage at this policy. Imprint staff reporter Travis Myers wrote the article, “A bloody outrage,” concerning the policy that is, in his words, “homophobic, ignorant thinking.” A writer from the University of Regina’s student newspaper, The Carillon, similarly pointed out that this policy excludes an estimated 10 per cent of the population — the 10 per cent that is generally recognized as being homosexual. Western’s daily student newspaper, The Gazette, ran an article discussing a November visit to campus by Canadian Blood Services (CBS) in which the agency unsuccessfully defended its MSM (men who have had sex with men) policy. Student reactions ranged from hushed protest to public campaigns to definitive action.

A campaign launched last spring at Concordia University called on CBS and Héma-Québec to change their discriminatory policies. The student council at McGill University banned blood drives from campus. As of November 30, the King’s University College students’ union was considering banning CBS from campus because of policies it sees as homophobic. National newspapers and magazines such as Maclean’s and The Vancouver Sun, driven largely by campus newspaper coverage and student interest, picked up the blood donation story in November and January respectively. The Maclean’s article in late November, which focused on student response to the issue, included a reference to Myers’ article. Meanwhile, according to The Vancouver Sun, student groups are actively pressing CBS to end the ban on blood donation from sexually active gay men. The new organ donor restrictions have prompted even more response from both student and national sources. Health Canada’s reasoning for this new policy change is the same as for their blood donation restrictions: to decrease the risks of transplanting organs with HIV, hepatitis, etc. Their policy, originally outlined in the June 2007 edition, Volume 141, No. 13 of the Canada Gazette Part 2, states that donor suitability (or unsuitability) is based on the criteria set out in the Canada Standards Association document in the section titled “Donor Screening.” This document is available only by purchase. The “Donor Screening” section discusses in-depth the process used to identify disease transmission and high-risk behaviour. According to Health Canada, these high risk behaviours include the following: • males who have had sexual contact with other males in the last five years

• anyone who has engaged in any prostitution in the last five years • anyone who has used any non-medical intravenous drugs • anyone who has had tattoos or any bodypiercings where the possibility of shared instruments exists • anyone incarcerated for more than 72 consecutive hours in the last year The most controversial of these regulations is the first one. Critics point out that MSM relations are not the only source of HIV/AIDS, the major concern driving the Health Canada regulations. They also note that sexual activity between two males does not automatically mean that the individuals have HIV/AIDS. Others demand to know why doctors can’t employ one of the commonly used tests that detect HIV/AIDS. Any blood or organ donation is screened for diseases and infections before being used, regardless of the donor’s sexual history. While this process does not eliminate 100 per cent of the risk, it does equalize safe sources and potentially at-risk sources. Health Canada intends to tighten the screening process. Family members and relatives will be questioned about the donor’s sexual and social history and practices, in an attempt to uncover any other reason why the donor should be rejected. The recent policy change also raises many concerns with organ donation facilities, as well as patients or people who would potentially need organ transplants in the future. According to CBC News, Dr. Gary Levy, head of Canada’s largest organ transplant program at Toronto’s University Health Network, Health Canada had not informed them of this new policy concerning organ donation. Many other transplant programs across Canada have stated that since there was no formal introduction of the

regulations, they intend to continue to consider all potential donors. Patients will feel the greatest effects of the new policy. Levy estimates that around seven of the yearly 100 donors at his Toronto hospital will be rejected due to the new regulations. Many online blogs and websites have expressed concerns on how this will negatively affect availability of organs for transplants. Health Canada mentions on its own website that Canada has one of the lowest rates of organ donation among industrialized nations, with 147 Canadians dying in the same year that 2,000 were waiting for organs which could not be provided. Currently, there are thousands of Canadians waiting for organs. Information on this issue is lacking: hospitals and transplant centers are confused, and interested citizens seeking clarification find almost no solid information. To many, this suggests that Health Canada trying to avoid another mass public outrage. This confusion is exacerbated by a recent statement by the Trilliam Gift of Life Network (TGLN), the organization responsible for organ and tissue donation in Ontario. TGLN’s Chief Medical Officer of Transplant, Dr. Gary Levy, said in a press statement on January 4: “We don’t exclude anyone from being an organ donor.” Health Canada is tightening regulations on organ donation and excluding a growing portion of society from eligibility to donate. Their actions, clearly demonstrating how unaffected they are by the community protests against their policies, might be interpreted by many as discriminatory and homophobic. ssoliman@imprint.uwaterloo.ca araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Science

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Adrienne Raw science editor

Researchers find infant planetary giant

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany recently reported the discovery of the youngest ever planet to be found. With a mass 3,115 times that of Earth and 9.8 times that of Jupiter, the planet, called TW Hya b, is classified as a giant planet. Its age of less than 10 million years old, however, makes it an infant in astrological terms. At the same time on Earth, primates were splitting into two lines, apes and Old World monkeys, one of which (the apes) would later evolve into modern day humans. Before the discovery of TW Hya b, the youngest planet identified was an estimated 100 million years old. TW Hya b orbits an infant star, called TW Hydrae (TW Hya), in a solar system that is still being formed from cosmic dust and gas. The new planet orbits its star at a distance of 3.7 million miles and takes just over three-and-a-half days to complete an orbit. Scientists estimate that the infant planet formed shortly after the star’s birth, and that other planets are likely still forming within the new system. The discovery of TW Hya b is expected to provide insights into the formation of solar systems. Atom-thick carbon sheets are superconductive

Graphene, atom-thick sheets of carbon arranged in a hexagon pattern, have the potential to provide the greatest room-temperature con-

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ductivity of any material including gold, silicon, gallium arsenide and carbon nanotubes. The ease with which electrons can travel could allow the development of super-fast microelectronics. The mobility of charge in a semiconductor is called the electronic quality and governs the transfer speed that material can provide to electronics. According to researchers’ calculations, graphene has an electronic quality at roomtemperature of over 23 times that of gallium arsenide, the material currently used in cellphones. Prototype devices have already been created using graphene, but scientists have yet to develop a method that would allow them to easily produce the material in large enough quantities to be used commercially. Science debunks widely accepted assumption about intelligence

One of the most widely accepted assumptions about the aging process is that the human brain is at its most powerful between the ages of 18 and 26, during the height of youth, and that mental ability decreases with age. New research led by Lars Larsen, a psychologist at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, however, seems to contradict this assumption. Larsen’s research involved a comparison of the records of 4,300 American ex-servicemen. These men were given rigorous intelligence test when they joined the military at about 20 years old. The same servicemen were re-tested two decades later. Results of the study show that intelligence, instead of peaking during youth, remains relatively steady and, in some areas,

The Science Podium Science is looking for two opposing articles of about 500 words on a science issue. The issue: Is there a scientific basis for the ban on blood and/or organ donations by men who have had sex with other men? If you’re interested in writing either in favour or opposed to this issue, please contact us: science@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

gets sharper as people grow older. Verbal skills increase for at least two decades beyond the age of 20, while arithmetic skills remain constant. A likely reason for the improvement in verbal skills is experience; older

people have had to solve many more social and practical problems than younger ones. The results of Larsen’s research have demonstrated to scientists that real changes in intelligence are much more complex

than previously realized. — with files from The Times and NewScientist araw@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


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Science

science Book review

The Trouble with Physics Lee Smolin Mariner Books

In The Trouble with Physics, UW adjunct Prof. Lee Smolin sets for himself a daunting task: making the history of, and problems with, string theory accessible to the average reader. This is especially

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008 difficult because the development of string theory over the past 30 years has been highly mathematical, with little advancement directly tied to lab experimentation. How, then, to chart its progress and pitfalls without devolving into the minutiae of special geometries, quantum mechanics and general cosmology? And, yet, Smolin knows both when to explain and when to bow out of such detailed discourse, allowing for a more overarching story about fundamental physics, the pursuit of unification and the price of human investments in science to emerge in its stead. Arguing that string theory is being pursued in ways that threaten the integrity of science as a whole, Smolin develops a striking case study of a field in crisis. String theory, in Smolin’s view, does not even have the luxury of being one theory — manifesting more as a landscape of theories numbering at least in the ten thousands, and requiring up to 11 dimensions and hundreds of variables to account for the added forces and geometries. And, as string theory has produced no useful predictions, with non-falsifiability finagling itself into more recent, multiverse manifestations, Smolin finds

the deficit of resources and manpower dedicated to other unification theories alarming. So not surprisingly, what arises most prominently in The Trouble with Physics is the human aspect of contemporary fundamental physics — the allure of elegant solutions and aesthetically pleasing ideas; the dangers of “groupthink;” and above all the difficulty involved in walking away from a lifetime of work. This is not, however, to suggest that Smolin’s book should be taken as the last word on contemporary unification theories. In fact, I strongly encourage interested readers to follow up their reading of Smolin’s text with a trip to the internet, where he and other distinguished physicists deliberate on Smolin’s more technical argumentation. But beyond the debate about who is “right” in regards to string theory, there lies the equally complex question of human fallibility — and even if Smolin is not wholly correct in his technical argumentation, his urging that physicists address the way they are doing science proves a telling read. Smolin reminds readers that even Einstein, for all his genius, was still so much a part of his era’s cultural paradigm that he could not readily

accept all the logical extensions of general relativity. I find it fascinating how difficult the pursuit of scientific truth can be even for those who have committed their whole lives to its cause. Smolin was also criticized for his choice of medium — with some scientists claiming that if he felt string theory was wrong he should be directing his arguments solely to other scientists, and not the general community. Of all the heated exchanges that arose from Smolin’s book, these were for me the most striking. Certainly, it is extremely difficult to make the history of higher level physics accessible to a general audience, while at the same time avoiding oversimplification of the issues at hand, but I would also argue that works like The Trouble with Physics serve as gateways to whole bodies of further research, sparking public interest in such under-acknowledged fields and ensuring that, even if string theory does prove a dead end in the years to come, the dedication of so many quantum cosmologists and mathematicians will not go unnoticed — or wasted.

28 or Tuesday, Janaury 29 – “Sentence Structure.” For more info/registration call 519-888-4567, ext 32655 or kmaclean@uwaterloo.ca or ext 33245.

p.m., TC 1112. “Starting Your Own Business: The Basics” – this workshop will help you assess your readiness to start a business venture. Only 20 spots available. 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC 1208. Wednesday, January 23: “Career Exploration and Decision Making” – this workshop will increase your understanding. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., TC 1112. “Are You Thinking About An International Experience?” – dreaming of going abroad to study or work? This workshop is for you. 3 to 4:30 p.m., TC 1208.

— Maggie Clark

Campus Bulletin ANNOUNCEMENTS

“Morning Drive Radio Show” – 6:30 to 9 a.m., www.ckmsfm.ca >click on webcast, for the latest news, traffic, school closures, interviews and a great mix of music! To get your important events on the air, e-mail morningdrivel@ yahoo.ca. If you have an interesting person that CKMS should interview call 519-884-2567 between 6:30 to 9 a.m....qualify for a prize! Win $1000, $500 or $200 award. UW, UWO, WLU, or U of G students. Submit transcript, cover letter, and two technical communication samples. Deadline February 29, 2008. Go to http://www.stc-soc.org/awards/thiessenaward. php.

UPCOMING

Thursday, January 17, 2008 Cross Cultures Perspectives Dialogue presents “Raising Children” at 6 p.m. at Kitchener Public Library, Main Branch auditorium-lower level, 85 Queen Street, Kitchener. For info call 519-748-9520 or crosscultures@bellnet.ca. Saturday, January 19, 2008 “Heads Up for Healthier Brains” – January is Alzheimer Awareness Month – Public Education Forums – what is dementia? What is Alzheimer’s disease? To be discussed from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Sunnyside Home, Heritage Hall, 247 Franklin St., N., Kitchener. RSVP to Alzheimer Society of KitchenerWaterloo at 519-742-1422. Tuesday, January 22, 2008 Volunteer/Internship Fair – Come out and meet representatives from a variety of local agencies to find out about volunteering opportunities of all kinds. Also, talk with representatives recruiting interns for very specific projects: setting up research, planning projects, preparing presentations, writing reports, performing data evaluations, planning events, managing a database, marketing for the organization - just to name a few. Join us between 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Life Centre, Great Hall. Renowned baroque violinist Linda Melsted performs music by J.S. Bach at 8 p.m. at the Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick Street, Kitchener. On January 24 she will be performing at the Guelph Youth Music Centre, 75 Cardigan Street, Guelph. For info on these events call 519-578-1570 or 877-520-2408 or tberns@magma.ca. Thursday, January 24, 2008 Learning Disabilities Association of K-W is hosting a workshop “Healthy Habits for Effective Learning” from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., hoted by Sandy Churchmach, registered dietitian. For info, location call 519743-9091. Wednesday, January 30, 2008 Ladies WOW Fun Seminar Series – 6:30 to 10 p.m. at the Arthur and area Community Centre. For more info call Wendy at 519-342-4029 or wsmith@wisemoove.com. Saturday, February 16, 2008 Women’s Crisis Services of Waterloo Region is proud to present “Hockey Night in Waterloo Region with NHL hockey legend Darryl Sittler,” at St. George Banquet Hall, 665 King Street N, Waterloo.

Call 519-653-8966, ext 239 or shelly.friesen@wcswr. org for more info.

CHURCH SERVICE St. Bede’s chapel at Renison College offers worship on Sundays at 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. or take a break mid-week with a brief silence followed by Celtic noon prayers on Wednesdays. Come and walk the labyrinth the second Thursday of each month, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more info contact Megan at 519-884-4404, ext 28604 or www.renison. uwaterloo.ca/ministry-centre.

STUDENT AWARDS FINANCIAL AID

2nd floor, Needles Hall, ext 33583. Loan release will begin on Wednesday, January 2/08. In an effort to decrease waiting times, the office will continue to use a time ticket system. Time tickets will be given out each day, throughout the day and will be released for more than one day at a time. Out of province students may come at any time, beginning January 2. Please check our website, safa.uwaterloo.ca for more info, a full listing of scholarships and awards. Remember: you must have your Social Insurance card and Watcard, or government issued photo ID, to pick up your funding.

VOLUNTEER

Volunteer with a child at their school and help improve their self-esteem and confidence. One to three hours a week commitment. Call Canadian Mental Health 519-744-7645, ext 229. City of Waterloo, 519-888-6488 or volunteer@ city.waterloo.on.ca has the following volunteer opportunities: “55+ MC for Friday Flicks and Hosts/Hostesses” – for afternoon drop-in programs. Call for more info. “Uptown Country: Print and Publications Designer and Website Designer” needed now until June. “Buskers Carnival: Logistics Coordinator and Director of Corporate Sponsorship” needed for this high-profile festival. Volunteer Action Centre, 519-742-8610 or www.volunteerkw.ca, has many opportunities available – call today! The Kitchener Youth Action Council is currently seeking volunteers aged 14-24 who are concerned about issues facing youth and young adults across Kitchener. For more info e-mail youth@kitchener.ca. Distress Line Volenteers Wanted - Canadian Mental Health Association is seeking caring volunteers to provide supportive listening and crisis deescalation to callers living in Waterloo Region. Please call 519-744-7645, ext 300.

COUNSELLING SERVICES English Language Proficiency Program (ELPP) – all workshops are scheduled between 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. Monday, January 14 or Tuesday, January 15 – “SelfAssessment.” Monday, January 21 or Tuesday, January 22 – “Essay Writing.” Monday, January

CO-OP/CAREER SERVICES Monday, January 14: “Networking 101” – learn how to apply successful networking strategies in your daily life. 4:30 to 6 p.m., TC 1208. Tuesday, January 22: “Exploring Your Personality Type (Part 1)” – two-session workshop. 2 to 3:30

Classifieds HELP WANTED

Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Minimum eight-month commitment. Paid positions. Send resume to Don Mader, K-W Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. We’ve got what you’re looking for – let’s make 2008 your best summer yet – Camp Wayne, northeast Pennsylvania, USA. Counselor-specialists for all Land and Water Sports Inc. Tennis, golf, basketball, baseball, football, martial arts, soccer, outdoor adventure, camping, mountain biking, climbing/ropes, roller hockey, archery, rocketry, water-ski, wakeboard, sailing, canoe/kayaking, fine artstheatre, ceramics, woodworking, drawing, painting, CDL drivers. RN’s for our Health Centre. Let’s get the ball rolling now! Online application www.campwayne.com ; info@ campwayne.com ; 1-888-549-2963. Summer of your life! Camp Wayne for Girls – children’s sleep-away camp, Northeast Pennsylvania (6/21 - 8/17/08). If you love children and want a caring fun environment we need counselors and program directors for: tennis, swimming, golf, gymnastics, cheerleading, drama, high and low ropes, camping/nature, team sports, waterskiing, sailing, painting/ drawing, ceramics, silkscreen, printmaking, batik, jewelry, calligraphy, photography, sculpture, guitar, aerobics, self-defense video, piano. Other staff: administrative, CDL driver (21+), nurses (RN’s and nursing students), bookkeeper, mother’s helper. On campus interviews January 31. Select the camp that selects the best staff! Call 1-215-944-3069 or apply on-line at www.campwaynegirls.com. Extend-A-Family part-time positions – providing in-home and community support to individuals with developmental/physical challenges in a variety of programs. Providers will be reliable, energetic and committed. $12.48/ hour. If interested, please contact Recruitment at 519-741-0190, ext 248 or via e-mail kcressman@eafwr.on.ca. Website: www.eafwr. on.ca. Have the summer of your life at a prestigious coed sleepaway camp in the beautiful Pocono

Mountains of Pennsylvania, two and a half hours from NY City. We’re seeking counselors who can teach any team and individual sports; tennis, gymnastics, horseback riding, mountain biking, theatre, tech theatre, circus, magic, arts and crafts, pioneering, climbing tower, water sports, music, dance or science. Great salaries and perks. Plenty of free time. Internships available for many majors. Interviews on February 6. Apply online at www.islandlake. com. Call 1-800-869-6083 between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time on weekdays for more information. info@islandlake.com.

HOUSING Attention Cambridge School of Architecture students! Live conveniently and comfortably right across the street from school in this beautifully renovated apartment. 4, 8 and 12-month leases available with excellent signing bonuses and rental incentives! Call Jelena at 519-746-1411 for more details. Two to seven bedroom houses available for May or September. Over 300 options! Houses or apartments, large rooms, back yards, free laundry and parking, bright and many newly renovated. Showings starting now so don’t delay! www.domushousing.com or call 519-572-0278. Awesome “real” houses – seven large bedrooms, two kitchens, two baths, at 423 and 426 Tamarack Drive. Eight minute walk to WLU, 12 minutes to UW, close to beer and grocery stores, lots of parking, free laundry, large yards, deck – must see! $399+/bedroom/month. Call 519-575-6313 or 519-575-6321.

COURSE INFO SP-100 Forest Firefighting course to be held in London, Ontario March 12-16, 2008 and Waterloo, Ontario March 19-23, 2008. Course will be held during evening hours during the week. To register, please call Wildfire Specialists Inc., 2233 Radar Road, Suite 5, Hanmer, Ontario, P3P 1R2, toll free 1-877-381-5849. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources accredited. No guarantee of employment.

DEADLINE IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M. FOR CLASSIFIEDS AND CAMPUS BULLETIN submissions, SLC room 1116 or ads@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


Sports

sports@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Warriors sweep through Kingston Yang Liu sports editor

The Warrior men’s hockey team surged to within a point of first place in the OUA far west division this past weekend with a pair of wins against the teams from Kingston: Queen’s and RMC. Playing in, arguably, the toughest division in the OUA, the Warriors success so far this season has been laudable, as they now sit 13-5 and within striking distance of the division-leading Western Mustangs. The Warriors began their weekend set with a match-up against the Queen’s Golden Gaels last Friday night in Napanee, Ontario. The first period was one of rough play as the two teams combined for eight penalties and 24 minutes of penalty time. Waterloo found itself shorthanded five times in the period but bore down shorthanded and did not concede a goal. Jordan Brenner gave the Warriors the lead late in the first period with his eighth goal of the season. The Warriors took a 1-0 lead into the dressing room at the end of the first. The second period saw little action until the last four minutes when Dave Philpott put the Warriors ahead 2-0 but the Golden Gaels would respond with a tally of their own with 1:14 left in the period cutting the lead to one. The Warriors however, refused to give up their lead pulling away in the third, with goals from Kyle Pellerin and David Edgeworth, to take a commanding 4-1 lead. Shane Hart added an empty netter as the Warriors cruised to a 5-2 victory. Goalie Jimmy Bernier took the win with 37 saves on the night. The following night, Waterloo took on the other team from Kingston: the RMC Paladins. Coming off the high of a win from the previous night, the Warriors needed to re-focus against the 7-9 Paladins. Things did not get off to a good start as the Paladins took the all-important first goal with a power play tally from Josh Fudge. The Warriors evened the game with two seconds left in first period with a goal from Doug Spooner. Brian Mulholland would then notch his first goal of the season to give the Warriors the lead late in the second period.

Richard Lu

A Warrior player streaks down the ice in the midst of a fast break. The Warriors beat both Queen’s and RMC by scores of 5-2. The Warriors built on this lead in the final frame, as they pulled away with three goals in the first three minutes. Kevin Hurley and Shane Hart each contributed with a powerplay goal on route to a 5-2 victory by the Warriors over the Paladins. Mark Hartman also had a goal and an assist on the night and goalie

Jimmy Bernier picked up another win with a 22 save effort. Previous to the weekend sweep of the Kingston teams, Waterloo had entered the CIS national rankings at tenth place. The Warriors now have the second most wins in the OUA, behind only UQTR, which leads

the pack with 14 wins. This weekend, the Warriors have home games against Toronto and Ryerson in the CIF arena, as they look to leap ahead of Western for first place in the OUA far west division.

Yang Liu

The Warriors would not be fazed as they seized the momentum late in the fourth quarter and prevailed with a nail-biting 88-86 victory, pulling them within one game of .500. Dan White had a career night with 25 points and two rebounds. The following night, the Warriors squared off once again against the Thunderwolves, looking for the two game road sweep. Unlike the previous night, the Warriors would be icecold shooting from the field. Lakehead took advantage of an anemic Waterloo offense and jumped out to a 20-15 lead in the first. In the second quarter, the Thunderwolves extended their lead to thirteen points, while Waterloo remained completely icy shooting from the field, managing just ten points. Dan White’s hot hand managed to get the Warriors’ offense back on track in the third as they actually outscored the Thunderwolves. However, the Thunderwolves would pull away for good in the fourth, cruising to a 87-68 point win and avenging the previous night’s loss. White, with his 29 points in the game, managed to top his previous career high which he set the night before. The weekend series split against Lakehead dropped the Warriors back into last place, but they still remain only one game out of second place with more than half the season left to play.

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Men’s basketball split weekend series sports editor

Rocky Choi

Ben Frisby attempts a three-pointer as teammate David Burnett looks on.

The Warriors headed into the new year having won three of their last four games, which greatly improved team morale after a brutal 0-4 start. Waterloo had a chance to ring in the year by climbing back to .500 with a pair of games against the Lakehead Thunderwolves. Despite stumbling out of the starting gate, Waterloo is still in the hunt for a playoff spot as the OUA west remains a mass of mediocrity with just one game separating second place from last. Playing on the road at the aptly named Thunderdome, the Warriors started strong in their Friday night game against Lakehead. The Warriors pulled ahead early with a strong 10-0 run in the first quarter and finished with a 20-12 lead, thanks to some blistering shooting from the field. In the second quarter, the Warriors defensive game broke down as the Thunderwolves torched the Warriors from the field shooting over 60 per cent that quarter. The fast paced action of that quarter saw the two teams put up a combined 58 points. Lakehead however, got the better end of that, putting up 31 points to tie the game going into halftime at 43-43. The beginning of the third quarter saw a “seesaw” battle between the Warriors and Lakehead for momentum and the lead with the two teams trading baskets up and down the court. The Thunderwolves, prevailed exiting the third with a four point lead.

yliu@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


24

Sports

Imprint, Friday, January 11, 2008

Warrior Wrap-up

Men’s Hockey OUA Far West Division GP Western 17 Waterloo 18 Lakehead 16 Laurier 18 Windsor 18

W 12 13 11 11 3

L 2 5 5 6 14

T OTL PTS 27 3 0 1 26 0 25 0 0 23 1 0 7 1 0

Women’s Hockey OUA GP Laurier 17 Toronto 17 17 Guelph Windsor 19 Queen’s 19 York 18 Western 18 Waterloo 17 Brock 17 UOIT 17

W 15 13 12 9 8 7 6 5 4 1

L 1 3 5 8 8 8 8 9 11 15

T OTL PTS 1 0 30 0 1 27 0 0 24 1 1 20 3 0 19 3 0 17 4 0 16 3 0 13 4 0 12 1 5 2

Cheerleading

Saturday, December 1, 2007 Waterloo finished 3rd at the University national cheerleading championship

Men’s Volleyball OUA GP McMaster 12 12 Guelph Waterloo 12 10 Western 10 Queen’s 11 York 10 Ryerson 10 Windsor 12 Laurier 11 Toronto 10 RMC

W L 12 0 10 2 7 5 6 4 6 4 6 5 5 5 3 7 3 9 2 9 0 10

GF 36 31 27 23 25 24 19 11 14 13 1

GA 6 15 21 16 19 19 17 23 29 29 30

PTS 24 20 14 12 12 12 10 6 6 4 0

W L 9 2 7 3 7 4 7 4 5 5 5 6 0 11

GF 28 26 25 23 21 19 6

GA 16 11 15 16 20 24 33

W 11 9 8 6 6 6 6 5

L 0 2 3 6 5 5 5 7

PF 816 800 732 750 718 711 782 778

PA 511 713 671 777 704 678 681 794

Friday, January 4 Queen’s 2 Waterloo 5

PTS 22 18 16 12 12 12 12 10

Saturday, January 5 RMC 2 Waterloo 5

PTS 18 14 14 14 10 10 0

GP Guelph 9 Brock 9 Windsor 9 Lakehead 10 McMaster 9 9 Laurier Waterloo 9 Western 10

W 7 5 5 5 4 4 4 4

L 2 4 4 5 5 5 5 6

PF 713 750 785 736 657 687 705 716

PA 648 659 735 621 648 684 736 693

Waterloo vs. York 8:00 p.m. Friday, Jan. 11

Women’s Hockey

Waterloo vs. Toronto 8:00 p.m. Saturday, January 12

Saturday, January 5 Windsor 0 Waterloo 1

Men’s Basketball

Women’s Volleyball

Friday, January 4 Waterloo 88 Lakehead 86

West Division

East Division GP 11 10 11 11 10 11 11

GP McMaster 11 Western 11 Laurier 11 Lakehead 12 Brock 11 Waterloo 11 Windsor 11 Guelph 12

Men’s Volleyball Main PAC Gym

Men’s Hockey

West Division

Men’s Basketball OUA

Women’s Volleyball OUA Waterloo McMaster Western Laurier Guelph Brock Windsor

Game Recaps

Women’s Basketball OUA

PTS 14 10 10 10 8 8 8 8

Main PAC Gym

Saturday, January 5 Lakehead 87 Waterloo 68

Women’s Basketball Saturday, January 5 Windsor 66 Waterloo 59

Waterloo vs. Lakehead 6:00 p.m. Friday, January 11

Women’s Hockey CIF Arena

Waterloo vs. Laurier 2:00 p.m. Sunday, January 13

Men’s Hockey CIF Arena Waterloo vs. Brock 7:30 p.m. Friday, January 11 Waterloo vs. Ryerson 7:30 p.m. Sunday, January 13

[M] Hockey

Presents

January 11, 2008 vs Uof T Varsity Blues 7:30 PM, CIF Arena

07 THIS WEEK IN 08 ATHLETICS

sfm km .

January 11

January 13, 2008 vs Ryerson Rams 7:30 PM, CIF Arena

vs York Lions 8:00 PM, PAC Gym

January 12

gowarriorsgo.ca

vs Toronto Varsity Blues 6:00 PM, PAC Gym

WARRIOR

Registered trademarks of Boston Pizza Royalties Limited Partnership, used under license. © Boston Pizza International Inc. 2005

gowarriorsgo.ca gowarriorsgo.ca

www.c

LI S T ca

LI V EN E

[W] Volleyball January 11, 2008 vs Lakehead 6:00 PM, PAC Gym

[W] Hockey January 13, 2008 vs WLU Golden Hawks 2:00 PM, CIF Arena

[M] VOLLEYBALL

Athletes of the Week Jordan Brenner - Hockey Jordan, a 4th year Arts student from Waterloo, Ontario led the Warriors to two road wins this past weekend against Queen's and RMC. On Friday night against the Golden Gaels, Jordan scored one goal and added an assist in a 5-2 win. On Saturday, Jordan had one assist but was instrumental on both the powerplay and penalty kill units. The four points has moved Waterloo within one point of first place Western in the OUA Far West division.

IMPRINT | JANUARY 11

Jo-Ann Scott - Hockey

Jo-Ann, a 3rd year History student from New Dundee, Ontario, scored the lone goal for Waterloo in a 1-0 Warrior win vs. the visiting Windsor Lancers Saturday night at the CIF Arena. Jo-Ann made a tremendous individual effort driving by two defenseman before scoring her third goal of the season.


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