Page 11

NEWS

IMPRINT,

CC Art show

he last week in March has been designated to herald in the new and improved hub of student life, the Campus Centrc, which, for approximately 19 months has been the “hubbub” of student life. AIthough the cacophony of drills, saws and jackhammers has barely subsided, the com-

T

It wiZl give artists the opportunity not only to display and sell their wurk, but also to have their art considered fur . permanent display in the Campus Centre mittcc in charge of opening ceremonies has already begun to plan the festivities. Among the week-long activities will be a juricd art show that will give artists the opportunity not only to display and sell their work, but also to have their art considered for permanent display in the Campus Ccntre. Aside from the pastel action gum&s that accent the old furniture in the Great Wall, there has been a dearth of artwork exhibited *

in the Campus Centre. Despite the fact that students are paying for the construction and maintenance of the new Campus Centre, they have participated relatively little in its actual architectural design and construction. More recently, however, students have had a hand in furniture selection and layout and have generated ideas for specific room USC. The upcoming juried art show will allow for students’ direct input (in terms of art submissions and jury decisions) into the aesthetics of the interior of their Campus Centre. Students, alumni, faculty and staff are invited to submit original artwork-paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, batiksfor viewing from March 27 to March 3 1 in the new multipurpose room. (That’s the room with the wooden swivel doors in the north side of the Great Hall.) At the beginning of the exhibition, a jury will select pieces to be permanently displayed in the Campus Centre. Artists of these works will receive an honorarium. In addition, the Campus Centre will pay for the selected pieces to be framed and mounted. During the week, students and visitors to the Campus Centre will be able to view the exhibition and purchase any pieces artists have chosen to sell. If you are interested in submitting your artwork to the exhibition, or if you have any suggestions, please contact Paula Thiessen at 579-4635,MaurecnRaat884-0807orTifhny Placins at 888-4567, ext. 6283. The deadline for submissions is March 22. Artwork need not be framed for submission. The jury will not be considering any sculptures. Depending on the show’s total number of submissions, the number of submissions per artist may have to be limited.

1

by Rebecca Higgins Imprint staff n October 1994, Queen’s Park sent universities a memo regarding the recom mendations of the Task Force on Wniversity Accountability. The task force was formed to discuss accountability issues, and previously the force outlined recommendations to be implemented by universities. Federal Minister of Education and Training David Cooke sent the October memo to strongly encourage the return of written reports that would describe how the task force’s recommendations were being dealt with. By February, the University of Waterloo had completed and returned the requested report. A divided chart listed the proposals,

I

UW News

Bureau

booths

and displays. UW’s six faculties will hold special activities and tours: Applied Health Sciences activities are based at B.C. Matthews Hall; Arts at Hagey Hall of the Humanities; Engineering at Carl Pollock Hall; Environmental Studies at the Environment Studies 1 building; Mathematics at the Mathematics and Computer building; and Science at the Biolugy 1 building. Information on the Independ-

I3

igh school students will have achance next Tuesday (March 14) to preview ampus life, academic programs and services at the University of Waterloo. The 23rd annual Campus Day is expected to attract several thousand students, along with their friends and family, said Steve Little, director of the secondary school liaison office, He added that last year about 3,800 students, friends and parents attended Campus Day. “We hope that their experience on Campus Day will increase their interest in attending Waterloo,” Little said. “Our main objectives are to provide information for our visitors and answer their questions, as well as to acquaint them with some of the people involved with our programs and services.” This will be an information-packed event for university-bound students. Most activities begin around 9 a.m. and continue until about 4 p.m., involving faculty, staff and students from nearly every department and student service area across the campus. It’s also a day for high school students to bring their parents along for information programs, covering such topics as co-operative education, health and safety, coutlselling, residence life, inter-university sportsandcampus recreation programs, financial aid and student life. The concourse of South Campus Hall (SCH), near UW’s University Avenue entrance, will be the focal point for the day’s events. Walking tours will start at the SCH concourse, where there will be information

The 23rd annual Campus Day is expected to attract several thousand students, along with their friends and family. About 3,800 attended last year. cnt Studies program is available at the Psychology, Anthropology, Sociology (PAS) building, Room 1055. The four UW church collcgcs are also involved in the big day, offering tours and special visitor events at Conrad Grebel College, Renison College, University of St. Jerome’s College and St. Paul’s United College.

m

Aaministration doesn’t discuss accountability A

23rd annual campus day

coming

by Paula Thiessen special to Imprint

11

Friday, March 10, 1995

and the university’s action to date. Of the forty-seven recommendations, eight were not dealt with at all. Beneath the “Action to Date” heading was a gaping blank space. Many of the requests involved the construction of advisory committees, for issues such as community relations, finances and physical assets. Some of the proposals were answered vaguely, stating that reports will be written and groups will meet “beginning in 1995.” Dates and times were not cited. Admittedly in specific sections the report was extremely concise, as in regarding the issue But of the termination of inactive members. much of the document was left open-ended. Apparently, the Task Force on University Accountability has their work cut out for them.

Notice

GENERAL

MEEXING

is hereby

OF II03

given

of the

FEDERATION

OF

STUDENTS,

University of Waterloo, a corporation under the laws of tbe Province of Ontario to be held on Tuesday, March X,1995 at 7:oO p.m in the Campus Centre Great Hall. The agenda for this meeting is as foUows: Appointment officer’s

of the &ard

Reports

of Directors.

1994-95 and Question

Period.

Motion pursuant to By-Law 1, Article IV: %e it resolved that the Federation of Students Fee be set at $23.55 per studeat per term effective September 1, 1995.” 4.

Motion i:

5*

to amend By-Law

1, Article

HLA, concerning

Add item 4 to read: The Senior Officers Re-number the rest of I1I.A accordingly.

Full Membership

of the Corporation;

as follows: and

AdjourmnenL

THE AGENDA FOR THIS MEEXtNG IS REZXRICTED To THE ABCWE BUSINESS, FOR WHICH PROPER NOTICE HAS BEEN GIVEN.

ITEMS

OF

Stephen Codrington President ____-_-__-__-__I__---------- ---_----_______-___------------- -------__--*-_----_-_----_---___---*1__LC________________-----REMEMBER!!! .

PROXY

FORMS

oPFTtzE$

IN

MONDAY, l

ALL, THOSE smJDElUTIDw.

ARE AVAILAEKE

-rKEi

WiRCH

CYdvWUS

CEPU’RE.

IN THE

FEDERATION

OF STUDENTS

TilESE

MUST

BE

RETURNED

MAKE

SU-itE

You

IlAW3

BY

20 AT 4:30 P.M.

ATTENDING,

PLEASE

Yom

1994-95_v17,n30_Imprint  

rettes and lottery tickets. Both of violence,” she says, call- sion being made on a moral these items will be sold in the ing pornographic m...