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Friday, September 21,1990 Vol. 13 no. 10

Second Class Registration Number NP6455 Kitchener, Ontar


The

r-r.1

DID YOU 9 9 KNOW? ‘m I “The

Federation

Hoard assist

r)l’Sludcnts

of Ac;rdemic undwgr;ldu;ltc

with.any academic mdy cncountcr,

\

WHOYAGONNA

CALL?

1

.

l

Creative Arts Board

WANTS

h:i% a

MMrs to st udcnt s prohlcms they

such as

j

unprokssional practice or violation of ac;adcmic policirs.”

There are limited opportunites l’eil for mediation training. If you are interested in voluntwring, please inquire to the oiWe of the ombudsperson CC 150 (ext. 2402) by October 2 I, 1989. Training sessons will be held October 28

FOH hlOWC: IS)‘0H~1.*~TI0S, (I )NTA(‘T lU )SS III !il.AWTI N( 1, (‘IJAJK, A(‘.4lN:htl(’ AFF.WtS. AT EXT. 62W, \

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SEPTEMBER

..

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NEEDED: JUDGEBUSTERS ._

YOU!!!

22

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September

27, 1990

‘in the

g-@”Campus Centre Great Hall 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Learn more about the Ontario Federation of Students (OFS) and the Canadian Federation of Students [CFSJ , Pick up your Student Saver Card!

7 reasons you feel a psychic force pulling you, towards the des

MUSIC FOR ALL TASTES;EH!

FED AWARENESS,

1) GET ‘READY BOYS! Bombshelter Oktoberfest

Touch Football Tournament is (sponsored by Molson’s) is fast approaching!! Visit the pub for details.

W.B.Ws - What a student pub is all about! Enjoy the savings, beer lovers! t Oktoberfest is coming...feel free to use our great 9 , training facility. T.C.Ts, QB.Fs,

Comedy, cult favourites, box office biggies, B movies, thriller, sci-fi, fantasy, etc, etc: Movies . daily noonish and five. Open every day, including Saturday’s at noon Free Concert! the EDDIE KIRKLAND BAND on Thursday afternoon, September

27, this @ar.

Meet your favourite off-duty Fed Hall staff at the

r Bomber. . Great entertainment Friday September -28 with the “WAMMEE” tind the Research Monkeys.

r September 2‘5 and 26 this year ot, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. % Jb t in the Q9 5 Campus Centre Great Hall Find

out more about your student government, the Federation of Students!

THE FRANKLIN COLLEGIATE ACADEMIC SUCCESS SEMINAR You’ll learn to take power notes, meet assignment and test deadlines, reduce **ire!, study ti They guarunte~ to help you 1


The decade of doirig the by Sandy Atwal Imprintstaff On September 29-30,78 heads of State will meet in New York at the United Nations to hold an unprecedented World Summit for Children. This is the first time in history that world leaders from around the globe - the largest meeting of world leaders in history have met for a single common purpose - to put children on top of the agenda for the 1990s. It is only now, at the turn of the century, that the majority of the world is beginning to realize the implications for future generations if we continue to use the earth in the careless manner we have adopted for centuries. However the potential benefactors of that future, the children of the earth, are in a dire situation as it stands. Over 40 000 children under the age of five die every day in the developing countries from six preventable diseases. No catastrophe in human history has ever claimed the lives of 280 000 children a week-but that is what is happening and will continue to happen unless the world decides to take action. This Summit was initiated by six countries in November of 1989 - the Presidents of Egypt, Mali, Mexico and the Prime Ministers of Pakistan, Sweden, and the chairman of the Summit - Prime Minister Mulroirey, These six leaders asked the United Nations for assistance in facilitating their action, and UNICEF Ml1 be supplying the secretariat to organize thk meeting. This movement to bring to the world’s attention the importance of saving our children is not restricted to a meeting of dignitaries in New York. On September 23, Kitchener will hold one of 1600 Candlelight Vigils around the world in support of the summit and in support of children around the globe. The Vigil will be held at the Centre in the Square from 7:00 to 8:3O p.m. In recognition of the Summit, a concert will be given by local choirs - The Schneider Male Voice Choir, The Regional Male Voice Choir and Mr. Alfred Kuntz. Following the performances, there will be a candlelight vigil ceremony outside the Centre in the Square. Seats are being sponsored at $10.00 each by organizations such as the Kitchener Rotary Club, and given away to families who could not ordinarily afford to attend. Seats not sponsored prior to the performance will go on sale at the Centre’s box office on Friday Sept. 14. The goal of the Vigils and the Summit is not

just to awaken people to the plight of children for one day, but to establish a permanent structure through organizations such as UNICEF that will continue to aid children until certain established goals have been met.

Despite the actions of Mulroney at home, his role as chairman of theJargest Summit of world leaders ever held, ensures Canada’s place as a leader in supporting the rights of children internationally. Although Canadians tend to think of themselves as minor players

SEPTEMBER 23 m 1990

in observance

of

in comparison to the worId’s superpowers, this view is unjustified. Accord& io John Hotson, professor of economitis at &e University of Waterloo, the Canadian chapter of UNICEF collects more monev than anv other country in the world. This is r&t per ca&.a, but asagross amount. In order to maintain our p&&n as human rights supporters abroad, support must be shown for this Summit as well. 150 million children will die by the end of the 90s at preent rates. Technological improvements are expected to save 25 million of those lives, but it is hoped that the impetus provided by the Summit will save another SO million. Not only wil1 these children live, but the Summit could ensure that they will survive to adulthood with good health and an education. At thq same time, reducing the number of infant deaths will also decrease the population growth in developing countries since with the increase in the number of children that survive, there is a decrease in the birth rate. However the children in the third world, although lacking the most in terms of basic requirem&s of food and shelter, and opportunties f&he future, are not the only focus of the Summit. Urban children who drop out of high school, or are subjectedto abuse, or are illiterate, are ako an integral part of the meet> . ing. The cost of saving 50 million children by the end of the millenium is estimated at $2.5

World Summit for Children

.

billion a year until the end of the decade. This is an easily recognizable goal when considering that in one day, the world spends $2.5 billion on arms, or that in one year American advertising companies spend $2.5 billion to advertise cigarettes, or that in one month the Soviet peo$e spend that amount on Vodka. It is only a matter of priorities that prevents this goal from being reached. There

is no more perfect opportunity for governments away from military domination and global warfare to the needs of our future. In a post-cold war era it is possible for the world to move away from the disruptive forces of political ideology and toward the principle of giving children the attention that they need for their survival. UNICEF wants the 1990s to be the Decade of Doing the Obvious. The cost of doing so will be only a fraction of a countries’ military budget. But th& fraction will go a long way to ensure the survival of millions of children into the next century. shifting

the focus of world

Council back in session . by Dave Thomson Imprint staff

The Federation of Students held their first Students’Council Meeting of the Fall term last Sunday, September 15 in the new Coatcheck/ Meeting Room at Fed Hall. During the three hour meeting, many issues of interest were brought up including deferring the Student Life building referendum, endorsement of the abolition of the Smoking Room in the Campus Centre, and plans to renovate Fed Hall so it will generate revenue. Vice-President (Operations and Finance} Tess Sliwinski reported that Fed Hall has lost around $100,000 for the fiscal year ending in April 1990. She attributed this for the most part as a consequence of unnecessary labour costs. Ideas in the working to bring more busi-

ness to Fed Hall are centred around converting the upper section of Fed to a sports lounge/nightclub type of area. This includes the possible purchase of two billiard tables, viQeo games, televisions, and moving the dartboards to a more accessible place upstairs. Essentially, an atmosphere more like the Bombshelter’s will be created upstairs in Fed Hall. The issue of “price equity” between the Bombshelter and Fed HaII concerning specials was also brought up, and Ms. Sliwinski expressed hope that a solution could be found during a meeting she will be having shortly with the Managers of the two bars. As an example, she pointed out that Fed Hall charges $3.25 for a “tall boy” while the Bombshelter charges only $250. Two items on the agenda will be of interest to those students who choose to smoke. Firstly, there was a motion that the Students’ Council endorse a proposal by Ann Simpson (Manager of the Campus Centre) to abolish the Smoking Room in the Campus Centre and convert it to another meeting room for

clubs on campus. The majority of voting members were non-smokers and argued that more space for meetings was needed, and that priority should be given to clubs, since the campus centre was originally designed as a general meeting place for students. The two people in the room who were smokers argued that the Smoking room was the only place on campus you could go to smoke without feeling obligated to buy something, that they never had any problem booking meeting rooms, and that abolishing the smoking room would only redirect smokers to the Wild Duck cafeteria or the Bombshelter, adding substantially to the amount of cigarette smoke in thae establishmentsDue in part to the vast majority of voting members being non-smokers, the Council approved the motion. Secondly there was a motion to discontinue the selling of cigarettes at Federationoperated services (the Bombshelter, Campus Shop, and Fed Hall). This motion was soundly defeated

In a discussion about the proposed Student Life Building, President of the Federation of Students John Vellinga motioned that the referendum be deferred from the planned dates in October to November 21 and 22 so that it wouldn’t happen in the middle of midterm exams. This motion was also passed. VPOF Tess Sliwinski stated that the proposed compulsory fees to be added to students’ fee statements to pay for the project (estimated to cost around $11 million) would start off at 20 dollars per term in 1991, increase to 30 dollars/term in 1992, and then to 40 dollars/term in 1993. The 40 dollar fee would be indexed every year thereafter until the complex is paid for. Due to logistical problems with the current computer set-up in Needles Hall, Sliwinski said that it will not be possible to exclude senior students from paying the fee, even though it is unlikely that the building would be available for their use before they graduate. The next Students’ Council meeting wilI be heti on September 3Q1990 at 490 pm in the Fed Hall C,mtcheck/Meeting room.


4 Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990

A committee

by Dave Thomson Imprint staff

from the Accounting

Student’s,Association (ASA) has put together a proposal called The

Apathy at Waterloo has once again hen overcome, this time by two accounting students.

Accounting Student Education Contribution (ASEC) that would see a 75 dollar fee placed on the fee

statements

of accounting

students.

The refundable fee will help to sustain the quality and credibility of the Accounting School and will also heIp to provide two courses that the Institute of Chartered Accountants have recently placed on a list of requirements for students to become certified Chartered Accountants (ICA). Students who don’t have the courses will still graduate with their degreefroniUW,butwillhavetotake the two courses to be recognized by the ICA. The School of Accountancy at Waterloo is financially L-ble to pro-

detailed description of who will be responsible for the funds, how they will be dispensed, and conditions tit the fee will be subject to. One condition that has already been met is that the University guarantee in writing that their funding policy %ll never be adversely adjusted in response to the ASEC or any other funds generated by the Endowment.” Other conditions are that: the fee is “the fee will be fully refundable;

students pay the fee during the next ten years (75 percent of engineering students pay the same amount toward a similar fund for their faculty) the principal amount in the fund would be well over a million dollars and would generate $91230 in interest for the ASEC committee to spend. The table is based on two assumptions: that the fees will increase 5 percent/year to cover inflation and that interest rates will be 10 percent.

indexed to inflation sumer Price index

A unique aspect of this proposal is that it is geared toward meeting long-

using the Conas a measure;”

See financial projections - page 5 vide these courses and maintain the quality of teaching and facilities for other courses, which is a perennial problem in nearly all UW departments.

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Karen Wasslen and Marc Chiang of the ASA have visited classes near the end of last term and the beginning of this term attempting to inform the eleven or twelve hundred accounting students of the benefits and rationale for the fee. A referendum will be held on September 26 and 27 of this year to determine whether the proposal will be implemented. A vote in favotir will be considered to be 50 percent plus one (a simple majority). Included

in the

prop-l

is a

100% of the ASEC proceeds will be put in an Endowment Fund by the year 2000; and that the undergraduate students will control the money by requiring a students’council to ratify any funding decisions. If approved, only ten percent of ASEC revenue will be placed in the endowment fund and the other 90 percent will be used to help meet needs in accounting courses. Every year thereafter an additional ten percentage points more will be pIaced in the endowment fund until all ASEC revenue is placed in the endowment fund and the interest generated by the principal would be used to fund the accounting courses. AS you can see from the table prin ted on this page, if 75 percent of

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term goals. This will be achieved by allowing the principal amount t0 grow indefinitely and use only monies generated by the interest on the principal amount. As well, the University’s professional money manager will manage the fund at no extra cost. The ASEC will be administered by a Steering COmmittee and a Board of Directors. The former will decide where the funds should be allocated and consists of a Director, Associate Director, four students from the Arts faculty (accounting), four students from the Mathematics faculty (accounting), three students from the Professional Accredited Stream, (PAS), the Associate Director of the School of Accountancy, one recent graduate (under three years), and one position open to any Alumni. Nearly all of these positions will be filled by students. The Board of Directors will be repponsible for administration, legal, mdding and constitutional matters. It will consist of a Director and an Associate Dirfzctor (both from the Steering Committee), four student representatives that are also on the Steering Committee, the ASA President, Director of the School of Accounting Accountancy, and Alwnni Executive, and a recent alumni (under three years). It is important to note that the two aforementioned governing bodies of ASEC are studentdominated and therefore the administration of the funds will ideally represent student interests. There is also a possibility of setting UP ASEC as a charitable corporation that would solicit donations from Alumni and various accounting firms which would be tax-deductible. As well, any students who make the Wluntary contribution will receive an income tax credit If the ASEC is approved, the 75 dd.h fee would, be placed on the fee statements of accounting students for the term commencing in January 1991.

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News

new fee

.

. by Chris

Maher 4B Accounting

VI: Endowment

g-row tk possible growth % SPENT

ST-NT

mm

YEAR”

CONTRIBUMON

1990

S 61,875

IWO

-NT

OF

STUOENT CONTRIBUTION

f

Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990 5

-

and Wendy

Kei

scenario

SPENT

/

w

TOTAL

STUDENT

INTEREST

CONTRIBUTION

ohl

FlNOS

AVAILA8LE

ENCKIUIENT-.

FOR

ENOU+XNT

SPENOING

BALANCE

The Accounting Students Association at UW has recently come UD with a proposal for the thye Accounting Student Education Contribution (ASEC), a $75 toluntary’student contribution. On September 26 & 27, a referendum is being held on the issue. As 4b accounting studenk, we are encouraging all accounting students to vote NO to this proposal on the following grounds.

,- ‘. 1991

'

S

6,188

90%

s S5.6$8

-S

0

t

S5.688

S

6.188

129,938W

25,988

80

lQ3.9SO

1992

136.434,

40.930

70

95.so4

3,218

98,722

73,705

1993

143.256

57,302

60

85,954

7,311

93,264

130,408

1994

150,419

75,209

50

75.209

13,041

88.250

205,617

1995

157,940

94,764

40

63.776

20,562

83.738

300,381

619

704.569

32.175

1996

165.837

116.086

30

49,751

30,038

79,789

416,467

1997

'174.129

139,303

20

34.826'

41,647

76,472

555,770

1998

182.835

164.552

10

18.284

55,577

73,860

720,321

1999

191.977

197.977

0

0

72,032

72,032

zoo0

201,576

201.576

0

0

91,230

91,230

*

based

on on

I)*

after

this

***

based

on assuared

912,298 1.113.974

full lm

year, cmtributiorts retu-n

i!T nut really volunlQry.

’ All students will be forced to pay the $75 up fm$t *then refund later. If it was truly a voh~~~tary contribution, wd * ..’ ke statements if we did not wish to pay.

2. L&tem@m the Administration Accounting programs.

on

are assmed to increase

by

request the strike it off our

do nut mu& guaron&e miuced&nding

fur

Most decisions about program funding are made by the upper administration of the university in meetings where there are nd Accounting students present. How can we be sure that funding has not been reduced if we are not present when the decision is being made?

3. Studen& can already make truly voluntary contributiuns to the School uf Accountamy. Contributions can be made at any time to the School of Accountancy. The contribution can be directed to a specific n&d the ASEC on our fee statements?

ocodemic yeor first

il. The cuntributiun

project

or purpose.

Why do we

4. Huven ‘t students btm paying more than their fair share?

S# to cover inflation

ln five of the past &ye&s&ition fees havi risen quicjer than inflation while operating grank from the government have dropped in real terms. Why should students be responsible ftir the government’s lack of responsibility?

investrknt

Accounting studenk should not be forced to pay more to offer required courses such as ACCQOl and ACC453. The proposal indicates that 90 per cent of the funds will be spent in the first year, which turns the ASEC into a short-term bandaid solution to the underfunding crisis. However, the $53,000 that is avaihble to spend in the first year is not enough to put on even one additional-course! On September 26 & 27, vote no to the ASEC - it isn’t the solution we need! Mark Wednesday, September 26 in your calendar. That’s the date for the Centre for Society Technology and Values’ (CSTV) fitst ‘lxown bag” lunchtime talk/discussion of the Fall term. the speaker wi.lI be Shelly Beauchamp, co-director of the Women Inventors Project. Her topic will be ‘women, technology and values” and shell outline why women (and men) are currently opting out of science and engineering programs and how STV programs might bridge the gap, especL~lly between women and tience. Beauchamp will also describe the Women Inventors Project, about which she’s often interviewed by tie local and national media. Beauchamp who received her Ph.D. from UW in 1977, was a resident scholar at Queens in 1989 and is an adjunct professor in Environmental Studies here at UW. Her one-hour session for CSTV will be held in Davis Centre room 1302 at 12:30.

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6 Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990

Forum

.

LeaaL but not loved -WI’

-->-

Oh the evils of smoking

tobacco.

Two Air

Canada pilots have been charged with smoking. Apparently the RCMP conducted an investigation after a fellow worker exposed what these pilots were doing in the cockpits, other than flying a plane. You see, Canadian law prohibits smoking in the workplace unless there is a designated smoking area, and there are none designated on domestic flights. Separating smoking and nonsmoking passengers from each other is an intelligent move for health reasons, as well as being plain common sense. But depriving the people who are in control of the aircraft of a Zegul substance their body is used to is somewhat irrational. I would much rather risk any health affects fri5m faint odours of a cigarette than see the pilots having a nicotine fit when they’re coming in for a landing. Call me insane. I’m fed up with the anti-smoking movement, and not solely because of the fact that I smoke. I respect the health interests of others I’m not ignorant of the fact that there are people who are really bothered physically and mentally by cigarette smoke. The problem I have with this particular movement is the fact that smokers have been singled out as a group of undesireables due to the well-known health risks associated with smok@g. It is appalling that the Canadian govern&nt has cracked down on smokers while applying band-aid approaches - if any - to other drug problems such as caffeine, alcohol, and “hard drug” addictions. Cigarette smoking has become restricted enough that the only person it hurts - in most cases - is the smoker

themselves. Meanwhile, drinking and driving is still very much a serio& problem, especially

in the university

community,

and

sometimes results in immediate death for one or more people. And who knows how many

people are lucky enough to not get caught or have an accident? This is an activity that has definable immediate effects and, if you consider the relative risk asswment, penalties that are not sufficient. Aside from the drinking and driving problem, alcohol consumption also causes bar fights, gun fights, and a whole host of other problems when otherwise “normal” people are impaired. In just the last month or so, two Bombshelter staff were assaulted when a few patrons had too much to drink. Why do we take the problems of alcohol so lightly? Because alcohol is still socially acceptable by the (moral) majority, while tobacco has become taboo. Evidence of this can be seen if one looks at the history of advertising of these products. The first stage of banning tobacco advertising in Canada had something to do with the urGrness of tobacco companies associating cigarette smoking with healthy activities such as skiing or surfing. In the meantime, the large brewing companies

produce commercials en masse that objectify women by associating beer with pictures of beautiful women. Non-smokers definitely have their right not to be subjected to cigarette smoke, which many perceive as being deadly. Some people in bars wU leap out of the way to avoid a plume of blue smoke coming tfieir direction. Smokers also have a right to be treated rationally. In all probability these New Puritans breath polluted air, drink polluted water, eat food pumped fuIl of chemicals, and so on, just like the rest of us. Again, it all comes down to how you assess the risk Smokers are the scapegoats for those moral authorities who take pleasure in imposing their beliefs on others. It’s a very mixed up country when the government bans the advertising of a Ipgal product that harms ody

the user, f&r the most part - but won’t stop corporations from polluting everyone’s environment. Just one more fact to refute the “facts”. Over sixty (60) percent of Japanese men smoke.

Japanese men also have the meatest lifespan 1 biany

gr0up

of males on eiz&

is:

Editorial Board Editor-in-Chief Paul Done Assistant Editor ................... Stacey Lobbin News Editor vacant News Assistant ........................ Jenny Croft Features Editor ........J ................. Jon f-iagey Science Editor.. ................... ..Darc y Brewer Sports Editor .......................... Peter Brown Sports Assistant.. .................... Rich Nicholl Arts Editor ............................ John Hymers Arts Assistant ...................... ..Sand y Atwal Photo Editor ...................... Joanne Sandrin Photo Assistant ................... *Terry Gauchat ..........................

.....................................

by Dave Thomson

Imprint Publications Ltd Anniial General Meeting < -Friday, October 5,12:30pm,

Imprint

CC140.

Staff Production

..... ..Lauri e Tigert-Dumas

Mgr.

Asst. .............. .Michal Quigley General Manager.. ............ Vivian Tambeau Business Assistant .......... Federica Nazzani Advertising Manager ........ ..Arlen e Peddie Ad Assistant.. .................... Warren Stevens Proof Reader Phillip Chee Production

..........................

...................................................... Duff Vormittag

Board of Directors

John Mason Paul Done .............. ..Dav e Thomson Dire&p at Large .................... Trevor Blair .......................................................... Stacey Lobin

President Vice-President Secretary-Treiis.

.................................

If you are an undergraduatestudent at UW and have paid your Imprint fee, you are entitled to attend and ~0% at this meet.ing. The finances of the corporation will be discussed

In hi-s Image byMi&aelH.aifton Chiivtian Intitiatim

2

Becoming vulnerable to the process of change (of week) is vital to Christian expression, and is part of’the symbol of Baptism, the Christ& initiatory rite. Change, however, is not arbitrary or self serving - it conforms one to the view of God, tc the kind of viewpoint God has. Thus the process of change must include input from God (just as a mentor is required from whom the apprentice may learn). This input is both realized and represented by the endowment of the Gift of the Holy Ghost. Jaus told his early disciples, ‘? will pray the

E$ther,andhe&allgiveyouanotherComforter ‘~~w~whenhe...iscome,hewill~de you into all truth: . . . for he shall receive of mine, and shall show it unto you/ (John 14:16-17; l&13-14.) The Holy Spirit, or Ghost, is a revealer of truth, an instrument for learning the will of the Divine; and if it is true that ‘Icnowledge is power/ then he also s-es the @ace by which we can paform according to God% will. This re resents the change o‘iheart-the cleansing 0 rpthe inner vessel as one ancient prophetput it - which necessady precedes a sincere change of attitude and behaviour. In the Hindu Geera, Prince Arjuna ’ experiences a change of heart when the Lord :

l

.

EentheSpiritoftruth...

Shri Krishna

enables him to perceive

more

according to the viewpoint of God. The first chapter is entitled, “the Despmdency of Arjuna,” in which he despairs over the results of war, the bldshed amongst families, friends, and teachers. By the power of Lord Shri Krishna, Arjuna is moved into the midst of the battlefield, as he requests. There he sees all the members of the armies at

war, his heart is broken, and he weeps for them. This scene alone is moving, and rep resenti the general human viewpoint when one is touched by pity, love and sympathy. Krishna goes on, however, to give the Prince a further insight into the eternal nature of thin= “rhe wise,” he tells him, “grieve neither for the dead nor for the living. ‘There never was a time. when I was not, nor thou, nor these princes + . .; there never will be a time when we shall cease to be.” (trans. Shri Purohit Swami, bndon: 1935, 1973.) Having eternity revealed to him, being able to see from the perspective of God, Arjuna is consoled, is capable of greater faith, and in life of greater action because his soul, his heart, confidence and understanding have been enlarged. First becoming vulnerable to God’s power? and then receiving it and proceeding to act upon it, are essential to the initiation of a Christian life. Humility, insight, and action alone are vital to almost any definition of a successful

life.

...........................

Imprintis

the offi& student newspaper at the University of Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper published by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprintis a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association (CJCNA). Imprintpublishes every Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Mail should be addressed to Imprint,Campus Centre, Room 140, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario. N2L 3G 1. Mail an also be sent via e-mail to imprintiatmath .Waterloo.edu. Imprintreserves the right to screen, edit and refuse advertising. Imprint ISSN 0706-7380.

Subscription

rates available upon request.

Contribution List Christine Abrams, Kenton Augerman, Trevor Blair, Gaby Bright, L~ri Brown, Rike Burkhardt, Claudia Campana, Michael Clifton, Peter Dedes, Sandra Duncan, Jennier Epps, Bill Falshaw, Al Folliott, Graham Forbes, Laura Gorman, John Hagey, Richard Ho Fatt, Bernard Kearney, Wendy Kei, Damien Lanza. Tammy Lee, Lance Christ Maher,

Don

Livingston,

Manion, Breni McFarlane, Craig Netterfield, Ati Rosselet, Stefan Schmidt, Tyler Shaw, Jackie Sustar, Dave Thomson, Mark Vanderkam, Wim van der Lugt, Chris Williams.


Forum. Run-of-the-mill To the editor, In last Friday’s edition of Imprint, our names and opinions appeared in the article “Where do we draw the line?” We would like to make it clear that the opinions expressed in the interview were our own personal opinions and do not represent the op&Gons of the Federation of Students. Further, the presence of our opinions does not necessarily condone the manner in which the issue was presented. When interviewed, we were not aware of the fact that the photographs related to the article would be reproduced in hnprint. We were also unclear on whether or not our names would appear with our opinions. Neither of us were elected to formulate opinions on pornography and censorship on behalf of students and we have no intention of bringing the Federation into the inevitable controversy that will follow Friday’s article. We do however feel the responsibility to participate in the education of students with regard to important issues such as pornography and censorship so that they may formulate their own opinions. It was clearly the intention of thi article to promote discussion on the topic of pornography and censorship. This is a noble goal and the issue should be addressed on University Campuses. The issue of pornography and censorship has been hidden away as a result of society’s fear of confronting controversial problems. a All arguments for and against censorship put aside, Imprint is a widely read and readily available publication with no control over distribution. As such, the presence of photos like those shown last Friday represents a dangerous risk Another unfortunate result of this article is the reaction that was provoked. While hprint attempted to caution people to react rationally, this debate is rife with emotion and deeply entrenched opinion. Instead of rationaI dialogue, there were knee-jerk reactions. On one hand, people are experiencing blind rage at the photos while ignoring the article and its purpose and content. On the other hand, some have simply sensationalized the photos as run-of-the-mill porno pictures, also ignoring the article. This is not what hprint wanted as a reaction. We hope that as the debate unfolds, people keep an open mind. If the trenches are not dug too deeply, on both sides, dialogue can still take place.

John VeIlinga President, hderation Kim spem Vice-President

of Students

university

of Students

Affair,

Federation

‘N

A few cummencs: (1) 7Xe authur of rhe fmture uriicle claims, and other respondents have cunfirm& thut the purpose uf the inter-v&s war made clear. (2) It is un&muud in democracies that while we separate the u@ce@m its hulder.. the holder’s opinions do in sume way mold the agenda uf the uflce. (3) Imprint did nut dishibute the last issue to our usual o$-campus luc~tiuns, in acknowledgement of the nature uf

righteous conservative attitudes.‘~I find that as a woman 1 cannot disagree more strongly with my own self-proclaimed representatives at the Women’s Centre and Women’s Issues Board: If either Ms. Speers or Ms. Herold think they represent my concerns they are sadly mistaken. They have more in common with the repressive ranks of fundamental Christianity than with Women’s liberation. As someone who considers herself intellectual and appreciative of openness in sexual matters I can only find censorship, a patriarchal tool of bondage, intolerable. Education is the only real way to solve the problems attributed to pornography and the sex trade. If either Ms. Speers or Ms. Herold were up-to-date with the rhetoric and feminist dialogue of thrlr decade, instead of being stuck in some sixties knee-jerk reactionary fear, they would s_ee my point. I find it interesting to note th&t the studentt leaders, those who are labelled “radicals” ini other countries, have much more conserva-tive views than the members of the faculty’ or administration consulted. Perhaps the geritol got sent out to the wrong offices. If Imprintcontinues in this vein, I know I will enjoy my next two years here.

had a

sick countering ea& stab at females with an equally crass remark about males. Better yet, why not eliminatealtogether these comments that deliberately put down a particular group?

Christy

This is not to be construed as a criticism of the type of humour throughout the handbook Most of the humour is funny, but when that humour is continuously attacking one group in a society, it ceases to be so amusingApart from the Bastard of the Week Quotes, the selections are generally negative, and tend to reflect anti-establishment sentiments. Few would find thoughts such as “Deceive and attack others for your own selfish gain, regardless of the pa’in or loss inflicted upon them fl hilarious. Editors, perhaps you would do better to include more positive and inspiring quotations. The Student Handbook is otherwise a high-quality publication, and you have reason to be proud of your hard work. Yet it is important to remember that many students read the handbook, and will refer to it several times throughout the academic year. When one considers how hard we have fought to counter negative and unfounded biases toward various groups by increasing enlightenment through education, why, in this decade, are we regressing to standards that reflect a narrow-minded and mediocre SOCktJl?

Pieroway

2A Applied

Studies

Shallow inspid

&

Rohter I recently picked Student Handbook

up 8 copy of the 1990-91 I was dismayed to read

many of the quotations

Close vour mind To the editor, 1was deeply shocked (though not entirely surprised) at page 19 of the September 14 issue of Imprint. University is supposed to be a place of higher learning, but this article seems to promote the animal level. If this is all some people can think about, that’s too bad, but why should the student population have to look at such garbage?! Clean up your act,

Imprint. MarcCharnberland Grad student

at the bottom

of the

pages. I am referring to those selections that are preceded by “Arrogant (Nation&y) Bastard of the Week Quote.” Quotations such as’Thou goest to women? Do not forget thy whip!” and “A man of straw is worth more than a woman of gold” are, in 1990, degrading to females. I do not wish to dispute the greatness of historical figures such as Nietzsche, Aristotle, and Terence. I acknowledge that these opinions w& widely accepted in their day; women were considered to have a lesser value than their male count&parts. Thus, the Arrogant Urnbrian Bastard of the Week Quote’May my enemies love women” was valid and acceptable at one time, but not in the latter part of the twentieth century. A half-hearted attempt to compensate for these demeaning quotations has been made: the phrase “Arrogant . . . Bastard” is placed before each insulting statement. hogant? Yes, and also shallow, insipid, incom-

passionate,.

Catherine Coleman 2A EnviKmmentaI studies

Valid disclaimers Tb the editor, At the risk of sounding like more humourless, anally retentive feminists, we wish to voice our complaint over some of the quotes included in this year’s student handbook For

those of you who are unaware, these ate but a few of the misogynistic little ditties: “A woman is only a lesser man” (Plato); “A man continued to page 8

. . Perhaps the editors should con-

Circles-a mixed gender bar Totheeditor,

_

The article about Circles in the September 14 issue of Imprint has created some unfortunate confusion about the Club’s attitudes towards lesbian clientele. The owner, Tom Reidel, met with representatives of GLTDW and made it emphatically clear that Circles caters not only to gay men but lesbians as well. In support of this it should be noted that five of the staff at Circles a;e f&male. Since its start, Circles has been a mixed gender bar and it would be most unfortunate if members of the lesbian community were to feel alienated by the unfortunate choice of quotes in the Imprint article.

on behalf of GLLOW, Lindsay Patten Paul Barton

Thank-you Imprint!

Arrogant insults

Here, Here!! Finally an article ori pornography that really deals with the issue by having the guts to print so-called “objectionable” pictures. I have seen many articles printed about pornography printed in other publications but none had any questionable material without the accompanying black censor dots. I have always found it interesting how many people object to material they have never seen. Thank you Imprint for treating me like an aduIt. As a new student to Waterloo, I was afraid that I would find the same, if not worse, conservative attitudes that seem to be permeating campuses today. The answers procured by Mr. Hagey from the various student leaders have revealed their, and I quote ‘self-

1

the latter is inferior...“Aristotle

valid point in his era; women were considered inferior, however, in today’s era these attitudes are rejected Quotations cited from many prominent figuies could have beeri found insulting other groups such as blacks or homosexuals. These groups also struggle to change society’s misconceptions and attitutdes about them. Just as it wduld have been inappropriate to single out these groups, it was,inappropriate to single out women. I feel it was wrong to include the quotes in the handbook. The world is full of other more inspiring quotes which could have been cited and appreciated in the handbook.

To the editor, Marcia

the article. - ed.

To the editor,

superior,

Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990 7

ACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL.’ _. .. CALL US !

220 KING

ST. N., WATERLOO

To the editor, The 19904991 Student Handbook, commonly used by most Waterloo students, was a disappointment this year to many students both men and women. Many of the quotations at the bottom of the page I are insulting to women and our intelligence. I can respect that these quoted were taken from prominent

philosophers

PLUS TAX

and

historical figures, but that does not excuse their arrogance or warrant their repetition in the handbook. Heading each quote with an “Arrogant () of ths Week Quote” also faiIs to excuse the remark and apologize to women. Page 123 quotes Aristotle saying “Also, as regards male and female, the former is

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cont’d. from page 7

Work is for Saps! We are so close to the world of work that we can’t see what it does to us. We have to rely on outside observeis from other times or other cultures to appreciate the extremity and the pathology of our present position. There was a time in our own p&st yhen the “work ethic” would have been inmmprehensible, and perhaps Weber was on to something when he tied its appearance to religion, Calvanism, which ifit emerged today instead of four centuries ago would immediately be labeled a cult. We have only to draw upon the wisdom of antiquity to put work in perspective. The ancienk saw w&k for what it’is, &d their view prevailed until overthrown by industrialism. Let’s pretend for a moient that work doesn’t turn people into stultified submissives. Let’s pretend, in defiance of any plausible psychology and the ideology of its boosters, that it has no effect on the formation of character. And let’s pretend that work isn’t as boring and tiring and humiliating as we all know it really is. Even then, work would srill make a mockery of all humanistic and democratic aspirations, just Because it takes up so much of our time. Socrates said that manual Iabourers make bad friends and bad citizens because they have no time to fulfill the responsibilitiesof friendship and citizenship. He was right. Because of work, no matter what we do wekeep looking at our watches. The only thing%ee”aboutso4alleclfreetimeisthatit doesn’t cost the boss anvthine. Free time is mostly devoted to g&g reidy for work, going to work, returning from work, and kco~ering from workFree time is a euphemism for the peculiar way labour as a Eactor of production not only transportz,‘itself at its own expense to and from the work place but assumes primary responsibihty fbr its own maintenance and repair. Coal and steel don’t do that. Lathes and typewriters don’t do that. But workers do. No wonder Edward G. Robinson in one of h& gangster movies exclaimed “Work is for saps!”

Even if you aren’t kiIled or crippled while actually working you very well might be while going to work, coming from pork, looking for work, or trying to forget about work The vast mai+ of@of the automobile are either dwiof the& yprtc-obligatory activities or * @j #ofi of &hose who do them. To this aug&+ed body count must be added the victims of auto-industrial pollution and work induced alcoholism and drug addiction Both cancer and heart disease are modern afflictions normally traceable, directly or indirectly, to work. - Work, then,~institutionalizes homicide as a way of life. People think the Cambodians were crazy for etierminating themselves, but are we any different? The Pol Pot regime at least had a vision, however blurred; of an egalitarian society. We kill people in the sixfigure range (at least) in order to sell Big Mats and Cadillacs to the sutivors. Our forty or fifty thousand annual highway fatalities are victims, not martyrs. They died for nothing or rather, they died for work. But work is nothing to die for. Only one more to go, be seeing you.

offended try this little home exercise: Substitute any oppressed group of your choice for female and white male for male and reread &is quote: “As regards male and female, the former is superior, the latter is inferior.” Get it?

of straw is worth more that a woman of gold” (John Florio): “Also as regards male and female, the former is superior, the latter is inferior...” (Arsitotle) And here’s and oldie but a goodie - ‘Thou goest to w&an? Do not forget thy whip!” (Nietzsche) Is this a fun icebreaker at Anselma House boys and girls or what?

Bernie Herold Women’s Centre Helen Victoros

Now, in order to set the situation up as accurately as possible, we must mention that there were indeed disclaimers placed in front of every sexist comment - ie. Arrogant Greek, Roman, Urnbrian, German bastard of the week quote. For this. we say oh, thank-you great omniscient and s&&ive handbo& editors.

Coardirqtor

A plea for help

We have only one question. Why is it considered to be hip and cool and terribly witty to print remarks degrading women, but none of the above when dealing with comments degrading other social groups which have been institutionally oppressed. For instance, how would a racist remark with an arrogant Ku Klux Klan disclaimer have gone over? How hysterical would it have been to include an anti-Semitic remark pulled from Shakespeare’s ‘IMerchant of Venice” with arrogant English bastard of the week quote printed above it?

To the editor,

On June 191990 Elizabeth Bain, a student at Scarborough College of the University of Toronto, disappeared while on the Sacrborough campus. I received a letter from her parents asking for help in locating Elizabeth. There are numerous ways of help ing, and I am asking any student who is interested in the issue to please come up to the Fed office, CC room 235, as scxm as possible. I’d like to end this letter with a quote from her parents: “We hope that given today’s climate of rising incidents of violence tow& alI sectors of society, our educational system may hold a ~~r~~nsibilityandbeinaprivileged position to educate the generation of tomorrow to be street wise’, i.e. the art of perceiving danger, exercising caution and creative channelling of energy toward constructive methods to deal with this malaise. Perhaps the enigmatic community spirit sparked by the dedication and concern of those participating in these searches might be one such worthy channel, one which tomorrow could serve any community to face yet another personal crisis, in their fold, with compassion.”

We have spent hours agonizing over this enigma, smoking sometimes five cigarettes at a time while imploring the great oracle to glean the truth from vulture droppings and lo and behold, not only did we manage to create this incredible run-on sentence, we also &me up with an answer. Racist remarks are viewed with such abhorrence and disgust that even a sarcastic disclaimer would not justify its inclusion in a publica~on. Sexism is completely different. First, it is not nearly as recognizable. Second, even if it is noticed, sexism does not seem to provoke nearly the amount of outrage that racism does. We know that this letter might be discounted as the rantings and ravings of date-less wonders. However, if it is still next-toimpossible to understand why we are so

Kimspem VP,universityAffairs Meration

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Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990 9

UW unionized staff set to strike A “no board” report on stalled contract talks between U-W and unionized staff is expected this week, clearing the way for mediation to avert a strike. The provincial labour ministry’s report is expected to tell UW and Canadian Union of Public Employees local 793 that “no board of conciliation” will be appointed in the CiiSpUk.

What that means &hat the union can legally go on strike, and the university can legally lock out union members, 16 days from the date of the mini&y’s report. In the mea&e, mediation efforts to head off a walkout or lockout are

being stepped

up.

A meeting is scheduled for Monday, October 1, with labour mediator Jim Leonard, who presided over an earlier conciliation meeting with the negotiating teams. ‘That will probably be close to the deadline, so both sides will Q to resolve the issues that are outstanding” said Mark Charboneau, national CUF’E representative. “It places the obligation on both to try to reach an agreement.”

Missionary to visit UW

by Mark Vanderkam hprint staff

Joshua Daniel will speak at UW on

September

21. Dank1 travels around

the world teaching people what it means to live with a Christian conscience in a world that adheres to predominantly secular values. Daniel fights against the idea that people must be selfish if they want to survive in a brutal dog-eatdog society. He claims that when people devote their lives to serving God and their fellow human beings, a real change takes place in their lives. Instead of living for only self-centered ends, people be@ to make a difference in the lives of the people around them; they also find purpose and meaning for their own lives. Because of his forty-five years in missionary work, Daniel should know from experience whether or not it is really possible to live by the high ideals of love and service that were taught by Jesus Christ. He has worked with Christians in dozens of countries and has led the building

up of a missionary

organization,

the

Laymen’s Evangelical Fellowship International, which is committed to carrying out the indructions that Christ gave to His disciples. This Fellowship has established hundreds of mission centres in Asia and Europe and many medical and dental “Gospel” clinics for the poor throughout India. Daniel travels over one hundred thousand miles per year ministering at these Fellowship centres as well as preaching in many evangelistic services. He also speaks at Christian conferences such as the Keswick Conventions and at churches of many

different

denominations

(Anglican, Methodist, Lutheran, and Baptist, to name a few). Despite his hectic schedule, he also finds time for a weekly radio broadcast that is aired across many countries as well as for extensive writing and editing work. Daniel will speak on Friday in CC 135 at 7:15 pm.

Last Wednesday, 257 members of local 793 voted unanimously in favour of a motion that could lead to a strike to back their contract propm&kThey have authorized t)re union to take strike action - if necessary,” Charboneau said He said the main issues are wages

and job security. ‘The university does not want a strike,“said UW’s director of personnel Catharine Scott. ‘That’S not MLT style and we don’t want to see our employees on the streets not making a pay heque.” She added: “We are going to do

everything

we can to come

to a

resolution. We don’t want a strike, but ‘if it cqmes to that we can manage it.” Scott declined to discuss what propo& the university, as employer, has made to the union’s nego&ting committee. .

,

I.maI 793, which represents about 380 workers in plant operations and food services, is seehg a new contract to replace a two-year pact which expired Iast June 30. The two sides held three days of negotiations in July and met September 6 with the provincial conciliator.


10 Imprint, Friday, September 21, Ij990

News

y

Don’t look. . .

It’s pornography, by Paul Done & Stacey Lobin Imprint staff

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The Censorship Forum, sponsored by the Federation of Students, filled the Campus Centre’s Great Hall on Wednesday night (Sept. 18). The forum began with a screening of Nil a Luve Story,a pro-censorship documentary on pornography and some of the attitudes PomwaPhY generates. Guest speaker Jon Hagey, Imprint’s current Features Editor, opened the forum with a rant parodying the position of the censor. “No, we must ban all filth and cleanse our land before the g&t retribution sweeps down upon our heads and bums us forever in the sulfureous fires of Hell.” Hagey spoke about the danger of such thought, and questioned the motives of the censor. He asked the audience to “abandon emotions and pursue the matter of pornography unfettered by censorship.” He concluded with the statbnient that there shouldbe no censorship, and opened the floor to debate. An issue of contention was the issue of child pornography; Hagey stated that the issue was not one which fell under the ausImprint’s J. Hagey- spewing pices of a censorship debate since our society accepts the need to protect childrenand has laws * which protects them from sexual audience however, wanted evloitation and therefore, the ” Hagey to answer the hypothetical manufacture of the product itself question “would you nonetheless i@ illegal. Members of the censor child pornography?”

photo credit:

again.

0. Thompson

,

‘Much of the criticism against Hagey stemmed from the opinion, presented in Not CI Love SIO~, that there is a causal

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News

Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990 11

it% a forum! segments of society like the women and men who are forced into prostitution. In other words, the prosecution of the vulnerable.

relationship between pornography and sexual assault, rape and violence against women. Other members of the audience countered this argument with a case which was based upon a presumption that pornography, rape and sexual assault are all symptoms of the same so&J dysfunction.

Audience participation was resumed after Fogel had spoken, with many audience members speaking out with force and passion. Hagey’s position of absolute anti-censorship was interpreted by many as an ‘acceptance of pornography, despite Hagey’s protestations to the contrary.

English professor Stan Fogel, the second guest speaker, discussed the way in which society “tends to divide art from pornography in quite arbitrary means.” He further commented on the fact the the film previously viewed, Not A Love Story a fiIm about pornography, tried to establish a puritanical definition of love as opposed to a broader gne which dealt with the physical aspects as well. Fogel, while touching upon many bases, introduced a political element into the debate - one which was not subsequently picked up by the audience. He contended that the differentiation between erotica and pornography, a common theme of censorship, was one of pure political expediency. He stated that the line of differentiation was one which had changed from political era to era and must therefore be suspect. He also went on to quote from various feminist anti-censorship groups and journals. The general theme of these opinions was that feminists must actively pursue a new and egalitian detition of erotica. Further, Fogel thought it dangerous that feminists ally themselves with religious groups on the issue of censorship, when the agendas of these groups are so generally anti-feminist. One interesting sidebar was his reference to cartoonist Linda Barry (Ernie Pwk’s Cumeek), who claimed that women were socialized to place too much value in romantic notions of love. He claimed that censorship and criminalization of the sex trade constituted yet another attack on the mz@nalized

mulation

’ BPCCHUSb

of attitudes.

CANADA .

What became clear from all the comments was the incredible diversity of opinion on the subject and the emotion with which the views are held. The censorship forum provided an invaluable opportunity for open discussion and exchange of ideas. Pornography and censorship are issues of great importance as we strive toward a more

*

Romantic notions of love There were emotional outpourings from audience memhers who could not in any way condone a discussion of censorship without explicit reference to the emotions - it nroduced. - - _r----Other themes touched upon were discussions of gender roles, and the role they play in the for-

egalitarian society, they cannot left unexamined. ,

be

The next forum will be upon the topic of cults, with representatives from the Council On Mind Abuse

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Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990 13

News

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14 Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990

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15


ing ._ im:‘eye I+ .on by Da& Brewer Imprint staff

& Da&n

Lanza

The school of Optometry started in 1968 on the main University. of Waterloo campus, It, then became situatedinthepresen~buil~north of the campus, in 1974. The clinic, which has always been a part of the schod, at one time was situated in the old post office in Kitchener. Before the school was established it was part of the College of Optometry in Toronto. The University of Waterloo is one of two schools in Canada with a school of Optometry. The other school, University of Montreal, is instructed only in the French language. The school here in Waterloo has 28 faculty. They vary in backgrounds from optometrists, biochemists, physicists, etc. The school was found+ here at UW for various reasons. Schools such as U of T, Western, Gd Ma&laster already have professional schools, therefore another one would be difficult to fund. University politics, no doubt, would not maintain both professional institutions. Also, Waterloo had a good reputation even when it began therefore it was a great choice for further growth in a respectable atmosphere. Out of over 400 applicants the University of Waterloo admits 60 students *with both academic and non-academic profiles taken into account. The admissions at the Universie of Montreal is also immensely competitive taking 40 students a year based on marks alone, with preference lo Quebec residents. At the school here in Waterloo, for those extraordinary first year students, one or two of them will get in after completing only one year in some sort of

general science program. In the p&t year the academic average for offers sent out to students was in the mideighties. Dr. M. Spafford, the Admissions Officer for Optometry, vs “Generally, when one gets into the Optometry program we assume a certain background of science. Still, there is an assumption of a higher level of knowledge.” In regard to admissions, Dr. Spafford goes on to say,‘we want everything and we can have it. We want someone who academically can handle the program (and) has strong interpersonal skills.. However, I stress, marks are hefinitely not everything.” This past year the Optometry Admissions Test (OAT) has become a requirement of admissions criteria. The test is given by an American Corporation. It is written in mid-October and early February. Percentiles ranging from 200 to 400 are given (ZOO being the lowest mark) with impressive applicants receiving 350 and above. The test gives the faculty a good comparison with American Universities and fairer evaluations of students in different disciplines. -

There are eight separate Components that make vp the fi.naI criteria for admission evaIuation. In order for an application to be considered comblete, these requirements must%e met, and then the competition begins. The overseem of the admissions at the school is a committee made up mainly of faculty. The first component is the academic mark &ieved during the previous years of post-secondary studies. This is in the form of a transcript. Am the overall average in the courses taken is important, but as you will see it is thoroughly substantiated by other criteria. The second component is the Ontario Admissions Test (OAT) which is written and the results given to the school for consideration. The third component takes the form of a personal interview with a member of the admissions committee. This is where the student can make a great impact on those that will beadmitting them. It is one of the best forms of non-academic evaluation that is part of the admissions criteria.

P

The Optometry

building just to the north of campus.

their own clink% time one day a week treating patients. One day a week is in the laboratories. A noticeable stress is puf on’clinical specialty

The &&h and fifth components are an autobiographical sketch accompaniti by a written essayThese give more of a depth in a nonacademic way as well as examine the applicant’s command of the English language. The fmal three components consist of different types of references. A character reference, an academic reference, and an optometric reference. The optometric reference is required so as to force the applicant to become associated with all optometrist. This makes sure that they feel good about their decision to become an optometrist. It is realized that although a career guide is helpful, it does not provide the necessary elements for a true picture of the profession. The obvious question arises as to why a person would ever want to submit themselves to this admis&on procedure anyway. The answer lies in many areas of the profession. optometry is a profession that deals with the he&h sciences is the main reason students pursue optometry. The difference it provides from a physician’s career is another carrot for the program. The program i&elf is quite intense in nature and lasts for four years, not to forget that this is after previous studies. The first year is where many students of various backgrounds are brought into a didactic situation (lab/ lecture) to learn introductory optometry. The second year is where clinical studies begin. These courses teach the various optometric tech& ques in use, why they are used, and what the results of their evaluations mean In the laboratories,< the students practice these techniques or! each other. There is also volunteer time for these students to observe fmal year students in the clinic. The third year provides students with

Optometry . - . a higher level of knowledge applications in I&LIE. In between third and fourth years the students musf perform ti practicum. This ‘entails at least eight weeks treating various cases in a clinic, much thee same as an internship. Some students go the in&national route and become exposed to various optometric techniques, as well as, many of the different philosophies of optometry. It is seen that this type of experience will no,t only benefit those students wouldpartakeinitbutalsothclsein the Program associated with the student. Finally, during fourth year, electives, albeit a limited number, are allowed. In this year students are examining patients three days a week , with the other two days in lecture. After the student has completed his/her four years they must write a series of exams. These consist of practical exams, oral exams, and written exams.ApassisneetMinallofthese exams in order for the student to be granted their Doctor of Optometry (O.D.). Also, a student graduating from the school of optorn* is already licensed in Ontario, whereas further exams need be written to be licensed in other provinces. Optometry is said to be one of the most &isf+g ways of &oming a professionaL If you have any further inquiries Debbie Clermont, Assistant Admissions officer, would be very pleased to be of assistance. Please caIl 885-1211 ex. 2782.

photo by Darcy Brewer

Why we don’t ‘Just Say No’ by Phillip Chee Imprint staff

Now that the Berlin Wall has collapsed, the US. government has tuned its resources to fighting drugs. But if you check carefully, the media seems to have dropped the Just Say No’ campaign, for something more exciting like a Gulf war. Doesthismeanthewarondrugsis unwinnal$e. Ur is it an implicit statement by some authorities, that drug addiction is not really important, or even inevitable. There is no question that drug abuse has taken many lives. The violence endemic to many urban U.S. cities, and in Canadian places such as Toronto and Montreal, can be traced to the drug problem. Some so&I workers say the problem is also the result of class and racial ma@naLition, especially in the U.S. While what goes unnoticed is the drug abuse in the middle-class; your typical Yuppie-user hit

who can afford

Indeed, there is a complex so&I factors at work Two theories that try to uncover of human addiction, may some interesting perspectives drugs in the modern Western

a $1,000

First, Jared Diamond, a physiologist at UCLA medical school, wrote an article in the July issue of Natural History magazine, titled Kung Fu Kerosene Drinking’. Returning from a trip in Indonesia, he was struck by the paradox implicit in Western cigarette and alcohol ads, and began forming some thoughts on why human beings desire substances that are blatantly harmful to themselves. It is apparent from c&ent scientific evidence, that alcohol, tobacco, and cocaine have quite lethal effectson man. He wondered then, why do we continue to use such tox-

Perspectives ‘about drugs

icads,

modem,

array of unusual the roots provide about culture.

from

primitive

hi-tech

&e&s

to

cultures. By ‘gathering insights from his work with New Guinea male birds of paradise, and coming across a paper by an Isreali biologist named Amotz Zahati he came up with a novel h othesis. He realized that all those coYpourfd and weird physical and

behavioral features of the males would make them more susceptible to predators. These may include bright plumage feathers, ornate eyedrow feathers, or hanging upside down from trees. So why would the males handicap themselves, and why do the females find this attractive. Zahavi’s controversial theory basically stated that those behavioral adaptations W seem at first a drawback to surviare actually indicators of go4 genes, because those behavioral baits themselves are handicaps. En other words, the de that has survived is actualiy proving his superior ability to survive, in spite of his handicap. Diamond points to thernalepeacockfantailandthemale bird of paradise’s plumage. He then suggested we look closely at all those cigarette ads showing how sexy it is to be a cowboy, or the beer ads showing people consuming vast quantities of alcohol and doing th@s requiring sobriety. Now, when this theory is applied to humans,

it does n&seem

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Diamond postulated that this primitive male instinct trait has become maladaptive in the context’of modem human social structures. Other means have evolved for choosing mates, such as courtships and business associations, and allow us to get to know each other more carefully.

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These traits have become superfi&l and ‘if you haven’t developed lung cancer after years of smoking several packs of cigarettes daily, you may have a gene for resistance to lung cancer, but that gene doesn’t convey intelligence, business acumen, or the ability to create happiness for your spouse and chifdren.’ This theory also has a crosscultural component. Substance abuse is not a modem phenomendn, Diamond explains. He described the drinking of kerosepe by his Indonesian kung fu friends as a way of asserting their stre;a@ Most people will die from drinking petroleum, but it has no apparent h+rmful effects on’ these men. However, there may be some hidden danger not readily noticeable. Another ritual can be found in the ancient Mayan culture. Here was evidence of a highly sophisticated civilization that apparently practiced the ceremonial use of enema tubes. The tubes allowed the user to ingest beer-like liquids that probably contained a high concentration of alcohol or hallucinogens. Such a ritual was a social event, since one could not easily operate the tubes alone. One advantage over drinking this stuff is that this route bypasses the liver, thereby avoiding the toxic effects upon the brain and other organs. It also reaches the bloodstream quicker through the intestines, rather than through the stomach. A somewhat more conventional theory is discussed by Dr. Ronald Segal in his book, Imxication. Segal claims that the need for intoxication is a basic desire of human nature, just as important as food, sex, and social contact. The need for intoxication, the use of toxic substances, may be a way of relieving mental stress. He said that the function of this desire was to attain pleasurable stimuli. The problem is that the compounds we have discovered and used are addictive and lethal. And not alI of can be easily the substances eradicated once they become coopted as foodstuff, such as tobacco and caffeine. Work in the field of molecular biochemistry has shown that many pleasurable effects are chemically-

Laurier

Lecture

Dr. John

Series

induced, and that it is possible to seIectively target these chemical sites without causing lethal side-effects. Segal says the pharmaceutical industry is well-equipped to engineer safe drugs for the purpose of giving mental pleasure. Se@ finds this important because he says many diseases are caused by mental fatigue and stress. This can be prevented by mental stimulation. He mentioned an experiment in which rheumatoid arthritis patients were given controlled dmages of crack to help them feel better, with a purported reduction in stress-related illness. , What sort of perspecti* &&met now. In addressing the issue of the fight against cocaine, Segal directs us to the early part of the twentiee, century, when Coca-cola originally contained cocaine extract, and coca leaves and cocaine were considered healthful remedies. As the addictive and lethal properties of this and other drugs became apparent, the authorities have responded by trying to curb its use by imposing harsher and harsher penalties on their use and distribution. For instance, neurosurgeons in Peru have resorted to severing the neural pathways in the brains of users unwilling to overcome their addiction. The wars against drugs are bound to faiI, Segal admits. Twenty-seven percent of the U.S. marijuana market is supplied by domestic growers, the result of former President Nixon’s burning of the northern Mexican marijuana crops. He feels that a similar tactic to destroy the South American cocaine supply will be a catalyst for the domestic cocaine growing market. Then there will be a metamphetamine epidemic and so on, because there is no end to the number of toxicants available. And there is no end to the human need for feeling intoxicated, whether from alcohol, glue, hard drugs, tobacc%, and anything else that will give you a high. vision of a Huxleyianbrave new world coloured with soma-induced fantasies, strikes me as rather grim. If anything, maybe these two ideas will initiate other new thoughts and solutions on the corn: plex nature of addiction.

1990/91

Polanyi

Science, Technology, and Society

Yet, the

One of the newest professors in th Chemistry department this year is D Melinda Gugelchuk. She is a theoret cal organic chemist who will b studying synthetic organic reactior that have a catalytic component Iik transition met&. She will also be Iec turing in &lEM 265 in the Wina term. More importantly though sh will be heading the CHEW 01 seminars this term! Dr. Gugelchu grew up in Southport, Ohio. She stal ted her academic endeavours as Phys. Ed. major in the local college After transfening into media technology at Ohio State UniversiQ she realized. her true love wa chemistry. After continuing on in schoc through a Bachelor’s program, shy went to work in the chemica abstracts services. She spent three years at this, but again decided shl was destined for other pursuits. DI Gugelchuk then went back to Ohio State into a Ph.D. program. Afte completing this she transferred tc UCLA. to do postdoctoral research Here she started working in the fielc of theoretical organic chemistry. At this time she married a Cana dian fellow who is now at the Univer sity of Guelph. Hopefully she will bc with us for a while to come. Just a reminder that CHEM 010 is i weekly seminar that is for the nrich ment of undergraduate students. The seminars deal with various topics tha the students choose. Everyone i welcome to come to the next semina on Tuesday September 25 at 12:31 pm. It has been noted though tha further seminar times may change.

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18

Imprint,

Friday,

September

This ain’t no Canadian Institute Peace and Security

Features

21, 1990

court

of justice son

l

l

l

ThiCis a court ofelaw

for International

The Limitations of the World Court and Intmtional Law The domestic laws of individual states attempt to maintain a peaceful and stable society by establishing rules which apply to all. Most citizens accept this body of law as a legitimate guide to ind’ * ual and group behaviour. The 2 te has the power to punish those who br?ak the law, the power to enforce and punish strengthens the legal system of the state. International law is made collectively by sovereign states. States are reluctant to accept a higher authority such as international law in the way that citizens accept the laws of their state. Because of this, international law can only be as effective as states allow it to be. Many people argue that, in a world of sovereign states, a state’s peace, security and independence can be guaranteed only by the possession of arms. They believe that states wit1 always be competitive. It would be unwise, they say, to put much faith in international laws which cannot be enforced. Force, they conclude, is the final judge in the international community.

IIltrodUCti~

One of the ways to pursue a more peaceful and stable world order is the development of international law. International law. &a sy*m of principles and rules-Vwhich attempts to regulate relations among states. It seeks to resolve disputes by applying legal principles, rather than by applying force. An important institution in the field of international law is the International Court of Justice, or the World Court, as it is popularly kn0Wl-l.

Law. There is an important difference between international Iaw and the domestic law found in individual states. In states, the sovereign authority - for example, the parliament or congress - makes the law. It is then enforced by police and interpreted by the courts. In the current international system, there is no sovereign authority above the state. States, therefore, cooperate to make international law among themselves. There is no world police authority, however, to enforce international l.ntemati0na.l

law.

The beginnings of international law is the habitual or repeated behaviour of states in their relations with each other. These accepted norms of behaviour may eventually find their way into treaties, or become a written part of international law. For example, the 1982 United Nations (UN) Convention on the Law of the Sea was signed by almost all the states in the world. It sets down the rules which govern most of the uses of the oceans and seas. Many of these rules were previously of behaviour.

accepted

standards

The Use of Force and International Law

Although international law deals with many aspects of the relations between states, a primary concern has been the question of war and peace. States have, for many years, claimed the right to declare and wage war against other statesSome have challenged this right but it was not until the twentieth century that meaningful steps were taken to make the use of force illegal under international law. In 1928, most of the states in the world signed the Kellogg-Wand Treaty. They pledged not to resort to war as an “instrument of national policy in mutual relations.” Despite the Kellogg-Briand Treaty, war contiNed.

Gene Roddenberry

predicted

In 1945, The Charter of the United Nations marked another attempt to reduce the role of force in international relations. All states which sign the UN Charter pledge to settle their disputes in a peaceful manner. In additioh, they pledge to refrain from the threat or use of force. Only in the case of selfdefence against an armed attack is a state, or group of

Don’t mess with us

states, justified in the use of force. Even so, such a measure is acceptable only until the UN Security Council has taken the necessary steps to restore international peace and security. The legal provisions of the UN Charter against the use of force have helped change attitudes about acceptable behaviour between states. They have not, however, put an end to armed conflict.

Origins and Role of the World court The International Court of Justice (XCJ) was established at the founding conference of the United Nations in 1945. The ICJ succeeded the Permanent Court of International Justice was founded in 1919. Both the earlier court, and today’s World Court, sit at The Hague, in the Netherlands. All the states which signed the UN Charter also S@d the Statute of the Court, The -UN Charter makes the Court the prinwhich

it all! cipal judicial organ of the UN. The World Court is not the only - institution in the international community which deals with questions of international law. It is, however, the highest authority on international law, and its judgments carry considerable prestige and authority. The World Court deals only with disputes between states. Under the UN Charter, its decisions are binding upon UN member-states. The Security Council is the only other UN organ whose decisions are binding. The Court’s Statute allows for the non-UN memhers - for example, Switzerland to become party to the Statute of the .

The court

F~nctionirtg

of

the

Worki

Fifteen jurists sit on the World Court. They are elected by separate votes it the UN General Assembly and the UN Security Council. They must receive a majority of votes in each body. jurists sit for a nine year term and can be re-elected. No two jurists from the same state can sit on the Court at the same time. The jurists are selected so that the fifteen represent the main cultures, traditions, geographical regions and legal systems of the world. The Court can hand down two different forms of decision It can decide a dispute on the basis of law. This legal decision is final: there is no appeal. On the other band, the Court can provide a non-binding, advisory opinion Both the General Assembly and the Security Council can ask the Court for an advisory opinion on any legal question. With the permission of the General Assembly, so can any other UN organ or agency.

International Court of Justice. The Court’s jurisdiction, or authority to decide in a case, is based on the consent of the states involved in the dispute. This upholds an important principle in \mternational law: the sovereignty of the state. Because it is sovereign, no state is obliged to submit a dispute with another state to an international court.

Others argue that cooperation is, in the long run, the best interest of all states. They are convinced that the use of force as a means of solving disputes must end. In order to work toward a peaceful, secure world, states should support the development of international law, and abide by it. In the last half of this century, states have shown that they are more accepting of the rule of international . law.

We bad posse

-~

There are several -ways a case can come before the World Court: -Two disputing states can refer 1 their problem to the Court. -Some international treaties give the World Court the power to rule on

Dance-a-halls! Come work Imprint.

a dispute arising from the treaty. By signing such a treaty, a state recognizes the jurisdiction of the Court in matters covered by that agreement.

-As set out in the World Court’s Statute, a state can declare that it accepts the Court’s jurisdiction in any matter under international law. Such compulsory jurisdiction is only valid if the other state in the dispute also accepts the jurisdiction of the Court.

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It’s partly my fault for never having

BootsauceKordie Gordo The Bombshelter Friduy, Sept. 14

never

heard

of them,

Bootsauce’s

veryone’s

A Winner’

by Peter Brown Imprint staff

Montreal’s Bootsauce made a triumphant return to the Bomb- shelter last Friday night and rocked the house despite a lacklustre op&+ act and an anal-retentNe *

ey were competent casionally interesting, but the prospect of having to relive their set by way of a fireside tale told to young ones makes me want to ask for shock treatment to purge my brain of the

sauc

their manager was an the has a great band on his

memory.

Dread 2eppeIi.n ?kter Clark Hull. GueIph

Sept. 13 ‘y B~HWCI Ibrney Have you ever heard of The leggae Blades? Based in Temple City, lalifomia, their claim to fame lies in a chart topping”,smash success hit ong “Cheesums”. Okay, kaybe not ‘hart topping; perhaps Ill even conede that it wasn’t a smash success, kut I can definitely affirm that Cheesums” blasted its way right up o number 220. Which charts? dmmmm... Beat’s me. Jah Paul JO naintains that 1 would know it if I leard it, after wh.@h he br&cs into an mproniptu rendition of the ver&ble lassie, his only response a very blank lxpression on rlay face. Two years ago, if what the video asserts bears any truth, an innocuous ccident involving i. The Reggae blades and an overweight milkman a man who obviously shunned the nerits of skim milk) spawned the reation of one of the greatest musical ens&ions since Ned Jones. This notley fusion of blubber and blades alved Dread Zeppelin (file this one utder Imd Zeppelin music inna eggae style). What, combination vould be complete without the nelodic vocalization of none other him the King himseE Yes it’s true a kew genre of die hake fans have emerged under the uniting appellaion “Dreadheads”. Zeppmania has aken a twisted, humorous turn leadng the mass on an eclectic trip down naudlin street. Fans around the globe hall make arduous pilgrimages #forttoreapthewisdomimpartedby

in an

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photo by: Wim Vanderlugt

that my qualms

were ‘immediately his highness, Tortelvis. I am one funky cat instrumental ti pioneering _ dismissed, From the moment Tarthisi legion. Let it be known that I telvis and the boys grace(lande)d the stage, an incredible infusion of recktravelled all the way to Peter Clark less energy was created, kinetics that Hall at the Universib of Guelph for would last well into the wee hours of an audience with the monarch on the night as I lulled myself to sleep September 13,199O. humming the air of “Your Time is Prior to this historic event, I concede

reservations

concerning

the

extent my interest in this spectacle could be sustained. Three, four songs

maybe? Cqtainly the novelty of this fad would war thin, forcing me to concoct bgenious ways to procure copious amounts of La Dry in a bar that limits the pation to a two beer purchase limit I am pleased to reveal

Gonna

Come”-

There are various&vets

on which

album Un-Zed-ed, were performed much to the delight of those have the record. a-YPw Musically, the band is extremely polished &d work diligently to prove that while the surface is very lighthearted, the music is indeed very serious. It is at this point that I would like to acknowMge Charlie I-Iaj, the man who gives Tortelvis his towels on stage. Credited on the album for this

one can appreciate the concert. As the premise of the band lies in the realm of parody, enjoyment could be humble contribution to their success, I admit to undermining his necessity extracted from each sung, a& nowledging Dread Zeppelin’s treat- , in maintajning stage conk&Y. A ment and integration of all three man who tirelessly tends to the demands, needs and wants of the musicalveins. Many songs not on the

king‘ must surely be awarded knighthood. So, if the parodies bore you and the music annoys you, you can rely on the stage antics to provide the source of entertainment. I have one bone of contention to pick with Dread Zeppelin. Ed Zep pelin the band’s hep, dreadlocked,“trinidadio” was limited to but three opportunities to share the limelight with Tortelvis. His voice is every bit as commanding and it is a shame that Ed’s vocal contribution in the contortion of L,ed Zeppelin’s musical legacy should be stifled. A definite highlight of the concert was Dread Zeppelin’s unique homage to the song every high school from Red Deer, Alberta to Charlottetown, P.E.I. plays at the end of every, dance to allow a final grope, feel and tongue wrestle before the inevitable midnight curfew. That song is of course, “Stairway to Heaven”. If ever there was a song that needed an enema, that was it. Thank you Dread Zeppelin for providing the necessary injection Already in the works to be released in conjunction with the next album, is a film. I believe that a plethora of celebrities from Todd Bridges to Herbie the zlovebug shall be invikd to appear in cameos. I have made it quite clear to the powers that be, I wiIl appear in one of the scenes, only if they ask nicely. So “Dreadheads” unite. Unfortunately, with my financial resources severely tapped, the extent to which I , can pioneer piImes across the ( continent is rather limited. However, judging by the stir created at Peter Clark Hall last Thursday, one can expeCf a convoy of VW vans tearing up the black mountain side. \.I\\ * ’


20 In-iprint, Friday, September 21, 1990

Your Future Awaits.....

M.B.A. Wilfrid

University

Laurier and

MANAGEMENT’ SCIENCES University of Waterloo are hosting a Joint Information Session on Wednesday, September 26, 1990

THE ’ HOOD00 LOUNGE

4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. E2 Room 1303

(Upstairs at the Mayfair Hotel) 11 Young Street at King

Refreshments.will be served.

Downtown Contact:

Gail focsyth Coordinator/Counsellor M.B.A. Program, WLU 884-1950, Ext. 2142

Of

Management Sciences University of Waterloo 8851211, Ext. 3286

Office

Kitchener

Saturday September 22 doors 8:00 pm

tickets Inn

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Arts

Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990 21

Public Enemy

1995, YouVI TWIST to this On September 24, Public Enemy will be making a return visit to The Twist in WaterLoo. When they played there last October 23, their show was easily the best that Waterloo had Seen in years. Controversy dogs the group at every juncture - the latest example be% the I-&&on Police Force’s refusal to pro* uniformed security at their Hamilton show. The police backed off, and will now provide the security.

The main theme of F& Planet is confrontation,

O.JA Bhck a theme

possble

echoed in a many a sociological study about what the 1990s hold for the races as a whole. There is widespread acknt3wledgement that society is ream a boiling p&& what with

solutions.

“We came out in 1987, and one of my first objectives was to lessen the quest for materialism in Black People, especially Black brothers,” says Chuck D., “‘cause if brothers out there feel that they can be accepted by sisters, or be accepted in society without having to go out and buy a $3000 gold rope, then they’re gonna be kinda alright. They’re only doing it to impress somebody. because they’re not impressed with themselves,”

crumb% governmental systems, hometessness, drugs, gangs, the decentralization of Black life and culture. In sixty minutes of Fear of A

Along with Chuck D., Public Enemy consists of sidekick Flavor Flav (aka ‘The Jokeic), DJ Terminator X (aka “The Assault Technician”) and SlW’s. Their dissertations on Black Pride and unity extend well beyond vinyl as Public Enemy has initiated concerts for convicts, the homeless,

My 98

anti-drug and gang activities, and then went head-on in one-to-one discussions with community groups to show their deep commitment to the uplifting of the entire Black spectrum.

With the release, in 1987, of their first , album Yo, Bum Rush the Show,” Public Enemy became, instantly, the most important black spokespeople in America. Their emphasis on Black knowledge and awareness, rather than the wearing

Public Enemy have than a rap group, they phenomenon. They sampled and imitated around.

Black Planet, Public Enemy supplies Incanny

insight

and,

who

knows,

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become more are a cultural are the most musical group

Suckers to the side

of gold ropes and buying a Benz, has become the standard by which rap music is measured in the 1990’s. The continuation of a revolution materialized with. the critically acclaimed It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back. The album consistently found itself at the top of nearly every critics’ list of the best of 1988, and was voted Best 1 Album in the Village Voice Music Critics’ Poll that year. In 1989, Public Enemy continued to make headlines by writing “Fight the Power,” the pivotal song in Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing. The next step was Fear of A Black Planet. Few ofA Black Planet was the most eagerly-awaited album in rap - and modem music history. Public Enemy, led by activist Chuck D., sharpens the confrontational focus achieved on their previous two albums. PE leader, Chuck D., along with deft assistance from co-

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22 Imprint, Friday, September 21 I 1990 t

Arts

The Look People: Up and Coming, y and Canadian,< too! Tyler Shaw Imprint staff

The Toronto-based band LOOK PEOPLE treated an enthusiastic crowd to an adventure through their eclectic “satio-futur mish stash” at the Diamond Club last Wednesday. 7

possessed. The show was a tasty twohour testimonial to the idea that hysterical stage antics and musical ability need not be mutually exclusive. The LOOK PEOPLE approach, if you haven’t yet heard, is sort of an extrapolation of what might happen if the styles of George Clinton, Pee Wee Henn;tn and Frank Zappa were to

their amalgamation plan as comical theatrics, unisonal gestures, masks, hats, toy instruments and striptease are all part of the program. Their stage dress, which consists of every thing from Ioin cloths to PseudmHippy Disco Bondage Shuffle Demon Wear is detitely a sight to behold. So what does all this mean vou ask? How does

Satiro-futur mish mash by George “Pee Wee” Zappa IFresh l&ions

from

a two-month from

their

tour

latest

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album,

collide. Likewise, their music incorporates impec&ble feel, abstruse comedy, and complex arrangements into a single conceptual entity. The band’s stage show is also a part of

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wrld mnovabon under the control of capable and versatile Artists sound? Jaymz Bee their Captain Beefheartesque ring-leader is experienced in many facets of the music business and seems to have a master plan in mind. He is a talented entertainer and his abilities as a vocalist, lyricist, dramatic artist, publicist and trumpet player are a key component in the LooK PEOPLE scheme. Another core member of the group is drummer/exhibitionist Great Bob Scott, He is an innovative player with monstrous technique and his ability to play drums while prancing around the stage in a state of near nakedness figures prominently in the band’s visual assault. Great Bob is also responsible for LOOK PEOPLE’s unique artwork. Other members of the band include bassist Clayton Tyson and keyboard&/guitarist Kevin Heam. Tyson and Hearn are both accomplished musicians and they exude session player-like confidence in their execution of the raxze of stvIes that make up the LOOK PEOkE~ songlist. Also, the band recently acquired a guitarist while touring in SwitzerIand. He was about seven feet tall and his abilities seemed to Wup

in one?”

Look - People! without any help from firgin records) is well worth checking out. The bed tracks were all recorded live so the album accurately captures the high energy of the band. The album’s

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Book Reviews

by Kathyn

Imprint,

the importance of dealing with population issues on prime time T.V. Eventualiy,.they won over Norman L,ear and he produced the infamous abortion episode of Mu&e. This episode, wherein Maude undergoes an abortion, was inspired by the RI. who also acted as technical con‘SUItants.

Prime Time

C. Montgomery

Oxford University Press 272 pages, $13.95

by John Hymm Imprint staff I waited a year to get my hands on this book. Through a caba consisting of my own lack of funds, an apathetic section editor, and an unorganized publisher, this book reached my hands over a full year after I asked for it. It was worth the wait, but only in some regards, . Target: Prime Time evolved out of a Ph. D thesis written by the author that detailed the effects of the homosexual lobby on prime time television. Her findings compelled her to eventually attempt to tackle a broader spectrum of lobbyists, though by no means does the book claim to be comprehensive. Still, it is a good outline of the seemingly more important groups shaping T.V. The book itself is organized chronologically, providing a sketchy history of television, but more importantly, a history of the influences on television. Starting off with the NAACP claiming racism over the Amos and Andy program, Kathryn C. Montgomery continues through the time line and covers other controversial programs and episodes, and ends up with a discussion about the deregulation of the American T.V. industry and its effects on lobby groups. The book dehvers on its promise to be enlightening, but at the same time, Montgbmery failed to lose her ideological baggage and thus the

Friday,

September

21, 1990

Th&ay Bobby, on the other hand, used threats of economic boycotts to get their points across. They also used a network of gay actors and producers to procure scripts and critique them. These techniques eventualIy evolved into a system that saw the television networks recognizing one gay lobby group, The Gay Media Task Force (G.M.T.F.), to which they submitted most scripts involving homosexuality for their views and comments. This continues to the present day.

Fisting the system book is at times quite unbalanced. Her tone, but not her actual words, suggests that the Gay Media Task Force should influence television, but that the MoraI Majority should not. Right or wrong, her lack of balance helps to undermine an otherwise scholarly piece of work The value of the book is its excellent treatment of the process of influence prime time shows go through, and its treatment of how this process developed. At first,, the lobby groups complained about programs that were existent and already aired. The NAACP voiced its concern about what was happening regarding racism and stereotyping while other groups were forming to stem the tide of rising television violence in the sixties. These groups, and others, all had a few things in common; they were

Montgomery choose to concentrate on liberal Iobby groups, and this of course is her right. But she does devote a chapter to conservatives, which she condescendingly titles “Cleaning Up TV”. This is the only ’ chapter in which she makes a lobby group look stupid, quoting people who echo cliches about meddling Christians and freedom of expression These objections do not turn up in any of the other chapters, where the lobbyists are seen as crusaders. AS well, she refers to conservative coalitions as ominous, an epithel offered to no liberal group. Her off-kilter and slanted approach to the book is quite a disappointment. Not because she has an opinion, but because this book is not about the validity of various lobby groups, but about their affects on television. And her * editorializing suggests that she may have some unspoken agenda.

reactive, not proactive, and they had no id&a really how to influence the producers and directors. Thus, their comments were, out of necessitv, I r The value of these early groups, argues Montaomerv. was their expeiience%. Ger gr&ps learned to influence programs before they were broadcasted, and learned to offer advice and assistance in presenting their various partisan causes in the light they desired. Hence, the lobbyists switched from being reactionary to being part of the television cycle of production. In the long run, Montgomery claims, this neutered them. The lobby groups got their foot in the door two ways; one illustrated by the Population Institute (P-I.), and one by the gay lobby. The P.I. hosted parties and convinced the media of

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The Cabher

in the< Radio Station

Slater portrays Mark, a recently moved to the city of his father’s new highadministrative position in the Mark has no friends and get along with his parents, so

Christian bY J-

Epps

The title ought to tip ydu off right away that Armp Up the Volume is going to be a tad shallow. Actually, it’s akin to those Miss America

pageants

where the immaculate contestants look at the camera earnestly and say: “I’d like to bring an end to world hunger.” It’s a buinper sticker, not a movie. You’re supposed to go home feeling elated, with the feeling that the issues are simple and candywrapped, as if you had just par-

shy kid because ranking school. doesn’t

he fills his lonely hours

their radios. They act as if they are all of one mind. (‘Who’s using it tonight?” you might ask, to steal a barb from FamiZy Ties ’ Alex, directed at his sis and her boyfriend.) There is no sign of the dissension we all know exists in the h$$ school microcosm, but, after all, evelyone in this movie carries on as if they’re in a state of war, the teens against the adults; and the sad truth is that nothing is so unifying as a common enemy.

by dj-ing his

own radio show from the basement

role),

begins

to suspect

identity.

She also happens

a library

and write poetry

his secret to work in - a literary

woman, like reporter Lois. When the principa of the school begins behavhg like a female L,ex Luthor, Nora

becomes

Mark% aIly.

Nora will ever “do the nasty.” Slater and Mathis give adequate but they can’t help it that they’ve got such a paltry vehicle. It is a hybrid mixture unremarkable performances. Nobody else in the movie even has a character. I suppose the technicians

,r

of his suburban home, under the persona of Happy Harry Hard-On. Other teensstart tuning in because they are intrigued and delighted by

his obscene commentary (he makes masturbation noises, burps, etc.) and his criticisms of the school staff. He also reads his mail over the air and calls uj3 the authors to chat.

ticipated in a 60’s ‘Ibe-in.” Most of the timethecastofthel%nseemstobe doing just that, participating in a “bein”; for there are lots of shots of them all hanging out together, listening to

.

/ Arts

24 Imprint, Friday, September 21 I 1990

These

letters

begin to sound

like

bespectacled

the kind. This film feeds on adolescent

give the principal a secret scheme so that there will actually be something

This film would work a lot better if taken on a simple comic-book level. The only thing it really has going for it is a plot, which keeps you attentive in order to find out if the F.C.C. (the Federal

Communications

Commis-

sion - Harry

doesn’t have a license) will catch him, and whether he and

‘he Texas

667

Longhorn King

did a good job - costumes, photography, editing and so on, of N&UXS, Dead AXZS Sc~ieiy, and GoodMonting, Vietnam, and it has the obligatory partial nudity scene. I like to think it was put together with a mercantile mentality, with one eye on the box office, because if this is

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messiah. What is worse about this picture is that it denounces the “System” at the. same time as it embraces it. There is nothing its subversive about mainstream attitudes - Harry make a

passing reference to the environmental crisis; what could be more box office? The crowd that cheered and clapped its way through this movie on opening tight was being sold a bill of goods similarly to young children

when they are led to desire toys based on Saturday morning cartoon characters who are themselves based on toys. Some people are making a bun-

dle selling adolescents an unending stream of tapes, posters, concerts, clothes, movies, and more. Pump Up the Volume never hints that corporate America is the System, of course, because it has a slice in the pie itself. At the same time, it does not occur to the gung-ho youths on the screen that their attitudes

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are not very

dif-

ferent from those their once-radical parents held and later betrayed. The teens do not consider that they run , just as great a risk of turning out staid and accepting and uninvolved, once the mob effect wears off. They’re too busy basking culture aura.

in their oh-so counter-

The hero of Talk Rub found out that a radio show is just a radio show, it isn’t going to change the world. Furthermore, one of the suggestions Xeathersseemed to make was that we ought to be very careful about the solutions we attempt. The American satirical cartoonist, Walt Kelly, creator of &go, wrote thatrather than trying +a m&e

the

world

racy, the policy

sah

should

“make democracy

for

democ-

first be to

safe for the world.” considerations are beyond the pale of fimp Uphe Volume, and it is this blissful ignorance that allows it to barrel ahead so self-righteously.

These

LATE

for Berg was +

I-Iarry Hard-On, has all the answers, he just doesn’t realize it. Every philosophical musing or pop psychology slogan that spills from his lips is treated as the Sermon from the Mount, and he, the r&ctant

LOAD:

First and Foremost Tex-Mex Restaurant

in that movie,

eventually murdered by white supremacists for his Jewishness and his verbal attacks on racism.) Unlike the gloriously crazy rebel-hero Slater played in Heathers, Mark, or, rather,

HOME BREWING 101 1

/

-

for the restless mob to oppose. It seems that school personnel and middle-class parents have become the teen flicks’ version of the old Nazi and Soviet spies, whose foreignness labelled them as villains; in the new films, it is banality alone which immediately and easily condemns the older generation to the audience. Mark reads Lenny Bruce’s autobiography for inspiration, and it is a cheap allusion. Mark is not half as interesting as Lenny Bruce was, not even as Allan Berg, the pugilistic Tern radio host, was when depicted by Erik Bogosonian in Oliver Stone’s film Talk Radio, (Free speech meant

more

Kitchener

57012554

Kitchends Authentic

self-

interest, and conflicts with parents and the school are meant to be indicative of a hideous lack of human rights in the world at large. Moyle has to

and

hunched, Mark is a m3dmannered Clark Kent, but a LoiS Lane-like character, dark-haired, selfcontained Nora (played by Samantha Mathis, in her first leading screen

shoulders

seems to think they have to do both these days, regardless of ability.) The joke is that the movie tries to pass itself off as a paean to free speech. How can you talk about free speech and leave out all mention of racism, sexism, or anything remotely political? We are told society is collapsing. but no-one in the film ever listens to the news unless it’s about Harry, and you don’t see any sign on campus of any social awareness, no Amnesty International or anything of

AM Landers’ more desperate corresponder& and he feels he’s in over his head, that he should not be responsible for people’s lives in this way. (Personally, I don’t think he should either - he’s not a psychologist. kut this movie makes believe that if you just care enough, you can stop people from killing themselves and all that

map.1 By day,

director Allan Moyle’s idea of personal artistic expression, we’re really in trouble. (Moyle also wrote the script. Everybody in Hollywood

alternative


26

Friday, September 21, 1990

Imprint,

by Trevor Blair Imprint staff This is the most flamboyant album I own. A wreal scwreamer. Although hell probably never croon another classic like ‘“Tainted Love,” it is surprising that he’s survived the 80%. If anyone has carual@ written all over him, it’s Marc Almond. Enchanted isn’t quite as gccessable as his last offering The Sfizm IV2 Are which featured the heavenly pop hit ‘Tears Run Rings,” rather it’s more 01 arareeeba! it’s as if he’s been aan... lounging in a bathtub of creole butter for the past year, or some&ii Enchanted is essentially the soundtrack for 10 upcoming Taco Bell COIIuneTcials.

El Taco Supreme! El Taco Supremo! Visions of dribbling chicken-fist tacos float through tracks like “A

TWIST’N

i

HAUSEN also boasts:

-complete bar’ setike by experienced bar staff - non-stop music and entertainment , - music videos - ‘The bfg game’ on SateRite dish -over 6000 square feet of dance floor -souvenir booth - photos on a button - spielcasino -beer nuts made fresh on the premises

2

by Paul Done

Imprintstaff

ItusedtobethatWestcoastrapwas a real poor cousin to its New York City counterpart. What with RunDMC, LL Cool J and Boogie Down Productions din tha roost, there was

$@%d” and “Orifice In Red Velv&” Fudgey deserts bouncy along with the more danceable ���Madame De la Lufta,” while the hypn&c’Waifs and Strays” is a veritable aoorplan to the restroom NOW, lifeinaideaTacoBellcommer&l~y

L,W~

little reason to give any attention to the weak records emanating from LA andoakland. Tiies have changed, though. While, more obviously, weak-assed West coast rappers MC Hammer (give him the gas-face!), Young MC and Tone Lot rule the charts, hard core menace like Kid Frost, Ice T, Everlast and the latest crew, CP.0. (Capital Punishment organization) are carrying onthe torch of rock hard beats. New Yorkhas been taken over by the funky-retro likes of the Jungle Bros., Tribe Called Quest and De La Soul, leaving the b-boys to consume the West coast product. I was reading an interview with Chuck D of Public Enemy, who wasdiscussing how the different geographical areas of hiphop could be defined and judged by the beats per minute - and currently the West coast rules the slow, slow

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Imprint,

Record Reviews would

rather

sit at an outdoor

Friday,

Imprintstaff MC Lyte may love cappuccino,

but

I’m not so sure about the stuff. I’ve got

separate Les Thugs from the Soundgardens and Mudhoneys of this world, StiZZ Hungry has the same feel as Electric Troubles, but with a little

more variety between mugs. The lon-

this theory that drinking too much of: the favorite apres-club beverage of baggy-jeaned and flowery shirt sport- I ing youths across the globe can wither your ability to rgck Just look at what it did to Paul Weller. Age didn’t weaken his songwriting it was diluted with foamed milk. But the’ best case study for this theory is the I@ entire nation of France. As a rule, the French just can’t rock, which is why Les Thug8 are so interesting. Sure, , they look like four Euro-wimps who 1

His debut album Hispanic Causing hzic, is a treatise on the opposed and ; intertwining notions of hot and cool I which define latin cukure. From the , opening bass riff of “La Raza,” which I

sounds; Mongo Santamaria and Ray Barreto adopted elements of soul into their brew and labelled it Latin Soul; the big band percussive tradition of Latin music ran deeply through funk groupS like Ohio Players, War and even Barry White’s Love Unlimited Orchestra. In the eighties, the sole notabte form .of crossover between the two cukures was the Miamigerminated latin hiphop, the high speed, high sweat c@ce music as . typified by Expose and Sa-Fire.

bpiwlDme I.tnpfint staff There has always been a fertile cross-poHination between America’s two dominant sub-cultures: Hispanic and Negro. Jazzmen like Dizzy Gillespiead Miles Davis have incorporated hot salsa rhythms into their music; the Drifters mixed Win persussion with classic vocal group &b

reprises The Drifters’ “Under The L Boardwalk,” the album moves along with restrained cool - the kind d F cool which camouflages something ; far less calm.

Los Angeles’ Latin0 population has found its voice in the crossover sounds of rappers Kid Frost and Mellow Man Ace. While the latter is is far too smooth to maintain interest, Kid’ Frost has, with his first single “La Ram,” somehow combined with rap

The album is most successful when it operates on the terrain of funky kin rhythms, with sax fills and melodic keyboards. When Frost’s i fancy turns to straightahead hip-hop, I Hispanic C&sing Panic becomes i barely distinguishable from other rap artists. &I tracks like”Ya Estuvo,” and ; “Come Together” the mingling df cultures produces a new hybrid.

beats the heat of barrio asphalt on a summer day; the ineffable cool of low riders pulling up to a stop light; menacing sneers from behind dark shades . . . sounds kind of Like I’ve seen Colou~~ once too often, don’t it?

Rap has produced, and continues to produce, new regional and culturg variatioiw and interpretations which make it the most crucial modem mu&aI idiom. Kid Frost’s hispanic take on rap is more than a curio, it’s I damn funky, too.

21, 7990

matured in the past two years. As an added bonus, the record comes with a lyric sheet so you can try to decipher the rowIy mixed English as a Second Language vocals. The singer has a uncanny ability to emphasize the wro17g syllable in almost every word. There’s no way these gu$ drink cappuccino. Probably Jack Daniels. With some foamed milk on the side.

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28

Imprint,

Friday,

September

21, 1990

Record Reviews

What makes Phranc unique is the fact that she is a lesbian Consequently, the songs on Folksinger fall into two distinct categories: those that tackle issues such as murder, suicide, and journalistic credibility, and those that showcase her sexual preference for women In both cases, the listener is forced to think, and this, in all likelihood, is Phranc’s chief reason for recording this album. Next to the Dylan tune, Phranc’s own appear ridiculously sim le. “Liar I.&r” @‘s actually Q cow uP the Castuways’hme, isn ‘t it? - ed) makes use of the childish phrase “liar liar,“pants on he.” The lords “no dumb cookie” actually appear in “Ballad Of The Dumb Hairdresser.” And “Handicap+d” is about able-bodied motorists who park their cars in areas reserved for the PhysicallY challenged. Admittedly, this is a stupid thing to do; but it is an equally

q Kenton Augerman @mint staff

In many ways, Phranc (prOnoun:ed “Frank”) is a stereotypical ~olksinger: her songs deal with roublesome social problems, she :ommunicates her ideas by way of ler voice and an acoustic guitar, and ihe pledges allegiance to folk-god 3ob Dylan by covering ‘The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll.”

stupid

thing to sing about.

Normally, a musician’s ferences are unimportant

sexual prein review-

ing a record. Phranc, however, forces her lesbianism upon an unsuspecting listener. “One 0’ The Girls” is an autobiographical tale of being on a female swim team, and how much it meant to her. “Carolyn” finds her singing: “Carolyn, it’s no small thing/ I’ve got a crush on your hamstrings/ I’ve got a crush on your everything.” In “Amazons,” she expresses her desire to live with tennis star Martina Navratilova. Clearly, Island Records is taking a bit of a risk with this release. Despite her tendency for “‘repetitious guitar playing Phranc’s musicianship and vocal abilities are comparable to those of, say, Tracy Chapman; so thii @ormer does have some talent But is the record-buying public ready for a hairy-legged, lesbtin folksinger with a crew cut?

JQb by Lance Manion

hqmint staff _

Things seem to be pretty hectic over in the lemonheads camp these days. Last yearp they lost longtime vocalist/g&ari$t Lemon Deily but bravely soldiered on without him for a while. Then, this summer, the reports were that the band was calling it a day and their upcomkg major: label debut would & their &ar&ng record. But now, that record (L&J is in the stores, and there’s ” a . scheduled gig for the Shads in TQ this month. Just what th’ hell is goiti’ on here?

Oh well, no reason to complain. hvy offers the same kind of low-key great stuff that’s already been perfec: ted on past albums &e Lick. It should be mentioned .$at there’s nothing very distinctive or unusual about the %eads’sound; they sound a lot like scores of other bands floating around (Husker Du is the one that comes to my mind most often). However, they have at least two things going for them in a big way. First is the strength of their songwriting: every track on Lovq is as worthwhile as it is derivative. Second, their diversity: they are capable of writingemotionalballads justasgood as their more standard rockers. To put it simply, this is American indeprmdent guitar music. h’s not bloated heavy metal like Mudhoney or Soundgarden. It’s not smarmily “experimental” like Sonic Youth. It’s not full of attitude like Dinosaur Jr. It’s not self-consciously weird like the Butthole Surfers. It’s just good, direct rock ‘n’ roll geetar music. Give it a listen.

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Imprint,

Record Reviews dark, moonless

sky. Iately

I’ve been

envisioning them as goth’s answer to The Stone Roses (don’t laugh - both ‘Fool’s Gold” and “Psychonaut”

originally

half-hour

were

songs.)

Friday,

Blair

Imprintstaff After

chonaut headed

moject - in Idoyn’tknowhowl&: Side A has Dan Hartman at the controls, side 8, the PSEYs. To be fair to Hart-man, I remember enjoying the title track, although I can’t remember how it goes. The rest of the side I don’t lemth

Reputation in the dust remember at all. Now then, I wish I could rave-about the PSB’s involvement, but they cer-

by TIWQ~ Blair Imprint staff Dusty Springfield has a lovely voice. The Pet Shop Boys were bewildered that she wasn’t making records anymore, hence their 1987 collaboration “What I-Iave I Done To Deserve This?”

Reputation

is Dusty’s

first

full-

tainly weren’t able to work the same magic evident on Liza Minelli’s Rex&s. Apart from “In Private” and the sublime “Nothing Has Been Proved” (from the film Scandal) neither Dusty nor the Boys particularly dazzle, creating

fodder.

a vagueiy

pleasing

AM

last years puzzling mep, the Nephs seemed for the great jam session in

“For Her Light” is the forerunner of the imminent Elysium Zp.(nrmo~&’ to be split themeatically into a dark and a light side - what fun!) Sadly though, it strikes these jaded ears too much like a reworking of “Blue Water” from ‘87. Once again I specuIate on the regressive fate of goth in

21, 1990

29

the 90’s. Any&e having sat through either their first or second albums (Dawnrazor and The Nephilim) will admit that these guys have the clinical Skill to do whatever their

I love the sound of Nephilim by Trevor

September

in the morning

imaginations ing into

come up with, and tak-

account

~~m~r~t~*ention~

. ‘For Her

particularly

Light”

the possibility of maYbe a Litt1e hasn’t gotten

me

excited about the new lp, but on their past merits alone, I can’t W&Z them off yet*


30 Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990 I

Record Reviews

even more irresistible. But the deciding factor is the most compelling: it is damn fine. What we have here is the rrummabt wonder of theirprior existence as Garden Bower. That outfit, .

l

surviving

ktually

unchanged

in

Gord’s Ramble, proved themselves capable as handlers of the understatement. Their music was, and is,

steeped in a quiet intensity. is much basically The temptation

to like this CD sim-

because it comes from a local band, members of which I sort of know, is undeniably strong. Coupled

ply

with the fact that I got it free makes it

Live, this

more predominate as they ignore the audience and

dritt off in

to

their own world.

On

record, this is achieved largely through recording techniques, which can be charitably described as primitive.

Though

recorded

digitally

by Peter

Moore (the dude who recorded the now legendary Trinity sesgions for the Cowboy Junkies),the CD sounds like it was recorded off AM radio. A better technique might improve their marketabiity, and consequently their fan base, but what they have now doesn’t obscure their talent as musicians and as song writers. When They Write His Memoirs recalls Johnny Cash in his M& in Bhck mode. Plaintiff and simple. Acoustic guitar, bass, drums, and that country sensibility that speaks of uncertainty. Cash is a strong influence to Gord’s Ramble and this is demonstrated ably throughout the disk But they merely call up on him; they don’t consume

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himwhole. The diffe~encesare many Cash wrote shorter songs; Gord’s Rambles run the entire length spectrurn; Cash wrote songs with catchy hooks;

Gord’s

Ramble’s

with a providential l& of production, nothing reigns in the scattered musing of the band but the composition itself. And this is the way music ought to played: by the musicians with instruments, not the producer with theknobs. r

ramble

aimlessly. 1

ramble

And

aimlessly

they

do:

songs. Nature is the strongest image, with rain, thunder, clouds etc. mentioned in most of the songs. However this clever word play (which sounds better in a review than it does on the album) is offset by songs like the sdng Rain with the ingenious technique of repeating the phrase “frozen memories”, and stretching the word “memories” to four syllables the second time around. Geez, guys get a rhyming dictionary or something, If you take this time, The Red House turns out to at least be better than average, but that’s also why 1 would say you should hear the album, but c@n’t bother buying it. With the increase in the number of record labels, the number of albums released in one year, and thus the gross number of shitty bands, it’s %nportant not to claim something is good by default, ie. because it’s better than most of the stuff out there. Just because a band can phy their instruments, even if they can play them better than average, this isn’t enough to state that they are a ‘good’ band. 1 would definitely have given this album more enthusiasm if they didn’t try to overpower everything by a hard rock sound. However, if you actually like the first single I Said A Prayer and are going to buy the album, you should be surprised because the first single is easily one of the weakest songs on the whole album. The Red House is not that far from being a strong debut album. It will be interesting to see what they do next. They’re off to a good start.

by Sandy Atwal Imprint staff The Red House’s self titled album is one that can easily be defined in terms of comparison. The lead singer sounds like Gowan on more than. a couple of tracks, and the music has a definite U2 sound to it. The majority of the album has that sort of typical Bryan Adams rock kind of sound to it. However the album also has a certain quality that demands m’ore attention than you might think it deserves after a first listen. Tracks like The l3r~a.m I

Never Had and Shot in the Back have

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an originality that makes you want to listen to the album a few times, reading the lyrics, seeing if you can get something more out of the album than it first appears to have. Lyrically, the album has some pretty typical themes, love, betrayal, and relationships, but it also has some pretty interesting ones such as the surreal dream of the grotesque as mirror of reaIity. But the strongest point about the lyrics is that they have common themes throughout the

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31


Warriors

Athenas

Mustangs score late try-for win

Warriors lose opener to the Purple I Satan Warrior

Rugby

by peter Brown

Imprint staff The temperature plummeted last Friday night, and the rugby team’s hopes did the same on Saturday afternoon. Opening on the road against Western, a traditionally strong team in Division I, the Warriors suffered a disappointing loss by a 9-3 score. ‘%Ie played Western’s game and lost,” commented assistant coach Derek Humphries, referring to the Mustangs’ near-perfect execution of the kicking game. Kicking was indeed the key to the positional play and scoring, as Waterloo missed four penalty kick tries in the first half alone, finishing l-4 in three-pointers. But head coach Derek Quistberg saw some silver lining in UW’s play.

“Our

forwards

played

well,

we

were rucking well, and the strums were even I saw some good things out there, but we definitely need TV sharpen our counter-attack” Quistberg saw SOme inspired running from Stel Nikolakakis and hungry possessional play from Paul Toon. To Western’s credit, they played physical and opportunistic rugby, winning most of the lineouts and

o&r possessional play. A pair of Mustang backs provided all of the defence the ‘Stangs needed, senhg the ball out of danger with high, booming kicks. This points to one area of the game that UW was completely outplayed: the counterattack.

Granted that the Stangs kicked superbly, but Waterloo never seemed to get their running game on track. The Warriors started strongly, pressing into Western territory, despite the 3angs’ boots. With play taking

* Place about 35 metres out from WeStern’s tryline, UW was awarded two penalty kick attempts in the first 10 minutes. The first wa& admittedly a huge angle, and the wind played havoc with accuracy, but the fact remains that Waterloo was O-2 on

kicks only~minutes into the game. Later in the half, UW turned away a ’ Western drive and the official ordered a strum 15 metres out from the Waterloo endzone, almost directly in front of the uprights. A UW player got sloppy and a penalty kick was awarded, the Westem kicker chipping it easily over the crossbar to take the lead 3-O. This was the halftime score, after Waterloo missed two more penalty kicks. Finally, in the second half, Peter Keir connected from about 25 me&s out to tie the game 3-3. But the ‘Stangs wouldn’t let Waterloo build on this momentum, pinning the Black and Gold in their own end time and again. With five minutes left to play, Western finally broke through for the first major of the game, a try in the left corner. After the successful convert, the score stood at 9-3. In other OUAA rugby action this past weekend, three time defending champion Queen’s Golden Gaels dominated Laurier 25-9, and McMaster edged York 12-10 in the other Division I match In Division II play, Toronto trounced Bnxk 24-3, Carleton blanked Trent 20-0, and Guelph, relegated to the lower division, handled RMC 10-3. Tomorrow, the warriors will play their home opener at Columbia Field against the fellow cellar-dwelling York Yeomen. Game time is 1:00 pm; let’s see you there.

Slow start for Waterloo football

Guei’phfourth quarter surge doubles UWefforts War&r

Football

by Rich Nichol Impxint staff

It doesn’t matter what the sport is, but if you are playing competitively and expect to win, you’ve got to keep your head in the game. The 1990 University of Waterloo football Warriors have yet to do that. In their season opener at the University of Guelph, the Warriors lost 22-11 as a resuli of a fourth quarter scoring,

melled York 29-12. Guelph did not play a fantastic game, but rather an average one. In general, the Waterloo offence was stagnant (153 total yards of net offence compared to 268 by Guelph) and warning shots were fired early. Starting quarterback Dave Sharp fumbled the ball in the pocket on the first series, giving the Gryphons possession and great field position.

CIAU Top 10 \ I’

~ g;.

8

.;. ;;:,;

9 7

1. Saint Mary’s from being undisciplined. You don’t win games against good teams when you commit five turnovers. Our mistakes were not uncorrectable, but you don’t expect that from second year players -and veterans. It was- an Lnprovement - _.over the Concordia game though.” What is Knight’s synopsis of the results of the past two weeks? He said that it is all an aftershock of their Cinderella season of 1989. Last year, no opponents took the Waterloo football team as any serious threat. But now Knight says that his players must understand that the other teams in the OUAA are more prepared for W this time around. In the other OUAA games on Saturday, Western bowled over Toronto 33-15, Iaurier defeated McMaster 24-l 1, and Windsor pum-

2. Western

Ontario

3. Bishop’s 4. Saskatchewan 5. Concordia 6. Guelph 7. Toronto 8. Ottawa9. UBC 10. Calgary

Knight elected to play rookie pivot Steve Bennet for the rest of the game. ‘The story of the game on our part was mental ,breakdown and mis-

Tuffyb team will try to shake off their first loss and overcome York. takes,” said Waterloo assistant head coach Chuck McMann. “We have to eliminate those things to get back on track.“ Guelph opened up the scoring early in the first quarter when a field goal attempt by place kicker Danny Walker failed, settling for a single instead. Laterin the quarter with the Gryphons in excellent field position once again, veteran running back Chuck Sims ran in for the game’s first

major. Walker kicked the convert and added a 29 yard field goal for a first quarter total of 11-O for Guelph. Disaster struck the Warrior running game early when fourth-year fuIlback Orville Beckford was injured and could not continue. He left the game with 27 yards on five carries and his replacement (sophomore Rob Patai) collected 45 yards on 12 runs. The tables turned in the second

Imprint file photo

quarter as the Waterloo offence came alive. Five minutes in, rookie star Mike Raynard kicked a 56 yard punt into the Gryphons’ end zone for a single point. fIace kitiker Peter Tchir followed that up with a 43 yard field goal. Finally just before the half, thirdyear running back Tom Chartier

continued to page 34


Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990 33

Soccer Athena off to rocky start

Waterloo area, last Friday’s tornado ushered in the typically cold and wet weather that greets the start of the varsity soccer season at Waterloo. . Un Saturday, Sept. 15, the Athena soccer team hosted Guelph at their home-opener. Weather conditions were a f&or in the game, with high post-storm winds playing a significant role in the direction of many inflight balls Guelph scored early, with a high shot that curved out of reach of k-per Andrea Jalbert The Athenas kept up the pressure, but close to the end of the first half, a flying header in front of the net and another high 2 ball put Guelph up by Tlk Athenas started the second half strongly, with a pass from Sarah

opened up the scoring early in the first half, and though the Athenas played hard and had several good chances, including a near miss by right-*er Catherine Ho&field, the game ended with a Western win of 1-o. Athena forwards Anita Toogood,

Western

Catherine HolMeld, Darb Tchir, *and newcomer to the forward line,

I

Kelly Campbell, played two hard and intense games and used d-t& speed to open up scoring opportunities. Also, sweeper L,isa Bater provided. controlled defence coverage through her speed and tackling abilities. The Athenas will be playing Windsor this Sunday, Sept. 23 at 3:OO p.m. Come out to Columbia fieIds and cheer them on! THAT’S HOW MANY CANADIANS ARE SWIMMERS

b-d G? 0

Warrior

Soccer

byPeterBnrwn Imprint staff

The Warrior soccer team began a hopeful season with a step in the right direction, a l-0 win over the Guelph Gryphons last Saturday. Midfielder Carlos Burmeister scored the UW goal. Coaching staff Ron Coop& and Peter Gardiner are confident that the

men’s team can have their first 500 season in several years. ‘we’re solid down the middle and in goal/ says Cooper, with co-captain DanSiccoliretumingasthestarting &k&p. Behind him on the depth chart are Carlo Donald and rookie Scott Do’fomo. In the midfield, veterans Burrneister, Paul Zimmerman, Nazir Succoor, and Dan Rogozynski (the other cocaptain)

join

rookies

Mark

Blake,

Dave Presta, and Artaura Koosau. Amongst the backs are first-year players Greg Pappas, who was on the Heights Kitchener’s Cameron Collegiate OFSAA champion team, and Jason Pither of Nepean. Retum-

ing in the backfield are Peter Straub, Paul Knalfelc, and Rick Deane. Returning up front are Scott Gardner, Everton Barnes, and Russell Snow. Jeff Kritz and Neil Daniel are new forwards. The offseason saw the OUAA revise the structure of the soccer league, splitting it into two four-team divisions. Waterloo is in the west division along with Laurier, Western, and Windsor, while the east division contains Brock, McMaster, Ryerson, and Guelph. Guelph

UW’s weekend victory over was the only inter-division game that they play, their rema%nR

nine riVdS.

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34

Imprint,

Friday,

September

21, 1990

Waterloo k varsitv elite

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yards.

- Football

Mike was the Wtiors’b& offenMike Raynard has been selected sive weapon gaining an average of the University of Waterloo and over 10 yards every time they Molson’s male athlete of the week exchanged possession of the ball. Mike is first year Accounting student from Rochester, N.Y. Mikehad12puntsforatotalof461 LEA BATER - Soccer yards this past weekend when the 1 Lisa Dater has been selected as the Warriors met Guelph. He had a total University of Waterloo and Molson’s. of 38.4 yard average per punt betterfemale athlete of the week Lisa is a ing his opponent by more than 10 fourth year Applied Studies student

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REAL LIFE REAL DRAMA REAL RUGBY

Football opener lost 224 1 scored the Warriors first and only major of the game on a one-yard run. Tchir added a convert and the score was tied at the half, 11-11. Waterloo’s defence began to break. down in the third quarter, allowing the Gryphons to begin their scoringfest. Wide receiver-tumedquarterback Frank Marof completed a 15 yard pass to tailback Chuck Sims for Guelph’s second major. The host team rounded out the scoring with another single and a 33 yard field goal, both by Walker. One bright note for the Warriors was the punting game of Raynard. He had 12 punts for a total of 461 yards, averaging 38.4 yards per punt, bettering his opponent by more than 10

WARRIORS I vs YORK YEOMEN

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27 Scott (across

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MAKE

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trouncing of the Yeomen in North Raynard, a native of Rochester, York. N,Y., received University of Waterloo and Molson’s Male Athlete of the correction: Week honow for his efforts. Last issue, Imprint Sports reported Sims led the ground attack for the that the varsity f&ball team’s trip to Gryphons with 150 yards on 23 carConcordia for an exhibition game ries. Promising OUAA all-star can- ’ marked the first out-of-province didate Tom Chartier was the top game for the Wtiors in 16 years. rusher for Waterloo, carrying the ball Thanks to Chris Jacob of the Warrior 18 times for 72 yards. band for pointing out that four years The passing game of both teams ago, in 1986, the Warriors travelled to was nothing to brag about. Marof Wilmington, Ohio to play the Wilmington Quakers., completed six of 20 attempts and HOW does Mr. Jacobs know? Bennet was two for 10. Because he was there with the Tomorrow (Saturday, September W&or band. Did he tell us the 22), Waterloo plays its home opener score? No! Do we have days full of against the hapless York Yeomen leisure during which we can sit with a kickoff time of 2 pm at Seagram around on our keesters looking up Stadium Last season, the Warriors -obscure exhibition scores?! No!! lost their first three league games and Seriously, thanks for letting us then began their four game win know. streak to the playoffs with a 32-9.

yvds.

cont’d. from page 32

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from Waterloo, Ontario. Anchoring the defensive core, Lisa played very well this past weekend in games against Guelph and Western. She made several individual tackles to prevent players from breaking through. Lisa is a sweeper and also the cap tin of the Athena soccer team. She is a strong asset and leader to her team.

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this event possible and to the &ampions, the DAWGS, who helped to make the tournament a success. tit’s keep our fingers crossed for better weather for this weekend’s mixed slo-pitch tourney. The preliminaries will run all day Saturday, with the finals on Sunday at the Green. Rain dates are Sept. 29

Campus FM by Lori Brown Imprint staff

-Instructors

courses

for squash

with openings: is now over, but if you are still interested in that cou* YOU were going to take but didn’t because you did not want to stand in line for

three

Registration

Apply tionist.

now with the PAC recep Earn extra cash, meet lots of people, add to your resume, and have ‘a good time!

Friday, September 21, 1990 35

may

.

9:30 ti

to 4:30 pm on both Saturday and Sunday. Even though the weather was not as cooperative as it could have been, the tournament was as popular as always. There were 24 teams entered, which is about 280 participants with 40 scheduled games. It was a challenging weekend, but thanks to the officials who made

We want you! Campus Ret is still ldoking for student leaders for the following positions: -Tournament conveners for tennis, baseball, squash, and volleyball -Referees for hockey, volleyball, baseball, flag football, soccer, ball hockey

Warrior Goif by Don Livingstti 7

On Sunday, September 16, in Kingston, a split squad of the Warrior varsity golf team battled difficult course and weather conditions to

bined score of 315. M&laster sity finished &rd at 317.

Univer-

m Warrior effort was led by Clapp; a second year honours science

may still b

register

with

the PAC recep

Fitness: FIT 101-03 FIT 208-01

Other:

FIT 209-01

CPR 252-01 CPR 252-02

FIT 209-02 FIT 301-04 FIT 301-06

CPR 352-03

CPR 352-04 CPR 354-01

FIT 401-01 FIT 501-01 FIT 201-05

FlUDAY SEPT~ 21 Final date to enter a league for bail hockey, floor hockey, and men’s and women’s volleyball,

Dance: Males Males Males 147-02

TUESDAY OCT. 9 Final entry date for men’s baseball tournament and men’s and women’s tennis singles.

CPR 354-02 WT 248-01 CROSS 531-01 DIST 534-01 ESSO 226-01 STROK 225-01 TSWIM 640-01 LSWIM All AWARD 533-01 _ BREC 631-01 BRONZ 530-01 NLSRE 639-01

146-03 147-01 and Females and 246-01

skating: ALL c

Second place for .putters capture second place in the Queen’s Invitational Golf Tournament. In their first i.ntercoIlegiate tournament of the se&n, the team of Shawn Brown, Jeff Clapp, Matt Kwiecien, Craig Moore, and Rick Wong nearly upset defending champion Quehn%, ‘finishing only &ree strbkes behind the host team with a com-

well there

tiotit:

FIT 306-N

from

hours,

room! If you are interested in any oj the following avaiiable courses, you

WARRIOR

student, and Kwiecien, a doctoral candidate ‘m chemical engineering, who tied for third place in the individual competition with a pair of a * 76’s. - Don Livingston, assistant golf coach,who accompanied the team to Kingston, was vee pleased with the

-1

\

FOOTBALL

Waterloo at McMaster Saturday, Sept. 29,2:00 p.m. The low, low price of $7. will get you to Hamilton by 3x1sand into the game. Tickets are available at the Fed Office. Buses leave at 1; noon.

effort and is looking ahead to this Friday, when both Warrior squads will be in action at the Waterloo Invitational Tournament at Conestoga Golf & Country Club.

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36 Imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990

sports THAT’S HOW MANY CANADIANS ARE CYCLISTS

.

The dweebs make their picks The monotonously long bareballseason mencement of football in September, unlex~ George Bell litem& stmngia Jkm the top b ananas in hpht

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can jnai!y be ignor& and the real and hockey and basketball in October emybudy. T’Aus, we set the stage fur the Sp& And so what ifwek a couple oj’

sporlsstx~~n now begins with thecornThe Jays will choke again unywuy, h!FL semun with wnfmc~pmdictiom W~T~.Ylate. Stop your whining!

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OUAA Golf Cross

Country

by Brent-e

Paul Ernst, UW’s middIe distance sensation, pIaced fifth in the men’s cross country season opener in Gueiph this past weekend. His time of 30 minutes and 56 seconds over 10,200 metres in the damp and wet conditions was good for this competition which was open to club and F

university athIet=. Ernst was the second university athlete to finish. The Warrior team of Paul Em& Tom Rand, h4ark Ferguso~ I?& Sudlow, and Gary Pogue pIaced 6fth with 200 points, only 12 points out of Grd pIace (RhK had 190 points). ‘The first m& was set up to give our team a chance to race over 10 km,” head coach Brent McFarIance remarked. ‘Most of the athletes are just coming off of’ a summer track season and starting their mileage for cross country. It was a good start Next week at Western, well have to run -a lot harder and f&s&r.”

W

Waterloo Jewish Students Association Presents Our Famous Annual Wine and CheeseParty

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Classi fieds

38 imprint, Friday, September 21, 1990

CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED

. L Ii!-

1

EVERY

SUMDAY

Laymen’s EvangelicaI Fellowship evening service. 7:00 pm. at 163 University Ave. W. (MSA), apt321. All are welcome. For more information, call 884-5712.

FASS Writers

Meetings - those writers are at it again, and they tiaht Help write the shows that millions raved about. 7:30 p.m. MC Everyone welcome.

crazy YOU. have 5158.

Amnesty International Rights at 7:30 welcome!

- write for Human in CC135. Everyone

Feminist Discussion

Group. Meets every Wednesday from 7:00 to 9:00 pm. at Global Community Centre in Waterloo. Topic and group vary weekly so that all women are welcome anytime. For more information ext. 3457 or 578-3456.

Laymen’s

G #

Waterloo) will be planning special and weekly events throughout the summer term. Everyone is welcome to join in. Watch this column for upcoming dates, and call 884-GLOW for currentinfo.

. House of Debates meets in Physics 3 13 at 5:30 p.m. New members welcomed ecstatically. Come

I

will be out and

.

lVlRYTUrnSDAY

IS

Evangelical Fellowship Bible Study. DC1304 at 7:30 pm. All are welcome. For more information, call 8845712. FASS Wrikrs

Meetings - come be a part of the crew who write that crazy yearly show. Everyone welcome (we mean it).

7:3O p.m. MC5158.

Jazz Choir - The UW Jazz Choir meets every Tuesday at 1O:OO pm. in Siegfried Hal New members are always welcome. b! For more information con&t David Fi m sher at 884-6565. See you there!

I Students and ; “Come

be a part of the Caribbean Association (CSA) every Tuesday at 5:30 pm. in CC 135. A number of interesting events are scheduled for this term, See you there!”

II

Play Go! Beginners are invited to go classes starting Sept. 26, 7:00 p.m., B.C. Matthews HatI, Room 1040, Free playing time for all at 7:30. Call ext. 4428.

out and meet other fans of Science Fiction, Fantasy, Comics, Wargames, or Role-playing games. Check in the Clubs Room (CC 215) for further details.

P.O.E.T.S. Jam Night - welcomes all musicians. 8:30 - 1:00 a,m. Poets Pub . (Engineering) licensed. CPH 1337. Contact Eng. Sot. + x2323. EVERY

Join the Warriors

WEdNRSPAY

Instead ALLOW

of the usual coffeehouses (Gay and Lesbian Liberation of

Band! Thursday at 530 pm. in 2012 (8lue North). New b,ers welcome. we instruments.

Practice every the PAC, room and old memcan -provide

CLASSIFIED

~. Science Fiction fans: WATSFIC -Waterloo Science Fiction Club is active this sumMeetings 6:30 p.m. Thursdays. New members welcome. For details of planned events see WATSFIC board in clubs room (CC 138)

mer.

Womyn’s Group - meets in CC 135 at 8:30 pm. Come Out. and enjoy movie nnights, educational evenings, dances, road trips and casual discussions. For weekly events call 884-GLOW or listen to “Leaping Lesbians” onCKMS, 94.5 FM, Thursdays from 6-8 pm.

Bagels! The Waterloo Jewish Students Association/Hiltel presents a weekly Baget .EIrunch every Thursday from ‘11:30 am. to I:30 pm. in the Campus Genfre - Check with Turnkeys for the room number. The Student Christians ‘Movement meets to discuss issues of injustice. The SCM is an ecumenical group that challenges people to live out their faith in action. For more information call Sheri at

741-0892 or Garth at 884-7130.

WATSFIC, the Waterloo Science Fiction Club, is holding meetings at 6:30. Come

l

a

CLASSIFIED

1 Ii!I

Chinese Christian

Fellowship meetings every Friday at 7100 pm. at WtlJ sem inaG building, room 201, Contact Mike Liu at 747-4065 for rides.

Support the INNU - native people of Labrador and fundraise for your own group as well. Join the Freedom Walk For Nitassinan ,_ Peace Walkathon from KitchenertoGuelph Sat. Oct. 6. Leaves from Speaker’s Corner, Kitchener, IO:00 a.m. Proceeds will be split between Freedom Walk and group of Walker’s choice. Public speaking event will be held Thurs. Oct. 4, 7:30 p.m., St. John’s Anglican, Kitchener. For information and pledge sheets, call Lisa 7464073 or Marc 884-3465 or 5788457. Horn-hare-offersasafe,futlyscreened introduction service to people interested in shared accommodation. Homeshare is a program sponsored by the Social Planning Council, Region of Waterloo, and the Ministry of Housing, for details call 578-9894.

The SO&I Justice Action Groupmeets

campaign, NATO out of ’ Nitassinan actions and on-going solidarity with the Innu, Christmas Anti-War Toys’ action, and a continual focus on non-violent resistance to militarism. For details, call

l

DIAL-A-SECRETARY hl

Standard

u

22 King Other

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Student u

rates

LIBRARY INIp & WORKSHOPS

Resume

1 page

+ 10 laser

Tuesday,

- $21.00 - - Iy DIAL 746-6910 South,

(King

just

and

services

Suite 502, south of Erb)

Waterlao

availnbfe~umn

reuuest

- -.FOR THE BEST INDIAN- iOOD

septamber

25

Chemical Research Workshop: II:30 a.m. 50 minute workshop is designed primarily for students writing a term paper or doing reserrach in Chemistry, Biochemistry or Chemical Engineering. Meet at Information Desk, Davis Centre Library.

Wadnm8d8y,

September

We serve a speck1

jlCOURSE

UJN~H

Monday to Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 338 King St. E., Kltchener (at Cedar HOURS: Mon - Sat 11:30 - 2:30 pm.,5 - t I pm.,

St.1

745-3600

Sun 5 pm - 11 pm

FREE PjAFtKlNO AT REAR

10% STUDENT DISCOliT

WITH I.D.

Thumday,

Saptambr

27

Library Information: I:30 p.m. to introduce new students to the library and the services. Meet at the Information Desk at the Davis Centre Library. F-Y,

-P-f-=

Volunteer Fair ‘90 - is coming to Fairview Park on Oct. 19 and 20. If you belong to a charitable group which would like to inform the public about the work you do and encourage people to become involved as volunteers, you may wish to participate. For further information, call the Volunteer Placement Service at 742-

0610. Our office is now located at 89 Caroline St. S. in Waterloo, behind Waterloo Town Square. If you have a few hours that you can share as a volunteer, call 742-8610. Volunteers them!

. . . we can’t

do without

Wilfrid

Laurier University : Sept. 26 John Polanyi, professor of chemistry al the University of Toronto, will speak on what science is, how it gegets technology and how society can best manage that technology. 8 p.m., FREE. wilfrid Laurier University : Sept. 27 Music at Noon - a free concert at John Aird Centre Recital Hatl, at noon.

Volunteers Needed! - volunteers are urgently needed for Oct. 3rd Career greet employers upon Excellent opportunity to make contact. Contact Linda, Needles Hall, room 1003, ext. 2896.

Canada Scholarship Renewals: students eligible for renewals of Canada Scholarships are advised that the cheques are now available. A list of eligible students is posted in the Student Awards Office and CUBques may also be picked up,there. J c Application mation

Awards Hall.

forms and further infcncontact the Student Office, 2nd floor, Needles

@ease

invited to Temple for High Holidays. ; 743-0401.

--I

Students needed for evening work. The University student escort service needs y6u! To work evenings from 9 P.m. until 2 a.m. $g.OO/hr. Apply at the Student Awards Counter, the Registrar’s Office NH. Meet new people and have an exciting nightlife. For more info call Tammy ext. 6305.

26

Library Information: for Graduate students. 2:30 p.m. Information on introduction to the library and the services offered to them. Meet at the lnfomation Desk, Davis Centre Library .

Curry, Tandoori and Vegetarian Dishes are our Specialties

looking for mature, caring women and meti to volunteer with our agency as counsellors. We are a commuinitybased pro-choice agency whose focus is on family planning and sexuality issues. Call 743-9360.

SCHOLARSHIP NOTBCBS

Career Fair Wednesday, Oct. 3 PAC Main Gym, IO a.m. - 4 p.m. All students meet informally with 92 organizations, ranging from MC: Donald’s, Hospital for Sick Children and such agencies as CUSO.

Jewish students Shalom (Reform) Phone: 746-4332 -.

prints

au

Street

_

Planned Parenthood Waterloo Region is

884-3465.

I!!

1

Bemedial English. Contact Paul Beam, Dept. of English or send e-mail message lJ Waterloo each listing your name, hours of contact and preferences in teaching time.

on CMS to PDBEAM at WATDCS.

Past actions have included the Dis ARMX

Do you think you have a drinking problem? Perhaps Alcoholics Anonymous can help. Weekly meetings operd to the public held in the Health & Safety Building -Meeting Room (ask receptionist) on Fridays at 12:30 pm. or cafl742-6183. -.

24

Chemical Abstracts Research Workshop: 11:30 a.m. 50 minute workshop is primarily for student writing a term paper or doing research in chemistry, biochemistry or chemical engineering. Meet at the Information Desk, Davis Centre Library

Tutors needed each term to help International students with conversational English. Contact Sheryl in the International Student Office, Needies Hall 2080, acrpss from the Registrar. -,.. .

(416) 923*8173

Friends is a sch&l &oIunteer program where a chiid is paired with a volunteer, establishing a one-to-one relationship to build the chiid’s selfesteem and confidence. Urgent need: male and female volunteers. Call 742-4380.

K-W p.m. Hall, ney

_

Tutors needed for Spring Term to teach English as a second language or

regularly throughout the term to coordinate educational events and civil disobedience actions ranging from speakers and leafletting to blockades.

WtRYCRlDAY

CLASSIFIED

WWF

Chamber Music Society all at 8 at KWCMS Music Room orAird WLU. Irving Ilmer, violin; SydBulman-Fleming, piano.

CIIA is hosting speaker Prof. Robert Bothwell, FRSC, University of Toronto and Trinity College, topic - Pierre Trudeau and the lllusipn of Change, Sept. 25 at 7:30 p.m. Room 1302, Davis Centre, University of Waterioo.

We Recyc


Classifieds -

CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED 42 inch. Odd chairs, tables, stenochairs, bulletin boards, etc. 664-3334.

ORIRNTATBOW 81ssIows '

CLASSIFIED

smith CoIoIla - I]ortable electronic typewriter XL1 000. Many programmable functions. A MUST for essays. As new. Owners manual. $170.00. 725-2956.

Mondry,-P---24

Applid Health Sciences, Arts and Mathematics (regular program) ai 3:30 - 5:OO p.m. at Humanities T heatre.

Compact computer - desk with monitor stand. Includes upright computer stand. New. $75.OO/pair. 725-2956.

Applied

Luscm stereo - 300 watts of pure music. This stereo includes an amp, preamp, tape deck and C. D. player. It has two remote controts and is worth well over $5,000. in total. First offer over $2,900 takes it. Call Tom at 747-4964 to see it.

Health Sciences, Arts, Engineering and Mathematics (coop program) at 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. at Humanities Theatre

science

(regular

and

co-op

pro-

gram) at 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. Students must register in ESC Rm 252. THIS PROGRAM WILL ALSO BE HELD ON Thursday, Sept. 27 at 7:00 - IO:00 p.m. and Friday, Sept. 28 at I:30 - 4:30 p.m. POR SAU XS 400 Motorcycle clean and reliable, includes crash bars, rack/backrest and helmet, excellent beginners bike. $750. certified. 745- 1148 evenings ; 579- 2453 days. Ask for Adrian. lo-Speed Bike - Nishiki chromali frame - 5 years works fine - deal includes asking $150. (or best offer) 886-9797.

Landau with old but still tire pump - cali Sean at

&~&cases: 100% solid pine, 70% off slight seconds, new $39. - $59. AlSO 5 piece solid pine dinette - $299.00.9 a.m. 4 5 p.m. only please. 669-5048.

Commodore 64C - with 1571 disk drive and word processing software. Like new / rarely used $250. Call Trevor at 7415296. Two ccmhea - good condition, brown with rust, beige and blue oriental design. $50. each. Call 743-6525 after 5 p.m.

Honda CBX550 - Sport 8ike. Excellent condition - ridden 5 summers. Fast, nimble, also reliable for available. touring: accessories $1,200. negotiable. 747-0727. TYPlNQ Experienced %ist will take care of all your typing needs. Fast efficient service. Westmount-Erb area. Phone. 886-7 153. 35 yevls experience; .95 d.s.p. typewritten; $1.25 d.s.p. Word Processor. Erb and Westmount area. Call 743-3342. Fast, professional word processing by University Grad (English). Grammar, spelling, corrections available. Laser printer. Suzanne, 886-3857.

-hardly used. Bought in March 1990 for $485. Will sell for $375. Call 743-9849.

Words for Money. Quality word processing and graphics. Postscript Laser Printer. Free pickup and delivery. $2.50 per page, 742-4315.

Steel Desks - good condition 30 x 60 inch. Student desks good condition 24 x

Wordprocessing - fast, accurate and ietter quality. Resumes, essays, theses,

VCRMqnav~x

Imprint,

StRVlCIS Gary’s Moving - residential, small or large jobs, in town or out-of-town, students 15% off. 746-7 160. IBM RISC/System 6000: include one in your next grant proposal. Call Karin Barrie, IBM Kitchener at 749-7371 for details.

Townhouse Condo: 3-bedroom, newly built, fully carpeted, near Towers Plaza (Waterloo), parking garage, flexible lease, negotiable rent. Phone 8854186.

LO8T Contact lenses - in white case. Lost Thursday, September 13 on or near campus. Call Yvonne 725-2375. Reward.

Let that Cat out of thelaag!

September

Super Sound call Rhythm Rob’s Disc Jockey Services, collect (416) 546-5538. Member Canadian Disc Jockey Association. Very Reasonable Rates. SO,you had a great summer! Oh! Worried about a possible pregnancy? For a free pregnancy test, practical help, call Birthright 579-3990. much!! “Harry kills mice with a Onlirtesayshammer as part of his poetry readings, but weire still pats.” (Kyle J. Spiller) what have you got to say? Drop off your poetry, prose, and cover art submissions to the creative arts board, c/o Federation of Students, CC235. Hot Tub Parties - Now you can rent for your big event. We deliver and set up. No plumbing required. “For something completely different” call Splash Spa Rentals l-421 -0958.

GOTCHA!

- The first U of W Watergun Assassin Game. Cash $$ prizes for top scorers. All you need to play is a watergun. Call Colin for info 725-9584.

United Church Sunday night worship begins at 9:30 p.m. in Wesley Chapel, St. Paul’s United College (Westmount Rd. N.). Ail are welcome. Sponsored by the United Church Campus Ministry at UW and WLU. Young Adults Christian Group has its start-up meeting at 7 p.m. at Emmanuel United Church (corner of Albert and Bridgeport in Waterloo). Sponsored by Emmanuel United, Calvary United and the United Church Campus Ministry at WLU and UW. B,

-*a

Transcendental Meditation -free introductory lecture, at Waterloo Inn, 7:30 p.m.. For information phone 8868766. Frateniity Awareness Club (FAC)meeting at CC 110 at 7:30 p.m. Waterloo Citizens’ Recycling Gommittee meets at 7:30 p.m. in the City of Waterlop Council Chambers. Joe Mancini will be speaking about TriTech Recycling - EVERYONE IS WELCOME. Call Susan Sauve at 8862634 for further information.

Women Inventors Project Director To Give Brown Bag Discussion. Shelly Beauchamp, will give discussion in DC 1302 at 12:30 p.m. CSTV operates on an interdisciplinary basis and is an umbrella organization for society-technotogyvalues activites taking place in all six UW faculties. Free Noon How Concert at 12:30 p.m. at Conrad Grebel College, Chapel. Baroque Music Concert, Elissa Fbole, Baroque flute ; Boyd McDonald, Fortepiano. Contact Eleanor Dueck at 8850220, ext. 26.

China Cinema - screenings in UW’s East Campus Hall #I219 at 7:00 p.m. BORDER TOWN (Bian Cheng).

mtit~te of Peace and Coinflict Studies, Conrad Grebel College is hosting a forum on “After Meech Lake: Concerns for the Church”. For furthei information: 885-0220. (65)

m

THAT’S HOW MANY CANADIANS ARE SWIMMERS

n

CANCER 4 INFORMATION SERVICE

Imprixrt!.

CALL GGMOIbEt.-

39

The Baha’i iipith - “An Introduction”. Everyone is welcome for this informal discussion at 8:30 p.m. in DC. 1304. Sponsored by Association for Baha’i Studies at U.W.

L

GreatMltsic,

21, 1990

UPCOMING EVENTS

CLASSIFIED

business reports, etc. Pickup and delivery arranged. Call Diane 576- WILP WANT80 1284. Reports, Resumes, etc., done on a laser printer. Our software or yours. K & K Print Weekend Councellors & Relief Staff for Designs. 745-7635. developmentally challenged individuals. $8.75/hr. Every second weekend. Leave Fast, reliable quality word processmessage for Don Mader. 746-1007. ing service. Letter quality at cornPart-time help - at Ciao The Pasta Shop, petit& rates. Call Betty 886-6361. 33 Erb St. W., Waterloo (in the atrium). Apply in person. Desktop Wordpro - special student rates. Resumes, theses, reports, We’re Eking for people who want to covering letters, etc. High quality earn extra money in their spare time on Wednesday evenings or Thursday morresults on lazer or near letter quality nings delivering the Waterloo Chronicle printers. FAST- ACCURATEPROin areas around the University. Please all FESSIONAL. 747-3555. 886-2830, 9:OO a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

UW - Hamilton - regular ride wanted. Happy to share costs and driving. Phone Tom Slee at 888-4099, or (416) 5256379 evenings.

Friday,

l-800-263-6750


We’re going to

BEATTHE

‘OFFTHE COMPET/=Ti’O/ PRE-PREGRAND OPENING

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September

29

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3865s 16 MHZ

asq25 33MHz

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lasic

2” lTL Amber

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liiwalo 4349.99

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PC FACTORY 2nd most respected name in computer hardware 170 University Ave. W., University Shops Plaza II) Waterlocx Fax. 747-0932 Tel. 746-4 b 65 HOURS:

10 AM - 6 PM MON - THURS

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1990-91_v13,n10_Imprint