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photo by george kaufman

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University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario volume 14, number 7 friday, july 27,1 1973

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Waterloo was the scene, last weekend, of a less than spectacular educational programming conference. Delegates were invited from post-secondary school insitutions all over Ontario to attend a two-and-one-half-day seminar on the state, of student, governm&t and education. was However, attendance somewhat less. than expected and only ten campuses. 1 sent ,/representatives. David Robertson, major co&dinator of all the activity and a federation summer employee, structured the weekend in such a way as to allow the largest number of people to take part in the, different discussions. There\ were _ three workshops schedul&l for each time period -and each topic ’ was to be handled twice. in the weekend. ,Therefore a delegate cquld attend all but two workshops. That’s how it was orginally planned. But Robertson’s first words and words he would be, repeating all weekend were, t‘This conference can ,be restructured, If there are any topics you would like to ‘._discuss or if there are any changes you would like to suggest, please go ahead:” And that is what Workshops were happened.. deleted or combined with others and plenarys turned into kingsize seminars., It was probably the memory of previous conferences that brought about this looseness and free-form attitude among the delegates. Also, the small number of people involved in the weekend made it perfect for less-structured arrangements. Friday 1 evening, delegates gathered to hear Brian Switzman address himself to the subject, the ‘Poverty of Student Life. Switzman has a long history- in student politics and is presently involved with both, the university and the community. He began with an account of “how things used to be in the sixties” with j the student movement and the general unrest all over the world. Some -of his 1 interpretations and assumptions were challenged by those present. A point of disagreement was the number today and yesterday of the

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larger and delegates dealt with the get-a-BA-to-get-a-job students. problem of orientation and the Switzmans’ claim was that more heavy proportion’ of pubs in students are interested or fighting relation to any-. sort - of in- - On July 12, 1973 the executive of Apparently this feedback did for that job than there were five ‘formational Oi educational York University ‘ drafted a motion have’an effect on the executive, for years ago. , when they did, face council last Five years ago students knew programs. University representhat was meant to stop, the tatives face the task of letting new publication of . York’s student tuesday evening, they had changed the jobs were there when they their tune--or at least it might wanted them and the pressure was students see that there is more to newspaper Excalibur. The motion life than getting drunk passed unanimously. appear that they had. Instead of not-so great to get into school and university afternoon and evening.. the original motion the executive then get out again ,as quickly as every IThey recommended to council possible. There was mere time’ (Waterloo’s orientation is two and that all Excalibur publication asked for the institution of an. one half weeks long and there is, at editorial board to: govern the given to being politically active. cease for the 73-79 season, efleast ‘one pub scheduled for However, many delegates fective immediately upon adoption content of Excalibur. . everyday except for the first one This boqd would be comprised disagreed with his interpretation by council of the motion. During saying that the’ majority of and the Sundays that happen to fall this time there would be no budget of ,one federation member, one _ in that time-. ) students today seem to.be in school allocations. from the council to ‘Excalibur staff member and then to fill in time rather than get an After nearly an hour of this Excalibur . All employees of EX- ‘. two or four other elect@,students.’ debate a, delegate from a comeducation, or be politically active. calibur would terminate their A. separate f.ee w@ld be levied for munity college broke in and exThey saw that _ as their. major employment as soon as the motion ti9 the ~l$xcalil$ui: along with the problem in trying to interest plained how irrelevant the whole was passed, severance payments 1. fede$$ion fee and the move would students in any educational discussion had been since O@ and other such benefits would be b be ’ towards incorporation-universities have this sort of paid according to law. along with 1 separating the ’ Excalibur comprograms outside of the classes. In conclusion, Switzman program. The community colleges any other compensation seen fit by.:, ’ pletely from the federation except begin classes on the very first day stressed. the need for more personal relationships between the and- there is no time for a couple of of pubbing _ or any stud$nt politicians and those I weeks educational sort of activity. students thay want to motivate, This was. a <problem faced and more of a commitment from the student politicians themselves throughout/the entire weekend; As Robertson pointed out: to what they purport to believe. And with these matters fresh on “University,&udents tend to forget sTnewspaper. The committee would Although the York council about their brothers and si@:p in ,.~~‘:@gotiate ‘with various college their minds the delegates tripped agreed they wanted to get out of on over to the pub that was con- the community colleges, s$M of?papcrs affiliated with York publishing, they could not reach an whose everyday experiences:are agreement, on the editorial board. veniently being held that evening. Un.i$ersity to ensure the. provision quite different ‘than our own:.” of “a regular university-wide Saturday morning delegates Instead&hey drafted a motion to discussed the role of - campus Student governments are poorer. publication for 73-74. institute a committee to look into and there are fewer students in the media and its relation to the -The executive wanted to be sure the matter. educational aspect of student life. institutions. Relationships with . that there would be no way for the ‘This idea- seems to have been and. so The group was very ,small and administration are also very staff of Excalibur to publish even if - agreeable to the majority within the next month the comcentred on a trading of facts about e different.” they could have-managed to obtain each campus before A’resolution that did come out of other funds. Reaction from across mitteehas to reach a ‘decision as to any the weekend was what to do with Excalibur. The discussion began on the real issue. that to the province was strong’ and committee consists of two There was some. question as to strengthen the ties between the campuses sent telegrams ;to the university and the college. York. executive urging them to ’ members of the federation and two what should ,be. considered Delegates were urged to make withhold any decision until the Excalibur staff members. These relevant to student life and what should be included in the contact with the n&ghbouring student body could be consulted., four will agree to a fifth member radio institutions and break ‘down, the Their present tactics reminded too and then hopefully they will come newspaper. or the up with a solution amenable to all, programming. ’ many people of something the -The other workshop was much gmt’d ‘pg. .2 administration would try. J -Susan jotmson 4 \ \


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From Die-k. and Jane t0 Minoo in Waterloo have hiked the price to If you’re in university or older, you probably remember being $1.75. brought up on primers or readers Orders for most of the 200 copies which were inhabited by Dick and have been received by the group. Jane and their look-alike Minoo’s Family is an excellent imitators. example of the group’s nonstereotyped approach to the Dick and ‘Jane were beautiful, shildren’s books. Minoo is a-young well-dispositioned youngsters, girl whose father drives trucks and mother and father got along is away often. When he is at home, perfectly-father “went to work” he and Minoo’s mother argue quite and mother stayed home and kept a lot, and finally separate. Minoo’s things beautiful-and they lived in mother and she find new friends, a tidy, tree-lined neighborhood of and her father visits her often. At equally fortunate families. They the end of the book, Minoo realizes often visted grandpa and grandma on the nice, clean farm in the everyone is happier now, so she is -&o happy. country. The members of the group feel Only white people existed; no that many children-especially in ghettos existed, mommy never day-care centres, where they hope worked, daddy always “went to tohave their books used a lotwork” wearing a suit and tie, there come from one-parent families. were always two parents. But they never see books about Studies done since our childhoods have revealed the WASP-ish and sexist nature of those readers, a nature which illprepared many WASPiish children to live with and respect people in later life who did not conform to those standards. While these studies have been available for many years, the , J school systems and libraries have been slow to change accordingly. A similar study, condemning the sexist nature of such books used in Manitoba schools has been finished since last winter, but was only this week leaked publicly by a Winnipeg alternate newspaper, the Prairie

friday,

children like them, and so they are made to feel “abnormal.” Other books will be’about orphaned children, children with working mothers and other nonstereotypical situations. Although their OFY grant ends in the middle of August, the’ members hope to keep the project going by funds from the sale of the books, donations and whatever sources or grants are available. ’ They have for sale at $1 a silkscreened poster of photos taken at the Klemmer Farmhouse day-care center here at the university. The poster folds into a photo-box for children; The group’s approach to the subject matter of the books is based solely on their own feelings, or on published studies. Members carried out their own survey by sending questionnaires to Ontario nursery schools and day-care centres during June of 1972. They found out that only about half the books in these places are bought, often meaning thet get old books donated which are both out of date and in bad condition. Also, about half the respondentsreplied that they are not satisfied with the condition of their lih+srinc

Most replies indicated that too many .of the books available are ‘ ‘Americanized” and too middleclass in content. The majority of the directors want more stories that reflect real-life situations. Quoting from a 1970 study, the group reported that, in most books, “boys are -shown to be active, creative, brave, resourceful, industrious and capable leaders while girls are found to be passive, docile; dependent, incompetent and less intelligent followers. Like the stereotypes of men and women, these images of children’s sex-roles are not based on descriptions of reality.” The group may be contacted for information of aid at 136 Allen St. East, Waterloo, phone (519) 7420432.

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Talking from page one

false barriers that keep them apart. The most popular seminar in the afternoon session was the discussion about the relation of the university to the community. There seemed to be some disagreement as to who should be involved with the community, at what level, and to what end. The university already has ties with the community at the board of governors level which automatically means business-a selected group. I Some students believe that they should begin to involve the students with people in the lower middle classes and get some sort of feeling from this group that never sees the university. There was a lot of debate over how the students should approach the community and how the community could be brought into contact with university life. ‘Peace corps’ sort of groups were frowned upon and the emphasis was put on working with the people rather than going-in as the leader. The efforts of liberal dogooders are not appreciated by the working class and in fact tend to build up resentment of university students. Projects like legal aid, medical aid, drop in centres were brought up as possible areas of student involvement. But the emphasis was put on getting those people in the community to come to the university and use the facilities there, such as the library. Many lower class groups still feel the university is out of their reach and do not participate on any present ‘programs available at the university. Ways to breach this gap were discussed in this workshop but .unfortunately no workable solutions were brought forth. One delegate summed up the feeling saying, “Perhaps these

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One of the major problems in changing is the lack of available alternative books. Few people are writing children’s books in any but the traditional format, and fewer ( get published. _ ’ A K-W group is among the few groups trying to -provide an alternative. Funded by Opportunities For Youth (OFY) for the second year, the group is called - “Before We Are Six” and works in the Unitarian House in Waterloo. They have published one bookMinoo’s Family, available in most K-W bookstores-and have six others in the making. Se.ven people are permanent members of the group, and various assignments, such as graphic and illustration work, is handed out to outsiders on a piecework basis. Minoo’s Family was actually written last year by Sue Crawford, a member of the original group, and illustrated by Frances McGlynn. It has since been revised, and published in more durable form at a selling price of $1.25. All area bookstores which accepted it except the Book Barn

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july 27, 1973

~ people will only feel comfortable in the university environment after the students have gone out into their world and the ties are established between the two groups. ” Out of this seminar came a decision to gather together a file of all existing projects in the different cities that have begun bringing the community and the student closer together. The data will be collected by each campus and then held at a central pbintmost likely the O.F.S. office-for the benefit of any campus in Ontario. Other workshops held Saturday afternoon were the discussion on the speakers bureau and an information exchange on the mechanics of organ izing an educational event. A speakers bureau is presently being established in Ontario with the different institutions drawing up lists of good speakers on their campus. The speakers will be available for the cost of transportation and expenses as well as a small set fee. This will hopefully . build a good selection of Canadian speakers on Canadian topics. Faculty, students, and administration will be included on the list. Saturday evening the delegates found themselves again sitting plenary with no scheduled discussion. Talk turned to the campus media problem and the present controversy raging on York’s campus with their newspaper Excalibur. (See page one) ’ Most delegates agreed that the campus media needed to be completely independent _ of the student governments in order to preserve freedom of the press. They agreed that the campus media should be critical of their student politicians as well as take a critical look at all areas of life around them. Few topics can be considered irrelevant to a students’ life whether it happens on their campus or across the world. However, Waterloo’s federation president Andrew Telegdi made a plea for control of the student media, explaining that the elected officials had a mandate from the people to control the money. the students pay. The money that is then granted to the student newspaper or the student radio station is out of the control of the elected officials. Therefore, he believes that some sort of editorial board needs to be instituted to insure that the media is not controlled by any select group and that its news is studentoriented. There was little agreement with him on this point, as long as any student, media follows certain guidelines. These were outlined by Shane Roberts, “Any student should be allowed to join the staff as long as they are willing to learn all the processes in the writing or whatever they are interested in, and- willing to put in the time it requires. Also, each paper should have a letter-to-the-editor section that is open to any student that wants to express an opinion.” Soon thereafter, the bar opened and the delegates lost themselves in music, drink and sake. The next morning, unable to face the possibility of more workshops the delegates voted to again revise Robertsons’ revisable schedule and held the final plenary first, thing in the morning. Nothing new was covered that had not already been discussed in the workshops and the morning dragged on till lunch, when at five to twelve the delegates breathed a sigh of relief and ‘wandered over for some village goodies. -swan

johnson


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july 27, 1973

Regardless. of how much trouble he, has playing the tune, the registrar will invariably praise his performance and ask him if he would like to learn some more songs.‘With the child thus aroused, the registrar now turns to the parents with the enrolment form. Not wishing to contend with ‘a very disappointed son or daughter, they will rarely refuse to sign and pay the twenty-five dollar enrolment fee, which must be paid on the spot._ To ensure a sale, the registrar will sometimes bring out a courier, a five- to ten-minute program on the operation of the. Conservatory. It has been designed over35 years of experienceto, appeal to the parents both psychologically and . ma’am, I”m implied ‘no into a yes. .‘ ‘Good morning, emotionally. - c This afternoon, on my first call, from the Ontario Conservatory of Matthews after his successful the lady told me that she used to sale, said to me: “It’s- like taking Music and we are doing our annual work for the-conservatory making survey of your neighbourhood.” candy from a baby.” ’ -by phone and that This greeting is being heard by appointments The registrar receives a twentymore and more parents in the she wanted nothing to do with us. dollar commission on each child he She closed the door in my face: Kitchener-Waterloo area upon enrols. This. afternoon I had been Back at the studios, George answering their doorbells in the talking to one of the instructors at Belan, who has been 8with the morning or early afternoon and the studios. He complained of the Conservatory for 17 years, was finding a stranger on the front large number of slow students in going through the surveying, porch. his -classes because . of the Before she is able to respond-to aspect of the job with myself and registrar’s willingness to enrol When I asked him in a way in which she is ac- another. trainee. anyone. whether this could properly be ’ customed, to respond to door-toThis afternoon -Mills was going called a survey since it sounded door salesmen, the particular over the enrolment form with the more like a come-on to get into the other trainee ‘and myself- He was housewife is immediately con“Does home to make a sale, I received a explaining that if-the father asks fronted with this question: study weird look and about five minutes why he has to pay the twenty-five anyone in the family _ music?” She soon finds herself of talking in circles. The fact is dollars when the music lessons will providing the man with the that all information gathered from be costing him four dollars per families-who do not agree to make following information : the names, week, that we are to respond that is destroyed. a-ges and -school grades -of .any an appointment this makes the program possible, Belan said that in making an children in the family’; the family’s paying for office stiff, bookappointment the important thing is keeping and grading for the 6,266 last name, address, and telephone Inumber; a list of the musical in- to be subtle and not to pressure in- the Kitchenerstudents strumentsin. the home; and anyone into it. Waterloo-Cambridge area. I asked Today I made thre.e apif this response would not amount whether any of the children have shown a particular inclination for pointmen&. Mills congratulated to a “little white lie”, since twenty any musical instrument. me and said I was starting off well. of those twenty-five dollars goes, in effect, into the pocket of the very She will also be asked: “ilou do Before dropping me off at a street believe that musical education is corner he said: “We’re in business registrar who is sitting in his ‘home . good training for young people, * to make money and you’re with us enrolling his child. to make money. Right?” I replied don’t you?” and is then informed Mills reaction was one, of slight that the Conservatory is giving that1 just wanted tobe able to live. anger, saying the original twentyIn the evening I went with Belan free aptitude . tests for school five was sent to-the head offices in children and is asked to agree to and another registrar, Jack Cambridge and redistributed. Matthews, to observe the taking of - make an appointment to test the When I replied that I had said ‘-‘in the aptitude tests and the enrolling child that evening or any other effect”-, he told me that if. I had any of the child for music lessons. This further questions on the matter to ’ time when both parents are home. Once inside the home, the ap- is where the second part of my get in touch with the Cambridge titude test becomes an attempt to training began. office. As had been previously exWhen I came back from lunch enrol the child for music lessons at today Mills called me into his the Conservatory. An experienced plained to me, the test is very me that the salesman -will be able to do so in simple. Mills himself put it this ,offi&e and informed .had no further need almost all cases. Jim Mills, who is way: “Any child can pass it who is Conservatory in charge of student, registrations, L, not deaf, blind, stupid, and has no of\ my services.. He said that I had the wrong attitude towards the job sits the child claims that he will make a sale 97 arms.” The registrar down opposite him, numbers his and that he had never had a to 99 per cent of the time. trainee ask the question that I had This reporter was recently hired fingers one through five, brings- out asked yesterday. I did not argue a- small piano accordion, numbers by the Conservatory as a registrar. Although my job lasted only three the first five keys to correspond to with him.’ The Ontario Conservatory of and one-half days, I saw enough of the child’s fingers, shows him how and Music has been in business for the internal dynamics of the to open and close the bell&s; thirty-five years and all of its had a-little registration process to compel! me has him play “Mary i to forewarn transactions are technically legal. as ‘many parents as lamb” from a music sheet with the To unsuspecting and uninitiated possible about the slick and notes numbered one through -five. smooth-talking registrar% The registrar himself requires no parents on the outside who may Conmusical ability- to administerthe . suddenly find themselves going to representing the . Ontario bed some night wondering how servatory of Music who may some test. they will be able to pay for When the registrar first enters day be knocking on your door. the home, then, he “concentrates’ Johnny’s music le@@f%s~- it may They ’ make it -an easy ‘step- from seem like they are-dealing with answering .-a few questions. to solely on the child. In most cases honest and agreeable people. walking out your front door with the, accordion will be something However, with a survey whose twenty-five dollars in their back entirely new for a child’ between purpose is to get inside the home, a - ’ the agesof seven to twelve to play pockets. In the morning of my first day at with, It is often the first time he free aptitude test whose purpose is has played a note on any kind of to get Johnny on the salesman’s work I went withMills door-to-door side, a psychologically-designed to observe his technique before musical instrument. , dourrier, and a “little white lie” Up to thispoint; not a word has being sent out on my own. He made ready-at-hand in case the parents 1 three appointments on one side of been said about music lessons. The uneasy; the Conprime concern while become the street. One of these ,is registrar’s regist,ration noteworthy. The lady responded to giving the test is to sell the child on servatory’s the instrument in his hands. -(in procedures seem to constitute an his first question by saying that underhanded and dishonest consomle‘ cases a guitar is used). someone from the Conservatory game. described above had been by the year before and -Within thetontext Good morning, indeed! that she had told them she wasn’t this is an easy manipulation. With interested. Within ‘a matter of a both parents watching, the child is _ ‘-br.uce meharg few minutes he had turned this- eager to display ’ his abilities. .I

In preparation for the upcoming federation council meeting tuesday evening, the executive of the federation -got together last tuesday to discuss ,any forseeable issues. j The first consideration was a request for money for a presently operating legal aid project. Cindy Campbell, representing the group, People in Legal Difficulty, ex- _ plained their operation and their present financial situation. Court workers help people that are about to appear in court but do-not have any *assistance and do not know how to handle the system: In conjunction with’ this work they _ have organized a house for,people that do not have any where else to stay and need a- home. The\ court allows people to’ remain in this house rather than detain .-them simplybecause they do not have any homebase. There are now ten people between the ages of 16-21 living in the house. The group has managed to find a ’ more suitable house for their operation but finances are short and in order to keep functioning they need grants or loans from other groups with money. The executive all agreed the group was indeed a worthwhile cause but they did have some difficulty in finding . the money. Eventually Shane Roberts offered to pay ‘one ,month’s rent out ,of the budget for external affairs and then FredBunting volunteered -another months rent from the student grievances fund. The executive will recommend to council thatthese monies be granted to the operation. ‘The total will, .be -666 dollars. David Robertson got the goahead from the executive council to hold a p.re-orientation orientation weekend the-last weekend in August, >pproximately the 23, 24 and 25. .He had been concerned about the possibility of losing some. money on the weekend and wanted the say so of the executive before committing himself. He also tried to get some ‘discussion-going about the importance of education&l events but unfortunately the majority of members present were>’ more interested in getting on with . the agenda. Radio Waterloo’s request for permission to seek a loan from the university administration received a - great deal of attention. Treasurer David _Chapley expressed concern over the fact that the-loan would be tying up 5,666‘ dollars each year for the next ten years. The loan is only Tfor 15,660 but ,because of a previous 17,606 loan, the interest and payments willamount to 5,225.each year for /’ I the next ten years. Robertson countered with a plea priorities on for putting -educational experience rather than economics. John Jongerius

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summed up the problem saying that it was a debate between economicsand an alternate learning situation. Executive eventually, gave Radio Waterloo the permission to get the loan as long as they were given a lease for the property they are now in. The iease should cover at least the ten >ear period. Vice-president Steve Treadwell brought up an issue that had been brought to his attention earlier in the day. Apparently a security officer is being charged with assault by someone that had attended a federation sponsored event on campus and had some sort of contact with security at that time. Some membersof the executive felt the whole problem was none of their business but Roberts saw their commitment at least as far as to investigate what had happened; He said, “We must . feel responsible for anything that happened at anything we sponsor.” Then Robertson and Chapley ‘got themselves into’ a *debate about whether or not a person can be an insurance salesman and at the same time be a fascist; The possibility seemedto escape Chapley but he was promptly . reprimanded. Treadwell - informed , ,!he executive that the federation was about to institute a phone in the old rap room for students to use to find housing in the area: He has received complaints from students that have been denied housing only because they are students. The possibility of pressing charges against these landlords is being looked into. The situation at York with their newspaper Excalibur was brought before the executive. -Telegdi thought the whole thing was none of our business but many other members of the executive agreed that the problem needed attention. They were, urged to A send, telegrams in asking the council to hold off judgement until- the student body can be polled. The matter will be brought to council next ,tuesday when there will be more infomation. Jongerius moved that the photo ’ co-op equipment be auctioned off in public in the fall. His motion was accepted readily as a solution to their problem of deciding what to do with the nearly useless equipment that at present no one ’ has access to. He also suggested that. David Monoogian be allowed use of the room until the fall in return for setting up the auction and cleaning the equipment. Everybody liked that idea too. Treadwell was directed to look into the still pressing question of the architecture students and their I honours degrees in environmental studies that they never received. , The case is being tested in the courts and -it seems that the executive did not know much about it so he is to seek out the information. _ * And finally it all came to an end.,

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-Susan

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The following survey was conducted by U of’W studentsDanny Doo, Rick Schler, Ken ‘Whyte and Daniel Lam.

A list of products most likely to show some increase over the survey period were chosen. The survey includes prices for the first two weeks inJune and%ly. The stores surveyed. were Zehrs in WaterlooSquarDominion in Westmount Plaza and A&P at Franklin and Weber. The cost of the products increased from $10.23 to $11.04 at

Zehrs, from $10.23 to $11.25 at Dominion and from $10.36 to $11.46 at A&P over the one month period. The increase in the cost of the products -amounted to the following : l Zehrs $0.82 or 8 per cent 0 Dominion $1.02 or 9.9 per cent l A&P $1.14 or 11 per cent If these figures are averaged they-show an increase of $0.99 or 916 per cent. The price of. pork chops increased 10 cents per lb. from $1;28 to $1.38 at Zehrs. 19 cents ner lb. f rom $1.29 to $1.48 at Dominibn and

30 cents per lb. from $1.18 tp $1.48 cents per lb. from $1.08 to $1.15.at , constant at all three stores at 41 I at A&P. A&P. It decreased 1 cent per lb. cents per quart. The- price of side bacon in- from- $1.09 to $1.08 at Dominion. _The price of bread remained creased 22 cents per lb. from $1.24 The price of-cfhicken remained. constant at Zehrs; Dominion and to $1.46 at Zehrs, 18 cents per lb.” constant at both Zehrs and A&P at A&P with prices of 28 cents per 24 from $1.24 to $1.42 at Dominion and. ‘74 centsper lb. and 79 cents per lb. oz., 23 centsper 24 oz., and 29 cents 15 cents per lb. from $1.08 io $f,23 respectively. It increased 5 cents per 24 oz., respectively . per lb. at Dominion from $0.78 to The price of eggs increased 7 at A&P. The price of sirloin steak $0.83. cents per-dozen, from $0.61 to $0.68 remained constant at $1.76 per lb. The. price of turkey remained at Dominion. The price decreased constant at both Zehrs and 2 cents per dozen from $0.69 to $.67 at Zehrti; it went up 14 cents per lb. at Zchrs and 1 cent per dozen-from from $1.54 to$1.68 at Dominion and Dominion at 89 cents per lb. and It , ‘$0.69 to $0.68 at A&P. 19 cents per lb. from $1.59b to $1.78 72 cents her ‘lb. respectively. . increased 11 cents per lb. at A&P, at A&P. The prices for the products were The price of blade steak from So.68 to.$0.79, recorded on either friday or ,The price of potatoes increased Saturday. If a special was on for remained constant at 98 cents per 49 cents for 10 lb. from $0.99 to $1.48 any one product this price was lb. at both Zehrs and Dominion. It increased 10 cents per lb. at A&P, : at Zehrs, 40 cents for 210 lb. from recorded for that product. The $1.29 to $1.69 at Dominion and 20 most economical store to shop at from-$0.98 to $1.08. -The price of *ground chuck cents for 10 lb. from $1.59 to $1.79 at for products surveyed was iehrs which showed an 8 per cent inhamburger increased 2 cents per, A&P. crease over the one month period. lb. from $0.97 to $0.99-at Zehrs, 7 The price of milk remained . PRODUCTS

-

.. 2EHRS

WK. l- WK. 2 WK. 3 WK. 4 WK.1

Pork chops loin centre (1 lb.1 A Schneiders side bacon (1 lb.) ’ Sirloin steak ’ (1 lb.) Blade steak ,

1.28

1.2-8.- 1.38

1.38

1.29

1.24

1.24

1.46

1.76

-1.76

.98

1.76

1.76‘

I.46

(1 qt.) Bread, store brand (24-02.) - Eggs, grade A large (1 doz.) . TOTALS

’ x

,’

WK.3

WK.1

A&P WK.2

1.18

1.24

1.42

-1.08 ’ 1.08

1.54

1.59

1.68

1.58

.98

.98

97

.97

.99

.99

1.09

.74

..74

.7;

.74

.78

.89

\ .89

.89

.89

.99

-.$9

. 1.48

.41

.41

.28 .69

1.38

_ WK.4

1.48

.98

‘10.23

WK.2

1.48 _-1.24 1.42.

.98

\ 1.68 1 .98 .98

1%

1.59

WK.3

WK.4

1.48

1.48

1.23-

1.23.

l.78

- 1.78

.98

.98

.98

1.08

1.08

1.09

1.08

1.08

1.08

-1.08

1.15

1.15

.78

.83

.83 *

.79

.79

.79

.72

.72

72

- .72

:68

.68

.79

;79

1.48

1.29

1.38

1.69

1.69

1.59

1.59

1.79

1.79

.41

.41

.41

.41-

.41

.41

.41

.41.

.41

.41

.28

.28

.28

~ .28

- .28

.28

.28

.29

.29

.29

-.29

69

.68

.67

(1 lb.) Ground chuck hamburger (1 lb.) Chicken,, Canada grade A (1 lb.) Turkey, butterball (1 lb.) Potatoes* (10 Ibs.) Milk, homo

DOMINION>

10.23. J1.05

Il.04

/

\

.79

I

Blues nite at the Grad Clubif you dig WaterlooXhristian Fellowship-all Two Siamese kittens-one male and listening and-or playing the blues and students, faculty and staff are welcome one female. $15.. Ext. 2892 or 576would like to meet similarly motivated to bible study. For further info contact 1413 after 5pm. freaks then come bring your favourite Doug Stoute at 884-4937. Every 1968 CB350 Honda-engine just records. Non-members must be acThursday nite at 8pm-137 University - ,.ebuiIt l-824-6492 /companied by a -<memberAve. W. Apt. 904. WANTED ’ memberships are available to nonChristian science informal groupUsed Rock, classical; jazz, folk 81bums grads at no extra cost. -Every Friday meeting. Discussion and experiences purchased, 25-50 cents, depending on Nite.3 or 9pm-Graduate Club; - related to the practical value of an condition. Call Paul at 745-2003, 6Baha’i Fireside-everyone welcome. understanding of God. Every Thursday 9pm: Every Saturday nite-8pm-23 Ezra, nite at 9pm-ML216 TYPING Waterloo. ’ . Film Festival presented by’ K-W -’ Typing:for students. Phone 742-4689 Gay Lib Movement Meeting-goodwomen’s place collective, introducing) PERSONAL L’ ’ discussion and interesting people; K-W women’s place. biscussion groups required for to follow - films; silver collection. * All ‘2 Secretary-receptionist everyone- welcome. For more info part-time work. Proficient typing and women welcome. August. 13--Growing contact CC217 ext 2372. Every skills plus ability to work in -up “fernafe, psychoiogical’ differences . clerical I Monday nite-8pm-CClL3. undergraduate environment are only nite at the’ Grad Clu&here’s 8. between ,the Sexes; August %---lt prerequisites. Apply with resume to happens to-us Francois; August 27chance to get to know fellow bridge The Secretary,-Engineering Society B, Three guesses pandora, 8pm-YWCA players on campus: (Non-members Rm 1338’ Eng IV, University of 84 Frederick St. Kitchener. must be accompanied by a memberWaterloo. memberships are available to nonTranscendental meditation and ‘the j . Gir6?%njoy a relaxing body-rub in the grads at no-extra cost.) Every Monday science -of creative intelligence (as privacy of your own hbme or at our nite-8pm-Graduate Club. _ taught by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi). studio. Call 884-0068 or .884-0039 for Everyone welcome to these _free -inaWaterloo Christian Fellowzhip-All more information. troductory public lectures. Wednesday students, staff and faculty are invited and Thursday August 8 &. 9; Wed’ HoUSlNG WANTED to an informal get-together for supper. nesday and Thursday August 29, & Townhouse in, Lakeshore wanted For further info contact Doug Stoute at 30411 lectures .at 8pm in M&C2065 starting September. Ail offers con884-4937. Every Tuesday nite-6pnisidered. Call Aldo 416-491-3360 137 University Ave. W. Apt. 904. Advanc& lectures on transcendental collect. meditation and,thescience of creative Electra-a contemporary version of House of large apartment needed intelligence-meditators only please.the classical Greek drama Euripides. September. Call (collect) Don or Joe Sundays August 5 81 19-Eng. II Rm. presented by the professional summer 884-0444, or Mark 578-5128. 1101. youth theatre. Admission: adults $2; Wanted : furnished apartment in West-. students’sl. Tickets available at Miller Central Toronto, 3 girls, Sept. 1 to Dec. . Ticket Agency and Cameron Heights 31~ Write 653-H Albert St.-Waterloo. Collegiate.- August 1 at 10:3bpm; Woman with .2 small kids needs acAugust 1,2. and 3 at 8:30pm and . ’ FOR_ SALE 1970 Pontiac LeMans in excellent commodation for September. Call Sue‘10: 30pm-Cacmeron Heights condition. Call 576-8947 after 5pm. in- counselling 2655.Collegiate.

Bridge

CLAZiilFIEDS

,

._


9 6

’ friday,

the chevron

july

27, 1973

TERMPAPERS SERVICE ( R&d) A Canadian

Company

Chevron requires for -September 1, 1973 through April, 1974

PAPERSON FILE $2.00 PER PAGE, OR -

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News Editor

Important

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Noon

Kaufman

Ont.

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chevron

600 KING ST. WEST, KITCHENER - 742-4411 at

416-638-3559 Suite 906( Wj 12 Goldfinch Ct.

Lumber

meeting next _ Monday.

ONTARIO PUBLIC INTEREST RESEARCH GROUP (OPIRG) requires a DIRECTOR

All staffers are beseeched to attend. lpm in chevron office.

To head

an investigative research group inquiring into areas of public interest such as consumer protection, environmental issues, government and corporate responsibilities, etc.

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to the Editor of the Chevron by Friday, August 3.

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The candidate will have demonstrated organizational and investigative research ability preferably with legal background or law degree. This

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Applications should be sent to: OPIRG Room 158A Biology II Building University of Waterloo Waterloo, Ontario

Exam time. pressures! Vent your frustration,

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drink- and boogie

all night Thursday Aug. 2 starting 8:30 pm to the notorious Freefall band at the campus cefitre admission 75 cents


I .

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friday,

-,

july 27,,?973

I

the chevron

c

$

i

.

Joyce Bridge, No. 1 star, belted f home runs and led the Suffrajocks to’ their 2nd championship. Mainliner MacKenzie played = another moving game along with . the Kipper as the ZB-Ballers struck early for a 4-3 lead. Tied 5-5 in the fifth, Suffrajocks went ahead 11-8 in the 7th. The 2B-Bailers came ‘back on hits by Riddell and McCarron to go ahead 12-11. Ada stole a pair of shorts and also managed to cover first backed kby a spectacular Joutfield-Liddell and\ company. ‘It- was tied. at the of the ninth, J.B. stepped up tq the plate swinging and sent a fly out to Dot who chased it up to Diamond 6. Home run. and the suffrajocks grabbed the title. 13-12 in a. good game. Congratulations to both teams. The 2B-B lers will attempt within to keep the c hlf?mpionship the 4A domain. For all those, who didn’t make it’ ’ to the Loo, the suffrajocks can even chug better than the 2BBallers but Mainliner MacKenzie has got peanut flys eaten up. You know what peanuts can do to you.

\

.‘PropOsed site inspected The delegation representing the World Student Games Association -was here last week to inspect the facilities and accomodations’ the K-W area will have to offer in their bid for the 1975 games. The delegation, comprised of four persons, spent three days in the area talking with members of the K-W organizing committee and inspecting facilities and accomodations which would be ‘used if the games were to come to the K. W area. The delegation of Dr. Ludovit Komadel of Czechoslavakia, Dr. Charles Wenden of England,, Nick Rodis of United States and Eugenio Scarpiello of Italy, was impressed with the accomodations of the University of Waterloo and Wilfrid Laurier. Dr. Wenden and Mr. Rodis felt that there were very few places in the world that could . match these. accomodations. Dr. Wenden also felt that this would be the strong point in t-he KitchenerWaterloo bid for the 1975 games and- it would be highly considered when the time comes to vote for the 1975 site. It appears that there was some I disagreement about’ the seating capacity of the track and field facilities in the K-W bid. Mr. Scarpiello felt that the proposed seating capacity of 12,500 would be inadequate. He was under the impression that a capacity of 18,000 to 20,000 was more inline for the track and field facilities. Carl ‘Totzke said that if the K-W bid was successful and if there were indications that the planned seating capacity of 12,500 would be insuf f i&e-n t temporary bleachers would be added. Totzke felt that there was little sense in making changes that, possibly, could not be met. - $ l-

7

The delegation was also impressed with the number and quality of athletic facilities which are already available for training’ and competition.’ As it looks at present the only point which might cause the Kitchener-Waterloo area to lose the bid for the 1975 World Student Games would be th,at of the seating capacity of the track and field stadium. This stadium” will also be used for the opening and closing ceremonies. There was a. daily attendance of over 20,000 for the three day track and field at the 1970 games. held ’ competition _ in Torino, Italy. There is a rumour that Mexico City is also bidding for the games. This bid may affect the K-W position because Mexico City has - the facilities which were constructed for the 1968 Olympics but Reg McAfee from the US passes Lasse Viren of L%-rland with about! 306 they no longer have the acmetres to go in the 3000 metre race held at ;Birchmount Stadium, comodations for the athletes and Scarborough last Saturday. McAfee placed first, Viren, who was a officials. double gold medalistain the Munich Olympics, placed second and Dan One. point which might have a Shaughnessy (no. 48) p,laced third. photo by george neeiand , bearing on where the 1975, games . will be held,. and-it is the biggest one; is politics. ’ Now that inhomers by Nancy Doole and J. athletics has become a Liddell. The score seesawed back ’ ternational political tool there is a tremendous and forth and ‘Suffrajocks didn’t Soc%er amount of political manoeuvering win it until the last inning. Sandy ‘As you probably read in the last 1 in the selection of sites for any. the Sleigh played a varied lst, 2nd and issue of the Chevron, ma jar international. athletic shortstop game with Ada S, Cno professionals won the Dr. Mackay competition. Montreal may never tape this game) stretching and Soccer Trophy for the second have been given the 1976 Olympics Lorraine M. stopping balls with consecutive year. In the finals they her feet _ if only one of the United States or defeated systems united 2-O. Russia had bid for the 76 Olympics The wonders had’ Lynn grabbing ’ XThe game started very badly for but they both bid for them. flies as well as Diana who got the winners who missed two With the 1976 Olympics being revenge on two in a row out shots in the opening held in Montreal, 1975 would be a penalty situation. Suffrajpcks advance to . minutes. This, however, seemed to good time for many ‘athletes from the championship game against spur them to the attack for the those 2B-Ballers who have been other countries to come to Canada remaining part of the first half. out of action lately. The l&pack to test out our weather, It would effort was also be a good time to test out the The professionals’ will be ship-shape no doubt, clean awhen Sergio Carvallio officials who will be involved in i rewarded shirts and all. headed, the ball into the net on a Championship game running the Montreal c Olympics. was Y corner kick. A few minutes later, - something else, 2 .B-Ballers were george neeland Joe Petervely managed- to get out of shape but scrapedthe barrel away from the. full-back that was for, 12 runs. Suffrajocks were on checking him and scored with a the%&11 for .13 runs, The score was strong kick from just inside ‘ the no indication of the play. koth penalty area. team showed hot fingers- and good ,* In the ;, ,second half, the arm action. Suffrajocks showed professiona.ls, limited themselves good defense and power house ,to protectingtheir lead while the hitting. systems team was consistently on ’ / the attack. But against the very strong defence of the professionals : led by captain Ed Farrell, systems never came close to scoring.. I

iast

Police games,

-

Tomorrow ’ is the day when-the law enforcement officers from Toronto and Detroit get together for their annual tug-a-war at the CNE in Toronto. The event has been dominated by the’ Toronto force since the annualduel began. The victor must win two out. of three matches. ’ Besides the tug-a-war, which is ‘part, of the evening program, there is a complete list of track and field events for both age class and open groups of competitors during the morning and afternoon. The games get started at 990 am with A a marathon-and a marathon relay. Waterloo trackster Dan Anderson ’ will be competing in the marathon while Waterloo tracksters .-,Murry Hale and ‘Python Northy will be competing on one of the relay. teams. - The evening program will have four track events, the\Miss Toronto contest, a musicai ride with horses - , and ,band on the, field at. the same time, land. a roller skating demonstration -. j ‘: 1 \ I\.’ ’ ‘\ I ;v.

~hiiramural!

r Ball Hockey

_

All showsat Admission $1.50,

Here are the semifinal scores : t-nuts.-18, %grads-3 - ’ roadrunners,-12; team 10-6. The final game was between the t-nuts and the roadrunners. T-nuts took the game 7-3. 1

FilFs

@Chill Your Hot Sum_mer

&&ball

The semifinal scores were as ’ follows : math society-49, B’&31. 1 _’village dons-al, renison-12. In the ,final game the village dons won by amargin of 3 points ‘I‘ over math sockets 15-12. > . Women’s

photo by george

neeland

Slowpi

-

B&d N’ight

- Friday

I

Touch

7:00 &9: l-sprn I children under 12 - $50.

,

on-_a

_

:

I .. ”

‘,.

:

- I%. JekyH & Mi; ,Hyd& : c ’ s‘tarring

Frederick

March,

Academy

Award

4931.

-. .

~

The semifinal game in women’s slowpitch took place last Monday night. Six wonders took on the complete Suffrajock team in a valiant attempt to advance to the championshipgame. The wonders, led. by “Hands” Davis went way out ahead on 6 runs while 4A was .‘getting organized in the field. The Kind Souls’. on 4A consented to renting a catcher to the wonders so that staff would have 2 outfielders. Suffrajocks came back in the ~,3rd. on various. hits including 1

Tuesday

thru

Thursday

PSYCH’O,’ directed MlONlTE

SHOW

by Alfred taiiite

Hitchcock

&,Saturday

L,ADY’FF#QM SHANGHAI, ‘, ’ dir&ted ,Everett

by Orson Sloane and

Wells Orson

and ,starring W,ells. ’

Rita Hgyworth, ’ *


.

8

_’

the chevron

friday,

july 27, 1973

the guns blast on

\t.ml”g

@ TED NEELEY.CARLANDERSON -YVONNE ELLIMAN BARRY DENNEN \Lrernp~d) hr Melvyn Brag .In~NormanJewison RSrd

“wm

Andrt

kVil

I hr Rock

0prr.1

M,,\~<h) Andrew Muw Produced

c onducwd

hy

.

A

\UILI.IIC

“Jesus Christ Superstar”. &,o~ by Tim Rice LloydWet&p ~~~~~~ byTim Rice Pwducer PATRICK PALMER . Dircrlrd hy NORMAN

tqNORMAN JEWISON And ROBERT‘STIGWOOD . A

Umvcndl

P~cturc

TEREOPHONIC

’ JEWISON

Tcchmcolor”

Todd-A0

JS

SOUND’

2 SHOWS NIGHTLY 7: 15 & 9:30 MATINEES SAT. & SUN. 2PM. A

((One

delightful,

* MWC ,wr~nen byALVINSARGENT

by MICHAEL

hilarious

SMALL

- Produced

heartache

and Dlrecled

byA!N

of SMITH, a movie!” Cosmopolitan

-L/i!

J. PAKUm

2SHOtiSNIGHTLY7:Qo&9:30 MAT. SAT. & SUN. 2PM.

FANTASTIC WEEK.

TIME AND

.

YOU STOOD APPLAUDED

UP A

“M.ight just turn out to be this year’s sleeper and emulate the runaway success of “Bi~lyJa~k.” / -Kevin

Thomas, L.A. Times

2 SHOWS-NIGHTLY 7 & 9: 15 MATI,NEE SUNDAY 2PM.

,

It’s tempting to say--“well, Sam Peckinpab has done it againcreated another tasteless,. bloody and even boring movie.” But although Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is even more boring than the last two Peckinpa! films, Junior Bonner ‘and the Getaway, it appears that Garrett isn’t even a Peckinpa h product. It is, according to the credits, directed by him. However, it seems that Sam lost control of the filming somewhere in the middle because he’went over budget and the backers at MGM decided he needed some more account-bookoriented minds looking eve; his shoulder. Rumour also has it that Peckinpah had nothing to say about the fi!m’s editing, which is sadly evident. This is a strange position tq be in, defending Sam Peckinpah whose excesses in film--blood and violence always exceed what I find acceptable. But in his previous films there has been a tightness and tension which kept up the pace and a sense of mood and place especially with his westerns. (The Getaway has to be ;!n exception to all this since, that movie despite jts frenetic pace, reached ’ the absolute in triviality.) Well, poor Sam, so he lost his film midway. But unfortunately not all can be blamed on the MGM moguls. .__ Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid now showing at the Lyric is sadly miscast with James Coburn who plays Garrett almost the only professional actor in the’lot. Jason Robarts Jr. makes a brief appearanceas Governor Lew Wallace and Slim Pickens and Chill Wills play their usual stock characters of tough guys with hearts of gold. - -Kris Kristopherson, count& rock’s golden boy, makes an at-tempt at playing Billy the Kid. And .a very dapper Billy he is, almost the fashion plate of Lincoln County in white shirt and black suit. Admittedly I am prejudiced in this as well, since I remember seeing a photo of the real Billy the Kid dressed in greasy overalls and dirty shirt. Someone who knew the real terror of the Arizona territory remarked that ithe only way you could stand being near’ the Kid was “if you stood upwind of him.” Kristopherson . with his cleanly shaven cheeks and boyish grin is obviously much more lovable than the real Kid, but hardly seems like ’ the” person wti0 killed people out of sheer spite. A young Steve McQueen is an, actor (another Peckinpah favorite so it is strange that he wasn’t chosen for the part) with enough sneer and swagger to convey the toughness and amorality of the real Billy and of the spirit of the territory at that time. After Kristopherson the actors (that word should be taken in its loosest sense) deteriorate even more rapidly in quality. The very well publicicized Bob, Dylan appears on the screen as the Kid’s sidekick much given to leaning

. graphic

against buildings and ap.pearing out of shadows with meaningful looks on his face. The pretentiousness of the movie reaches unbearable heights at the moment when Garrett turns to Dylan sitting alone at a table in the saloon and asks “what’s your name, kid.” An‘swers. Dylan, “That’s a good question.” Later, when Dylan turns up it- the Kid’s hideout he decides his name is Alias. Yes,~ existentialism has reached the golden west, folks. The hangers-on around Billy were actually Kristopherson’s own band. Unfortunately, it shows. Not one of them --has enough acting presence of mind to develop a believable character-which is not the- case in even John Wayne westerns. Rita Coolidge, by the way, iS also in this star-packed extravaganza as Maria, Billy’s Mexican maiden. She is very pretty and she smiles sweetly and it is a good thing she sings better than she acts. Because of the disjoinied’ scenes Pat Garrett reminded me very much of a low-budget and amateurish western called Zachariah. Zachariah was almost surreal, failing because of bad acting and awkward dialogue; but it came closer to protraying the gunfighter in the west and the relationship between the two young men than did Peckinpah with his big budget and cast of celebrities. One of the most absurd scenes in Pat Garrett is when the sheriff after meeting up with three of Billy’s gang in a saloon calmly and slowly kills two of the gang and the barkeeper while he has Dylan read the IabeEs of food,tins behind the bar. After a scene like that the_ audiep*se is still, --sgpJosed to empavhi’ie with a I’oc&i”sheriff’s ,wife when her husband is killed. This is after the three, Garrett, the sheriff and his shotgun-packing wife, ambush one of Billy’s friends. A film like Pat Garett and Billy the Kid is so much more offensive than something like Zachariah or even John Wayne westerns because of the violence (slowmotion killing of tied chickens yet) and because audiences unfortunately take Peckinpa h more seriously. And worse yet, they don’t seem to see the violence on the screen or feel the violence that is being done to them.

by don ballanger

The plot, by the way, has to do with Garrett being hired as sheriff by the cattle ranchers to run Billy out of their peace-loving territory or kill him if he won’t go. Naturally, silly won’t go peaceful. The legend has been depicted many times before in films that are a lot less pretentious and better acted. And Bob Dylan’s music isn’t worth the price of admission either. Deanna

kaufman

Lions and lambs Dvorak, Legends, London ’ Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Raymond Leppard. (Philips 6500188.) Dvorak’s Legends is a gem of a record which happens along only once- in a. long while. . Brisk happy tunes are a delight by themselves but here are coupled with expert performance and a first rate recording. What more could you ask? The music doesn’I_ drag since it’s in the form of ten cuts each 3 to 5 minutes long., Its origin is the same melodic folk vein as Dvorak’s popular ‘Slavonic Dances’. Highly recommended for anyone. Soundtrack of Henry’VUI and his Six Wives, Angel SF0 36895. David Munrow must be a busy man now that his prebaroque music has become so popular due to those BBC series Elisabeth R and Hecry the 8th. There are now 3 spinoff albums on Angel the most recent being the oniy one actually labklled as a soundtrack. This one contains much of that fascinating and energetic ancient material that has gained such a following recently but unfortunately also much original material by Munrow himself written to coincide with dramatic moments in the series. It is modernistic music played on ’ ancient instruments and is just an earsore when compared with the tuneful vitality of the older works. A letdown from the fine ‘Plea,sures of the Court’ album, Angel S 36851, which preceded this one. - pete smith


. friday,

the chevron

july 27, 1973

graphic

by don ballanger

Going , mad with ,Kurt /

Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut Fitzhenry & Whiteside Limited, (New York: 1973) price $9.15. jr.

Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., is a writer. That means he puts words together in combinations that amuse him, or make him think they will amuse others. He is paid to put the words together like that. Most writers do not get paid, but a few get paid very well. Kut Vonnegut gets paid very well, very well indeed. He was not always paid well. For a while, after he had tried to fight for his country against some Europeans, he worked for a very large company just like most of the rest of us. But he was writing stories at the same time, and they were good stories, they amused most of the people who read them. These stories were about the war he had tried to fight in, or about the large company he worked for. The people in the stories, and the things that happened to them, were mostly made up by Kurt Vonnegut. But a lot of it was true, or at least mostly true. The reason many people were amused by Vonnegut’s word-combinations is that he did not try to be a writer in the way that people were used to other people trying to be a write’r. He didn’t bandy about all the time with other writers. He didn’t go to elaborate pains to disguise the fact that the words he wrote were just words he decided to write. In fact, he often/ admitted openly in his stories that he was making it all up, and that he sometimes didn’t know what to make his characteFs do next. But, he always thought of something for them to do eventually, and his stories were published. People paid money to read his combinations of words, because they were too lazy or_ too busy to put their own combinations of words together. They used his. Most professional writers had a good racket going, as far as getting money is concerned. They would put combinations of words together. Then their publishers would print off thousands of copies of those word-corn binations, and put expensive hard covers around them. Then they w&Id sell the “rights” to these copies -to clubs which had trapped tens of thousands of people into choosing “this month’s selection.” After those thousands of people had i chosen the “select ion”, the publishers would print a lot of words and pictures about the book in variousnewspapers and magazines, called “ads”. Ads were, by this time in man’s evolutionary stance, technologically designed to make people think they had to have something which they did not really have to have at all. So, all the people who were influenced by these ads would rush to books stores and pay anywhere from $4.95 on up for a copy of these combinations of words. Then, when all those people had been used up, the rest of the people would be taken care of by selling copies of the book in cheaper, more easily destroyable forms, called paperbacks. Paperbacks were less expensive, but also quite profitable.

This was called the “publishing business”, ‘by which hundreds of executives, idea-men, ad-men, secretaries and other unnecessary people received money because one man had put together a combination of words. Kurt Vonnegut did not do this at first. The publishers and idea-men and ad-men, did not think his word-combinations would amuse very many people. So, the hardcover racket was skipped, and Vonnegut’s books were simply printed in paperback form right off, and this is the amount of money Vonnegut or anyone else expected to make off these paperbacks: doodleysquat. Which means very little indeed. But a lot of people were amused by these paperbacks, and told a lot of other people, who were also amused, and lots and lots of these paperbacks were printed and sold, and lots and lots of executives kicked themselves for not making it a “selectidn of the month”. So Vonnegut had the money and the audience to put together almost any combination of words he wanted, and he put together several he liked. But there was one combination he wanted to put together more than any other: it was about his being captured in the fight against the Europeans, and how he saw an entire city which was not a military target bombed to smithereens so that his country could save Europe. And so Vonnegut put that combination of words together, and made up a lot of people, and situations, even an entire planet and a new way of looking at things, and blended them with real people and real situations 2nd a real planet, and even admitted several times during the book that it was just a combination of words he had thought up and not for anybod) to take the whole thing very seriously. But a lot of people did. And a moviewhich is a combination of words plus pictu,res-was made about the book, which was ca I led SJaughterhouse-Five. And even Kurt Vonnegut started taking the whole thing pretty seriously. He took it so seriously that he decidedeven though he had already put together the combinatiop of words he wanted most badly to put together-to put together another combination of words. This time, Vonnegut did it right. He talked to a lot of people about it, which is called an interview. The interviews, like ads, are calcvlated to make a big fuss, in a lot’ of people’s minds ’ a bout something, in this case the new book. He also let the publishers put an expensive hard, brightly-coloured cover on it and make it a “selection of the month.” And ads were made up about it. Vonnegut’s picture was put on the back;after it was taken by the author-camera, which takes the pictures of all author? and makes them all look alike. In the new combination of words, which he calls by another combination of wordsBreakfast of Champions-Vonnegut makes up some more characters and talks about “going mad.” He even makes one of his characters go mad and hurt a lot of other people.

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He also talks about himself-Vonnegutgoing mad. He thinks a lot of people are going mad these days, because they don’t know whether they are machines or animals with a free will. This is one of Vonnegut’s favorite topics, but he has already put together great combinations of . words about it, and adds nothing new here. He also has drawn many little pictures in the book, to illustrate what he is writing about: assholes, flags, womens’ panties ,and beavers, tombstones, trucks, ETC. And so on. Kurt Vonnegut used to be a very special writer. Now he is just another “selection of the month.” So it goes.. . . . -george

kaufman

You

recently. Four makes it on the strength of the guitar interplay between Andy Turner and Ted Powell, whd weave complex acoustic-electric tapestries which overcome reservations as to the weakness of their material. A pleasant “easy listening” hard rock album, all in all, perhaps most attractive to those of us who need something to carry us over until the next I Who album is released. Even less heralded, but equally talented, is Atlantis (Vertigo 6360 609), whose debut album showcases a rough-hewn vocalist named lnga Runipf. Ms. Rumpf comes on like a healthy cross between Genya R’avan and Julie Driscoll, and is ably supported by a group whose musicianship is about 68 times as interesting as that of the Ten Years After-Savoy BrownFleetwood Mat variety. Uninspiring original songs, once again, but on the whole Atlatitis is 3 worthy companion to two other excellent-but-largely-unknown Vertigo acts, Jade Warrior and Gentle Giant. Ooh La La (Warner Brothers BS 2665), finally, continues the tradition of wildly variable quality exemplified on previous Faces’ albums. When Rod Stewart is wailing up front, and The Faces restrict themselves to providing a sound rock’n’r@l backing, this is one great band: “Borstal Grown,” and “My Fault” Boys,” “Silicone are the killer cuts here, and will provide sufficient justification for acquiring Ooh La La for fecllow Stewart aficionados. To get to these however, one has to put up with three Ronnie Lane vocals, the usual throwaway instrumental, and a batch of at best mediocre songs, so be discreet unless you’re already a Faces person. A suggestion for Warner Brothers: given the success of the Stewart-Jeff Beck collaborations on such classic items as “All Shook Up” and “Jailhouse Rock,” a similar venture with, The Faces might well result in their first album of uniformly acceptable quality.

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As one who came to rock via Motown rather than Liverpool, I’ve often had difficulty appreciating this week’s English super-group. Procul Harum drove me back to Bach; Led Zepplin drove me back to drink; and the Yes-Pink Floyd’ brand of cosmic noodling drives me back, period, preferably right out of whereever it’s being played. Thus the arrival of a batch of goodto-excellent albums by British artists provides an opportunity to transcend functional Anglo-phobia, and to reaffirm that national origins have little bearing on a music which represents one of the few concrete manifestations of the “global village.” Although Rick Wakeman is a member of Yes, his The Six Wives of Henry VIII (A & M SP 4361) is well above the level of their recent work. Wakeman’s keyboard virtuousity has been abundantly displayed previously, and it is certainly in evidence here; but since it is accompanied by a coherent and well organized set of arrangements, it achieves a contextual validity all too rare in music ofthe flash-myplimsoul variety. Henry VIII is somewhat vitiated by the current craze for frequent and arbitrary tempo changes, although Wakeman’s ability to compose intriguing melodies makes this’much less annoying than it could be. In the final analysis, however, it impresses as an ambitious and largely successful “concept album”, of particular interest to Emerson, Lake, and Palmer fans who find Yes’s last few albums more off the wall than close to the edge. Also in the “nice surprise” category is Wishbone Ash’s latest, Wishbone Four (MCA-327)-,which makes me sorry that I missed them when they were at Lutheran

Billion Dollar Babies (Reprise BS 2685) by Alice Cooper: when they stick to /rocbin’ n’rollin’, a reasonably diverting group; but almost half of this album consists of some rather tacky excercises in be-draggled pretentiousness, and without visua! theatrics these are about amusing as... a -clutch of dead babies (a “motif”). Most curious is “Unfinished Sweet,” which for some reason interpolates a theme from From Russia With Love midway through. Oh well, if they’ll let me be in their dream... Ekseption 5 (Phillips 6423 042): their best yet. The classical melodies from Bach and Beethoven are used as jumping-offpoints .for some excellent instrumental solos, with trumpeter Rein van der Broek and keyboard man Rick van der Linden standing out as highly accomplished musicians incorporating mainstream jazz styles in their playing. Phillips’ superb recorded sound captures it all on one of the most satisfying of the’rock-classical fusions proliferating recently. Bursting at the Seams (A & M SP 4383) by The Strawbs: this album is bursting, all right, but hardly with talent. If your taste runs to elaborately produced, -lyrically banal, and one-step-this-side-of-the-grave schlock-pop, you could conceivably enjoy this, although I had difficulty in staying awake through both sides. Moody Bluesers will like it, I suppose. . Raunch’n’Roll (Atco SD 7018) by Black Oak Arkansas: the worst live album since Bloodrock’s, and that’s saying something. The only remarkable thing about this singularly unappetizing group is lead singer Jim Dandy, who has John Kay’s pipes and Tom Jones’ ego, and should’ singlehandedly traumatize anyone unfortunate enough to listen to this album. Historians will remember that Black Oak Arkansas was once hyped as “The new Rolling Stones” by. . . yes indeed, Rolling Stone, acd that ought tq make you think twice before renewing your subscription. -pad

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the chevron

On March 16, at a public rally sponsored by the Canadian Women’s Coalition to Repeal the Abortion Laws, Dr. Henry Morgantaler publicly declared for the first time that he has performed nearly 5,000 abortions in his Montreal clinic. Following are excerpts from his statement which was greeted with a standing ovation from the audience of 500.

n October 1967 I presented a brief to the House of Commons Health committee in the name of the Humanist groups in Canada urging abortion on request in the first three months of pregnancy. It was a revolutionary idea at the time and to my knowledge the first occasion in Canada that a responsible organization had made such a proposal. As a result of the publicity surrounding my appearance in Ottawa and the many others that followed after I became the of the Humanist first president Association of Canada _ and continued law repeal, campaigning for abortion many women started coming to my office in Montreal saying to me: “Doctor, I heard your views and I am in trouble, can you help me?” I realized that I could do nothing .for these women and that there was no help available except to those who could travel to Japan or England: there were ,at that time no competent reputable doctors in Montreal or Canada to provide assistance to these women. I used to excuse myself saying that I could not aid them because it was against the law, that if I did help I could go to jail for the restof my life, that I had to think of my wife .and children etc. I saw these women drift off in despair, many of them to go to back-alley butchers, to risk death and injury at the hands of incompetent people, to abort themselves, or in some cases to go on to give birth to unwanted babies. As the abortion ‘campaign intensified, the stream and finally the flood of women seeking abortion made me realize the magnitude of the problem. I became painfully aware that there were thousands of women in Canada denied basic human rights and forced to risk their very lives when seeking an abortion because a law based on ignorance and religious prejudice would not allow them to obtain safe medical abortions and permit doctors to offer this help. It became clear to me that unjust laws create victims and that in this case the potential victims are all women of childbearing age subject to unwanted pregnancies, an accident of normal sexual activity, not the result of any crime. It dawned on me that it was not enough to fight for repeal of these barbarous laws but that it was also imperative to help the victims of these laws who could not wait months or years until the law would be changed. Their plight was real and they needed help NOW. I had a choice. I could continue to hide behind a screen of legality and refuse while denouncing these laws as cruel, unjust and dangerous to women, or else I had to defy them and offer help to women in order to protect them. , After a great deal of soul-searching I mustered enough courage to choose the only morally defensible course; to offer a helping hand in spite of the law. I am glad I had enough strength to

‘I am not a -criminal

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make this decision and to bear the stress resulting from it. I Two conditions had to be met in order to make such a decision valid and consistent with my philosophy and my conscience: the operations had to be done competently under the best, most modern and safe medical conditions; secondly, the fees had to be reasonable and adjustable downward even to zero, so that no person would be denied this service because of inability to pay. Both of these conditions were fulfilled. And now I wish to share with you tonight a secret widely known in Montreal, Quebec and by many people across Canada. I wish to make public that I have been doing abortions in my clinic in Montreal for the past few years and that I am proud, of having helped a few thousand women obtain safe medical operations. I am convinced that by doing so I have saved many from death and many others from injury, disease and tremendous anguish. I am firmly convinced that the law under. which I am now being tried is unjust,cruel and dangerous to women and unnecessarily restrictive. I claim the right to myself as a medical doctor to’provide help to my patients who want it without the approval of a threeman Board and without being forced to perform abortions in a hospital while I can do it well, under the best medical conditions, in my own clinic. I claim that my duty as a doctor is to assist women with unwanted pregnancies who ask for an abortion, to provide them with the best medical care available so that they are not exposed to the dangers

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of self-induced or incompetent operations done by quacks without medical knowledge. I claim that my moral obligation and duty to my patients to save their lives and health transcends the dead letter of a law based on religious superstition and false premises, a law which is widely disregarded by most Canadians as obsolete and unjust, and which has just been declared an unwarranted invasion of privacy by no less an authority than the Supreme Court of the United States. I finally claim that not only is my action in providing safe medical abortions to women wanting them, morally right; but that I firmly believe that it will be declared legal in due time by the courts of this country. Until such time that the highest courts of the land decide on these important questions, I believe that, according to legal opinion, the Canadian abortion laws are in violation of the Canadian Bill of Rights, and am therefore convinced that doctors performing abortions in good faith and by accepted medical standards are within the bounds of legality even though they disregard the stipulations limiting them as to the locale and conditions under which these operations can be performed. You are well aware that I am now before the courts of the country on three charges of the Criminal Code. Conspiracy to perform an abortion (Mark wellconspiracy; apparently it is a crime still for a woman to ask a doctor to perform a safe abortion and if he agrees, the two of them are apparently engaged in a criminal conspiracy); as well as two other charges of having performed illegal abortions. I cannot of course for obvious reasons

‘WELL, IF 1 WERE PREGNANT 1 CERTAINLY W&JLDN’T

HAVE AN ABORTION!’

july 27, 1973

go into details of the cases; but can tell you that I intend to fight these cases as a major challenge to the very laws under . which I am being tried. I do not believe that doing medically safe abortions is a criminal act. On the contrary, I feel very strongly that denying women safe abortions and exposing them to death and injury is criminal. I am firmly convinced that all those who oppose the liberalization of the C.anadian abortion laws and those who have the power to act to change these laws yet do not do so, have a moral and perhaps more than moral responsibility for the deaths and injuries of women who died and continue to die and be injured as a result of self-inflicted or botched incompetent abortions, because they were denied access to safe medical procedures before the law. If I have decided to speak of my clinic tonight in spite of the legal risks involved and the fact that I have three charges under the Criminal Code pending against me, it is because I believe that it is important for the Canadian people to know that clinics such as mine do exist, that they are safe and of benefit to women seeking abortions and that they would be the ideal solution to the abortion issue in this country by providing specialized facilities, easy of access, to all those in need of them at low cost under medicare. If I ‘have decided to take some risk tonight by making these public‘ disclosures, it is because I realize that in spite of the numbers of women helped in my clinic and similar facilities, there are still in this country thousands more who are deprived of this type of help because of the restrictions of the law. The requirements of a three-man Board and this in a restricted number of hospitals severely limits access to legal abortions and thus makes them difficult to obtain for the majority of Canadian women desiring to do so; this provisionris contrary to the Canadian Bill of Rights and violates the fundamental right of privacy recognized by the U.S. Supreme Court. It is high time the Canadian government follows the example given by the U.S. Supreme Court and repeals the Canadian abortion laws. The excuses given for inaction are no longer valid; there are a clear majority of Canadians, two out of-three, who favour repeal. There is no reason why the Canadian government should deny Canadian women the services freely available across the border by imposing restrictions found unreasonable and dangerous by enlightened legal and medical authorities. ’ I hope the time will come soon when birth control clinics including out-patient abortion facilities will be established across Canada, when women in need of abortion will be allowed to have them without legal hindrance, under the best and most modern conditions. I hope that my medical experience as well as my campaign for safe abortions for women will contribute to this end. In the meantime, I pledge you to continue the fight for this fundamental human right. Looking back on the last few difficult years I feel a great sense of accomplishment; I feel that of all the things I have done, providing safe abortions for women in an atmosphere of compassion and understanding was the most important and gratifying thing I have done in my life. ---from

the Spokeswoman


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bias which would lead people,-to believe that homosexuality is considered a normal form of sexuality. eespite claims from both sides to the contrary, I believe it is correct to say that there is no definitive answer to the question at this time. A bias in favour of homosexuality could have have the effect of encocraging it and I do’ not believe that public funds should be used for something *that might permanently affect the emotional stability of people exposed to such literature. l While as a conservative, I am Opposed to ‘the censorship of any privately funded literature designed for adults, because public funds are being used in this project and because the -material is designed fQr distribution to minors, I believe -the - government ‘ has a responsibility to maintain editorial control over the contents of this handbook. This, they have Last week I was sent a couple of copies not done. of your article of <July 13, 1973 about On the basis of these conclusions, J told Operation Socirates which I read with a the people a$ the meeting that it was my great .deal of interest.Unfortunately, Deanna- Kaufman, wh6 intention to ask to have the Secretary of . wrote the article, did not accurately report Sta’te called before the Standing Committee .on s Broadcastirig, -Films, and the nature of my involvement with the Assistance to the. Arts (which approved ’ project and appeared more interested in the estimates for OFY) to ?explain the demonstrating creativetalent . than reasons for the funding of this and other reportorial skills. The result was that the OFY projects and to discuss the structure article was, in many ways, inaccurate and of the Opportunities for Youth Program -incomplete. which has never been submitted to Perhaps I could betpermitted to reply to the allegations made in the article in order Parliament for incorporation into legislation despite the fact that it has to present your readers with some pf the facts that were not included in it. -already cost the Canadian taxpayer’s about $100 million. It was my belief at - At the request of a Kitchener resident th’at time that everyone who was present who was concerned about the govemat the, meeting felt this course of action ment’s decision to fund this project, I would be fair both to the public and to the telephoned the organizers of Operation project organizers . ‘Socrates to make arrangements to visit I btilieve that, whenever pub& funds them in their ohfice the following day. I ‘are used, the public is entitled, first, to full had read the Kitchener-Waterloo Record discl&ure of the nature of the project and, stbry about it-and heard oth”er secondsecondly, to an assurance that the public hand accounts and felt that I owed it to titerest will be protected. Unfortunately, both’ ,$he project organizers and- to my because ‘of the refusal by the. project constitu&ts to get all the facts I could organizers even to make their budget about the project before deciding whether public -ostensibly, because they -could see to pursue the matter or to let .it drop. I no reason to do so-and because of the took with me Mrs. Carol Verduw a of State to protect member of the Local Advisory Board that . failure of the Secretary -the public interest, I do iot believe the approved this project and one sf. its should be allow?d -to simply supporters. I felt that she was entitled to . goyernment , ignore its responsibility. be present to participate in the meeting t”o It now appears that we will be unable to help ensure that the organizers would get a fair hearing. have the Minister called before:- the As a result of our discussions I reached Committee prior to the summer recess. a number of conclusion@ which I explained Accordingly, I will be writing him to to the gfoup, namely: request that the Operation Socrates cant l I am not convinced that they have-the be continued only under the condition that professional experience at preparing thq government would be able tg approve questionnaires and educational booklets the contents ~of the handbook prior to its publication. which the handling of such a subject requires. s When we igain haie the opportunity to , ‘0 I ,am convinced d‘f: the group’s sincerity - call the Secretary of State before the and I do not ,believe that any of them can Standing Committee, I will be wanting be accused of misleading the government him to explain his reasons for giving this grant with no adequate safeguards atabout their (project. If there is-any fau& to be found with the project, it is to .be found tached, especially in light of the fact that with the government arid not with the both the 1ocal’Member of Parliament, Max Saltsman, and the Ontario Ministry of principals of this group who, to the best of . my knotiledge, are d&g nothing illegal or Health, which was consulted by the dishonest. Department, recommended against giving the grant. l The fact that a number of them are I ‘am sorry that the Chtivron-did not go hom&exuals is irrelevant. ’ to the trouble to report all the facts ‘L l There is indeed a need f& educational this project, but I hope this material relating to homosexuality as w&11‘ concerning letter will serve to correct some of the asother aspects ofsexuality such as birth misunderstanding fostered by the article: control land venereal disease. However, -Petin Beatty, M.P. this material should be prepared by . ’ lprdfessionals and should not -iticlude a ’ - _ _-Wellington~Grey-Dufferin-Waterloo . .7 .,* ,- 1’2 = \ . *

Deanna’s _.creativ6 talent

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. You know you are one of the CI&P$+ if you remember: l It’s 12: 15 and Kung Fu .hasn’t started-“Call Grand River!” l You didn’t get problem’ 2.2.2. l You decided-not to vote on whether you were going to vote on whether you were going to vote on how you were going to vote on whether or not ewe were going to have a second midterm. And ,whether this vote would be secret ballot or by show of hands. : l The course &tting ‘tensor’ than last year. ’ ’ l Slapping on some load lines, hanging some capacitors, and even after shaking a stick at it, all you got was negative feedback, and it @id not,look operational. l SayinIg, “Insult my intelligence, please.” . l ’ Giggling before the three hour midterm. . Not knowing the answers were in the back of. the book on the open-book rni-dterm. l Everyone wanting to drop-out. l “Whereis Bricker? I got a job I didn’t want!” about 30% initiallytiut finally about 75 %. I , - l The midterm whichaveraged l You can make a ham sandwich with‘bread on the outside and ham in the middle, or with bread in the middle aiid ham on the outside. (No one knows where to put the mustgrd.) l The prof commenting, “Dr. Leech corn-mended me on my brave@ in attempting this method, since it hasn’t met with much success.” otThe couple in bed who created a runaway feedback ampli,fier. 0’ “If the reader ever encounters one-sided surfaces such as Moebitis strips, it is suggested that he’either cut them and form reasonable, well-behaved surfaces or label them patholdgicaland send them to the nearest mathematics department.” l Efficiendy of a Bricker engine : no work input, but lots df hot, hot air output ‘co-op

_ ‘The better

honours

applied physics student physics summ$73 ._ i

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to judg,e-

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This is a time of shrinking university enrolment, rising tuition and widespread disillusionment with higher education. In spite of this, the policy of the university of Waterloo is that the professors teach students only as a sideline to their research and studies. Consider the professor ev&‘lyations at the end of each term. The results are seldom seen by the students tid are often ignored by the professors. Onl! alternative; proposed by a group of students in ‘a 1B Syqtems Design Sociology class, is a mid-term evaluation of a less fohalized format (ie. not multiple choice). Although this format makes it harder to get statistics, wider student response in comments is achieved. A survey of the professors was also done to get their opinion of the ‘formal survey currently in use. The results of the 1B Systems Design survey sho_wed that a mid-term su_r)ley was preferred by the professors and that_unlessclass time was given,. student returns to the questionnaire were poor. There was a greater-range in’ the students’ comments as expected: iThe professo& also fe!t that the formalihed survey did not pinpoint any problems if there were any. - In conclusion it is rsommended that professor evaluations be carried out during the mid-term, to improve the professor’s teaching techniques and to dispei the feeling that professors are not inteieste-d in the progress of their students. I , . richard brimmel systems design \

member: canadign university press (CUP)>and (OWNA). The chevron is typeset by .dumont federation of students,‘incorporate& university sibility of the chevron staff, in’dependent of the campus centre; phone (5-19) 885-1660;885-1661 Summer circulation

Ontario weekly newspaper dissociation presi grap_hix and published by the of water-loo. Content is the responfederation. Offices a,re located in the or university local 2331. : 9,000 _

The last regular issue of the summer, and many unexpected people popped out of the cement-wiik to help US ori this one; by the way, if you are so moved by’the article on the opposite page (10, for ’ ’ those with a small vocab), you may join a nation-wide petition campaign to support the-dropping of , charges against Dr: Morgantaler. we meapnt to include‘s handy send-in petition form, but there wasn’t room...anyw8y, send your signature (and your friends’) and your support to: Canadian Women’s’ ,Coalition to repeal the abortion Laws, P.O. Bojc 5673, station‘ A, Toronto. See you in the fall, friends and neighbourSIIendinga hand.this time: .mike rohatynsky, Susan gable, hard-w&king . george neeland, bru‘ce meharg, dapny doo, rick schler, ken tihyte, daniel lam, deanna’kaufman, kati middleion, paul stuewe, peter Yates;. peter hopkins, sally kemp,-mel rotman, ‘Susan Scott, david cubberley, nick (the-greek) savage, george s kaufman ahd all the ducks in the dumont pond. gsk.


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An exhibition qf .fiue womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings, drawings, and constructions is presently in the art gallery qf the modern languages building. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Funfies

july

27, 1973


1973-74_v14,n07_Chevron