Page 1

volume

11 number

51

UNIVERSITY

OF WATERLOO,

Waterloo,

Ontario

friday

16 april

1971,

WLU cadministrution )hreatens

who was more alike, Antonio or Portia? Compare Shakespeare. Define the universe and give five examples. How many megatons does it take to make a mess[ Was the. . . ” .

,-

.

.

Strong objections have been raised from many corners of the university over the space usage proposed by the architectural firm of Page and Steele, the designers of the object of disenchantment, the student services building. In a scathing attack of the defederation of student’s , sign, president Rick Page and vice president Carl Sulliman took aim at “an entire basement floor of a 2.1 million dollar “student services” building.. .utterly wasted on thirty-six indoor parking spaces! Surely it is not suggested that thirty-six indoor parking spaces is any kind of meaningful alleviation of the parking problem on this campus.” Page and Sulliman issued their

This is the very last chevron this term. Next issue about mid may. The community is\. sue scheduled to accompany _this paper did not materialize for lack of copy and volunteers to produce and distribute it. Voices, the chevrorz ‘s experimen ta1 magazine is due on campus next wednesday. of

attack in a 4 page letter to Burt Matthews, administration president. The letter pointed out that the student services building does not include space for offices for the federation of students, the chevron or radio Waterloo, considered by the student group to be “student services”. A change in location for the federation of students and the chevron has been recommended by the campus center study committee report which states, “We have recommended a clear disassociation between the federation of students and the campus center.. . the physical re-location of the federation and chevron offices elsewhere on campus. ” In the april 14 edition of the Gazette, Matthews is described as being “not clear what action can be taken, or when it can be taken, in connection with some of the recommendations (of the campus centre study committee report)...for example, the move of the federation of students and chevron offices out of the camto provide more pus center, recreational space, will be contingent upon space being available elsewhere”. / Page and Sulliman attempt a strong case for the conversion of the underground, pay parking lot into office space for the federation of students, the chevron and possibly radio Waterloo, in their letter to Matthews. “We would like to contend once again that these parking spaces are not only ‘elitist’, but a great waste of needed space and money.” Attacks have been made on other space allocations in the building. The 6,006 square foot allocation for a ‘-presidential suite” has received wide criticism, with special attention directed at the need for an information services (publishers of Gazette) allocation directly beside

The administration at WLU has voiced it’s displeasure at the printing of a cord spoof issue, cored, by voting to ,cut off collection of funds for campus publications. And it appears that student union president John Buote has taken the university’s move with the attitude that the student union will not make an issue of the cut of fund collection, but will rather attempt to pursuade the campus to voluntarily support the paper. In danger of dying with the cord is the campus radio station, yearbook, telephone directory and literary publications. The 9.90 -dollars in fees directed to publications will be cut from the fee statements this fall if the decision of the executive commit-

tee of the board of governors carries through the‘ rest of the university’s administrative channels, Although it seems that the student administrative council will make little effort to save the student newspaper, some effort . will be put forth to negotiate with. the university on behalf of the other organizations under the publications tag. The cord, in the ‘meantime, hopes that enough enthusiasm and interest can be generated under the new editor Paul Jones to save the paper. The board of governors stated that they took action to cut off funds from the cord because the april 1 spoof issue hurt the university”s public image.

services office requirements of the presidential suite. of campus, will contain finanThe student services building cial services, purchasing, perthe university, and for less, if (as of this moment) will house sonnel, internal audit, physical not equal costs. the presidental offices, the office . plant and planning and the office Federation of student’s repreof the vice president academic, sentatives Page and Sulliman of the vice president of finance have pointed out that “as conthe registrar’s office, co-ordinand operations. This 1.5 million struction of that building (stuation and placement, counselling, dollar, 52,000 square foot building the career planning library, has also been designed by the dent services) has just started, housing and residence operations, re-vamping of the architect’s Toronto firm of Page and Steele. the graduate office, research. Some question has arisen as to design can be easily done.” It admin., academic services and would seem that more than a the need for two buildings when few allies for this proposal could the infamous pay parking lot. A one construction of less elaborate second building, administrative design might have housed the X be found a’mong the taxpayers services, located at the north’ end en tire administrative and student of the area.

Soci&ies fail in Five attempts to assert the right of student societies to a larger portion of the federation of students’ activity fee were thwarted at a crucial federation budget meeting april5. The moves were initiated by exofficio society representatives Bob Beggs and Paul Spafford. Both are out-going presidents of math and engineering ‘B’ societies, respectively. Several. society officials attending the meeting urged higher revenue allocations for the federation’s major concerts and weekends and a corresponding reduction in subsidy - a move they felt would allow larger council grants to individual societies. Motions that the federation hire full-time secretaries for each of the societies, increase the direct grant to societies to 20,900 dollars, and cut its chevron subsidy t.o a flat 35,000 dollars - all designed to force council to channel more money into society coffers -- were all defeated. Federat”ron president Rick Page noted the initially-proposed lO,000 dollar grant to societies had been increased to ‘l5,OOO dollars after a review of society needs,

but that

demands

he saw no justification

for further increases. Page claimed the societies ha’d not even completely used the available funds in the past year’s operating budget, and further stated the societies “will have to justify to me” that their grant is being used for “educational” purposes, not entertainment services. The original purpose in providing grants to societies was to have societies carry out educational projects (such as seminars and course evaluations) they were better suited than the federation to perform, said Page. Although council re-af f irmed its policy of subsidizing major entertainment events on campus, Beggs received some support for increasing grants to societies by a further 5,000 dollars - a motion defeated by only three votes. Other budget changes in the marathon five-hour debate inI cluded l a grant of 500 dollars (up 300 dollars from the original proposal) ‘to Crossroads Africa, and l an allocation of 470 dollars ‘or representation at the up-

coming special conference of World University Services. Both projects involve university of Waterloo students. In other business, council postponed indefinitely , consideration of support for the planned may 3 ‘ ‘parity ’ ’ demonstration in Toronto by Waterloo Lutheran university, and failed to resolve a demand by some engineering students that it act on a socalled “impeachment” petition against Page. A delegation of engineers claimed Page’s support for a motion passed by council at its last. meeting contravened the right of engineers to seek their own entertainment. They were referring to council’s condemnation of those “involved” with an engineering stag two weeks ago which featured female strippers. Council had re-affirmed a year-old policy statement which called for withdrawal of financial support to any campus body which contributes to the oppression of the female body. A compromise proposal that would have taken the policy statement to a referendum of the students never came to a vote.


the chearan requires

a

contact Counselling & Health Ambulance ........................... .579-1010 Birth control center ..................... .578-4843 (tuesday 9-12 noon, or thurday 7-9 pm ......... .3446 Counselling services (9-5) 2655 Toronto drug information ................ 533-8501 Health services . . . . . ..................... 3541 Hi-line (7pm - 7am) . . . . ................. 745-4733 K-W hospital . . . . . . . . ................. 742-36 11

Full-time summer -production editor

Administration Student awards . . .. . .. . .. Better business bureau . . . . . . Book store (Q-5). . . . . . . . . . . Burton Matthews (president) crffice . . . . . .-. . . . . . . . . home (6pm - 8am) . . .. Howard Petch (academic VP). Waterloo Lutheran . . . . . . . ::

The summer production editor will be responsible for assigning, rewriting and copy-editing news stories and news features, and to a l&rge extent will co-ordinate and assist in layout of all facets of the paper (news, features, sports photo and entertainment) up to and including production. Journalism training or experience, preferably in an editorial position with a weekly newspaper, is mandatory. Personal interview wilt be conducted. The’position is salaried.

Send application,

in writing,

-

BEST ACTOR

-

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Conference on Mobius Algebras. 10 am and 2 pm HUM334. Century Band. $1 .OO 8:30 pm Campus center free movies. The ,Haunted Sponsored by PP -Le. 8 pm TUESDAY Conference on Mobius Algebras. 10 am MC Toronto express bus leaves the campus center 5158 for Toronto 1:30 & 4:30 pm. Sponsored by Pub dance with Hooker Family. 8:30 pm cc Federation of Students. pub area. federation members 50~; non-members 75~ Federation flicks. Bullit and The Fox. 8 pm Conference on Mobius Algebras. 10 am and Campus center free movies. Beach Party AL1 16. members 50~; non-members $1 .OO 2 om MC51 58 8pm Campus Center free movies. Brute, and the Campus, center free movies. Wild in the WEDNESDAY Beast. 8 pm streets. 8 pm Pub dance with Rain. 8:30 pm cc pub area. -_ federation members 25e ; non-members 75~ SATtiRDAY MONDAY Conference on Mobius Algebras. 10 am and Campus center free movies. Reptilucus 8pm Gay liberation movement will hold general 2 pm MC51 58 THURSDAY meeting regularly monday evenings during Campus center free movies. Fantastic flyspring term. Everyone welcome. 8 pm HUM W.U.S.A. and Cotton Federation Flicks. 161 grad lounge. ing fools. 8 pm comes to Harlem. EL201 8 pm .__y * ‘.x.,.~$p~\‘. ..~.., ..,p:.$ ,... ..;v.@.s.. > b,,~. ...I ...>.........A.. >.+.:p.qr ?. .,,.r:~~ .&.<;<<y< ... .zyy,. T..-. .. ..<.. .Y .q>$qq.<~p~,yzp@ .. , y yy <,a$., .....A..*. %?, ~,e+,~..&+~.~ .‘.W.. ....v,w<:<.:$.y.., ...~:.....~...:.:~.:~~~~~.~:~:.~~~::.~~:,~.~::.::~.:.~,:,~. .* :.~qx???.. , <.A,.y....~,,),..__ _ ,A._,0.“““.....s~z2ww.:~~...:* ~....‘~~~~ ... .,.,,..,>,,$,,_...$,,, ~~~~~~~~~~~.;~~~~~~:.~~~;:,~~.,.:.?,~~~~:~~~..~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ‘.A ..&/y...>+. ;v.&.+,‘......y... .......>..<<.:..s.byh$. vlz.&++.Q..:... ...,.,,s ,,~~~:~,:.~.~..~.,~,~ ~.~~.., .a,....*,. 3.,x.*cc.<.nx .+..w.>~>~ ...* is > 3*%x ..ht /A ~~~~:~~~:.~:~.~~.~~:.~~~?~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~?~~,~~ .....,,. .x:...:*.>.< .>.b...

Classified ads are accepted between 9 and 5 in the chevron office. See Charlotte. Rates are 50 cents for the first fifteen words and five cents each per extra word. Deadline is tuesday afternoons by 3 p.m.

AWARDS

BEST ACTRESS HOUSING AVAILABLE Furnished room with full kitchen ing. 83 William street west. 744-5809

,...._ ...-a

Ali MatSraw* RyanO’NealCOLOR

\Volunteers wanted tel this summer. 576-5128.

for Kitchener For information

in

DRIVE-IN OPENS 7 pm STARTS at 7:30 pm . sorry - No children Admitted to this program

U of W jacket 578-9288

Room and bath for 2 men. 36 1 Dale crescent. 745-2550

lettering,

I t started out

Commune forming. A alternative to the family. Box 28, Clarkson, Ontario

asfive love stories. ’

Summer Waterloo

Wanted to rent or buy mobile home. Desperate.

It didn’t end that way.

Apply single living

now rooms room

To sublet two bedroom apartment 332 Regina street north, available may 1, Phone 579-3 1 17

included

in their

annual

student Sand

fees

Double rooms, sitting chen, shower, private High street. 744-7044 One to three persons on University avenue. Glenridge dr)

to aca part-

address

room entitles changes

of

W

promptly

Furnished bachelor apartment, may-september. Waterloo Towers, $120 ideal for two. Visit 712 or phone 579-6246 or 579-4414. Large one bedroom apartment at Waterloo Towers, furnished including cable TV for may to September. For further information Phone 578-5645. Girl students for September. Very nice furnished, modern, carpeted, single and double rooms, near university and trolley, large kitchen and bathroom. 578- 1469. Apartment Waterloo Tower. Must sublet from april 25 to September. One bedroom, furnished, unbelievable view. Call 579-6526

room, entrance.

complete kit$10 weekly.

to share “co-op” Phone 576-2638

house (251A

Single rooms for male students, complete kitchen in basement, parking. 15 minutes walk to U of W. $1 1 weekly. Apply 118 Columbia street. 744-7790. Apartment to sublet may terloo Towers, 5 minute Phone 579-2652 Rooms for rent cludes excellent ten minute walk 2176.

to September Wawalk to university.

from Niay to September incooking facilities. Only a from university. Phone 576-

Three floor, minimal kitchen facilities suitable for one-or two girls, furnished, on Waterloo. 744-4884 after five. Two bedroom apartment. $143 a month, partly furnished, University avenue. April 30 to September 1 (lease ends sept 1). Sofa, living room rug, chair, drapes plus one bed. Phone 578- 1686.

Large Podium suite, completely furnished, 5 minute walk to campus. $165 monthly; regular $220. Phone 579-2767 . ’ Girls, 2 double room in town house. Full use of home and outdoor pool. No ,restricting regulations. Call Mrs. Wright 745-l 1 1 1 weekdays; 745- 1534 evenings. Wanted 1 or 2 girls to share furnished apartment near campus. May to august. Rent $43 monthly. Call 745-03 15.

Wanted 1 or 2 girls to share 2 bedroom Tower’! apartment. Phone 578-0797 or write Sue Cav. an, 285 Erb street west, No. 4.01. stvdents to:

lo

The

receive Chevron,

the

Chevron

Um’versi,y

by of

maif Waterloo,

during

off-campus Waterloo,

Two girls wish to share or let a small two bedroom furnished apartment in central Ottawa or Tunney’s Pasture or Vanier city areas. May to September. Phone 579-6534 or write Pam Needham, RR 2. Picton, Ontario. terms.

Ontario.

Rooms for rent for may term Westmount road close to university. 576-4429 For rent 1 bedroom apartment. 430 Hazel street, apt 6, 744-0140. $1 15 monthly couple only.

HOUSING WANTED Chevron editor desires bachelor or one-bedroom apartment, furnished, with kitchen. Token salary, so rent must be reasonable. Willing to take for summer or for full year. Should be close to university. Contact Alex Smith, 578-7070 or exterision 3443.

383H. U

Three bedroom semi-furnished apartment available may 1st. close to university, shopping reasonable. Call Warren 579-5207.

Are you in civil eng 4A this summer? Good. So why not to share a 1 bedroom furnished apartment in Waterloo Towers? Calls expected on 579-2333

small house trailer or Phone Rod 579-6055

TYPING Typing see Linda, Humanities or call exten’sion 2881.

subscriptionfee

accomodation available. Co-op 578-2580.

RIDE AVAILABLE Driving to Saskatoon via’ Winnipeg april 22. Want passengers to share driving and gas. 578-8686 Ottawa: girl looking for second to share apartment in Ottawa for the summer. Jackie 5794456

$%&J CANNON.RlCHARO CRENNA ;;GENE HACKMAN . CARROLL O’CONNOR $RACHEL ROBERTS. JANlIZ% RULE DIANA SANDS.CARA WILLIAMS A

Unitarian humanistic For information write

Student accomodations available furnished; kitchen priviledges; with TV, fireplace. Call 743-6544.

Cross free.

Can you keypunch? We need people curately punch various small jobs on time basis. See Al in the chevron office.

or apply

Two bedroom apartment may to September, U of W one half mile. Erb street. $150 monthly. 579-2992.

Girl to share 2 bedroom apattment with 2 girls. Own bedroom, rent $53. Waterloo Towers. 578- 1607. Retail Manager, summer or full time. Canada or local. Exyellent training Phone Joe 699-5702; Don 699-5935.

each.

to become part owner of a corporation? and live at co-op this summer. 578-2580.

Want Come

WANTED Photographers models wanted for local parttime figure and glamour work. Experience’ not necessary but helpful. Reply stating qualifications and experience along with a photograph and phone number to: Photographer, Box 224, Palmerston, Ontario.

Except husbands.

a week

Apartment to sublet may 2 to sept 1, large two bedrooms, sauna, swimming pool, parking. $159 monthly. University and Weber. Call 579-6393 or write 55 Hickory street east apt 204

Interested in a house for sale in a wooded area? Three bedroom stone front split level, broadloomed throughout, living room, dining room, recreation room with fireplace, den or playroom, two bathrooms, main floor laundry room with walk out to large treed lot. Completely fenced. Asking price $33,900 may be carried for $131 monthly PIT. Vendor will take back second mortgage. Vendor transfered and has bought. Available immediately 578-9414.

Wives have everyth~ing.

$10

Furnished rooms, parking. 742-0727 234 Herbert street, Waterloo.

Private sale. $200 monthly student income from this large, nine-room, seven year old split level with attached g‘arage on quiet crescent in university area. Must sell - owner leaving country. 576-6573.

o D actors’

Need one more guy to share large, furnished. two bedroom apartment. May to September. Pool and sauna. 579-4556.

Seven bedroom house available may 1. Centrally located in beautiful downtown Waterloo. Ideal for large family of freaks. Rent $300 monthly. Contact Gabe at 192 King street south or phone 742-3883.

youth hoscall Bruno

no arm

park-

Nice furnished, modern, carpeted, single, and double rooms in new house near univer‘sity. Large kitchen and bathroom, very reasonable rent. 578- 1469. Clean rooms for rent, linen supplied, close to university. Phone anytime 576-6972

Pa&port or job application pictures. $3.50 for a set of 4. regulation size; see Steve lzma in the chevron offices or leave your name and phone number. FOR SALE Gold leather size 38. $35.

and

Montreal: large 2. bedroom furnished apartment, sublet may to September. Balcony, parking, near metro. Call 514-931-2049 or write J. Bates, 1830 Lincoln, No. 4. Montreal.

Macrame classes, 6 weeks. Starting may 5. Call 742-4766 The Open Door, 8 Queen Street North.

PIIRAYOUNr PlClURESPRISENlS

998 the Chevron

...... ........... 3444 ...... . . . ....... 578-7070 ...... . . . ........... 3443 . .*. . . ....... 578-7072

Pub dance with Whitehorse 8:30 pm Food services. federation members 25~ ; non-members $1 .OO Campus center free movies. Fire Ball 500. 8pm SUNDAY Toronto express bus leaves lslington Spbway station and returns to campus center 9 pm Sponsored by Federation of Students.

PERSONAL Volunteey are needed to participate in recreatlonal program for boys and girls at the Children’s Aid Society. Volunteers will have the opportunity to participate in activities of interest to children in such areas as sports, socializing. crafts, camping or just’ plain Phone 576-4264

2

Chevron Alex Smith (editor) .. Newsdesk & secretary (classified, TWOC) . Advertising . . . . .. .

. . . . . . . 3583 , . 742-1814 . . . . . . 2253

. .. 579-5850 A.. .... 2405 2478

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~.

TODAY Pub Dance with Appeton Members 50~; non-members Festival room food services. International Students Assoc.

LOST Bicycle - monday night. Please leave front of campus center as soon as possible.

CAPITOL Continuous I:30 pm FEATURE TIMES at 1:35 ’ 3:40 - 5:45 - 7:55 - 10:05 LAST SHOW at 9:40 pm

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .578-2670

.. . .. . . . . . . . .2201 . .. . . .. . .578-8918 Miscellaneous . .. . . .. . . . . . .2809 Campus center desk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3867 .. . .. . . . .744-8 141 Pizza01 am-2am) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ‘...744-4447 . .,...\; .q.r.+,<;u..q*~$$$~y ,... ...~. ..._., A&p .. A.., .I..,,.. ‘9, .,.(~,~;~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~.‘.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.:~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~;~~~~~~rr..~~.u~~~....~~~~~~~.,.,............~

FOUND . Set of notes for into. to combinatorics (math 239a) in 81027 1. Contact Tom in the chevron /’ fotografix office, campus center.

.......-i..‘.

Federation of students Dial-a-dance (24 hours) Student directory . . . . . ............... Federation offices . . . . . ............... Rick Page (president) . . ......................

. . . + . .<s,z,~~,y...yA

to:

deadline is 5 pm april 23, 197 i

OR 7 ACADEMY BEST FILM

. . .

.3211 .744-6101 .743- 14 11

This week on campus is a free column for the annguncement of meetings, special seminars or speakers, social events and other happenings on campus-student, faculty or staff. See the dhevron secretary or’ call extension 3443. Deadline is tuesday afternoons by 3 p.m.

the editor chevron campus ten ter university of Waterloo Application friday,

Security Campus security ... :. ...................... Waterloo police ........................ Kitchener police .......................

.....................

may 1 through august 15

\

Contact is a service provided by the chevron for listing important telephone numbers often sowght when a university directory is not available. If you wish an exceptional number listed, call 3443 between 9 and 5.

Non-studenh:

$8

annually,

$3

a term.


GS by Renato chevron

olitical I Ciolfi

of the organization to the federation of students. In a letter sent to the chevron, on Wednesday, the ISA repudiates the Grad Bag editorial and invites --the editor to resign and apologise to the ISA for “...writing such unnecessary garbage. ”

-‘

staff

An editorial in the latest edition of the Grad Bag, has helped create a new political battle between the graduate student union and the international student association. The federation of students has also entered the controversy, through an open letter Rick Page, federal president has sent to the executive of the GSU.

_I

games

The editorial, signed by Peter Lawrence, newly elected editor of the Grad Bag, ‘accuses the of ISA of “... blatant distortions the truth...” and it also states that the GSU did in fact try to consult the international association but that they simply refused to answer the letters and therefore the graduate union had no choice but to present. its own unilateral briefs to the federation of students. These briefs dealtwith the future use of campus center rooms and were submitted to the campus @enter study committee. The GSA in the brief stated tkat it was in tke best interest of both the. GSU and ISA to present a united front and both associations ask that they be allocated a room in the campus center, as a reading and recreational center. The graduate union went on to argue that co&operation between tbe two organizations would result in “A greater canadian international understanding...” and that the foreign students would feel more at home as a result of the united front of the two groups.- The GSU argued in their brief that neither of the two organiza tions members make much use of the campus center. The creation of the readwould ing-recreational room help graduate and international students -make better use. of the campus center, while at the same time fullf ill the basic function that the center itself was meant to develop. The Grad Bag in support of its editorial, prints the graduate union’s brief, a letter sent to the president of- ISA and a letter sent by Andrew Wu, president

In the letter, Wu states that he never received -a letter from the grad union, regarding the matter in question. He also goes on to state that the international association wants no part of a common brief with the graduates. He states that the two organizations have very little in common, that while the graduate union’s main concern is with its members only, the ISA welcomes all students, be they undergrads or grads. He calls “fallacious assumption” the statement in the graduate’s brief that “‘most international students do not use tke campus center”. He states that the members of the international club make frequent and varied use of the facilities of the center. Wu also pointed out that ISA cooperates with most of the ethnic groups on campus.

The decision to replace Tor Bjornstad as director of the school of architecture followed a month long series of discussions with * students and faculty. dissatisfied Students were with changes made in the third also they quesyear program, tioned the relevance of certain courses. The issues raised during the discussions were numerous, but the main issue centered around the directions the school of architecture was taking under the leadership of Brogstad. Particular aspects of the profession are rapidly becoming obsolete, thus doing away with the necessity of certain types of training. As the department

,

manager,

and

Full-time news editor September

1 - a@430

,‘72

Production manager will supervise entire production of the paper, including coordinating and preparing for production, all departmental pages (excluding news). Duties include supervising final production of paper one-day per week at printer, and distribirtion of paper on campus. News editor will prepare all news and news features for production (including assigning, rewriting, copy-editing and layout), and will assist the production manager as required.

For both positions, ience, preferably weekly newspaper, salaried.

in

journalism training or experan editorial position with a is mandatory. Positions are

Send

application, in writing, to: the editor chevron campus center university of Waterloo Application deadline is 5 pm Wednesday, june 30,197l

Personal

interview

will

be conducted.

This statement, totally repudates the allegation made by the GSU in their brief, regarding the use of the campus centre by ISA members. He concludes, warning duates union, to “...be

Rich Page, has come out strongly in favor of ISA, in an open letter to the GSU. He states that the international students association is doing a vital job on campus, work that would be beyond the means of the graduate union or the time of the federation. The federation of students recognizes ISA as an indkpendent body within the federation and that since- the organization has expressed a direct wish to remain within the structure of the federation, he has accepted their wish.

by

Jerry

Malzan staff

the grasure of

your contact with such organizations as ISA before submitting briefs in their names. ” Lack of communications and playing politics have created one more crises with - the student body of this university. It would seem better that instead of bickering among ourself, the students and the graduates should try to help each other and not play power politics to the depre-. ment of students.

s

is in the growing process, students demand that they keep up with the current trends in the profession. Dean of architecture and env studies Peter Nash admitted that much soul searching is needed both by the department and students alike. Presently a selection committee is being set up to find a new director. Brognstad will carry on until his replacement arrives, _after which he will take a sabbathical.

Two

ISA blast

Page, in the letter also states that -the members of ISA and other foreign groups “. . .have been’ the most consistent users of-the campus center facilities. ”

Wu concluded stating that, it is the intention of ISA to continue to operate independently of any other organization, that it strongly objects to the graduate union meddling in its affairs, and that ISA will- only deal with the federation of students.

the-dlevrcm -* Full--time production

-

While ISA ‘is a full member of the federation of students, it enjoys various financial, and other benefits, regardless whether its members are grads or undergraduates. The graduate union on the other hand does not belong to the federation and it is not concerned with undergrads.

ch.evron

requires

receive

-Gord

Moore,

the

chevron

A lonely soliloquy dies a scrubbingly scundalo~~~ death ilt the hands of’ three Wean-up men ” und their brushes. Oh, uwld that it codd have remuikted. See also story puge 15.

na ians get the axe

1 -

. The Ontario government’s slowdown on educational spending has put a severe damper on new hirings.- But some departments are managing to find new positions anyhow. How do you create an oasis of’ opportunity out of desert of dollar-shortage? Simple. You fire people. Of course you must be careful to dress it up in terms of academic incompetence, and speak in terms of rising qualifications here at Waterloo. But of course you never touch those faculty members who have the “good sense” to brown-nose regularly, and often, and who are careful (ever mindful of the wife and kids) never to voice an opinion very much. outside the collective myopia. If you are a Canadian, and your department chairman is not, it sometimes helps to be a quisling. Two _such firings are in the works now. We seem to be about to lose Harold Miller (psychology) and Hugh Miller (Renison). Let me tell you about Harold Miller first. Harold Miller’s troubles with his department, and with his US department head, Dyal, seem to have begun when he was suspected of having been an informant for the chevron expose of Dyal’s handling of the social personality. division. Whether or

not this was the reason, it is a fact that after the article appeared (does everyone still remember lovable “Canadians seem half:human’ ’ Lerner? ) Harold Miller,. at the last meeting of the social personality division, was hammered at length in an effort to find who was responsible for the “leak”. The persons doing’- the hammering were Dyal and Ron Lambert. You all remember Ron Lambert. He is the stout heart who- claims to be one of the j‘doers” on the canadianization issue. He is that, all right. Around Christmas Miller got notice that his services would not be required next year. Strangely enough, the person doing the firing (Dyal) suggested that he apply for an opening in another division of psychology, which he duly did. Not unsurprisingly, Dyal is reported to be blocking his appointment there. Those faculty who read the chevron are probably curious by now about Miller’s academic qualifications. Well, it must be admitted that he does not yet have his Ph.D (from Michigan), but is in the last stages of it, with completion reasonably guaranteed for early ,this summer. He has six publications in good journals, and is well regarded by his students. Those faculty who think he deserves dismissal for lack of a Ph.D should consider (a) why he was not rehired conditional on obtainihg his Ph.D this sum-

mer, or (b) how they will feel . as new, sometimes arbitrary, standards are applied to them._ Over in Renison, with about nine faculty members (only one of which has a Ph.D) Hugh Miller, a part-time instructor, is getting the gears. He is being replaced by a young lady of US extraction who is the wife of an assistant professor in the psychology department. She, it must be admitted, has a Ph.D (from Waterloo), and he does not. Still, there are a lot of questions: Why was Hugh Miller’s job thrown open when others’ jobs weren’t? (Although there were others in his category. ) He was very highly praised as a teacher by his psych 220 class in their teacher evaluations. Will ’ students opinion continue to count for little at Renison? He is half way through a Ph.D. Have standards jumped that much at Renison? One of the versions for his dismissal has it that Miller was not “aggressive” enough in defending his job. That is, he did not “actively curry favour in high places”. That is, “brown-nose”. We dumb canucks are not much given to aggressiveness, nor to toadying 7 US and european style. (The two go hand in hand. ) But if aggressiveness is what is finally called for, when survival is at stake, we will not be found wanting in it. friday

76april

7977 f77:57)

999

3


to soak-up the festival air. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival was almost a disaster when the organizers found they had only a few gallons of the sugary substance in town. The cold winter was to blame but appeals to points as far away as Quebec helped bring in several hundred gallons to save the day for the hungry capitalists.

30 the Chevron

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1977

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clarer now crossed to dummy on a diamond and led the club queen. East played the king and declarer won his ace. He carefully cashed the ace of hearts and then crossed to dummy to run the diamond * suit. With only one diamond reEAST WEST maining to be played, this was S.AJ10765 S.8432 the position : H. 543 H.Q87 D. 103 NORTH D.f?4 C. K7 c. 109 3 2 SoUTH S. VOID S.KQ9 H.9 H.AK106 East West D. 8 D. K75 s. 10 S. Void ) C.58 \ C.A65 ‘H.54 H.Q8 South The Auction : D. Void D. Void s. 9 East South West North c. 109 c. 7 H. K106 2s Dble 4S 6D D. Void pass 6 NT pass pass C. Void pass When the last diamond is played, Opening Lead: Diamond 6 east can throw a club and south a East opened the bidding with a small heart, but west is stuck. He weak two-bid and his partner made has both a heart gaurd and the club a further pre-empt to four spades gaurd. West released a heart hopafter the double by south. North ing that his partner could handle felt ‘that he had an exceptional the suit. Declarer now cashed the hand and bid an aggressive six dia- jack of clubs to try and clear the mond slam. Holding a good spade suit. The suit did hot split; but, stopper, south conve’rted to six no- east did not have a safe pitch eithtrump. er. If- he threw a heart, that suit West chose a passive lead as he would come home; and if he threw was unwilling to make a play to- a spade, declarer’s nine would wards ddclarer’s spade holding. be boss. East threw a small heart Declarer played a small diamond and declarer then threw the losing from dummy and won the diamond spade and made the balance when in his hand with the king. Declarthe heart suit came home. er then played the spade king and Note that the squeeze can be threw a small heart from dummy. broken if east does not win his ace West won the ace and returned of spades. Declarer then would go the spade jack to declarer’s queen, down one. dummy playing a small club., DeNorth-South Eait Deals

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GRADUATE STUDENT UNION GENERAL MEETING TUESDAY,

MATH

APRIL 20,1971 7:00 p.m. ’

and COMPUTER ROOM 5136

Tentative

Agenda

a) President’s Report b) Treasurer’s Report c) G.S.U. Budget for 1971 d) Grad House feasibility e) Creative Arts Support f) C.U.G.S. Conference Report g) Other , Business: h) Adjournment. WINE

AND CHEESE PARTY FOLLOWING FOR ALL GRADUATE STUDENTS

i Well puzzlers its that time again; we’re back fully armed with the worst in words, obscure definitions, not to mention some absolutely filthy clues - intriguing huh? All kidding aside friends, we were stuck for a gem this time round so we immediately formed a special staff collective to deal with the problem-much to your chagrin, Iin sure, since you’re stuck with the product. Treat it as just another experiential happening and you’ll find the vibes are ._ just gaseous. Summers a comin’ folks and with those tidy little minds safely back in their little hiding places we should be absolutely swamped with groovy mindbenders. One favour please ‘fans, start dating your best efforts so we don’t mess up by rerunning in our time of need. Credit is due to Al Kukachko and David Cubberley for dedication, as well as to Bruce Steele for inspiration and the intelligence to pull out. This weeks winner gets to eat free at the British Museum’s East Annex on Stirling ave in Kitchener. Enjoy, enjoy. This week’s solution appears on , page 9.

Across. 1. What we will be if we buy the crap they teach us at school. 8. Description of the style of relationship that brought God to Gracie Slick. 12. Food after supper. 13. What a construction worker calls a university student. 15. First name of one of Dick Tracy’s good buds. 16. Cyril shrugged, then gave one to Howie Petch. 19. Accurate description of the real purpose of the B.A. 21. Directly beneath her majestie’s coat of arms. 22. Lenin, being a resourceful fellow, breathed deeply and came up with the --. 23. We thought he had discovered dialectics in nature, but Sartre refused to believe it. 25. Use your imagination for once. 26. She wrote a book on sauerkraut and capitalism. 27. Good guys cause they respect

the picketline. 33. Peculiar brand of Cossacks that Sholokov was fond of. 35. If we caught a nice middle class girl smiling stupidly, we would say that she s---s. 36. Aggressive decision by a judge in a volleyball match. 39. We spend our time thinking but we never try to --. 40. Reversed United Electrical. 41. Brash virgin’s comment after deflowering. 42. French death. 44. What essays are at this time of year. 46. Object felt but unglimpsed till second year. 47. School of pot making on campus. 49. Anti-utilitarian premise. 50. Seeger said we were put in little boxes - synonym for that. 52. Where you used to go after graduation for a soft touch. 53. Thinking over the last four years here you might get a sense of ---. 55. Meaningless combination of letters. 56. Chargex, Bancard, etc. give now for regrets later. you ---58. Alcoa’s prize product spelt backwards. 59. Combined with 60 across gives you what Ray Milland had on the Longest Weekend. 60. Famous fellow named Bruce whose death Paul Krassner still mourns. 61. Only that which is vague or I unclear. 62. See 59 across 63. Pseudo phonetic for any 65. You might encounter one on stroll along the Suez Canal. 66. Universal cure-all. Down 1. What you will earn upon graduation if things keep up. 2. What men were doing before women’s lib. 3. If Bruce Steele were standing on a table, we might say he was --it. 4. Trite intellectual term for when ideas fuse or come together.

5. Three-consecutive letters. 6. Freud discovered it; Reich was overcome by it. 7. What old giffers tend to do. 9. Makes the absolutely best smoke. 10. First hack politician in the US. 11. What most peoples sexuality is after a few months in the classroom. 14. What mothers do with their sucky little kids. 17. Wrote a book on Picasso and on Alice B. Toklas. 18. What Popeye says when he sees the sea hag. 20. Fancies the younger ones. 24. ‘the point of the celestial sphere that is directly opposite the zenith and vertically downward from the observer.’ 28. Greek word from which Husserl derived eidetic. 29. Colloquial word for loye stolen from some Chevalier flick, now sole property of Pepe La Peu. 30. Overpaid political digit. 32. This is a bargain -mobile. 34. Consult a philosopher about the greek for ‘having real being’. 37. What an illiterate might say if observing childbirth. 38. Dobie Gray is --. 41. In between still and but. 42. Something lacking in tone af; ter a soft year at school. 43. When a man steps on a bug we might say he --on it. _ 45. Professional club for liars,. cheats and thieves. 48. A housewife might use these to castrate you if she caught you pilfering her garden. 51. In vogue sex practice that Playboy discreetly calls fellatio. 52. What you ought to do before they coopt you. 53. Predecessor of ‘good old,Joe’. 54. Downtown fantasies have it that all students live in --. 57. Name interchangeable for boys and girls, french. 58. We often declare things -and void. 59. Assorted letters. 64. Used to mark liquor bottles in the cartoons.

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Railwivy workers f eject- sellout There can be no letup in vigilance and continued pressure for the kind of demands and action Thepolicy of craft union leaders needed to achieve them. This is and government mediators negoindispensible if railway workers tiating sweetheart contracts _beare to protect their jobs and hind the backs of union members prevent backsliding in terms of has suffered a well-deserved rewages and working conditions. buff.‘That is the lesson to be drawn The key issue is not which from the rejection of a tentative group of railway unions is to contract settlement negotiated be the one to set a pattern, for by the leaders of eight railway all the others. The key issue is shopcraft unions with the help of how the railway workers in all federal mediators. the unions can develop concrete The leaders of the shopcraft and practical forms for co-operaunions never raised the most imtion in present negotiations so as portant demands of their memto defeat the governmen t-employbers. Besides agreeing to a comer strategy of playing one group pletely unacceptable monetary against the other to the detrioffer and some minute fringe benement of all railway workers. fits, these leaders never did subO%e aspect of this would be to mit such key demands as job secreate a form of liaison and concurity in the face of technological sultation between all the unions changes and rationalization propresently negotiating. Even grams by the railways, the right more important regular reportto bargain on pensions and proing to the membership with no posals for a plan of accumulated negotiations carried on behind sick leave. As a result of this, their backs’ and no agreement members of railway union from without membership ratification. coast to coast have been aroused Both main railways, the Cana-as never before. -. dian Pacific and the Canadian NaOn january 4, some 400 repretheir sentatives of all union locals in tional, are today pursuing profit motive with the most reckthe four western .provinces met less abandon of public service in Edmonton and pledged not to and public interests. One after be bound by the tentative shopthe other, services in most vital craft agreement. Two weeks areas of the country are being prior to that, in december, when scuttled. . the terms of the proposed settleIt is, therefore, of the utmost ment were announced, it was importance to link general conclearly seen as a coup to manifor the work-pulate all railway negotiations by tract negotiations ers on the railways with the confederal mediators working under crete demand that the railways labor minister Bryce Mackasey. be brought back to a policy of The vote to reject was 3,092 for the public and its interacceptance among members of the servicing ests. Railways were built at great machinist union. Other crafts’ cost and sacrifice by the people whose members voted to reject of Canada to link this country included the members of the intogether. They cannot now be alternational brotherhood of electrilowed to tear it asunder and-act cal workers, plumbers and pipeas mere vehicles for monopoly fitters, boilermakers and blackprofits. smiths. The 600 members of the Service not profit sheet metal workers and the 30 Service to the people and commembers of the moulders and allied workers union voted by a munities cannot be based onprofitability. The development of the narrow margin to accept the proCanadian economy as a whole deposed contract. The brotherhood of railway carmen of the United ^ mands that services be provided everywhere. The cost of such States and Canada approved the services must be measured againproposed settlement through its the benefits of the whole opelected officers as provided by st eration for the country’s ecoits constitution. It never submit2 nomic life. It cannot be left to. ted it to a membership vote. But fragmented segments and enterthe members of this union are prises, each pulling its own bitterly complaining about this way to realize a maximum rate bureaucratic proceedure. , of profit. Sweetheart contract Companies like the Canadian The idea that a sweetheart conPacific must be nationalized and tract for some 22,000 railway shop its operations brought within the workers could be used as a patscope of a modern, integrated tern for subsequent negotiations transportation system under for some 60,000 members of_ the public ownership. Such a system associated non-operating group is needed to move both freight and the 25,000 members of the and people, and serving every united transportation union has area of Canada. suffered a setback. The rank and file membership of the unions involved, as well as those leaders who listen to and speak for* the membership in these negotiations, have won a victory for democratic procedures in collective bargaining. . . But it is only the first step. What is now needed. more than anvthing else, is to continue the battle for greater unity of all railway workers, particularly at the local leve1. ‘by Don chevron

WHAT . IS TRAPPINGS \

-.

It’s a beautiful new leather shop just-opened at Westmount Place Shopping Centre It’s where you’ll find such leather and suede specialties as wide bullet belts, bullet chokers and pendants, cinch belts and peasant sashes, head bands, arm bands, exotic zebra skins, African drums, hide rugs, hand made Indian crafts and much more.

\

It’s where you’ll have fun finding fabulous leather fashions such as hot pants, ponchos, gaucho pants skirts-mini and midi-vests and coats and jackets in leather, suede and fur. Large selection of purses, wallets, etc.

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by Noah Chrispian

Roberts

6 gvf’ ’

chevron staff .

MIDSUMMER

NldHT’S

D REAM

sense in that no principal One of my favourite Shakespear..other ean plays, A Midsummer Night’s source is known, an unusual phenDream, presented this week until omenon in Shakespeare tuesday at the O’Keefe center by The plot is typical in that it is the Royal Shakespeare company. based on confused love. Theseus, The production is a unique and duke of Athens, is about to marry stimulating attempt to use modern Hippolyta. Bottom the weaver and theater techniques on shakeshis friends are preparing to play pearean drama. While the prothe tragedy of Pyramus and Thisbe duction is nothing short of excelfor I the duke after the wedding lent, the break with conventional Hermia and Lysander, two lovers ways of presentation was too overwhose love is opposed by her fathpowering. er, Egeus who favours Demetrius, The play itself is unique in anwho is also in love with Hermia.

Lust week’s

solution w 417

This

week’s A

solution

131

\ I -‘A b

i

The plot sickens. Helena, who was previously betrothed to Demetrius, is still in love with him. The lovers, to escape the opposition and the law of Athens flee into the woods with Demetrius and Helena in hot pursuit. Oberon, king of the fairies, has quarrelled with Titania, queen of the fairies. To punish her, he orders Puck to find a magic juice which, when squeezed into the eyes of his queen and the four lovers when they are asleep, will make them love the first being they see upon waking up. I In the woods, Lysander and Demetrius touched with the juice falls in love with Helena. Titania, her eyes under the same spell. falls in- love with Bottom. whose head Puck has changed into that of an ass. When Oberon is satisfied, the spells are lifted. The lovers are brought together and Bottom and his friends act their play. If it sounds long, this is only because it is: approximately three hours which is a bit much with only one intermission. The clue to the director’s intention is found in the notes: “ . . . the idea of the poet was always present. The nearly bare stage worked . . . to isolate the essential thing, the act of the mind”, “ . . . The illusory has its part in the total experience of reality”, “ . . . We must open our empty hands and show that there is . really nothing up our sleeves.” “ . . . from the friction between the actors’ creativity and the spectators’ imagination, a clear flame is kindled. ” So the idea is to create the feeling that the audience is participating in a quasi-poetry recital. To achieve this effect, the director, Peter Brook, had flat white flats, lights, and costumes, and kept the house lights on. He also used special sound effects, and the technique where the actors ran or went into the audience often. The flat white was glaring and made my eyes blurry after awhile. Also the electric music and visible catwalk etc. were distracting. I found myself paying more attention to the backstage action more than the production at times. The best production of this play that I have seen to date was at Stratford, Ontario two years ago. The dream sequences really involved me, but that is because I am a romantic. Nonetheless, I highly recommend that anyone who gets the chance ought to try and see this production. It is unique and an exciting attempt at originality. Also the acting is superb. Just to see Mary Rutherford playing Hermia is well worth the cost of admission.

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Dr. Daniel Edward Andrew, identified in an earlier article as Dr. K-W, will begin duties as fulltime medical director, at health \ services may 31. In an interview Andrew said: l “I want people who are tripping to come to health services. This is not a blanket statement,” said, Andrew. He explained if the ,person required further medical treatment the person would be sent to a hospital. l He is considering a program where various services such as health and counselling services, and students who have been through the freak-out scene, work together. ’ He said the program would change as people rehash this particular concept. @“I’m not a moralist”, said Andrew, as he explained his stand on sex and drugs. People may not come for help, knowing or fearing his view.

Post degree ,APHER 350 King St. W. Kitchener 742-5363

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Another article giving- further in. f ormation on Andrew’s views and plans in his role on health services and the medical directorship will follow in the next issue.

Medical

director,

Dan

Andrew

education

Applications deadline for the six --- It is expected that 300 students week long summer session beginwill attend such courses as enning july 5th at the university of tomology, analytical chemistry, Waterloo has been set at may first. drama, modern literature, clasA bachelor’s degree from a recogsical literature, ancient civilizanized university is the only quations, mathematics, computer lification required by the regissystems and thermal physics. trar’s office for admission to the Applications post-degree program of honour and a summer courses leading to specialist standschool brochure are available ing. from the registrar.

Errors corrected The chevron notes that certain inaccuracies crept into the account of Ken Hare’s visit to discuss Canadianization. ( “Canadization still a hot issue on this campus” - april2). Philosopher George Grant was never an applicant in this philosophy department although, the department considered, and re-

’ Arthis

SUMMER ACCOMMO’DATION, IN TORONTO Good accommodation available at the Co-op in Toronto from May 10 to Sept. 10. Rooms as low as $10.00 per week. (Meals $8..00 extra.) Central location. For information and applications write: Campus Co-op, Room 111, 395 Huron St., Toronto 181, Ontario. Telephone 964-1961.

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jetted him, as claimed in the artitle. Philosophy prof Les Armour did not use the term “bad faith” in describing his department’s hiring practices. Our apologies to professor mour for any embarassment may have caused him.

-_-

,


--

_’

’ , Federation ADMINISTRATIVE Student Government Summer-Meetings Entertainment Executive Travel Elections Conference

AND

GENERAL

budget

may’7 1 -april ‘72 Revenue

Allocation 600.00 150.00 350.00 700.00 650.00

§i

$ 2.000.00 $ 3,500.OO $ 1.300.00 $ 2.000.00 $ 1,500.00 $ 300.00 $ 475.00 $ 200.00 $ 7.500.00 $ 38.775.00

$ 2.000.00 $ 3.500.00 $ 1.300.00 $ 2.000.00 $ 1.500.00 $ 300.00 $ 475.00 $ 200.00 $ 7.500.00 $ 38.775.00

$ 60.000.00 BOARD OF COMMU?JICATIONS Dial-a-Dance Poster Supplies Radio Waterloo Chairman’s Honourarium

/ :

BOARD Oti STUDENT ACTIVITIES Summer Weekend Homecoming Winter Weekend Orientation Auxiliary Events Pubs Movies Concerts (4) c Auxiliary Services Entertainment Co-ordinator’s Salary Cashbox Billboard National Entertainment Conf. Clubs & Organizations Record Collection Flying Club Board Advertising

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Chevron Printing C.U.P. Distribution Telecommunications Telex Telephone Conference Attendance Travel & Expenses Subscriptions, Library Bound Volumes Capital Supplies Miscellaneous Supplies Salaries Photographic

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$

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CREATIVE ARTS BOARD Drama Music Dance Folk Song Extra Productions Production . Chairman’s Honourarium

Administration Board of Publications Board of Education/External Board of Student Activities Creative Arts Board Board of Communications Charities 81 Honouraria Post Office Campus Shop Deficit

$

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Administrative Debt Servicing and S/C Stationery 81 Office Supplies Xerox and Supplies Telegrams & Telephone Postage !’ Capital Equipment insurance Repairs & Maintenance Professional Fees & Expenses Office Salaries Office Services & Miscellaneous

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1 <.<.T HE BIG BLACK STACKS ‘of the Ilium -Works of the Federal Apparatus Corporation . spewed acid fumes and soot over the hundreds of men and women who were lined up before the red-brick employment office, It was summer. The Ilium Works, already the second-largest industrial plant in America, was increasing its staff by one third in order to m.eet armament contracts. Every ten minutes or so, a company police-’ man opened the employment-office door, letting out a chilly gust from the air-conditioned interior and admitting three more applicants. , “Next three,” said the policeman. ’ , A middle-sized man in his late twenties, his young face camouflaged with a mustaiche and spectacles, was admitted after a four-hour wait. His spirits and the new suit he’d’ bought for the occasion were wilted by the fumes and the august sun, and he’d given up lunch in order to keep his place in< line. But his bearing remained’ . jaunty. He was the last, in his group of three, to face the receptionist. “Screw-machine operator, ma’am,” said the / - first man. “See Mr. Cormody in booth seven,” said the receptionist. , “Plastic extrusion, miss,” said thenext man. “See Mr. Hoyt i8 booth two,” she said. “Skill?” she -asked the urbane young man in the wilted j\ suit. “Milling machine? Jig borer?” “Writing,” he said. “Any kind of writing.” 1 “You mean advertising and sales promotion?” _ I what I mean.” > (“‘Yes-that’s She looked doubtful. “Well, I. don’t know. We didn’,t’ put out a call. for that sort of people. You can’t run a machine, can you?” “Typewriter,” he said. jokingly. The receptionist was a sober young woman. “The company does not use male stenographers, ” she-said. “See Mr. Dilling in booth. twenty’ six. He just might know of some advertising-andsales-promo,tion-type job. ” He straightened his tie and ioat, forced a smile c that implied he was looking into jobs at the Works as sort of a lark. He ,walked into booth tw.enJtysix and extended his hand to Mr. Dilling; a man of his <own age. “Mr. Dilling, my name is Davi’-d Potter. I was curious to know what openings you might have in advertising and sales promotion, and thought I’d drop in for a talk.” 3 Mr. Dilling, an old hand at facing young men ’ who tried to hide their eagerness for a job, was polite but outwardly unimpressed. “Well, you came at a bad time, I’m afraid, Mr. Potter. The- competition for that kind of job is pretty - stiff, as you perhaps know, and there isn’t much of anything open just now.” David noded. “I see.” He had had no experien>e -in- asking for .a job with a big organization, and Mr. Dilling was making him aware of what a fineart it was-if you couldn’t run a machine. A duel was under way. “But have a seat anyway, Mr. Potter.” . “Thank you.” He looked at his watch. “I really: ought to be getting back to my paper soon.” ,c‘You work on a paper around here?p” “Yes. I own a weekly-paper in Dorset, about ten - miles from Ilium.” “Oh-you don’t say. Lovely little village. Think-i _ ing of giving up the paper, are you?” “Well, no-not exactly. It’s a possibility. I bought’ the paper soon after the war, so I’ve been with. it for eight years, and I don’t want to go stale. I might be wise to move on. It all depends on . , what opens up.” said Mr. Dilling pleasant“You have a family?” ly: “Yes. My wife, and two;boys and two girls.” “You don’t say!” said Mr. Dilling. He winked. “That would certainly start a young man thinking about getting- a little security, eh, with a family like that?” “Well, I’m just trying to get the lay of the land,‘ 6 now-to see how things are. I have no idea what . salary industry‘ might pay a man like me, with ?.’ my experience. ’ ’ “The question experienced men like yourself usually ask is: how high can I go and how fast? And the answer to tKat is that the sky is the limit for a m.an with drive and creative ambition. _ And he can go up fast or slow, depending on what he’s willing to do and capable of putting ‘ into_the.job. -“You’d find the work in the publicity end ju’st about thee same as what you’re doing now. Our publicity people have high standards for writ-ing and editing and reporting,, and our publicity -- releases don’t wind up in newspaper editors’ ’ .wastebackets. Our people do a professional job, and are well-respected as journalists.” He stood. “I’ve got a little matter to attend to-take me about ten minutes. Could you possibly stick around? 1% enjoying our talk.” , David looked at his watch. “Oh-guess I could spare another ten or fifteen minutes. ” Dilling was back in his booth in three minutes, chuckling over some private joke. “Just talkthe publi/ ing‘ on the phone .with Lou Flammer, -I

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ten to this,. Nan: under the company Security Pack- , eye. He dabbed at the cil handkerchief and finally 1 age, I get ten dollars a day for hospital expenses was restored, he looked a in case of illness, full pay for twenty-six weeks, a 31, where his new office a hundred dollars for special hospital expenses. I busy streets fanned out f get life insurance for about half what it would cost each stretched seemingly on the outside. For whatever I put into governHe stopped a passerby ment- bonds under the payroll-savings plan, the perate hurry than the r( company will give me a five per cent ‘bonus in please, how to find Buil company stock-twelve years fromnow. I get two office?” weeks’ vacation with pay each year, and, after fifUESS WHAT, NAN,” said David Potter to - teen, years, I get three weeks.“Get The man he asked was free memberhis wife on the telephone. He was wearing only<his parently getting as m*!ch ship in the company country club. After twentyshorts, and was phoning from the company hospigor and smells and nerve five years, I’ll be eligible for a pension of at least tal. “When you come home from the hospital toas David would have got a hundred and twenty-five dollars a month, and morrow, you’ll be coming home to a. solid citizen He squinted at David’s b: much more if I rise in the organization and stick who pulls down a hundred and ten dollars a week, “Just starting out, are yoi with it for more than twenty-five years! ” every week. I just got my badge and .passed my “Yes sir. My first day.” “‘Id be a damn fool to pass that up, Nan.” physical! ” ‘-“What do you know at ~ “I still feel youwere panicked into this.” \ “But, hon,” said Nan, “the paper is making “No, no-this is it, Nan. Give the girls a kiss? shook his head wonderir money. ’ ’ starting out. Building 31 apiece,for me. I’ve got to go now, and report to my “It could fold likethat,” said David, snapping his ‘came to work here in 189 new supervisor. ” fingers. “What about ten years from now?” 31 from here, with nothii -“Your what?” 7 Y “What about. ten yearsqfrom now in the Works? / ‘ ‘Super?isor. ” mud. Now it’s all built ul What about ten years from now anywhere?” ,_ there, about a quarter of “Oh. I thought that’s ”what you said, but I couldn’t / “We won’t be a very happy big family, darling, if branches off there, and y be sure.” Iyou’re not doing what you want to do. I want you to the end, then cut acroslr “Good-by, Nan.” , . * * * go on being happy the way you have been-driving ._ starting out, ehl Well, around the countryside j- getting- news and talking‘ there. and selling ads; coming home and writing what “Fifty-year man, I wa> you want to write, what you believe in. You in the AVID CLIPPED HIS badge to his‘lapel, and he led David up avenues 2 Works ! ’ ’ stepped out of the hospital and onto the hot asphover ramps and throagh “It’s what I’ve got to do.” alt floor of the world within the fences of the Works, ings filled with spitting, w David held up a brochure he’d been handed after Dull thunder came from the buildings around him, inery, and down corridor his physical examination was completed. “Lisa truck honked at him, and a cinder blew in his numbered black doors. city supervisor. Needs a new stenographer. Lou’s a card. Everybodyhere is crazy about Lou. Old. weekly man himself, and-1 guess that’s where he learned to be so easy to get along with. Just to feel him out for the hell of it, I told him about you.. I didn’t commit you to anything-. just said what you told me, that you were keeping your ‘eyes open. And guess what Lou said?” * * *

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got your first-assignment. There’s a deer loose in ‘ ‘Can’t be a fifty-year man no more, ” said the old man pityingly. “Can’t come to work until you’re the Works ! ” “Deei-? ” eighteen nowadays, and you got to retire when “Don’t know how he got in, but he’s in. Plumber your’re sixty-five.” The old man pointed out a door. “Here’s Flamwent to fix a drinking fountain out at the’softball diamond across from Building 217, and flushed a mer’s office. Keep your mouth shut till you find out who’s who and what they think. Good luck.” deer out from under the bleachers. Now they got lab.” He Lou Flammer’s secretary was not at her desk, so him cornered up around the metallurgy stood and hammered on his desk. “Murder! The David walked to the door of the inner office and story will go all over the country, Potter. Talk knocked. about human interest. Front page! Of all the times “Yes?” said a man’s voice sweetly. “Please come in.” for Al Tappin to be out at the Ashtabula Works, David opened the dodr. “Mr. Flammer?” taking pictures of a-new viscometer they cooked up out there! All right-I’ll call up a hack photoLou Flammer was a short, fat man in his early thirties. He beamed at David. “What can I do to grapher downtown, Potter, and get him to meet you out by the metallurgy lab. You get the story help you? ’ ’ “I’m David Potter, Mr. Flammer.” and see that he gets the right shots. Okay?” He led David into the hallway. “Just go back the Flammer’s Santa-Claus-like demeanor decayed. He leaned back, propped his feet on his desk top, way you came, turn left instead of right at fracand’stuffed a cigar, which he’d concealed in his tional horsepower motors, cut through hydraulic engineering, catch bus eleven on Avenue 9, and cupped hand, into his large mouth. “Hell-thought you were a scoutmaster.” He looked at his desk it’ll take you right there. After you get the story clock, which was mounted in a miniature of the and pictures, we’ll get them cleared by the law company’s uewqst automatic dishwasher. “Boy division, the plant security officer, our department scouts touring the Works. Supposed to stop in here head and buildings and grounds, and shoot them fifteen minutes ago for me to give ‘em a talk on right out. -Now get going. That deer isn’t on the scouting and industry. Fifty-six per cent of Federpayroll-he isn’t going to wait for you. Come to al Apparatus’ executives were eagle scouts. work today-tomorrow your work will be on every David started to laugh, but found himself doing it front page in the country, if we can get it approved. all alone, and he stopped. “Amazing figure,” he The name of the photograher you’re going to meet is McGarvey. Got it? You’re in the big time now, said. “Says “It is,” said Flammer judiciously. Potter. We’ll all be watching.” He shut the-door behind David. something for scouting and something for industry. Now, before I tell you where your desk is, I’m David found himself trotting down the hall, down a stairway, and into an alley, brushing roughly supposed to explain the rating-sheet system. That’s what the Manuals say. Dilling tell you about past persons in a race against time. Many turned that?” to watch the purposeful young man with admiration. “Not that I recall. There was an awful lot of inOn and on he strode, his mind seething with information all at once. ” formation : Flammer, Building 3 7; deer, metal“Well, there’s nothing much to it,” said Flamlurgy lab; photographer, Al Tappin. No. Al Tapmi?r. “Every six months a rating sheet is made pin in Ashtabula. Flenny the ha’ck photographer. out on you, to let you and to let us know just where No. McCammer. No. McCammer is new superyou stand, and what sort of progress you’ve been visor. Fifty-six per cent eagle scouts. Deer by vismaking. Three people who’ve been close to your cometer laboratory. No. Viscometer in Ashtabula. work make gut independent ratings of you, and then Call Danner, new supervisor, and get instructions all the information is brought together on a master copy-with carbons for you, rhe, and Personnel, right. Three weeks’ vacation after fifteen years. and the original for the head of the Advertising and Danner not new supervisor. Anyway, new superSales Promotion Division. “It’s very helpful for visor in ,Building 3 79. No. Fanner in Building 39987983379. everybody, you -most of all, if you take it the right way.” He waved a rating sheet beofre David. “See? Blanks for appearance, loyalty, promptness, iniL/’ AVID STOPPED, blocked by a grimy wintiative, cooperativeness-things like that. You’ll make out rating sheets on other people, too, and dow at the end of a blind alley. All he knew was that he’d never been there before, that his memory whoever does the rating is anonymous.” “I see,” David felt himself reddening with re- had blown a gasket, and that the deer was not on the payroll. The air in the alley was thick with sentment. He fought the emotion, telling himself his reaction was a small-town man’s-and that it tango music and the stench of scorched insulation. David scrubbed away. some of the crust on the would do him good to learn to think as a member window with his handkerchigf, praying for a of a great, efficient team. glimpse of something that made sense. “Now about pay, Potter,” said Flammer, Inside were ranks of women at benches, rocking “there’ll never be any point in coming in to ask me for a raise. That’s all done on the basis of the their heads in time to the music, and dipping soldering irons into great nests of colored wires that rating sheets and the salary curve.” He rummaged through his drawers and found a graph, which he crept past them on endless belts. One of them look“Here-now you see this ed up and saw David, and winked in tango rhythm. spread out on his desk. curve? Well, it’s the average salary curve for men David fled. At the mouth of the alley, he stopped a man and with colleg? educations in the company. Dee-you - . can follow it on up. At thirty, the average man asked him if he’d heard anything about a deel: in makes this much ; at fdrty , this much-and so on. the Works. The man shook his head and looked at Now, this curve above it shows what men with real David oddly,, making David aware of how frantic he must look. “I heard it was out by the lab.” growth potential can make. See. It’s a little higher and curves upward a little faster. You’re how old?” David said more calmly. “Twenty-nine,” said David, trying to see what “Which lab?” said the man. “That’s what I’m not sure of,” said David. the salary figures were that ran along one side of thf “There’s more than one?” graph. Flammer saw him doing it, and pointler with a corner of his “Chemical lab?” said the man. “Materials testedly kept them hidden with his forearm. it it out. When his vision ing lab? Paint lab? Insulation lab? ” “Uh-huh. ” Flammer---wet the tip of a pencil out himself for Building “No-I don’t think it’s any of those,” said David. with his tongue, and drew a small “x” on the graph, d supervisor were. Four “Well, 1 could stand here all afternoon naming squarely astride the average man’s curve. “There )rn where he stood, and labs, and probably not hit the right one. Sorry, you are! ” 0 ii,finity. David looked at the mark, and then followed the I’ve got to go. You don’t know what building they’ve rho was in less of a descurve with his eyes across the paper, over little got the differential analyze’r in, do you?” ;t. “Could you tell me, “Sorry,“’ said David. He stopped several other bumps, up gently slopes, along desolate plateaus, ing 31, Mr. Flammer’s people, none of whom knew anything about the until it died abruptly at the margin which repredeer, and he tried to retrace his steps to the office sented age sixty-five. The graph left no questions Did and bright-eyed, apof his supervisor, whatever his name was. He was to be asked and was deaf to argument. David lookplp”asure from the clanof the ed from it to the human being he would also be swept this way and that by the currents 1s activity of the Works Works, stranded in backwaters, sucked back into dealing with. “You had a weekly once, did you, en from April in Paris. Mr. Flammer?” the main stream, and his mind was more and Ige and then at his face. more numbed, and the mere reflexes of self-preserFlammer laughed. “In my naive, idealistic ?” vation were more and more in charge. youth, Potter, I sold ads to feed stores, gathered gossip, set type, and wrote editorials that were goHe chose a building at random, and walked inside jut. that?” The old man for a momentary respite from the summer heat, ing to’save the world, by God. ” gly, and winked. “Just and ,was deafened by the clangor. of steel sheets David smiled admiringly. “Whai a circus, eh?” Well, sir, when I first being cut and pu_nched, being smashed into strange “Circus?” said Flammer; “Freak show, maybe. you could see Building shapes by great hammers that dropped out of the It’s a good way to grow up fast. Took me about i between us and it but six months to find out I was killing myself for pea- smoke and dust overhead. , See that water tank up nuts, that a little guy couldn’t even save a village David, his ears ringing and his head aching, walka mile? Well, Avenue 17 three blocks long, and that the world wasn’t worth ed into the street again and chose another door, lu.follow that almost to saving anyway. So I started loo-king out for NumHere was peace and air conditioning. He was in the tracks, and- Just the lobby of an auditorium; where a group of men ber One. Sold out to a chain, came down -here, [‘d better walk you up and here I am.” were examining a box studded with dials and switches that was spotlighted and mounted on a The telephone rang. “Yes?” said Flammer swe1,” he said proudly, and revolving platform. etly . ‘ ! Pub-bliss-itee. ’ ’ His benign smile faded. nd alleys, across tracks, “Please,miss,” he said to a’receptionist by the “No. You’re kidding, aren’t you? Where? ReallyL’Sinnels, through buildthis is no gag? All right, all right. Lord! What a door, “could you tell me where I could find a telehining, grumb ling machphone?” time for this to happen. I haven’t got anybody s with green walls and “It’s right around the corner, sir,” she said. here, and I can’t get away on account of the god“But I’m afraid no one is permitted here today dam boy scouts.” He hung up. “Potter-you’ve

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but the crystallographers. Are you with them?” “Yes,” said David. “Oh-well, come right in. Name?” He told her, and a man sitting next to her lettered it on a badge. The badge was hung on his chest, and David headed for the telephone. A grinning, bald, big-toothed man, wearing- a badge that said, “Stan Dunkel, Sales,” caught him and steered him to the display. “Dr. Potter,” said Dunkel, “I ask you: is that the way to build a X-ray spectrogoniometer, or is that the way to build an X-ray spectrogoniometer?” “Yes,” said David. “That’s the way, all right.” “Martini, Dr. Potter?” said a maid, offeieing a tray. David emptied a Martini in one gloriously hot, A stinging gulp. “What features do you want in an X-ray spectrogoniometer, Doctor?” said Dunkel. “It should be sturdy, Mr. Dunkel,” said David, and he left Dunkel there, pledging his reputation that there wasn’t a sturdier one on earth. In the phone booth, David had barely got through the telephone director’s A’s before the, name of the supervisor miraculously returned to his consciou&eSs : Flammer! He found the number and dialed. “Mr. Flammer’s office,” said a woman. “Could I speak to him, please? This is David Potter.” “Oh-Mr. Potter. Well, Mr. Flammer is somewhere out in the Works now, but he left, a message for you. He said there’s an added twist on the deer story. When they catch the deer, the venison is going to be used at the Quarter-Century Club picnic.” “Quarter-Century Club?” said David. “Oh, that’s really something, Mr. Potter. It’s for people who’ve been with the company twentyfive- years or more. Free drinks and cigars, and just the best of everything. They have a wonderful time.” “Anything else about the deer?” “Nothing he hasn’t already told you:’ she said, and she hung up. David Potter, with a third Martini in his otherwise empty stomach, stood in front of the auditorium and-looked both ways for a deer. “But our X-ray spectrogoniometer is sturdy, Dr. Potter,” Stan Dunkel called to him from the ’ auditorium steps. Across the street was a pa&h of green, border.ed by hedges. David pushed through the hedges into the outfield of a softball ‘diamond. He crossed it and went behind the bleachers, where there was cool shade, and he sat down with his back-to a wiremesh fence which separated one end of the Works from a deep pine woods. There were two gates in the fence, but both were wired shut. David was going to sit there for just a moment, long enough to get his nerve back, to take bearings. Maybe he could leave a message for Flammer, saying he’d suddenly fallen ill, which was essentially true, or“There he goes!” cried somebody from the other side of the diamond. There were gleeful cries, shouted orders, the sounds of men running. A deer with broken antlers dashed under the bleachers, saw David, and ran frantically into the open again along the fence. He ran with a limp, and his reddish-brown coat was streaked with soot and grease. “Easy now ! Don’t rush him! Just keep him there. Shoot into the wodds, not the Works.” David came out from under the bleachers to see a great semicircle of men, several ranks deep, ~ closing in slowly on the corner of fence in which the deer was at bay. In the front rank were a dozen company policemen with drawn pistols. Other members of the posse carried sticks and . rocks and lariats hastily fashioned from wire. The deer pawed the grass, and bucked, and jerked its broken antlers in the direction of the 1 \ crowd. “Hold it! ” shouted a familiar voice. A company limousine rumbled across the diamond to the back of the crowd. Leaning out of a window was Lou Flammer, David’s supervisor. “Don’t shoot until we get a picture of him alive,” commanded Flammer. He pulled a photographer out of the limousine, and pushed him into the front rank. Flammer saw David standing alone by the fence, his back to a gate. “Good boy, Potter,” called Flammer. “Right on the ball! Photographer got lost, and I had to bring him here myself .” The photographer fired his flash bulbs. The ‘deer bucked and sprinted along the fence toward David. David unwired the gate, opened it wide. A second later the deer’s white tail was flashing through the woods and gone. r=fT .fl%a HE PROFOUND silence was broken first , by the whjstling of a switch engine and then by the click of a latch as David stepped into the woods and closed the gate behind him. He didn’t look back. This is adapted from VonnegutS short storyof the same name in the collection “Welcome to the monkey house, “published by Dell.

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\ . .

friday

16 april

7977

(7 7:57/

7009

0 3


Atrocities

of Saigon

Saigon - Saigon - where well over three million people are jammed into a town designed by the French to house only 500,000. There are administrative structures, but they are lost under the corrugated rooftops of this rabbitwarren for humans. Attempts are made to remedy the administrative inadequacies but it is too late. There are simply too many people. The existing and autonomous administration comprises a mayor, colonel Do Kinh N,hieu; a city council; officials responsible for each of the 11 boroughs, 56 phuong, or wards, and 711 khom, or subdivisions. The city’s entire budget for 1969 was 13.5 million dollars - less than the allocation for New York City’s health department. American cities spend an average 264 dollars a year per inhabitant. In Saigon, the figure is 7 dollars and 40 cents. Even nominally indispensable services are frequently lacking. The ordinary housewife cooks with kerosene and buys water from tank trucks. A garbage collectors’ strike in 1966 served grim warning of what could happen if the servic-: es that do function were to come to a standstill. Saigon boasted 16

ZhegMngadmWhg _

garbage trucks then. The strike left garbage all over the pavement Today there are 200 of these vehicles at work. The center of the city at least looks clean. But the rats are everywhere, even in smart restaurants and the wealthiest homes. The rate of infant mortality was one in 20 in 1968; today more than half of the city’s monthly 20,000 registered dead are children under five. Apart from the hundreds of practi tioners of Chinese medicine, there are only 500 doctors in Saigon. Malnutrition is widespread. Forty per cent of the population is tubercular. Hospitals can handle only 7,000 tuberculosis cases per month. Beggars die in the gutters. 1 Numerous children are left to their own devices. Of the some 250,000 children who attend 1,000 primary and secondary schools - with one teacher for every 106 pupils - only one child in four finishes primary and secondary school. Most children are reduced to catching a couple of hours of makeshift tuition, after which they hurry off to sell newspapers. If they have a piastre or two left, they go to the movies or the cai luong (,the popular theatre) - or buy a few American cigarettes, by the cigarette.

Short optometry Four short courses will be offered to practicing optometrists by. the optometry department this summer. Two of the courses with the various facets

will deal of contact

coufses

lenses and a new development called gel lenses. These will be offered between may 17 and 21. Two other courses dealing with more general topics of interest to optometrists will be offered may 31 to june 3.

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OTTAWA - It is expected that the summer. They will receive more than 600 Canadian studenttravel and- living allowanc-es. for athletes will receive assistance this period. from the $1 million dollar educaApplications will be screened by tional grant program announced a national selection committee, recently by national health and whose advice with respect to the welfare minister John Munro. applications will be submitted to the minister of national health and The educational grants, which welfare for his consideration and range up to 2,000 dollars in value, final determination. Robert Hindwill help and encourage students march, university of British Colto pursue athletic and academic umbia, and Pierre Charbonneau, careers. of the Olympic gamApplication information can be coordinator obtained from the athletics de- es, Montreal, are the co-chairmen of the committee, which includes partment, national sports governrepresentatives with sports, recing bodies and provincial fitness and amateur sport offices. Stu- reation and media backgrounds. dents can also write to the fitness and amateur sport directorate, department of national health and welfare in Ottawa for information concerning the grant program. The educational grants are avIt was a great morning-calm ailable to student-athletes with and sunny-the kind of morning international and national comthat gives you a good feeling inpetitive experience including such side. Walking across the arts events as Canada-games and the quad, one had to stop on account arctic games. of the commotion. The grants will assist students My God somethings happening. whose training and competitive Three of the PP&P boys are down schedules do not allow them suf- on their knees, scrubbing the ficient employment opportunities ground. The boss-man from PP&P in the summer months. and his assistant look on. A securStudent-athletes who are not in ity force member stands by. training or competitive programs Approaching for a closer view during the summer will be involved in various teaching clinics and of this terrible thing, one could see travelling - demonstrations during - neatly - printed- on the asphalt a verse. It read:

The ! million dollar program of educational grants is part of a departmental program to employ or otherwise involve in activities an estimated 2,000 students at a cost of approximately 3 million dollars this summer. One of the proposals in this summer employment undertaking is the staging of a clinic for student-athletes in the atlantic provinces. This clinic will provide concentrated training in several sports for a four-to-six week period. Participants will receive living and travel allowances and an educational grant.

ciatci

The Waterloo county social data depository project will be initiated this summer with a 3000 dollar ‘grant. Profs Dan Kubat, Jim Curtis, Frank Fasdick and Bill Scott of the sociology and anthropology departments hope to get the pro_ ject underway by may 1. The on-going-project will provide a basis of demographic variables for anyone doing research on Waterloo county. Information will be available on computer tapes.

This empty space seemed to shout tell the world what your love is about She’s about daisies from spring to fall and chocolate fudge cookies when the snows cover all She’s a source of joy to everyone’s delight and for someone like me she makes the world alright. “Don’t take it off” shouted one of the students at the boys from PP&P. “In two weeks it will wear off anyways. It’s only latex paint. “Look at all the money you’re

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wasting. ” “After all it isn’t that bad. People like it and besides _it’s spring. ’ ’ “Because I’m in charge and it’s ugly.” growled the little boss-man from PP&P. “This is my campus as well and I don’t want that sort of thing around. ” “No, I suppose not. After all it isn’t official. Thank you, Sir.”

Voices

comingj

Voices, an experimental color magazine being -produced by the chevron will be available to stu-dents on campus shortly after april 20th. This is somewhat later than anticipated, however, students are urged to return to campus to pick up their free copy. The community theme of the issue is reflected in the articles written mainly by Waterloo students. Articles include discussions on community cable TV, the summer job situation, community neighborhood groups, and a portrayal of the recent Renaissance ‘71 exhibition.

Special Student

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charter Flights for groups and clubs

Any.one interested- in one of the three honoraria. positions -at RADIO WATERLOO please submit a written application to J. Dale \ Chairman of Communications, Federation of Students. The .-. positions are -News

& Sports Mgr.

‘--Programming-Mgr. -Technical

Mgr.

friday

16 april

7977 (17:57)

707 I

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Brian Bissovt led UniwatS youthful distance runner Art Taylor home to a sixth finish. Rumor has it that Art’s chest was stuffed with a hot water bottle filled with bay rum.

Wuffiof’s Dave Nodiey finishes secod to Pete Lever in buy run Big Dave Northey failed in his started this winter after he had _ bid the other weekend to capture been on the rack most of last -the annual round the bay race- year with upside down kneecaps. in Hamilton. He did however, run His very respectable time of a very strong race to finish second 1: 49: 40 was good enough for 12th in a field of about 60 runners un- place for which his prize was a der cold and windy conditions. lawn chair. Pete kill also travel< Only in the last few miles of the to Boston this weekend for the 19 mile race was Dave finally big one. outdistanced by Peter Lever of For those of you who haven’t the Toronto Olympic Club after j heard of Art Taylor before, he leading through most of the early is an English transplant and has going. Lever clocked one hour been working in the personnel .- 41 minutes 47 seconds to beat department at the * university Northey by 39 seconds. since his arrival in 1966. He has The other Waterloo athletes been involved in athletics for 1 who competed also showed good about 18 years and was a creditBrian Bisson emerged form. able cross country and distance from hiding to capture 5th place runner in- England during the with a time of 1:46:43. Many late fifties and early sixties. observers of the local track ‘From 1966 to 1970 Art did a lot scene, including all of his profes-of coaching at the K-W track sors, had thought that Brian had club and at the university withleft the country. Hot on Bisson’s -out giving much thought to seriheels was U of W’s wonder boy ous competition himself. After Arthur Taylor. At the ripe old an appendix operation last spring, age of 44, Art finished 4 seconds however, he started jogging a behind Bisson in sixth and was few miles a day to get his body working properly again and beusing the race as a tuneup for this weekend’s Boston Marathon. fore he knew it he was caught up in the old life. He started runThe indefatigable Pete Olver continued his comeback which ning anywhere up to 10 miles a

Everybody’s getting into our pants!

-

day and last fall began entering ‘came oiit races. He officially of retirement’ at the Springbank road races and won the almost 6 mile race for athletes over forty. As well as shattering the record by almost 3 minutes with a time of 31: 19 he whipped ass on a group of New England runners who had come up thinking to sweep the race. One for King George. At the gardens this winter, Art ran a 4:48 in the handicapped mile for oldies and was edged for first by a guy who started with half a lap advantage. He won’t win the Boston Marathon either but there sure won’t be too many 44 year olds ahead of him. Art’s example might well be followed in a modified program by the majority of us who tend to balloon and wallow in to middle age. He is in better shape than 99% of the people on this campus. But sermons are a waste of time. Suffice it to say that Art is a rather extraordinary man.

* Maybe it’s because we put a little more into them

BOND &VARSITY SHOP - 385 FREDERICK ST. PLAZA 742-5491 TOPS & BOTTOMS SHOP - 322 KING ST. W. - DOWNTOWN 579-4700

Federation

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Students

Notice A has ship - is to dent

Labour/Student liaison program been initiated under the chairmanof Mr. Robt. Garthson. Its purpose explore all aspects of Labok/Sturelations.

Inquiries may be made for information and participation to Chairman Garthson or

Heather

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the

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Budget:

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Carl H. Sulliman V.P.

Photos by Crispin Sumner, the chevron

friday

76april

7977 (7 7:57)

7073


Lvre of eusyjnoney

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the constables showed up in New York and peddled an ounce of seized heroin to the Nagelbergs for 500 dollars. And six months later, they were back again, this time to arrange for a far larger sale., After the negotiations, Mrs. Nagelberg sealed the smuggling contract by procuring prostitutes for her new Canadian suppliers. But before the big drug transaction was completed, the two mounties fell to bickering. And when one of the constables went ahead with the deal on his own (turning a handsome $27,500 profit), his erstwhile partner spilled the whole story to his superior in the Montreal narcotics section, claiming that he had only gone along with the operation in the first place as an undercover agent. During the subsequent inquiry, RCMP investigators broke the case wide open. And eventually, the two mounties and the Nagelbergs -were brought to trial. For all four of the conspirators, the case ultimately ended in substantial jail sentences. But many experts believe that the successful denouement of the Nagelberg case may be an exception. “In the big-business world of international narcotics,” says one agent, “corruption is a way of life. And there’s just no way of telling how many of us fall victim to the magnetic lure of easy money. ”

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It seemed like a routine drug bust. Acting on a tip from US authorities back in 1967, royal canadian mounted police agents apprehended a pair of french couriers attempting to smuggle 13 pounds of heroin past customs officials at Montreal’s Dorval airport. The mounties thought they spotted the recipient too. She was Vivienne Nagelberg, a fleshy, 48-yearold New Yorker who was waiting expectantly just outside the customs area. Lacking solid- evidence, however, the mounties could not arrest Mrs. Nagelberg, so she was placed in the custody of two young constables and deported to the US. Thus began a story all too common in the war against drugs when the hunters join forces with the hunted. For in this case, the supposedly incorruptible mounties turned into accomplices of the criminals they were out to stop. Even before they left Montreal, Mrs. Nagelberg was already on good terms with her mounties. She treated them to a 60 dollar dinner at the city’s Rib’n Reef restaurant. And, promising to “show them a good time”, she invited the agents to visit her in New York-and to join the highly profitable drugsmuggling racket she operated with her husband Jerry. Astonishingly enough, the invitation was accepted with enthusiasm. Just two months later,

me puke.”

I

‘ ‘Apple ton Century” will perform at a pub dance sponsored by the International Student Association. Be at food services on friday, april 16 at 8.30 p.m. 50 cents for members $1.00 for non-members. I.S. A. is sponsoring two “know your world” trips during the summer. The first is a six day excursion to Washington and New York on june 1 to 6. The second is a four day trip to Ottawa and Montreal on july 1 to 4. For information regard-

ing cost and applications call Andrew Wu at 578-5183, I.S.A. winter film series is over, and was so well supported that another will be run over the summer. Films and dates will be announced at a later time. I.S.A. is an open student club and you may join by paying a small membership fee. The fee is an important segment of the budget for their activities. Membership entitles you to reduced rates at many ISA activities.

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WHAT'S 'YOURS IS HERS THIS

AND

NEXTYEAR

Now that the season is officially over, it’s time for shoes to be aired out, jocks washed and repaired, and the season viewed from two directions. A retrospective glance serves to remind of this year’s efforts, allowing an accurate prophetic peek into the next athletic season. In the men’s schedule, the track squad was the only group to win outright an O-QAA championship. However, the r golfers and wrestling warriors shared first place honours with others (which is almost as good). The hockey guys finished first in the league going into the playoffs and the b:ballers also finished on top, except the latter shared their position with Windsor and Western. Of these top five Warrior teams, the grapplers will definitely go the farthest next year. At this point, it is safe to forsee the first CIAU team trophy adorning the Waterloo trophy case as that of the wrestling team. Most of last year’s experience will return boosted by at least eight of the province’s high school champions. The trackmen will suffer tragically from losses of top point scorers, but will remain as one of the nation’s top three college teams. Judging from past years, not much hope can be placed on the hockey or basketball groups because of their inability to pull through when the pressure is applied during the playoff circuit. The lack of a national golf tourney, will limit that competition to the provincial 1eveL

ANOTHER

B0NE.R

How can the athletic #epartment actually advertise for an individual to coach both track and basketball? After all, the track schedule begins in September and extends . until march. This leaves the coach approximately three weeks of non-conflicting time. Imagine ‘for a moment, playoff time for the b-ball guys, that’11 be about the same time that the cin‘der guys are peaking for the CIAU championships.. . Now, the busy

can learn the Fosbury so that they coach has to handle both these can fake ‘out the competition by teams; to ease the load, he sends (and upside the distance guys outside to run going in backwards (they complain about the 20 be!o w down) ! . . . . . the b-ball guys are forbut he starts the ced to bob and weave around those temperature, pound shots being toswatch and tells ‘em to run in a sixteen southerly direction until the sed around on the far side by the practise doesn’t weather suits them) . .. inside to weight men...: present as big a headache, howtake care of the sprinters, jumpever, as the weekly problem of exers, throwers and oh yes, that basketball team... gym time is at plaining to one team why their leader can’t make it to see his a premium ‘cause the girl’s coach, struck by a duty to protect the team perform.. . . then, the distance guys return tanned and ready chastity of her charges, won’t for a speed workout.. .but where? allow anyone within thirty feet of the locked doors, that leaves all . .. . of course, there is the time when the teams grabbed the wrong but the very well endowed a few bags and balls don% inches short of success.. . so, a equipment go as far as javelins . . . . . . . . etc, great idea by the inventive coach. etc, etc, ad bordum. let the jumpers and ball players work out together, the shooters - Megann

and

so

if

goes..

Sitting at the typewriter for the last time in the service of the chevron makes me feel happy. For never again will I have to begin to make up copy to fill the graphic white spaces at one o’clock in the morning. Since this is the last paper I won’t have to hear any criticism from those people out there who believe that this department should only print yesterdays scores out of the record. I have decided to write about anything that interests me. And the most pressing thing at the moment is who will meet in the world series. To many of you this may not make much sense. You ‘probably feel I should be concerned about our national sport, lacrosse ...

l

have witnessed throughout the year it seems that CBS and the board of governors are selling a three ring circus with two rings empty. Perhaps CBC should change the name of their best canadian tv drawing card to hockey fights in Canada, since they have adopted the amerikan style of showing each and every sick attempt of fistacuffs on the video replay. Gone are the days when half of these punch drunk George Chuvalos would have been deterred from dropping their gloves by an ever ready Lou Fontinato or a . younger and more vigorous John Ferguson. Even their one ring / show is not the best there is. I guess what really burns my ass is the mockery performed by

er ah hockeyWell 1’11 tell YOU7 Clarence Campbell every time he having been accused of being a hands out fines to the guilty play-

jock and a chauvinist pig, I have decided that since the watered down brand of hockey that is being passed off as shiny is so poor, I will rise above my nationality to look at another sPoi”t that I am interested in and also feel has passed through it’s dismal stage of expansion. Even the greed of the Owners can’t Vi1 the Years’ season. Why should I get upset about the NHL where the owners have tripped over each other in their efforts to make as much gold out of their novel invention of selling franchises. From the games I \

ers. I think -everyone knows that fiats are encouraged by the management and so, they pay the fines not the players. But tonights statemerit. by Stafford Smythe takes the cake. He has come out and said that he will not pay the $5,000 or so that his Leafs had levied against them for their farcical outburst against the Rangers. That did it! I’m now almost out of space. It’ll be the Braves in six over the Birds of Baltimore. Take that you NHL war mongering

capitalistpigs.

and neuer hore flattering when the punts tmd tops are ours!

,

Fit, finesse - and a flair for imaginative colors and patterns. What more does a good men’s store need to attract the ladies? Nothing, we say, and our brisk sales in jeans and toppings prove the point. Never fear, yours will always be here - right alongside her sizes. (After all - togetherness is what it’s all about.)

!iiiii

Waterloo Square? mGftfleblxkwalm

-Notes friday

76april

1977 (17:57)

7075

19


feedback

0N THE PURCHASE 0~ ANY MCDIUM OR LARGER-PIZZA Offer expires may 3/71 Eat in, Take out or delivery 103

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Campus

needs

people

money

to solve

not

problems

With the completion of the campus center report, it seems that structural changes are inevitable. I hope that the consultants chosen will -come from our own school of architecture. ’ Since the building we have now is a result of numerous compromises and petty haggling, a word of warning to those who revel in petty bureautracy and power politics at all levels of university government. You have a two and a half million dollar “lemon” now, let’s not add injury to insult and repeat previous errors. Instead of modifying the existing building, it might be cheaper, in the long run, to turn the present campus center into an additional lecture and tutorial hall and start again. Failing this, I propose a series of cheap, highly untechnical experiments utilizing the existing structure. The lighting system in the great hall is instrumental in determining the center’s atmosphere. Utilizing the services of the turnkeys, various lighting combinations could be tried each night, for a week. In addition, the loudness of the music would be modified to meet the lighting. As the turnkeys are so aware of what is happening there, they should best, be able to judge the user’s reactions. If however, they should be uninterested, various departments within the university such as man-environment, sociology, psychology might be approached. My critics will argue that this 4 has all been tried before but this does not preclude another try under different circumstances. If you care enough about ‘your’ place additional funds for major renovations -are unnecessary. All the campus center needs is people who care enough about it to find ways of using it. This it has, but most of them are not students or faculty. This is the great tragedy of the campus center. IAN D. ROBERTSON plan 1

Cafdainization not

simple

is intelecf

nationalism

I was disappointed at the reporting of professor Kenneth Hare’s lecture to Canadian studies 200. It is clear by now that the iss,ue of canadianization of universities as reported in the chevron is principally one of the nationality of faculty members. Professor Hare’s lecture was about canadianization ‘of quite a different sort, and while it might be useful to your cause to quote various of his sentences out of context, the content of his lecture might be of some interest. Initially ‘Hare claimed that canadianization should be an intellectual, not a nationalistic issue. By this he meant that the prin-

ciple concern should be not the citizenship of faculty but rather the relevance to Canadian problems of the content of what is being taught and researched. He mentioned that these issues are more meaningfully raised in such-areas as the social sciences than in fields like pure mathema tics. In his second lecture Hare indicated some of the difficulties he had encountered in doing research in the Arctic: the unwillingness of Canadians to support his research, the lack of interest among Canadian, students in joining in the research, and the general disinterest of Canadians , in the Canadian north. He explained in great detail (though perhaps not satisfactorily) why he found this intellectual canadianization of the universities both desirable and very difficult to accomplish. It was demonstrated again at Hare’s lectures that for those who are involved in the former sort of canadianization it is indeed still a “hot issue” : the arguments were based more on emotion than on information. Judging by attendance at Canadian studies lectures, however, canadianization is hardly the most popular issue on campus. The service the Canadian studies program is providing, both in terms of encouraging departments in the university to canadianize, is in- * valuable. BETSY CRAP0

Hitch-hi&en drivers muy

t&e wufning be soreing

I had an interesting experience, but it sort of frustrated me and I felt that by writing to the chevron I might rid myself of a hostile feeling due to the frustration. ‘At 12:45 pm, I made a right turn on University avenue from King and stopped to pick up a chap who was thumbing for a ride. As I moved on, a police cruiser stopped me and the policeman started writing out a ticket. As he was doing so, the chap I had picked up quickly got out of the car and promptly started thumbing for a new ride. The fellow (I feel like calling him an s.o.b. and a few other names but I won’t since I have lost the hostile feeling) did not even bother to express his sympathy for the fact I had to pay three dollars for the ticket. I sure as hell did not expect him to offer to pay the ticket, but damn it, the fellow could have at least joined me in curs ing the policeman. Oh well, I guess I learned a lesson. Icertainly won’t stop at the corner of King and University to pick up a hitchhiker. It would be a help if people who are hitch-hiking would make sure that they are not getting an unwary motorist into trouble with the police when he-tries to give them a ride. All they have to do is not to try to hitch-hike from a no stopping zone. S.V. BAILY engineering

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feedback Chevron “question

articles of +O

raises hi

Address letters to feedback, ihe chevron, lJ of W. Be concise. The chevron reserves the right to shorten letters. Letters must be typed on a 32 character line. For legal.reasons, letters must be signed with course year and phone number. A pseudonym /will be printed if you have a good reason.

team. Why did it take three years before the coaches realized this In response to the article in the and have him replaced? This isn’t logical on the part of the coaches. april 2 chevron, “Oil and the futAnother important mention was ure of the indo-china war”,.1 would George Nogradi, ex-captain ; ‘ ‘all like to draw the attention of chevthe coaches agree that he wasn’t ron readers I to a related incident good enough” to play, yet he was that has aroused strong protest chosen captain by none other than across the US and is now spreading W. Delahey P. Hopkins and cominto Canada. Tiao Yu Tai collectively is a pany. Why pick a player who is group of small islands about 125) inept to be captain? A captain is supposed- to be one of the best miles northeast of Taiwan. Tiao Yu Tai is part of the province of players on the field, not an idiot as Peter the prick makes him out Taiwan, therefore these islands belong to China. Because of its to be. Next is W. Hull who is nearly 6’ and weights close to 200 lbs; closeness Taiwan’s fishermen doesn’t this come close to the have long made it one of their size requirement? habitual fishing grounds and a santuary for bad weather. If he wasn’t able to fill the job After the discovery of large oil requested of’ him why wasn’t he deposits throughout the east Asia placed at a different position? Inthe japanese offshore region, cluding offense there are 23 other government declared that the positions (excluding quarterSenkaku islands (Tiao Yu Tai is- back); surely he could have filled lands) belong to Japan, and the one of those positions. It is apUS government backed this japparent that Delahey lacked the anese claim by implying Tiao Yu b foresight to recognize this and Tai is part of Ryukyu and will be Peter the prick is also at fault returned hopefully, along with for not informing the head coach Ryukyu, to Japan in 1972. of this. Dennis Watts “lacked the Chinese students and Chinese ov- necessary skills”; why wasn’t he erseas ,in the US have staged large taught these skills? Is the coachdemonstrations in protest against ing staff that inept that’ they this US-japanese conspiracy over couldn’t teach the- players some Chinese territories - Tiao Yu skills? Isn’t it the job of, the asTai. Now this Tiao Yu Tai movesistant coach to help the head ment has spread across the bordcoach in this respect? er to Canada. On april 3, a signifPeter the prick then steps onto icant demonstration was staged the subject of coaching, which he at the US and japanese consulates considers his job‘ (he being on the in Montreal. staff). Where was the coaching The Montreal demonstration staff this year. How in Christ’s was organized by the Chinese stuname can an asshole of an assitdent’s union of Canada composed ant coach say that a team only of Chinese students’ associations lost 2 games in two years when in twelve universities in Quebec the record says that the team lost and Ontario, including the wat10 games. The coaches must have erloo Chinese students’ associabeen asleep for the rest of the tion at this university. games. Then again it may have With the US government being been those phantom tacklers who the chief conspirator in this incicame out of the bleachers to tackdent and for the sake of US inle our players on the goal line, or terest, it is understandable that was it due to an inexperienced news media in north America quarterback. Well we did have an have been mute over reaction’s experienced quarterback but its to this incident. the head coaches duty to find a Many Chinese students in Canada have taken a firm stand in suitable replacement. support of the Tiao Yu Tai moveThen there was the lacking of a ment which, no doubt, will soon good defensive line ‘that caused us to lose against Western and spread all across north America Queens. The defensive line is despite news blackouts over this issue. your responsibility and its Delahey’s responsibility in picking W.Y. LAU a suitable line coach. In the westgrad them eng ern game it was the defense that kept the team in the game; you must have been asleep for that one Hopkins integrity us couch because your observations are relative to &es-kissed quite incorrect. Then there were I would like to direct a few other factors, what other factors? questions to the assistant football You mention that Wally on the coach (?) Peter Hopkins, in resspur of the moment made some pect to his essay in the Gazette. good adjustments because of Peter starts his letter awarding weather, injuries etc. The only a trophy to the “rumor mongering, adjustments that he made was to knife-in-the-back ex - Warriors”; he seems to forget that many of take out his best players and replaced them with some secondthose who signed the petition were stringers. I would like you to members of the present Warrior list a few of the adjustments team, so why single out a few, that I may have missed over the who behaved like men in bringing past two years. out the difficulties, instead of letting everything remain quiet. Is Now the question of your init not a man who stands up for tegrity as an assistant coach comwhat he believes to be true, rathes to mind. How many asses did er than be a patsie and kiss asses you have to kiss to get from an to get ahead? Who is really more asshole with a 3 yr. degree & 1 yr. of a man? Phys-ed course to beccme an asPeter the prick lists a few namsistant coach of the team. How es as those who, from the impresthe hell do you qualify when sion of the letter, were the chief people like DeArmon who have instigators of the petition. A few forgotten more football than comments on those listed: Dave you’ll ever know, have been foreGroves who refused “to be a dised to leave. As far as the horse’s ciplined quarterback. ” Groves ass trophy is concerned, you are was, granted, an undisciplined the unanimous choice, Peter. quarterback from the day he arRIPPER rived on campus, but was the only quarterback, despite his limited REPTILE knowledge, who could move the GUS YU

But aside differences give us some good

and football

After listening to both sides of the present football war being waged between the players and the coaches, I would like to add my cornmen ts as a *e-average-fan. Congratulations to the football team on that fine counter-attack article which they wrote in the last edition of the chevron. I’m sure Mr. Hopkins (if he read the article) felt about an inch high for the slanderous and seditious remarks which he directed at the gutless, back stabbing ex-Warriors. I also think that these “gutless’ ex-Warriors should be congratulated on having ‘guts’ to finally stand up and speak out against the intolerable situation that exists on our football team. But now that both sides have expressed their feelings let’s get down to ‘brass tracks’ and do something about it. I’m not suggesting that Mr. Delahany be fired and the whole coaching staff resign after him. What I am saying is why can not the coaching staff and the players get together and hammer out their differences. It must be evident to the coaching staff that their past actions concerning player personal, player communication, and game strategy, are extremely questionable to even the most ignorant football fan. Why &n’t they face up to their inadequacies and be ‘men’ themselves by giving ‘a little towards the ideas of their players instead of acting like a bunch of stubborn. jack-asses. This is not a time for saving face Mr. Delahany, Mr. Totszke, and Mr. Hopkins. The situation is going to get one helluva a lot worse before it gets any better. Therefore, it is my suggestion that the players and coaches get together and do something about this critical situation. Both sides must be ‘honest’ with each other and be willing to compromise with each other.\Perhaps an un-biased with experience in arbitrator, player-coach relationships, should be brought in to iisten to both sides and then make positive recommendations to rectify the situation. It is time to start acting like professionals instead of a bunch of bush-league amateurs. I hope that something is done about this whole mess at once. When I come back next year I would like to see some decent football for a change instead of the dull and half-hearted bullshit that I have had to put up with in the last three seasons. Good God, scores like l-0, 3-2 etc., are enough to drive a man to drink on those windy, fall afternoons. PHIL STOESSER plan ‘72 Why is the library eased at most needed exum times

Doesn’t it seem pretty stupid that the library isn’t open 24 hours a day two weekends before final exams. The only time of year many if not most students want to use the library - because they’re desperate - and it’s closed. If the library were open now (12:30 am sunday/27) I wouldn’t be wasting my time writing this letter cause I bet it’s closed next weekend.. .yours pistoffilly . GRAHAM

-.

C.U.P.E. \ LOCAL 793

GENERAL MEETING 4:00 pm Wednesday April 28/71

L

Eng Let Room 101

Federation

of Students

J Research Project Written application ‘will be received by the undersigned for a “Summer Research Project” on the Student Unemployment problem. _ I

,

The successful applicant will be expected to devout a full three months to only this project while on summer break. Only members eligible to apply. Total

of the

Federation

are

Project Budget: $1 ,OOO.OO . Deadline- for applications is 5:00p.m.April21, 1971 Carl H. Sulliman V.P.

WAFER arts 4

1 LJ

friday

76 ;prVl 7977J7

7:57)

707> 21


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Experience f nothingness

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MACKENZIE PORTER, one of the western world’s most erudite anomalies complained recently that university students today were not what they used to be. Recollecting with teary eyes the hapless days of his youth when daring pranks and ribald brashness were a vital part of his grotesque life, Porter claims students have fallen into a dreary acceptance of what is and are apathetic, unconcerned and non-commital. Students, he notes: have been scared out of their wits by nothing more than a teenie-weenie recession. Well, no doubt the ‘unemployment of 700,000 men an.d up to 900,000 students is a mere teenie-weenie problem to the ga.lloping philosopher who once spent an entire column describing ultimate couth as eating fruit with a knife and fork, but surely, if, as Porter suggests, students are scared to death, there must be some real reason. First of all, scared to death might be an inappropriate euphomism for frightened of nothingness. Not nothing. Nothingness. For the first time, many students have been. faced with some frightening contradictions. A world that trains them, perhaps over a period of at least 23 years to need and more importantly, to want security suddenly snatches away.the means of attaining security. A world that has socialized people into accepting a social order of status based on intellectual and econo-mic levels suddenly renders meqningless, the many expensive years of striving to bchieve that status. A world that has emphasized the attainment of “things” as the fulfillment of worldly endeavor suddenly has no “things” available, yet continues to advertise as heavily as ever. Some students are finding that their world has steeped them in a reliance upon business, striving, filling up, moving ahead to such ,an extend that when ?hese activities no longer guarantee socially-set goals there is instant panic. Society has not said anything about experiencing nothingness; the deflation of expectation first, the not-caring about not caring second. it is the vile achievement of our society, however, that demands ’ all effort be expended to alleviate the pain of nothingness; the tragedy for student and worker alike is in assuming the/experience itself is bad. Both have been trained to misunderstand it, to face it alone as guilt or as a great burden that must somehow be ‘got rid of’. Perhaps this is the feeling that results in the “apathy” and sup, posed insensitivity of which mister Porter speaks. And if it is, then . mister Porter, too, has not escaped the mind management that forbids people from embracing nothingness, exploring it, appreciating it, realizing it as potentially the best spawning ground for new ideas and innovative solutions to problems that exists. It is not a mental void to be patched with therapy and medication; it is a common ground which all men may use to rebuild and restructure. And it is precisely for this reason that a society built on privilege and security fosters ignorance about the fantastic potential of doing nothing in particular, thinking nothing extraordinary, and planning only for now. It is as if these experiences gave freedom t& people to say ‘We don’t have to play by your rules anymore; we can make our own...” The danger in spawning innovative freedom of course, is that innovators often ‘have no respect.’ And, this, perhaps,. is why people like Mackenzie Porter deliberately foster the impression that ‘apathy’ and ‘unconcern’ are purjorative terms and &not IeE ‘i to a more honest investigation into the real meaning of “nothingness.” For it is easier to take advantage of apathy to preserve power and efficiency than it is to show how a seemingly great empty feeling can in fact, can be the seed of new structures, new methods, new _ goals. It is, for example, expedient for a’university administration to get rid of unwanted professors by setting student against student, faculty against faculty and student against faculty in a meaningless %und of rhetoric until everyone is so afraid his acquired position will be at stake thdt he retreats to “apathy” and becomes frightened of the “nothingness” lack of honesty, purpose, morality and - identity - around him. So it is with selecting a vice-president of personnel: reduce the act to an administrative move. at a time when no-one has the strength to object any longer. And so it‘ is with “service” buildings. After all, who could care less about 3‘6 reserved parking spaces? And so it is with “student observers” at the board of governors’ meeting. Why must they be excluded from in camera sessions of the board? I’The answer: tokenism if necessary, but not necessarily tokenism. Its how things are done; does anyone really care; after all, what can they DO about it?” And so it goes. And so it goes. Next year, the chevron will attempt to see that it doesn’t go so smoothly. -Alex Smith

22

by Tim Shortreed the chevron To tell the truth as much as possible that is what’s important but it’s difficult you know the small things that don’t seem like very much but they too are part of fabric i can remember Saturdays with you in your bed and the wind rippline the curtains and sending tiny waves to stir the hot still air that wrapped us in its soft cuckoon t

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the motion of your hand (when you take the hair from your face as you tell me of your lovers) whispers footsteps up the ladder of my spine and though i will never be jealous i will always be alone

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there on backporches overlooking alleyways in the harsh dead light of breathless summer days that looking over the ruins of the old factory i knew myself among the bricks and dust and was afraid * t * (these things i should have told you then but i was afraid) i remember you told me once that being lonely terrified you like a fear of the dark that will swallow you up _ in its emptiness always falling l

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(and i was afraid for both of us each in our separate way)

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A parable of sharks .

_ by Bertold Brecht _Kalendergeschichten 64

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: 1018 the Chevron

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even though you don’t understand the truth of little things is larger than a lie

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F SHARKS WERE pe\ople.” his landlady’s little daughter asked Mr. K., “would they be nicer to the little fish?” “Of course,” he said, “if sharks were people, they would have’ strong boxes built in the sea for little fish. There they would put in all sorts of food, plants and little animals too. They would see to it that the boxes alway: had fresh water, and they would take absolutely every sort of sanitary measures. When, for example, a little fish would injure’his fin, it would be immediately bandaged so that he would not die on the sharks before his time had come. In order that the little fishies would never be sad, there would be big water parties from time to time: for happy fishies taste better than sad ones. Of course, there would be schools in the big boxes as well; there the fishies would learn how to swim into the mouth of the sharks. They would need, for example, geography so that they could find the sharks, lazing around somewhere. The main subject would naturally be the moral education of fishies. They would be taught that that grandest, most beautiful thing is for a little fishy to offer himself happily, and that they must all believe in the sharks, above all when they say that they will provide for a beautiful future. One would let the fishies know that this future is only assured when they learn obedience. They must shy away from all lowly, materialistic, egoistic and marxist iticlinations, and inform the sharks immediately if any one of them betrayed such tendencies. “If sharks were people, there would of course be art as well. There would be beautiful pictures of sharks’ teeth-all in magnificant colors, of their mouth and throats as pur .e playgrounds where one can tumble and play. The theaters on the bottom of the sea would offer P lays showing heroic fishies swimming enthus&tic@ly down the throats of the sharks, and the music would be so beautiful that its sounds would lead the fishies dreamily to the chapels and, filled with the most pleasant thoughts, they wotild stream down .the sharks’ throats. There would certairily be religion... It would teach that true life really begins in the sharks’ bellies. And if sharks were people, the little fish would stop being, like they are now, equals. Some would be given offices and be put over the others. Those a little bigger would even be allowed to eat the littler ones. That would only be delightful for the sharks, for then they virould more often have bigger crumbs to gobble up. And the most important of the little fishies, those with offices, would rook to the ordering of the little fish. And they would become teachers, officers, box-building engineers, etc. In short, there could only be culture in the sea if the sharks were people.”

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member: Canadian univerkity press (CUP) and underground press syndicate (UPS), subscriber: liberation news service (LNS) and chevron international news service (GINS), the chevron is a newsfeature tabloid published offset fifty-two times a year (1970-7 1) on tuesdays and fridays by the federation of students, incorporated university of Waterloo. Content is the responsibility of the chevron staff, independent of the federation and the university administration, offices in the campus center; phone (519) 578-7070 or university local 3443; telex 0295 - 748. -circulation: 13,000 (fridays) Alex Smith, editor Another year, another volume. And its over now until the middle of may. Or thereabouts. Its difficult to say what we would have done without some important people this year: Notes, who had the sports ticking like clockwork and who, unquestionably, was one of the hardest working and most imaginative people on staff, anchovies no-twithstanding; Sheldon who bullied more people into writing more stories than any predecessor in the near past but who only put in half days (tsk,-tsk)S‘ Una, Krista. Eleanor, Bruce and Norm who are now qualified to write for the North Bay Nugget (classifieds); Bruce Steele, Bruce Steele, and Bruce Steele; Renato and Rosco; of course, the notogs and Mordon (We’re-gonna-need-more-film) Goore; Brenda and everybody (note to tde Pman: Phyllis, or else!) who partook of the pizza./Hopefully, exciting things will be happenthis coming year at the chevron: dabbling in video-tape, films, speakers. panels. debates, forums-all part of the chevron forum series to get more issues to the attention of more people./ Possibly some new formatin the tuesday papers, more extensive coverage of campus events and more locally-written features./Remember Voices next week: if you don’t find it on campus, its because it will be mailed-to you at home sometime in the’next two weeks./Finally, a special mention to Bob Epp who was chiefly responsible for keeping the chevron publishing last summer and who took Sheldon by the hand in the fall. We think it was Epr who started the tradition of playing computer games on deadline nights, which brings us to Biorythm Lukachko. How many days until your period-ah, that’s cycle, Al?/And ta -ta to Mary: may you be served first when next at Angie’s./Quotation of the year: “It is the duty of a newspaper to comfort the afflicted and to afflict .the comfortable.” production manager: Al Lukachko coordinators: Bill Sheldon (news), Gord Moore (photo), Ross Bell (entertainment) Bryan Anderson (sports and distribution), rats (features) Putting it to B-byes: renato ciolfi, brute a. Steele, esq. (as in Steele of Ottawa), dave cuddly, mel rotman, krista tomory, una o’callaghan, Colin hamer, Steve izma, eleanor hyodo, karl brubacher, gary robins, drispin sumner, dennis mcgann, the Radical,, jerry malzan, brenda Wilson, dan o’leary, brian lauder, nigel burnett, jeff bennett and rod hickman./XXX/-30-/TTFN-

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BE THE FIRST TO KILL \ .% ALL THE KIDS ON YOUR BLOCK .

friday

76april

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1020 the Chevron

By permission

from the Last Post


1970-71_v11,n51_Chevron  

a grant of 500 dollars (up 300 dollars from the original pro- posal) ‘to Crossroads Africa, and l an allocation of 470 dollars ‘or represent...

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