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UNIVERSITY

23

pdicipufe

200 students, faculty where the>] were met

Largest millions

WASHINGTON D.C. (CUP)Even though U.S. president Richard Nixon had already told them he wouldn’t listen,millions of americans took time off wednesday (October 15) to let him know one more time that they want an end to the Vietnam war. The Vietnam moratorium, originally planned as a student protest, mushroomed into the biggest civilian protest in the history of the United States, with thousands of demonstrations occurring where organizers had merely hoped to see thousands of people. over into students in and Tokyo ahead with own cities the Amer-

Reaction from the U.S. administration-which was listening all the time-was so negative that moratorium organizers have 1,500,OOO buttons advertising a

In one of the first demonstrations, approximately 1000 students of Georgetown University tuesday night filed three-abreast through the streets of Washington. The march aroused little public interest and went off without incident. Coretta King, widow of Martin Luther King Jr., led thousands of marchers in a candlelight parade around the whitehouse in the evening, and in a third demonstration at the capital, more than 2000 demonstrators turned out for a parade on the University of Washington campus. All across the States, flags were lowered to half-mast and protestars marched or attended teachins, forums, candlelight processions, prayers or the readings of the names of Vietnam war dead.

council briefs

backed

At a meeting of the student council of the federation of students on tuesday night, a motion was passed supporting wednesday’s Vietnam moratorium and urging all federation members to attend. * * *

delegates to the “year of the barricades” conference at York University, October 23 to 26. The Canadian Union of Studentssponsored conference is intended as a desensationalized in-depth study of student unrest. * * *

Council passed a motion expressing solidarity with the striking political science, sociology and anthropology department at Simon Fraser University in their struggle for academic freedom with the upiversity administration and the British Columbia government. The

federation

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in history, moratorium

two-day moratorium in november, which will go ahead if the U.S. does not make a “significant” move toward settlement of the war.

Wcw pro,test

Waterloo,

in Uniwat

and #friends marched ‘from Kitchener by another 100 to continue their march

protest observe

The protest spilled Canada in spots, and London, Rome, Paris were expected to *go demonstrations in their to show sympathy with ican effort.

OF WATERLOO,

Approximately 150 rallies took place in Nassau county, New York, alone. So large was the response that even major political figures endorsed it: New York mayor John Lindsay, despite conservative criticism, proclaimed a day of mourning in the city, with flags on city buildings at half-mast and church bells tolled hourly. But tuesday night in congress, Pro-Nixon forces foiled an attempt by anti-war representatives to keep the house in session as a gesture of support for the protest. By a vote of 112 to 110, members decided to adjourn before supmidnight : administration porters said an all-night session might give the impression that a majority of congressmen supported “surrender” in Vietnam. In Canada, interest and participation in the moratorium was sporadic, although sizeable demonstrations were held at the university of British Columbia, Waterloo and McGill. At UBC, approximately 500 students gathered in their student union building to hear antiwar speakers and listen to rock music, while a sizeable number of professors discussed the war in their classes. The university administration remained silent, as did the student council.

October

1969

moratorium At 9 am on Wednesday, a group of persons assembled at Kitchener city hall for the march. After, a couple of anti-war folk songs by Bob Janzen, history prof Cal Morrison of Waterloo Lutheran gave an historical account of the Vietnam war. Religious studies prof Walter Klassen then addressed the crowd with an appeal from several of the march organizers. He first endorsed the analysis of the war given by Morrison and expressed a realization of the oppressive role of the U.S. in the war; and then requested that all those carrying Viet Cong and red flags leave them behind for the march. He said that waving flags would only frighten people and defeat the purpose of the parade. History prof Leo Johnson spoke out in favor of the flag carriers, saying that one cannot merely speak out against viowithout examining its lence cause. He urged a differentiation between acts of imperialism and struggles and oppression, for liberation. “We should take the side of those people struggling to be free,” he stated. David Kirk, parade marshall, then told his fellow marchers that the mayor had been happy to see that there were many

Biology support

people taking part in the ,festivities carrying Oktoberfest banners. On this humorous note the march proceeded down King street:‘ The parade halted at the Waterloo mall to join the mothersand-children demonstration, and more folk-singing and speeches. As the group proceeded to the university, they were joined by Shane Roberts, clad in a diaper made from an American flag. At the campus center, he removed the flag and burned it, saying, “Here we burn flags while in Vietnam they are burning people. ” The marchers _ then entered the campus center for the beginning of the teach-in. From noon to midnight there were a variety of speakers and folk singers, with a showing of “the war game” to conclude the moratorium. Close to 1000 people participated in the teach-in at various times. A Vietnamese dinner was served instead of liberation lunch. Other

pictures and stories the Vietnam moratorium day march and teach-in are pages 2, 3, 426 and 288

from

profs asked to sci-sot policy

The science students’ society sets political policy in the science faculty-at least it seems that way when the society’s goals are compatible with the people who run the faculty. Biology department chairman Noel Hynes sent the following memorandum to faculty members in his department on October 10: “The science society, as you may have seen, is taking a firm line against. the proposal that classes should be cancelled on October 15 in protest against the Vietnam war. “The dean is most anxious that this faculty gives the society full support on this fairly crucial test case and complies with their request that professors be re-

quired to give normal courses on that day. “He has therefore asked chairmen to ensure that all courses are run. I personally am in entire agreement with this stand against dictatorship from the left. “So please ensure that your classes are fully manned next Wednesday, or, should you feel strongly that you belong in the other camp and that you are not going to give classes, inform me immediately so that I can arrange a substitute. “Please also, especially if your views run counter to my own, come to the biology seminar room at 5 .pm today for a lominute meeting on this matter.”

IBM researchers show support in peace effort More than 80 mathematicians in a symposium group of 120 signed a document in support of the antiwar moratorium. The participants in the tenth annual symposium on switching and automata theory decided it would be business as usual but many wanted to publicly show

their support for the peace effort. “The action was initiated by a group of research scientists from IBM,” said James Thatcher, an IBM researcher from Yorktown Heights, New York. A large number of armbands and buttons were worn by moratorium supporters.

Barry Fillimore, eng 4, was elected to replace Dave Cubberley who resigned recently as chairman of the board of education. * x *

At McGill, approximately 500 demonstrators led by students society president Julius Grey marched on the U.S. consulate in Montreal. Grey and vicepresidents Martin Shapiro and David Young presented a letter to consulate officials for U.S. president Nixon expressing opposition to the war by “members of the McGill University students and staff. ”

Renison

Joe Bartolocci, St. Jerome’s rep, was elected to replace Larry Caesar, who resigned recently as chairman of the board of external relations. -

Over 900 McGill students attendded a teach-in in the main university lecture hall, where all classes were cancelled for the moratorium.

Father Bill Townson of Renison College said last friday that the Renison faculty and administration voted unanimously to close operations on Wednesday October 15 for the moratorium. Principal Win Rees said, “It’s time that one of the church collef stood up to be counted.”

votes support


CU~~O~;CS, marxists “The chief opposition to birth control comes from roman catholits and marxists, authoritarian forces who believe that ordinary people don’t know best, ” a former worker for the planned parenthood association told the biology club tuesday\ night.

call~cf

In her address entitled “the children of this world have a right to be planned”, Barbara Cadbury deplored the interference of the catholic church in the process of what she felt should be individual decision-making. “We have been attacking the

bidi

problem of overpopulation from the wrong end, ” said Cadbury, who calls herself a “population alarmist” and who has promoted birth control in Jamaica and Asia. “Instead of worrying about ways of providing more housing, food and other necessities of life, why

Sociology prof attacks academics the ivoiy tower game for playing munity that enables them to live and work in this manner. Quoting C. Wright Mills on the role of intellectuals he said, “when they do not demand that the secrecy that makes elite decisions absolute and unchallengeable be removed, they too are part of the passive conspiracy to kill off public scrutiny. He suggested that faculty members from all departments should get together in loosely affiliated groups to undertake projects dedi-

The general apathy of academics towards community and world problems was attacked by sociology professor David Kirk wednesday in the moratorium’s campus ten ter teach-in. Kirk stressed the need for establishing morality in the universities. He said that academics are abusing their privileged position by neglecting to direct their attention to the needs of the human com-

Students stage funeral on Simon Fraser campus (CUP)-AdminisBURNABY tration president Kenneth Strand refused to sign the death certificate for Simon Fraser University Tuesday, so the corpse, covered with blood and fungus, had to get up and walk away. But Strand’s uncooperative attitude didn’t catch the mourners unprepared-they cremated the university’s coffin instead, on a mall underneath the windows of the president’s office. The mock funeral was guerrilla theater created by a group of striking students-about 35 in all-to liven up proceedings as the strike around the university’s department of political science, sociology and anthropology entered its fourth week. The strike began september 24. Led by a Greek orthodox “priest”, mourners followed a

huge black coffin around the university, wailing and weeping for the deceased institution. The corpse itself, brought up the rear of the procession, flanked by eight vestal virgins in oriental costumes. Halting at the administration building, mourners listened while the “Priest” explained that “the deceased, that is the university, suffered grievous wounds to numerous faculties prior to the final collapse and extinction. ” Cause of death was “amputation of reasoned discourse, castration of the intellect, and suffocation of the imagination.” The students left a blank space on the corpse’s death certificate for the signature of Strand, designated as chief mortician, but when corpse and coffin were deposited at the doors of Strand’s office, the administration president refused to sign.

enemies

control

cated to social justice and social reconstruction. As it now is, universities eschew social and political issues altogether, but we as intellectuals have both the opportunity and responsibility to think, research and act on behalf of those who cannot readily do so themselves, he added. He invited all interested persons to put their signatures to an open letter to administration president Howard Petch. In brief the letter asked the following embarrassing questions and offered a few relevant suggestions. l What are the amounts, origins and applications of monies coming to the university from government agencies, private industry and foundations, in both the U.S. and Canada? l What are the connections between these funds and classified research? l What proportion of research funds administered by the university are for projects initiated within the community as compared to projects contracted by outside organiza tions? The letter suggested: l That files and data related to research be open to inspection by any member of the university community ; l That a student-faculty committee work with the central research officer to study actual and potential applications of research ; l That summaries be published regularly concerning research done by this community, the structures of funding and the distribution of research efforts in science, the humanities and other faculties.

not help people to stop having children they don’t want? ” She feels that contraceptive information and devices should be made available to everyone, but that their use should be up to the individual, not religious institutions. She said that the church made its influence felt in the world health organization a few years ago when Ceylon asked for a major birth control program to control its increasing population problem, and the republic of Ireland (a catholic nation), announced it would withdraw from W.H.O. were such a program put into effect. Ceylon was therefore forced to wait until recently for W .H.O. contraception assistance. Cadbury also called attention to Scarborough general hospital, until 1968 the only hospital in the largest Toron to borough which banned all its doctors from prescribing contraceptives. The hospital was founded by a catholic order, the sisters of misericorde. “The roman catholic church doesn’t recognize that women are other than breeders,” she said. Cadbury called the Marxists a “new enemy” of birth control, for insisting that to promote birth control in underdeveloped nations is equivalent to genocide. She cited specifically the introduction to the birth control handbook printed by the McGill student society, which was distributed here at registration, in which

Arts

reduces

course

After two sessions of discussions, the arts faculty council on tuesday approved the reduction of courses for an honors degree. The voet of 37 to 29 reduced the number of degrees from 24 to 20. An amendment was added to permit departments to augment the number of courses required to a maximum of 24. Jack Gray commented that “the student will have the final say if he wants to take more than 20 courses”. The reason given for the reduction was “to permit the student to

Homecoming

The Federation of Students is seeking a volunteer to do research into problems of OHSIP. The particular area of study will be the relationship of the insurance companies to OHSIP, and how they profit from it.

Highlights be the Iron

The researcher selected will be granted funds to cover any costs incurred, the amount to be worked out with Council following the appointment. This is not a fulltime position.

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SATURDAY

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again

day night, a James Cotton Blues Band concert sunday evening and the biggest semi-formal in the history of the school Saturday night and sunday morning. Saturday morning will not have a parade, but there will be a car rally. That afternoon is the annual big drunk football game. Tickets for all events will be available in the federation of students office very soon, so watch for notices and ads (paid for) in the Chevron.

DUPLICATE

TODAY

for

load

go into more depth.. .it is the trend in university education . ” The general program was reduced from 16 courses to 15, and council passed a motion to permit a student to graduate with a general degree (non-major) in two years. The undergraduate affairs group asked- council for permission to have three student members to be identified by the federation of students “or until such time as the arts society can identify three such students. ” The group specified they must be students in good standing.

is coming

The homecoming ‘69 committee is pleased to announce that there really will-be a homecoming. It appears there have been a few problems in finalizing the program, and they were not willing to promote in error. All that will be said now is that homecoming starts Wednesday October 29 and continues to sunday evening.

0 HS IP Research Project

the U.S. government is accused of testing the intrauterine device on American blacks, Puerto Ricans, and Mexicans. Her argument is that the IUD is a poor example of enforced birth control, first of all because it must be inserted by a doctor, secondly because it is only suitable for a woman who has already borne at least one child. She added that the U.S. government has withheld birth control information from Puerto Rico and other countries due to the roman catholic bloc. Projected figures indicate that the world will have four billion people by 1980. The problem will not be food, ‘said Cadbury, (her figures show that last year total food supply outstripped total world population), but non-renewable resources such as minerals. In this connection she said that the birth of unwanted babies is a worse problem in North America than in underdeveloped countries, because poor people tend not to use these resources lavishly. However, large American families such as that of the late Robert Kennedy are a serious threat, because each child will probably own several sports cars, houses and other buildings, which use up valuable non-renewable resources. “Maybe the Kennedys can afford it, but we can’t”, said Cadbury.

EL201

NASA

Sot films

majors rncludrng


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BURNABY (CUP&-The administration at Simon Fraser University has discovered a simple solution to the problems posed by approximately 700 striking faculty and students in the university’s department of political science, sociology and anthropology. Ignore them.

strike,

Administration president Kenneth Strand announced business as usual officially began in the department tuesday with the dissolution of an administration trusteeship over PSA and the restoration of power to the department’s chairman. But according to Strand, the

uppoints

PSA department now consists of five professors who did not join the strike by students and faculty which began September 24, and which continues right under the administration president’s windows. In a statement issued a week ago, Strand also announced the

Sorry about the typos

Librarian Last, friday’s front-page “Books budgeted, but orders was not properly proofread

working story slow”

The correct figures, as stated by administration treasurer Bruce Gellatly. are as follows: $970,000 has been budgeted for book purchases this year, while $700,000 was spent (or committed for books still on order) in 196869. This represents an increase from 3.1 percent of the university’s operating budget last year to a projected 3.5 percent in 1969-70. Chief librarian William Watson said Wednesday that the actual figure for 1968-69 book purchases is $750,000, and not the $700,000 Gellatly stated. This means 3.3 percent of the operating budget was spent. on books in the last fiscal year. Watson also said that “with regard to undergraduate reading collections the steps taken so far to make them adequate have not been sporadic, but rather systematic and even aggressive. ” circulation Reference and staff have been asked to ord.er books as soon as the demand for them becomes known, according to Watson. Faculty are asked to let the library know ahead of time what books they will be using in the

on shortages

term ahead so that demand can be anticipated. ’ “Reserve books are processed in multiple copies; for one large course of 200 students, 42 journal articles wer/e obtained and put on reserve in a total of 385 copies, ” said Watson. A substantial part of a 55,o00item collection purchased from a New Hampshire dealer in the summer will directly support undergraduate needs. ’ Watson also said that book and periodical request cards have been made available in the libraries for recommendations on new, additional and replacement copies. “As for the past performance,” said the chief librarian, “the aim

has always been, as it remains, to provide an excellent library service for the university. “That it falls short of excellence-in an institution as new as this one and one in which the growth rate has been so phenomenal-is not surprising. “Within the framework of space, personnel and dollar limitations, the achievement to date has been most impressive. Hopefully the record for the next 12 or 13 years will be as satisfactory, ” he concluded. Watson came to the University of Waterloo on july 1 as chief librarian, replacing Doris Lewis. Lewis is taking a year off and will return to a library position with less administrative load. .

Underlying reasons for unigov report requested At yesterday’s meeting of the university act committee, a submission was received from math prof Ralph Staal. Staal, who felt the draft act did not outline the underlying philosophy and reasons for the recommendations, stated, “Surely the bodies which have spent so much time in finally produc-

head

impending appointment of one of the five, Robert Wyllie, as department head, and declared he would take over the duties of the trusteeship. It’s the second time in less than six months that Wyllie has held the post of department chairman : he resigned during the summer when faculty in the department-16 of them-declared they would not bow to administration demands that students be removed from their parity position on committees governing faculty appointments and tenure. This time, he apparently received a unanimous vote of confidence from the departmentwhich consists of himself, Herbert Adam, Don Barnett, Gary Rush and A.H. Somjee, all opposed to the strike and all technically “scabs” The rationale for Strand’s announcement stems from an administration ultimatum which set a deadline of October 1 for

PSA professors to return to their classes. When the deadline was ignored, Strand declared that nine striking faculty were suspended pending dismissal procedures: effectively making them “non-persons” in the department. The five “official” faculty have declared they elected Wyllik chairman “in order to facilitate the lifting of the trusteeship” imposed by the administration to clamp down on the total student parity operating in the department. The five also cited “a number of pressing problems” which figured in their decision, including unresolved difficulties with curriculum and budget, and “the general malaise existing in several sectors of the department.” Striking faculty and students gave no indication they would accede to the new state of affairs in PSA, and continued their strike to reinstate professors fired, suspended or demoted by the administration, and achieve recognition of student parity in the department.

Open meeting today discuss guest policy An open meeting of the presidential search and nominating committee is being held in the board and senate room at 11 a.m. today. According to an informationservices department press release, the purpose of the meeting is to discuss the draft of the procedures the committee proposes to follow in its continuing deliberations. The committee issued a statement that it has received nominations “of numerous highly-qualified individuals from many members of the university. ” The statement continues “The committee is happy to report that several eminent individuals have responded favorably to its inquiries and have indicated an interest in further discussions with the committee. Within -the near future, these individuals will separately visit the university as guests of the presiden-

ing these recommendations must have had reasons for their choice, and an adequate account of these reasons is necessary for guidance in the way the recommendations are to be used.” Staal continued, “If a personal reaction is considered relevant (I think it is in this case because it was shared with quite a few others), I was concerned to the point of bewilderment with the lack of interest-shown in this matter of rationale by our senate at the meetings I attended this spring. Perhaps it was due to the senate being caught off-balance by premature public announcements to the effect that it had gone on record as supporting a single-tier type of government, when all it had done was to recommend that the matter be discussed at a joint meeting of the board: certainly the pros and cons of the single-tier system received minimal attention at the meeting in question. ’ ‘ ‘Whatever the reason, the question of relationship between the kinds of decisions to be made and the competence of the voting (CUP)-Despite members was never taken up in a MONTREAL narrow mandate for action the any seriousness, although sev- students at Loyola eral members did try to st.im-. College hasassociation postponed -plans for ulate an interest in it,” Staal a three-day student strike, allowcontinued. ing administrators time to accept He concluded with the suggesdemands for binding arbitration tion that the matter of an aca- in the case of a physics professor demic council be used as a focal fired earlier this year. point for continuing discussion. In an unexpectedly heavy ‘ ‘This would, however, produce tuesday, 83 per cent of’ a government so close to that of turn-out loyola’s students took part in a a two-tier system that the very strike vote which barely approved meaning of the proposed one-tier the action:1,775 to 1,762. A total system should be questioned. of 34 ballots were spoiled: nearThere could, of course, be difly three times the victory margin. ferences, but this is precisely victory margin. what needs so urgently to be Student president Marcel Noudiscussed, and yet we have given vet termed the results of the reit almost no attention. ” ferendum “a definite victory,” and added that the university administration has little choice Tricky Dick but to comply with the, student executive’s support of physicist u&is insult S.A. Santhanam. “It’s now very apparent that NEW YORK (GINS)-The bourgeois press either missed or chose students will walk out to attain reforms, ” Nouvet said. to miss Richard Nixon making an valid “It’s up to the administration to obvious two-hand driving gesture indicate what steps it will take after shaking hands with Edward result. 1 Kennedy when the two met re- in light of the referendum’s He said the administration cently at Andrews airforce base.

to

tial search and nominating committee. During these visits, which are expected to last one or more days, each guest will meet with senior academics, with senior administrators, with representatives of the faculty, the students and the staff. “Each guest will be invited to present a learned talk on the topic of his choice; open t,o all members of the university and publicized in advance. An open informal reception will follow. “When all of its guests have indicated to the committee their final decision that they are or are not interested in the office of president of the University of Waterloo, the committee will then recommend a nominee to the senate and to the board of governors. ” \ According to the release, the guests’ addresses have been tentatively scheduled for the arts theater for one hour at 4 pm. 1

oyola student strike postponed temporudy

Mane Roberts joined the march clad on1.y in this American flag. He took it ofTand burned it outside the campus center, saying that in Vietnam more than -flags were burned.

friday

must now accept binding arbitration on the status of Santhanam -a position supported last june by the college’s academic senate and by the Canadian association of university teachers. Santhanam signed a statement in december .1967 stating his intention to resign in 1969, but was later given a contract for the 1969-70 year which stated it “sup‘erseded all other verbal agreements. ” But the physicist was not rehired by the college and a recommendation by the senate that his case be re-opened was rejected in june by the college’s all-jesuit board of trustees. On October 8, three students and seven faculty senators walked out of a senate meeting held to confirm or reject the college’s position. With the 10 dissident senators absent, the administration’s position was upheld. No deadline has been set by the students for an administration response to the strike vote, but it is reported that the strike may begin Wednesday if nothing further is done. 77 October

7969 (?i?:23)

357

3


*.

attention:

All Students assessed an arts society fee: Those students wishing their Arts Society fee refunded have until Oct. 31, 1969 to pick up the money in the Federation of Students office located in the Campus Cen-

tre, presenting the white copy of their fee statement.

Apathy, not hate, is the the opposite of love. -

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Prof explains why Viet successful revolutionaries Theories as to why the Viet Cong succeeded where other revolutionaries failed were presented by Waterloo Lutheran Qrofessor Cal Morrison to a campus center audience wednesday night. Morrison pointed out that Vietnam is the United States’ unsuccessful counter-revolution as opposed to the many successful ones they’ve had around the world. They had one in Guatemala in 1964, in Iran in 1953 and in Santa Domingo in 1965, when the state department counted seven communists among the revolutionaries. Morrison suggested that the. Geneva accord was the key to the whole situation, which he termed the American betrayal of the Viet Cong. His brief history of the struggle started with Ho Chi Minh’s victory over the French which culminated in the Viet Cong’s strong representation at the Geneva accord. The agreement reached called for a cease fire and a re-organiza-

Messuges

Trudeau

sent to and Nixon

The folio wing telegram was sent to Pierre Trudeau during moratorium actividay ties, signed by approximately 300 faculty, staff and students of the university.

We consider the complicity of the Canadian government in the Vietnam war to be morally repulsive; even more so as this action explicitly contradicts the purportkd ideas and values upon which our society is built. Because of this we demand that the Canadian government recognize and condemn Canada’s role in the war, effort to halt make every American aggression in south-

4

352 the Chevron

tion of zones. These zones were not to constitute political boundaries and the agreement provided for re-unification and an election in two years. After the agreement had been ratified by the main powers including the French, the lJ.S. deliberaterly prevented re-unification from taking place. They set up Diem who. had sat out the revolution, forced the French to install him as premier, and used him to create a separate independent nation of South Vietnam which would serve as an anti-communist base. The international commission, of which Canada was a member did nothing when Diem refused to allow free elections to take place two years later. Diem tried to consolidate his position by crushing opposition and changing control in the villages from local to central. This strategy didn’t win him much ground however, and it soon became clear that the revolutionaries were gaining control.

east Asi?, and concretely recognize the legitimate government of the Vietnamese people, that is the government in Hanoi. About 150 students, staff and faculty signed the following letter to Richard Nixon.

Great presidents of the United States sought to preserve the union. As American citizens abroad we believe the union is in danger. Immediate withdra&wal.from Vi&am and re-ordering national priorities are the first steps to re-establishing the respect the American people and world populace had in the governmental lead.

Cong

The American answer to this was to provide military support for Diem and in the late fifties and early sixties American intervention rapidly progressed. In 1965 the revolution was almost. over except for American intervention. Diem had been overthrown and replaced by a of generals who had group fought on the side of the French during the war with France. According to Morrison the Viet Cong had all the basic requirements for a successful revolution, whereas the Americans (or south Vietnam) had not. These were a great sense of grievance, willingness to die for the cause, and the abilitv to recruit new people. The Viet Cong had won the war against the French but had been betrayed by the Americans who bypassed the terms of the Geneva agreement. They had been fighting for eight years previous to the defeat of the French so had a long tradition of resistance. Recruits are easy to come by when the territory to be protected is home ground. The situation in south Vietnam however was quite different. The regime there was representative of a catholic minority and a group of landlords who bled the peasants for rent. The landlords were not interested in land reforms and since most of the peasants didn’t own their own land they had no real, stake in the conflict. The peasants were further alienated when the Americans started to wipe out villages whenever they heard rulmors that the Viet Cong had passed through. The sympathy of the peasants. who were mainly interested in tilling their rice fields, naturally went to the other side and thr> Americans lost out through t.hcir own stupidity. Morrison felt the Americans erred in picking a very weak instrument of control. ‘l‘h C‘!’ confounded this error why t hc., remained commit ted cvcn whctri it was quite obviously ;I I~~sII~~ proposition.


Ball is Dying’ l

‘-1

I

e 1 knowlton

aollister

1

-lIn which

we put the

Would you like to try to save it? presidential

search

Go abed.

in perspective

In this season of violence in the name of peace we find little activity in the “search” for a new president of this institution of higher training. We have, of course, often pondered reasons for this and corroborated our ponderings with many and varied tidbits of well-founded gossip and plain old facts. Perhaps it is time we looked at the whole scene in perspective. First of all, it looks like our friend Howie Petch really wants the job of president permanent. When he came here in the summer of 1967 he said, in reply to questions, that he would consider taking Uniwat’s presidency in perhaps three years. \ Well, a year and a half later, founding administration president Gerry Hagey gave up (about a year and a half earlier than most people expected) and Howie was named president pro tern. A presidential search committee was struck and Howie made two statements-first that he would not remain president pro tern longer than a year and a half and second, that he did not want the presidential search committee to consider him a candidate at this time. We have produced further evidence of zeal behind the mask of reluctance several times in the past and no doubt will continue to do so.

Next we think we shou Id consider what would happen other than Howie seriously considered taking the job.

* * * No, there’s not much hope of finding anyone better than our friend Howie Petch to meet the desires of the people who run this universitysomeone who’ll let bureaucrats bungle as long as they obey their superiors; someone who stands for high faculty salaries and no restrictions on an academic’s freedom to pursue his only personal interests at public expense even if they are directly opposed to the public’s real needs; someone who is firm and authoritarian in areas where nobody else important is concerned; somebody who will not negotiate with a gun at his head, but who will dutifully bend when pressure is applied from the correct sources; someone who will be the fall guy for protest, who will spend long hours in meetings avoiding issues and diverting dissent; someone who doesn’t sleep too well at night; someone with enough ego and misdirected zeal to plod through a hollow existence like a naive knight in reluctant armor. That’s what the people who run Uniwat want and that’s what they’ll get. Uniwat won’t know it until next spring, however, when the presidential search committee will have to report that they have been unable to find anyone to take on the arduous burden of president permanent. That’s when Petch and Minas’ publically-announced pro tern deadline of july 1, 1970 will be nigh, and the search committee will come begging at their feet, pleading to them to take the jobs permanently at the end of the pro tern terms they had so dedicatedly accepted a year before. Petch and Minas and all their cronies will accept the mandate to save Uniwat from anarchy.

sees need now for academic

-

Notice of By-Electkm

if someone

Immediately we can eliminate anyone currently within the university, because the petty jealousies and elite rivalries that would erupt would not be tolerated, especially by the careerists on the presidential search committee. If apyone external to Uniwat were seriously interested, he would face a real problem. Every bureaucrat, whether petty or gross, wants to continue in his present position of power or get higher. Particularly, according to their public statements, Petc’h and Minas want to return to the academic vicepresidency and arts deanship respectively, and everybody else (from academic-services director D.P. Robertson and operations vicepresident Al Adlington on down) will hold their ground. This presents a real problem. A traditional presidential-type wants to have sufficient authority to run the institution his way. Even meek and mild Howie works that way. Any presidential candidate who is inclined this way will be shit-out-of-luck at Uniwat-for the entrenched bureaucracy isn’t about to yield any ground. Of course, there’s another kind of presidential type who won’t even get considered by the search committee-the type who believes in real democracy. There’s no way for someone who believes that students and faculty, not department heads, deans, vicepresidents and presidents, should run then university; or someone who believes that bureaucrats should only serve and not master.

We note with amusement, tion’s Gazette, The front-page

Apply for chairman to: Louis Silcox Federation of Students

once again, an article in the administraheadline of the 8 October issue reads Pet& planning.

Did he not see the need in the summer of 1967 when he became academic vicepresident? Or in january of this year when he became admin president pro tern? Of course, he blamed the whole problem on the provincial government, it being the next highest body and therefore the proper channel to which to pass the buck.

The following have become

Student’s vacant:

Arts Phys. Ed. I . . tngineerlng Science

Council

-

Seats

two seats one seat one seat one seat

By-elections will be held Thursday, Nov. 6. Nominations open Mon. Oct. 20, and close at 5 p.m. Mon., Oct. 20. Nomination forms are available in the Federation of Students off ice.

7 leY

eaa

Wgnna make a hundred bucks? Wanna spend a couple a grand? Gotta fotta weird ideas?

Why not SUMMER

apply for Chairman (7970) WEEKEND

I

of

Send to Louis Sikox Federation of Students

its fun...

In any case, is Howie afraid he might get blamed as president permanent for the planning chaos Uniwat is sure to face in the near future? friday

17october

7969 (10:23)

353

5


The Canacfiu~ us nigger: no p/ace in the American wodd Ontario student >

I ! I

awards

z Students receiving grant assistance under = I the Ontario Student Awards Program I - should submit the request for Grant Par- m I tion in duplicate to the Student Awards I m Officerimmediately.

“You Canadians are in the same boat as the black man is in the south” said professor Stan Johannessen to a meeting of engsoc B tuesday noon. “All the learning and education is one way, that is towards the American middleclass. ’ We must, as Canadians and other subjected groups, learn all that there is about them but they do not have to learn about us. f ‘Therefore the white Canadian nigger is probably looking for his soul, or his place in the American world or empire. He is unable to find it here in Canada because there is no real Canada, no real Canadian nationalism, this is only a red herring. We don’t exist. “Canadians are also good for guinea pigs. New theories and ideas can be used on us, then if they work they are applicable in the American society. “As Canadians, we have no morals like the Americans have-, morals like “manifest desI think we can suffer the tiny’. outrageous pains of immorality. “Canada’s only claim to fame has been her independence on the international scene, but she is losing this status. Thus it is unforseen that Canada will change in any great way to be-

Women

equul

VANCOUVER (CUP)-Women cannot win equality with men under capitalism, according to the 100 delegates at a women’s caucus meeting held October ll13 in Vancouver. Delegates from six Canadian and five American cities agreed that women’s liberation -iould only be achieved as an “integral part of a socialist revolution.”

19 King N. Waterloo

6 354 the

Chevron

743-4871

come the international referee‘ that she wishes to become. “This Canadian nationalism has flared the U.S. radicals into their peace acceptances of the future. The Canadian nationalism being internationalism is a red herring; that is, we have no true national feelings that an immigrant into the U.S. would feel as he passes the statue of liberty. We are really accepting ourselves into a corporation rather than a nation. Canada’s one and only natioialism is Marshal McLuhan’s medium, because the U.S. owns everything else. We have no ‘glorious hisno civil war, no great tory, for a achievements ; nothing Canadian to feel proud of” “But, this great American corporation may die. It seems that they depend so much upon their successful technological achievements in satisfying everyone and everything that is American. How many South Americans are satisfied by the U.S. Fruit compan . “ Pn the past they have had no great intellects to depend upon, no true depth in their society, no tragic cultural awareness. There is no true value 1system except that of the almighty dollar. ”

only

under

Some delegates even agreed with Laura Murra, of Berkeley California, that “through women’s liberation we can liberate all oppressed people, since women are at the bottom of every oppressed group. ” Concentrating on methods, delegates their work in abortion

organizing discussed and birth

“In the case of a war, when the politicians have lost sight of the reason why, they hand it over to the military or the techand expect nological aspects that they will win as usual and cover up all the reasons why. But when the military fail and the evil question of why is brought out into the open, the politicians feel that they have been cheated because they don’t Who knows why B know why. war is started as long as the U.S. wins. “This blind faith to succeed, the great American ingenuity .of impulsive aggression is guiding them down the path to extinction. Must we go too? “The blame is of course put on the bourgeoisie, the exploiters. Theoretically, the bourgeoisie class in their exploitations will benefit the exploited people. Because they need a developing society that develops with the investors as the country is being exploited. But today that has failed because the U.S. investors are just taking what they need without any benefit to the other country or people. “Thus exploitation for the sake of the exploiter and not the exploited. ”

socialism control clinics, to make day-care working mothers.

and measures available to all

Although most delegates were university women, they also agreed that since “women on campus represent a privileged sector of society, ” real work in women’s liberation must be done among those off-campus. ”

AIN’T TECHNOLOGY WONDERFUL-The Chevron’s telex fascinates staffers and visitors alike. It used to be a luxury, but with the people’s postoffice’s service the way it is thcJsc> days, a wire service is almost essential to keep up-to-date on national news.


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A year

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ENTERTAINMENT INTHEPUB

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A BOLD NEW BREED OF FASH IONS FOR FALL Flared Bottoms Checks Stripes

by Mark

Feinstein

Liberation

News Service

MEXICO CITY (LNS )-One year ago, on October 2, Mexican soldiers and policemen shot down and killed hundreds of students who were demonstrating against the repressive nature of the Mexican government and the farce of the Olympic games. But one year later, the bloody evidence of repression and political turmoil has been washed away. The students, probably the most active and visible political people in the country at this point, are nowhere to be seen. The thousands of posters and slogans painted on walls that adorned Mexico City for weeks last year have disappeared without a trace. There are practically no political magazines on sale in the kiosks. Those magazines and slogans that do flourish this year are almost exclusively the official publications and posters of Gustav0 Diaz Ordaz, “GDO”, the president of Mexico. But the official whitewash, the “everything’s fine” smiles on the faces of government officials, and the seemingly total absence of political agitation here are all only surface cover-ups. Two scrawled slogans, perhaps the only ones visible in the city today, give a sense of some of the real problems : “Free all political prisoners, ” and “Remember october 2.” But they were not slogans boldly painted in red across walls; they were written with a felt-tip pen below bus windows, where the writer could go unnoticed. The notion of a government whitewash is literal. After the massacre last year, when the city was covered with slogans and posters denouncing the ruling party, U.S. imperialism and repression, the government ordered every poster removed and every wall scrubbed clean. Now the walls tell you to “keep your city clean,” and say “welcome” in three languages to tourists. If there are no external signs of social decay and unrest, it is not because Mexico’s revolution of 1910 has brought paradise south of the border. The absence of political organizing among the students this year, for example, is perfectly understandable-the government feared massive demonstrations on the anniversary of the Massacre, so it is ketping the university closed until the middle of October, passing over the bloody date of October 2. The killings several hundred in 11 all, were no&he only means the Mexican ruling class used to clamp the lid on incipient rebellion. Large numbers of student leaders, as well as foreign students designated as scapegoat leaders, have been jailed or deported. Many others were swept up in f3 the police dragnet that followed

wearing

the massacre: one of these was an American marine deserter who sought safety in the U.S. embassy when the shooting began. Because of his friendship with some student revolutionaries, the Americans turned him over to the Mexicans for crimes against the Mexican state, and he has been in prison ever since. When the fifteen Brazilian revolutionaries released in exchange for the life of C. Burke Elbrick, U.S. ambassador, arrived in Mexico, the government gleefully seized on the occasion to remind the Mexican people that their country is a land of freedom, where the oppressed of the earth can come seek. ing refuge, and where constitutional liberties are assured. While Diaz Ordaz was hugging Dick Nixon on the Rio Grande, he was also doing his best to keep his people from remembering the thousands of political prisoners, the hundreds of dead, and the supressed political publications. It is highly unlikely that the Diaz Ordaz government really wanted to take the Brazilians in at all-but public relations demanded it. As for the Brazilians themselves, they seem merely to have traded one prison for another. Although they have said they would try to find work here, and eventually return to Brazil when the political climate loosens up, they have stayed holed up in their hotel rooms ever since they arrived-it is clear to them that their lives are threatened by agents of the Brazilian generals as well as by the CIA, one of whose Mexican operatives, a diplomat, was recently expelled by the revolutionary government of Cuba. September 15 was the 159th anniversary of Mexican independence from the Spanish empire. The whole country was covered with red, green and white Mexican flags, colored lights, and huge posters celebrating liberty, revolution, and independence. Many of the thousands of huge flags were draped across the glass faces of buildings housing, among others, Ford, IBM, Coca-Cola, General Motors, Shell Oil, a hundred banks U.S. airlines, and other U.S. companies producing a huge array of products which the Mexican public is induced to buy. The fiesta is called the grito, the cry of agony that the Mexicans gave out under the Spanish yoke. Some things have improved for them, but their yoke is as real as ever. Independence merely replaced old yokes with new ones. Mexicans feel it, and president Diaz Ordaz knows it. Thus on the night of the

thin

celebration of the grito, a time of high-spirited spontaneous enthusiasm on the part of the people, Diaz Ordaz went to celebrate the event in Dolores de Hidalgo. Dolores is the Philadelphia of Mexico, where the independence movement began. But Ordaz did not go there out of respect for tradition, Mexican radicals say. He was terribly afraid that the placid face of Mexico today which he has worked hard to produce might be shattered if he stayed in Mexico City, where massive demonstrations against him were hinted at in political circles. As it turned out, hundreds of students came out to demonstrate and there were four fire bombings in the city. He appeared in Mexico City the day after the grito, however-on the reviewing stand in front of his army. One small, symbolic manifestation both of the government’s whitewash job and of real political sentiments among the people is the paloma blanca, a stylized, plastic-coated sticker of a white dove, attached to thousands of store windows around the city. Their purpose is to suggest calm, peace and friendship. But on examining just about any one of the plastic stickers more closely, it is clear that they are not pure virgin. white-they are pink. That is, just about all of them had once been painted red; the government moved in and whitewashed every last one of them. But every once in a while, even on the glamorous Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico City’s fifth avenue, a bright red dove shows UP* The symbolic rebellion of the red dove is hardly enough to bring down the system that condemns so many Mexicans to lives of grinding poverty. But they prove that despite the government cover-up, there are still freedomloving people in Mexico. So does the constant flow of people into the Cuban consulate, asking for magazines and literature that talk about the facts of the Cuban revolution. And dirt-streaked street kids stare derisively at American, tourists, shouting “Yanqui! ” Propaganda barrages about “friendship with the United States,” and mutual congratulations between Nixon and Diaz Ordaz because they build a dam (it was a faultily constructed dam that caused much of the damage in the recent flooding) are not going to keep those kids, and the people of Mexico, from shouting one day: “Venceremos! ”

are you peeved? YSW

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.

.

,T

Iti the pages of history ’ . 1968

We LIST To SELL

’\

REAL

Thh

_’ / week, students

A year ago this picketed the library to protest the planning and design of Habitat 69, while other students passed out coffee, donuts and leaflets at the construction site; and the proposal for a children-s nurser y on campus was presented to the university admin. w The campus center became the political football of the university when the administration denied that students had control; and the three student members on the university government committee published their minority report. 1

Grad Gregory

ball was cancelled when came to Seagram gym.

no chairman

ESTATE

could

be found,

and Dick,

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In a special supplement, the Chevron reprinted the complete report of the study committee on university government, and comments of various members of that committee:

3

versity-never consulted with the Provost sill Scott: In the light of We cite the actual rapidly changing: events -I’m con- X. committee. structuring of the committee as a vinced that our own proposals are clear indication ofthe real importnow much too conservative. ance with which this committee Board of governors member has been held by the administraHugh Heasly: WeIve had perhaps tion of the university. / 6 less trouble with it than other uni_ In the same memorandumwe versities. has not opFederation president Brian Iler : stated the committee erated in a frank and honest man’ The report is a failure because-it ner. Great exception to this stateignores the prerequisite to any dis- ment was also heard. But what cussion of structures-the purpose else can one call it when members of the university. of the subcommittee on governing Student representatives Steve structure supported that subcom-, Flott, Brian Iler and Steve Ireland. mittee’s recommendation for a , We find the distinction between single-tiered structure then aboutgovernment and administration in faced in full committee and silentthe University of. Waterloo which ly and meekly voted against the is drawn by its president a sham. recommendation when opposition The presiden ‘.s council-the real to it was expressed by the univerdecision-maki d g body of the unisity president? 8

-

1967

year, hi/ding meeting

Tenth anniversary week was .billed as the highlight of the sc<hoolwhile vandals painted graffiti on the engineering lecturewith red oil- base paint. _ x Registrar Trevor Boyes.refused to attend a student council to answer complaints directed at his-office, and the library was renamed the . Dana Porter memorial arts library. Howard interviewed

Petch, academic vicepresident and recent arrival at Uniwat by a Chevron staffer, and made the follewing statements:

I feel strongly for greater student and faculty involvement. The time lost in consulting students and faculty is easily made up when the decisions are implemented. I don’t think students on. the . board of governors is the correct answer. Representation is most important at the department level. Departments have a good deal of, independence. They make the decisions of what courses and handle matters of quality in the courses. Joint student-faculty committees I ,in the department are the answer. The problem lies in how to select the students. You have to pick those who are mature in judgment and who can meet the time demands. * * * -Waterloo is concerned with being

\

was

of service

to society. *‘* * In the first decade of this university there has been tremendous physical growth. The emphasis has been on quantity. For the next ten years ,the emphasis must be switched to quality. I *‘ * * Traditionally, university stuy dents have been treated like adolescents. They were not asking for the same responsibilities as others who were out ‘working. Now that they want the responsibility, they must be accountable for their ac- tions. They cannot just say it’s a prank and expect easy treatment. A discipline appeal tribunal is something to work out, especially the procedure or mechanism. It’s something students should, be very much involved in.

1966 A front-page Coryphaeus (the maiden Chevron) story stated that Gordon L ightfoo t would not appear at Bingeman park lodge, and the vote results on universal accessibility were in doubt pending out-term results.

.

More power was given to the president in an admin shuffle Gellatly as admin treasurer, and provost Bill Scott reporting president.

naming directly

Bruce to the

The Uniwat tiddleywinkers set a world record, and the campus cenfer was under construction while the Cory noted that admin president Gerry Hagey admitted he had forgotten all about the bank, postoffice and barbershop s\ that was to be in the basement.lra lileedles. was instalted as chancellor, replacing Dana Porter; and ChinaS militant red-guard were praised and Canada’s intarnatlonal role belittled by speakers at TorontoS International Teach-in, China 66;

,

The belittling of Canada came at the closing session of the teach-in sunday afternoon. Charles Marshall, .former advisor in the U.S. state department, poured scorn on the debate in Can-

ada over whether to recognize the Communist Chinese. “Flip a coin. Do as you please. It’s not a worldshaker. It will only be a footnote in diplomatic history,” he claimed.

\--your campus drugstore” Parkdale Free

Mail

d&vet-y

\

' 578-2910

..

r

I

1

' friday

17 October

7969 (10-23)

‘.I@7

9


Net

Paid

Last

year

Circulation

51,186;

10 years

Section

53,790 ago

34,430 KITCHENER,

ONTARIO,

SATURDAY,

OCTOBER

11,

2, Pc4ge 11

1969

We Canadians Have Cause to Give Thanks Thanksgiving Day for a lot of Canadians has become a meaningless observance, day on which to put up the storm windows, to close the cottage, to go for a drive.

more.

In the whole world, only the people of Iceland, Sweden, Kuwait (and only there if they are among the oil-rich), Switzerland and the United States have higher average incomes.

a

Only illiteracy

Sometimes, with our problems getting so much stress, it may appea; that we have little for which to be thankful. But when compared to most of the world, we Canadians should be counting our blessings.

18 countries

rate

of the wqrld as Canada.

as low

have

In far less than half the countries world (in only 53 other lands) is there press.

Millions live under does.

an

is at peace.

upon millions the totalitarian regimes.

world around No Canadian

The Apollo astronauts iti looking down from the moon called this “the good earth.” It is for us, but it may not be as good for the Gabon woman who has life expectancy of 25 years. Or the worker in Upper Volta who .earns $46 a year.

of the a free

TheVietnam war has affected more than 3OO,OOO,OOO people in the world; the Arab Israeli hostilities touch 40,000,OOO; the Nigerian-Biafra tragedy has embraced millions

On the entire globe, only the people of Israel, Iceland,. Denmark, The Netherlands, Norway and Sweden can expect to live longer than Canadians.

Canada

If you wa n t other examples of Canada has been favored, just study chprt below. Then count your blessings.

how the

b

AFGHANISTAN*

] 13,8Oo,OOO1

ALBANIA*

1

1,625,OOO

Strong

king:

No

AUSTRIA*

1President backed Mllltoty~ParNes 1 22,520,ooo 1 Democratit&z~l 1 7,073,ooo i

AUSTRALIA*

1 11,750,000

ALGERIA*

1 l&453,600

,

ARGENTINA*

1

portree

Democratic

182,000

IStrong

sheikh:

BARBADOS*

250,000

I

Democratic

1

BELGUlM* BOLIVIA*

9,556,380

1

4,334,121

BOTSWANA*

1

BRAZIL*

1 87,209,OOO) *

543,000

Democratic rule

Mi’itow

1

Peace

I

KUWAIT*

I

1 28.5%

1

Peace

I

63

lAos*

i 2,300,0001

No 1

$207

I

I

Peace

I

35

LEBANON*

1

1 No 1

$757

1 13.6%

1

Peace

1

63

LIBERIA”

1

I The?% Less 1 Than 1%

I

Peace

I

66

LIBYA*

I

Ff$$g$p

(

67 --Not Known

LUXEMBOURG*

1

Ives}

$1,111

I Yes I

$1,868

z!$,zin

part’es

1

- Peace

I Yes1

$404

1

1.1%

I

Peace

1

62

MALAWI”

) Yes1

$1,612

1

1 Yes I

$177

4,000,000

I

Strong

3.3%

I

Peace

i

67

MALAYSIA*

/

9,855,OOO

1

1

gFuie9,7&

I

49

MALI *

(

4,700,000

1

(

78%

I

P=ce

1 39.3%

]

Peace

I I

1

Peace

1

Peace

Less

MALTA*

1

39

MAURITANIA*

]

1

67

MAURITIUS*

I

t

67

MEXICO*

1 45,671,OOO

Strong

party

1 No I

$69

I 42.3%

I

40

MONGOLIA*

1

party

I No I

$75

I

I

35

MOROCCO*

1 13,300,000

1

I

44

NEPAL*

I

I

I

34

I

Democratic

IYesI

i

Democratic

iYesl

1,466,OOO 1 Military

-__ CEYLON”

I 11,504,000

CHAD*

I

3,400,000

&LE’

)

8,7QO,OOO 1

~760,000,000

I

I 19,300,000

I

Strong

party

pzres:

one

Democratic Communist Demo;Tti;:

870,0001 800,000 7,900,000

one

Democratic

1

CHINA

1

rule:

(

COLOMBIA* --. CONGO (gR,&‘Td”” I __ “h.03. .-- El* CO! STA RICA* 3A’ , GUI

one party1

i I

Peace

i

6’

NIGER*

I

3,300,000

I

1

1

Peace

(

1

Peace

I

president

46.1%

I

1 37.7%

1

1 NO 1

$161

I 84.6%

1

I Yes 1

$379

1 15.7%

1

Peace

1

T&!?~~

I

Peace

I

1

9,234,OOO

1 No 1

$71

1. KN&

I

Peace

)

37

RHODESIA

I

4,5OO,OOO1

$1,895

I m?urt%

I

Peace

)

70

ROMANIA*

I 19,100,000~

(

56

RWANDA*

(

EL SALVADOR*

1

3,000,000

ETHIOPIA* -FINLAND*

1 22,500,OOO I

I

Democratic

IYes

$1,546

I Than

FRANCEa*

1 46,500,OOO

1

Democratic

iYes

$1,616

1

GABON*

I

470,000

1

GAMBIA*

1

315,486(

1 Yes)

1

Peace

I 32.7%

I

PeCJce1 KN&

SAUDI

I~esi

$252

I

51%

I

Peace

SENEGAL*

I

3,500,000

I

$46

i

Not Known

1Border

SINGAPORE+

I

2,000,000

I

Democratic m-Q”8 ;;p

‘be

one

ppy;ent:

Democratic

1

8,500,OOO 1

Gl JATAMAl.A* c;r JINEA” G - JYANA*

1 1

4,575,ooo

HP..LITI *

I

4,500,000

I

HONDURAS*

I

2,300,OOO

IPresident

675,0001

SIERRA

67

SOMALIA*

25

SOUTH

LEONE*

Peace

I 43

1%

/

Peace

68

SUDAN*

I 13,000,OOO~

1%

I

Peace

I

67

SWAZILAND”

1

389,000

(

Strong

(

Peace

I

38

SWEDEN*

j

7,760,OOO

1

Democratic

j

Democratic

Less

1 19.6%

1

Peace

1

67

SWITZERLAND

I

5,500,ooo

) 70.6%

1

Pwce

1

48

SYRIA*

I

-4,600,OOO

Strongp~:~~nmmJnist President ormys

]

*

I No l

weak

I Yes 1

No

I

1 No1

by

Peace

1

26

I 24.1%

I

Peace

I

59

$82

1 89.5% I 64.8%

1

I

Peace Peace

1 I

32 44

1

1

Peace

1

67

Peace

I

70

TUNISIA*

51

TURKEY

$208 $1,215

1 Yes\

$2,165

l

KE&n

3.2%

( Than

Less

1%

I

1 Yesi

$82

1 72.2%

1

1 No 1

$91

1 57.1%

1

1

$222

1 87.2%

1 No 1

$227

1 85.5%

1 No backed one party

I

$286

$98

1 No 1

20%

.I

SPAIN*

$278

1

Less

Fighting guerrilas

1

Peace

I

1

Peace

I

42

1

wysTdewi*

1

KN&

/ 12,993,0001 1 12,231,OOO -1 32,000,OOO

1

1

1,650,OOO

(

I

974,oool

THAILAND

*

_

Kz&n

;iWID&D

and

I

I 30,000,000

)

70

UPPER

ITALY *

1 53,600,OOO

I YesI

1

8.4%

1

67

URUGUAY

35

VENELUELA*

62

VIETNAM

JAPAN*

~100,100,0001

JORDAN*,

I

~,IOO,OOO~

KENYA’

1

8,600,000

KINSHASA*

1 13,600,OOO

KOREA

(NORTH)

1 12,500,0001

KOREA

(SOUW I

1 29,200,0001

-

I 1

king:

Strong

no prddent

•mstwlt~~~rtw~~Yl

sholll

$225

1

I$&

1

Peace

IYes1

$447

1 18.1%

1

Peace

)

1 yesi

DWWWtltiC

Strong

1 Not

I I

partiw

I No

I

lye81 1 tlo

1

Communist

I No INot

~!k!&&mmm’M

1 Ye s 1

42.4%

1

/

Not Known

I

Peuce ~-~__Peace

I

40

Peace

Strong

Strong

$1,848

1 No 1

$326

1 No 1

$82

1 /

Peace

1

Peace Peace

1 99.1%

1

Less

1%

/ 47 ---t 44 -__----j 71

Fighting Vietnom

I ~~

(

i Than

in

( _-__..,

-6is--T

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/

._ _Not Known .-_

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I

37

Civil

war

With

BiatftJ

1

M

I

Peace

I --

71

i

53

$120

1 81.2%

1

$468

I 30.19/o

I

Peace

1

1 No 1

$199

1 25.7%

1

Peace

\

1 No )

$233

1 39.4%

1

I Yes i

$242

(

28.1%

I

1

I

Peace F$?zfi

Peace

1 No

(

$1,115

4.7%

(

1 No

)

$395

1 38.1%

1

I Yes I

$207

I

I F’gh$!&~~~~a”

1 No 1

$785

1 11.4%

K$..n

Mozambique, Angola

strife

I

51

I

48

I

64

I

60-

I $&I

1

Peace

1 I I

I

$75

1

Peace

1 No

1

$157

1

79%

1

Peace

I

1 No

Kk&n

1

$190

1 94.4%

1

Peace

1

1 Yes 1

$555

1 33.9%

I

Peuce

I

1 No

$134

I

60%

1

Peace

I

$65

I

93%

/

Peace

1

I$&

I No

I

$512

( 68.5%

I

Peace

i Ayi$n

1 No 1

$623

[

17.6%

1

Peace

1

( No I

$94

I

88%

I

Civil

war

1

$2,509

I Yes 1

$2,155

j Than

)

Peace

j No 1

$172

1 70.5%

JWar

with

1 No

]

$209

I

20.%

/

Peace

I

64

1 No

1

$69

1

,&$”

1

Peace

35

1 No

1%

I

Peace

/

48

1

Peace

I

71

I Israel)

(

Peace

I I I

1 26.2%

/

Peace

I

62

$190

1 84.3%

1

Peace

I

53

( No I

$290

I

61.9%

I

Peace

I No I

$170

I

80.5%

Iwar

with

weak one

1 No i

1 32.3% Not Known

i

1

F$ft’$ngmln

1 Israeli

I

2.2%

$1,513

/

1.5%

1

Peace

I I I

$46

1

82%

(

Peace

I

$567

1

9.7%

1

Peace

1

$785

$87

__

I Yes1

$fi,305

1 No 1

---P-P

party

1 No --I 1 No 1

1 74.9%

1

Peace Fi$t$y-

1 P.--.-P

Democratic

1 Yes I

1 34.2%

1

gF~~~l~’

I

1

Communist

I No 1 Not known1

35.5%

I

Fifj~,$&,,‘n

1

1 No 1

Not Known

1

(

68

VIETNAM

y$,,$th

I

52

Y EM@N

(North)*

$101

1

K=

1

Pwce

1

40

YEMEN

(South)?

$109

1 34.6%

1

Peace

I 18,549,0001

I k!s.‘iz

37 47

Y UGOSlAVIA*

I

I I

ZAMBIA*

I

1 w~“Nec’~w

1

5.1

(South)

1 15,100,OOO

1

I

4,500,000

1

1,500,000

I Military rule: one stmng presres: one I

3,700,000

* Signifies

St-

&??f,?;

backrd

Communist I

Strong

country

president

31

52 50

456 66 35 j$!$,

66 Not Known

1No I

$129

I ($&.I

I l I

1 No

$695

1 23.5%

1

Peace

1

62

$208

1 58.6%

I

Peace

I

40

$121

i

partyI NoI $100 I &&J 1 Yes]

is a member

1

of the United

Gz%g --Peace

53

51

I

1

68, K$in

9,350,ooo

2.2%

K$wr

I

Less

“M

67

1 77.2% Less ( Than 1%

1

1 17,800,OOO

37

1

1

(North)

Not Known .I-. K~&

1 yes I

but

president

?o 65

Not Known Not Known

2,750,OOO

Strong

57Not Known

I No

I

2.

NotKnown

Peace

1 No 1

one

I

194

50.4%

i (a$&.)

president

rule:

/

Less

$79

$565

president

I Thon

$1,629

I Yes I

ppy;ent:

Strong

1 Yes 1

67

i 58 Peace_II j -._.-- 55-_ Peace --___-l__ll ! KIN&

1

67.6%

.

)

$111

*

1

1 29.4%

$493

No/

~,OOO,OOO~ Military

I

$123

27

/ Yes1

/ ---i

I

$829

K&

Peace

1 77.7%

VOLTA*

$201

known

Peace

55

(

$94

Communist

U.S.S.R.*

I wffq$&~b

!

Not Known

$128

1

68

15.8%

I

Peace

i

1

rule

Democratic I

I

$69

1 No 1

r$;vle;ommunist

Military

1234,700,OOO

I

I

Peace

Mil tory

One

Democratic

1 YW 1 $1,211 ‘$989

Chia&

1

I YesI

Democratic -ctP~‘~m~ . Democratic

-

Stmng pz;v:

Democratic I

$261

(yes

party

37 Not

i---- Known

I Yes]

I Yes ) Not known

one

I

Democratic

Peuce

rule:

) 196,842,OOO

Democratic

weak

king

UGANDA*

1

1%

but

U.S.A.*

1 2,600,0001

7,700,000

rule

Dictatorship

Dictotor;hairs&$

1

) 31,391,000]

*

U.A.R-.*

1

I Than

4,457,ooo

minority

1 Military

TANZANIA*

TOGO*

White

Democratic

SAIWAN*

ISRAEL*

$845

I

_

IRELAND*

I

1

I

Less

$651

I

I

( 32,000,OOO

rule

Democratic

I&?&+

) No

Democratic

Military

I

1 No 1

1 25,700,OOO

1,859,OOO

1

parties

1

140,000 .

I 18,200,OOO

rc;ezll

Milito~f$e~;~munist

1

I

Military

by army1

president

$73

I

IRAN*

2,800,OOO

2,183,OOOj 2,500,OOO

$298

backed

king

Democratic

1

1 Yes I

but

Strong

(

parties

president

president

Strong

1Yes I

Than

AFRICA*

Strong

I

I

IRAW

8,200,OOO

64

1

I

Peace

1 Than

Democratic

I

I

Peace

gikf’

196,000\

(

Peace

rule

1

$1,635

Communist

~112,300,OOO

I 1

minority

1 87.6%

$1,591

purtles

~500,000,000

56 Kk

weak

dictator

$46

1 No i

Dlctotor-pr&s;i$t:

INDONESIA*

I (

rule but

Premier

1 6,000,0001

Mi’itaw

I 10,100,0001 )

disputes

3,300,000

president

1 No 1

I Yes1

DemQcratic

ICELAND* INDIA”

1%

Communist

3,500,000~ S+ronp k-idyent:

1

Less

3.6%

Democratic

Strong

I

1 No i

I ARABIA*

I

6i--

1 No /

i NO

rule

Communist

1 40.1%

j

1 No(

dictator

Strong

White

$197

$49 93.5%

1

I Yes1

Communist

$230

1 NO

1 No 1

Democratic

Military

] Yes I

I NO--- j Not known1 4.6% ..._.-. (Noi._$182 \ 86.2% -__e__e__c-__-j 94.9% $90 i NoI -Less I Yes / $1,428 I Than 1%

dictatorship: officialy free president: oneparty state rule: parties suspended

Democratic

1 No 1

weak

f

Peace -_____ Peace

j

I

but

Peace

1

PO

/ 66.5%

1

Military

1

(

Less

1 Than

$99

1 34.6%

Military

president

Democratic

GREECE* ,----

I 27,600,000( 1 31,800,000/

5,500,000)

7,945,0oo(

1 11,700,000

PHILIPPINES*

PORTUGAL*

3,500,000

1

PERU*

POLAND*

)

GHANA*

61 Not Known

67

I

17,000,000I

1,800,OOO 1

63

ECUADOR*

I

1

*

1

DOMINICA*

( 59,700,0001

PARAGUAY

(

1

EAST

37

Peace

4,800,OOO

WEST

1

Peace

1

Strong

I

1

DENMARK* ---

4,500,000

1,300,000

I

1

1

1

I

) mksj%

2,370,OOO

I

) 93,720,OOO

PANAMA*

1 24.1%

1

Strong

PAKISTAN*

44

$1,671

\p__-I_p--.-. 38.4%

-

1

[Yes] 1 Yes (

$468

Military

1

1 60 !Gov’t ! Estrmote) Not j Known

$216

Concealed parties Strong

3,700,0001

$672

i

Democratic

)

$1,347

14,200,OOO1

by

Peace

I

1 55,653,OOO

NORWAY*

1 No I

614,OOOj

1

backed

t$‘;%&

NIGERIA*

1 Yes1

(

ormy

Not Known

$297

Gi - *US* aI ICHOSLOVAKIA*

Soviet

49

1 Yesi

I No 1Not known1

Peace

K~A

-Peace

I Yes I

Democratic -

1

Peace

1

1 Yes 1

Democratic.--^

1 22%

]

1 87.1%

democracy

1

$138

1 91.1%

democracy

1

Ives1

$153 $713

Weak

2,600,OOO

- 65 -.___I.-

1 No1

;

Strong king S+mngok$gewties

Not

Known

i---

1 Noi

Weak

1

I

Democratic

one-

1 12,500,OOO

ZEALAND*

1,700,000

known1

democracy

NETliERlANDS*

1

50%

rule

NEW

NICARAGUA”

1 16.4%

I

458 33

$69

Peace

I I

$497

1

Peace Peace

1 Yes )

20%

)

I

1 No 1

1

Fighting guerrilas

I

Not

Known

.

I Yes1

Communist

Not Known

Com~ou;f;n;arty

Pmsident

9,500,000

$356

president: party state

1,100,000(

I

- I No INot

Communist: enforcement

1%

\

$127

n$ge one-party

Strong

$124 Less $2,075 1 Than

700,000~

I No I

,C;Cunist

Military

$118

No I

I Civil war Peace I Peace I 69.2% I Peace I KZ% I KEAn

1

Democracy

319,000~

one

1%

$101

president: oneparty state democracy: ComPorty banned rj;bs:, one-party

Weak munist Military

1,100,000]

one

-;5,200,000

the Chevron

(

rule:

1 20,630,OOO

10 y

1

rule:

I

1

6,300,OOO

Military

CANADA*

COAST*

1

( 67.9%

K:&!

I 53.2%

) No 1

president

Weak

I

I 2+/,“,9’d:

1 No 1 (oilyt$me)

by ormy: factions

Democratic

334,790l

Peace

no parties

democracy

Military

~,OOO,OOO~ Military

CAMEROONS*

IVORY

_ Strong

i &?h

premier:

JAMAICA*

1 I

I Than

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I IGW Rebord toots the horn i

Thanksgiving came and went once- again and the KitchenerWaterloo, Record breathed deeply once again and sighed Arent? you g/ad YOU live ’ in Canada?

Record and other local media suppressed a ’ story- about some questionable firings of personnel at the St. -Monica house for unwed mothers. Would a free press Don’t you wish everybody did? do that?.. The Record also refused ‘In a full-page article on the to publish four letters to the edifront of Saturday’s second tor on that subject. c section, the Record set out to Annual per capita income prove I that Canadians should means nothing if the income is count their blessings and pre- - totally unevenly distributed. sumably stop complaining, vstrikCanada could have the highest ing, rioting and any other forms per capita income in the world of dissenting because after all and still have 20 percent of its they could live in Upper Volta population living in real poverty or Gabon. (as in the United States). ‘Per The proof was statistics of capita income is also irrelevant life span, state of hostilities, if it doesn’t take cost of living percentage of illiteracy, annual into account. income per person and existence Percentage of illiterate statisof a free press. tics are meaningless unless viewed The statistics are impressive in the perspective of history. ti as hell to,the average K,W burgCommunist-party dominated Cuher, but a closer look almost ba, for instance, has an illiteracv disproves the Record’s case. rate of less than 1 percent, while Canada has a free press accord- ’ the Caribbean and Latin Ameriing to the statistics..: Free for can averages are much higher, whom? Just recently the K-W as Cuba was before the revolu-

tion. Perhaps Cubans have something to be thankful for now? \ As for ‘war or peace, the Record includes Canada in the peace column only three days after the forces of law and order in Montreal thumbed their noses at their rulers and .walked off their jobs. The only communist countries not marked in the peace column are fighting directly or indirectly with our j peace-loving neighbors to the south. Life span, too, must be viewed in the perspective - of history. There seems to be a possible factual ‘error as well, for only recently I Time magazine reported that Americans live longer than Canadians, contrary to the Record’s statistics. <Besides,who really cares how long the average Canadian _ is living now when nuclear war could break out in ‘our skies or pollution could kill us, and

change the statistics in ,the short or medium range? 1 Another interesting thing to be found in the statistics is unintentional proof (Record-style).that it’s better to live in East Germany than West. This handy compilation also makes possible a quick look at i the countries that make up the “free” world. A good number of these are not democratic even in name. The Record does say that millions live under totalitarian regimes but claims no Canadian does. Have they considered the ,unemployed who simply cannot find jobs, or the Indians who are still legally enslaved or the non-property owning _citizens of _ Montreal who don’t even get to vote for municipal offices? Even the conservative Toronto Globe and Mail didn’t come on with the rah-rah everything’s groovy line. The following was their thanksgiving statement:

Let us give thanksand fervently\ br

There is a phenomenon in the existence of the fairly, affluent Torontonian (and one suspects many others) that becomes particularly evident at the end of weekends, notably holiday weekends. 1 And while the occasion of this observation is thanksgiving, it is merely coincidental for the subject gives little cause for thanks. The phenomenon is the cottage-inMuskoka-weekender who. dutifully gets into his car every weekend from Victoria day to thanksgiving to visit his retreat in that Toronto-with-treesand-lakes called Muskoka. He may leave early or late to get there, but that’s the extent of his intitiative or individualism: _ Either way, he still fights more or less heavy traffic to get to his destination. * And he does the same thing going back to suburbia at the end of the weekend. Anyone who has never witnessed this phenomenon would find it incredible to behold. Bumper- to-bumtraffic is possible per, stop-and-go for :40 to 70 miles away from freeflowing traffic on the city streets, It has been observed that cars trying to get onto highway 401 from the northwest Muskoka access routes can wait up to an hour without m oving.

All this could be understandable if it were a simple case of lack of road capacity. But it isn’t. Only the designated highways are backed up like this. Back roads, including many paved ones, could easily carry five times as many cars as are backed up in “traffic jams”. But the huge majority of these businessmen and bureaucrats who retreat to Muskoka almost every weekend to get away from it all wouldn’t think of getting a map and plotting a back route, much less just striking .out with the sun as a directional guide ‘across the *county roads. Technological ‘man,, and particularly those who are the backbone of Toronto capitalism, are incapable of doing anything that isn’t .completely ordered. It’s a frightening thought to realize that the managers and bureaucrats (most workers can’t afford a house in Toronto, let alone a Muskoka cottage) of capitalist society would sit ~in a pool of carbon monoxide for hours while miles of open but less obviouslycharted road awaits them. L Perhaps we could find solutions to the deterioration of our society and an end to war if we simply barricaded the Muskoka weekenders’ access to freeways and saw how many were able to make it back to work.

‘-,-

It is the time of thanksgiving. Let us yet, have/ no laws to regulate pollution there. rejoice in our good fortune. Let us give thanks that we saw the For once, let us applaud our politicians who refused to allow the U.S. army signs in time and did not go swimming to ship poison gas through Canada to a in the pollutedL waters of Algonquin Park’s Lake of Two Rivers, or downdestination in the eastern United States. But let the applause be brief so that we stream from Montreal where all the city’s raw sewage is dumped, or at Tomay still utter thanks that Canadian ‘government researchers have not let ronto’s waterfront where the poisonous escape the disease-producing organisms red worms that feed on sewage live, or in any of the foul water multiplying in that they are developing as a “purely defensive” agent to be used in the event our country. Let us praise and give thanks for the of biological warfare. physician Sing hosannahs that British Columbia vigilance of: the Lethbridge escaped unscathed when the United ’ who warned us of the dangerous levels States exploded a hydrogen bomb underof pesticides he found in Alberta pheasground at Amchitka Island in the’ Aleuants and partridge; the editor of Canadian Audubon who pressed the Ontario tians:, There was no earthquake. There was no tidal wave, Only a sea otter was department of lands and forest into killed, crushed in the panic-stricken disclosing that fish tested in Lake Simcoe So, the United contained DDT residues that were twice _ flight of its companions. States has planned at least two more as high as is allowed in fish sold commercially; the fishermen at Placentia Bay, tests, each larger than the one. before. at the American spirit of I Newfoundland, who noticed that the * We marvel herring they caught were colored red, adventure. And pray that we canbe as thankful next year that nothing .went leading to an investigation that showed amiss. Electric Reduction Co. of Canada Ltd. was discharging serious pollutants into China has just completed explosions of its ’ ninth and tenth nuclear devices. the bay; the U.S. food and drug administration, which impounded 528,000 pounds The United States congress has just followed the senate in approving d&&yof ‘coho salmon from Lake Michigan that ment and continued development of the was being processed for sale, because it contained dangerously high levels of Safeguard anti-ballistic missile system. China’s gross national product in equivadieldrin, a cousin to DDT but stronger. Let us, hang laurels on the chairman lent dollar purchasing power ’ is $78billion. The United States spends $80of McMaster University’s department of biochemistry, who pointed out that the billion a year on the military alone. In Rome youths stoned’ radical Roman 708-foot-high smokestack that the Ontario hydro-electric power commission Catholic priests who seek reforms in the Church. In Chicago youths of the Weathplans to add to the Hearn generating erman faction of the students for a station in Toronto will not eliminate sulphur dioxide. It will merely distribdemocratic society battled with police in pursuit of their policy of advocating ute it more widely. Let us be fervent in our relief that street fighting as, a means of inspiring revolutionary activity l among youths of there has not been a disaster on our high school age. In Montreal police and shores such as that caused when the Torrey Canyon broke up 2% years ago, firemen went on strike and anarchy reigned. Let us be thankful that some spreading oil over the shores of B.ritain and France. But, in our relief, let us not corners of sanity and tranquility remain. And ,let us remain forever grateful forget that 2,000 seals were found dead that, although our society creates new in the Gulf of St. Lawrence last august, dovered in oil that sometimes was so appetites, we can buy satisfactions; although it plans obsolescence, it prothick their ‘flippers stuck to their sides and they couldn’t swim. Nor should we duces new models ;’ although it creates forget that the successful, trip of the new forms of pollution, it discovers new Manhattan through the arctic was to ways to fight the old forms and somefight th,em; although we arc’ test the . feasibility of shipping oil by timesdoes still here. tankers -along that route while ,we, as _embattled, we I?are .“.

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Campuscenter pool sharks apparenttv got tired of ptaving straight snooker on the’ table they II had treated so welt. What seems to- h&e been a new game resulted in two broken windo& in t-wo weeks. . The pool balls base been locked up damage prevention becomes possible.

Agnew’s

kkLbusted,

story sippreSsed

-’

anyplace but the undergo Ind WASHINGTON (UPS):T h e I I Cathedral school. in /Washington D.C. -early in june. She was press. s thirteen-year-old -daughter, , of caught along with nine school Ti.mothy Leary’, upon hearing United States vicepresident Spi’ro of this latest in a chain of famm&es. One of the girls was exI Agnew has been charged. with. marijuana possession but then pelled, four suspended, but. no ohs people’s children to be busted for $ossession of grass, has prepenalties were imposed on Kim released without penalty. . . and four-other girls. t pared a questiohnaire addressed to all United States legislators. This story has been hushed up “Do your kids smoke, and are by the white house but uncovered Reporters from the major they in favor of harsher- penalnewspaper and by the Washington Free Pressi s Washington a member of the uridergr,ound wire services descended* uponties for this habit?” Leary conpress syndicate. ” the Washington Free Press when eluded his questionnaire by .-the story broke ‘in the small. saying, “And . if you haven’t asked them about this subject, underground .newspaper, checked Elinor Kimberly Agnew, known I as Kim to her friends and family, what gives you the right to pass the story out at the ‘National legislation-sending other people’s Cathedral school but not a single participated ‘in a marijuana’ _. line on the matter has appeared kids to jail? ” party at the fashionable National

‘*Con~ersationd French .

.

-I’

I

Tuesday,.October

21 - 7 pm-

ML 355

\. .

“ARE CoMIiuG”


From

ihe Crimirial

Code

of Canada;

237. (I) Every one ..who, with intent’ to procure the miscarriage of a female person, whether or not she is pregnant, uses any means’for the purposepf carrying out his intention is guilty of an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonmen t for fife.’ (2) Every female person who, being pregnant, with intent to procure her o,wn miscarriage, uses any means or permits any means to be used for thepur, pose ‘of carrying out her intention is guilty of an indictable offence and is litible , to imprisonment for two years. ’ . (3) ,Jn this section, “means ‘I includes . . (a) the administration of a drug or other noxious thjng, (b) the use of an instrument, and (c) ,manipula tioj7 oi ari y kind. (4) Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to (a) a qualified medical practitioner...who in goo.d faith uses in ai accredited or approved hospital any means for the p_urpose of carrying out his intention to procure the miscarriage of a female person, or (b) a female person who, being pregnant, permits a qualified medical ‘practioner to use in an accredited or approved hospital any means described in paragraph (a) for the purpose of carrying out her intention to‘procure hertown mis- I carriage, if, before the use of ihose means, the therapufic abortion committee for that accredited or approved hospital, by a majority of the members of the committee and at a meeting of the committee at which the case of such a female pet%on has been reviewed, (c) has by certificate in writins stated that in its opinion the continuation of the pregnancy of such female person would or would be likely to endangbr her life or health.

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could follow the doctor’s advice and get married. They had talked about marriage, ndy must have been about five weeks but only in a kind of far-distant way, may-pregnant when she found out for sure. At first when her period didn’t come she put * be in the future. Now they were faced with it, a,decision they wanted to make over a it down to on-e of those irregularities that period of years and months, not days. happen every so often. She was under a lot If they did, would it work? Even if it , of strain, what with trying to keep up with worked, it meant that Wendy’s education all the essays she had been assigned and would be cut off for at least a year, probfighting her parents about her boyfriend, ably more and maybe even forever. Wo.uld about her marks, about anything they she resent. the child? Would she resent could find to meddle in her life about. Carl for ending a part of her life she wantThey say that pressures like that can delay ed to enjoy longer before she “settled things. down”? Would Carl resent her for preYet she didn’t get pregnant out of spite. maturely ending his freedom? How could That’s too highschoolish and Wendy had they answer any of these questions now too many things she wanted to do in her anyway? life to gum it up now. No, it was a pure andAnd the fury her parents would be in simple mistake. when they found out. Carl’s parents wouldSo when she began to worry to the extent n’t be happy either. What would people that she couldn’t work oreat much and think? Th,ey weren’t too worried about felt so awful in her stomach and so tired I their friends-if they were going to think all the time, she mustered ‘her courage any less of them for this mistake they and went to health services. The doctor weren’t real t friends anyway. But would was silent and noncommittal as she desother people whose respect they wanted cribed her .state_and then called the K-W to have look down on them? hospital. for an appintment for tests. ‘* * * So she skipped classes the next day (as The idea of Wendy going away to have she had been doing for some time-what’s e child and give it up for adoption was too the use of feeling like you want to stretch to consider. All their lives they out on the floor and sleep while you are- terrible would be wondering what happened to put to sleep by that droning from down their son or daughter. . front? ) . The alternative was for Wendy not to The tests were simple. Now all she had have the baby-except that they couldn’t to do was wait for her visit with the docthink of “it” as a baby. Not yet, anyway;’ tor (in the doctor’s regular $office-that “it” was more like a disease-not a human way this business was kept off the univerbeing. sity records). (Why did they think of it that way-was * This time her boyfriend Carl went with that just ,rationalizing? If she did get an her. He had known Wendy wasn’t well and what would they think after? had urged her to see a doctor. Now he abortion, What if they did marry?_would they all waited while she went in. The doctor told ways wonder what their first child would her the tests were positive and recomhave been like?) mended she get married. “After all,” the was abortion. But where doctor said, “There’s very little social ’ The alternative stigma attached to it: Anywhere from a and how? And what about all those scarey stories about backmom kitchen-table jobs third to half of the girls getting married that ended in permanent injury and even to,day are p>egnant.” She got a. prescrip-. death? Wendy was a healthy girl; there tion for pills for her nausea. was ‘no way even the most liberal hospiOut in the hall outside the office, Wendy ta1 board would say that having a child gave the news to Carl and then, for the would endanger her health. first time, broke down. Outside in the car The only hope was to get to some doctor and then back at Carl’s apartment they who would be sympathetic to their plight talked about what they could do-for the and would do a safe operation. The chancfirst of many times. es of finding one were slim indeed. The alternatives were not many. They

After they had gone through the thing The first doctor who needed to know exseveral times, each time considering as actly the length of her pregnancy was disrationally as they could the problems with carded since he wouldn’t take anyone who each of theirchoices, they decided to talk was over seven weeks, and Wendy was by to a couple of friends. After those talks, this time probably pretty close to that. the direction seemed to be more in favor Bay got in touch with his Toronto contact of abortion. Madge and Bay, the two again, got the correct telephone number friends, added what they knew and more and code and with despair written on their important, who they knew. faces, they placed the phone call. Bay said that from what he knew there , They got the doctor, finally, after three were no doctors in Kitchener-Waterloo calls over the next two days. He was very who would perform the operation and that guarded in his conversation, but yes, he in Toronto they were few or non-existent. would see Wendy. The price-$300. He promised to ask some people in ToronThey were to go a week later and the to who might have leads for something day before the noon appointment they outside the province-in New York or caught a plane and stayed in a hotel, as . Montreal. man andwife, the night before. Madge suggested that Wendy and Carl The doctor was kind, reassuring and talk to someone in counselling -services, exuded confidence. The mortality rate which would mean they’d have some probusiness was trash, he said. The operation fessional counselling, a. sympathetic, ear was simpler than a tonsillectomy and had and maYbe some sl;lgtest$s. . no risks if carried out in antiseptic conditions by a skilled person. Wendy wrote out It took almost two weeks, but the infora statement dictated to her by the doctor ‘mation finally came from Toronto about saying she ,had tried to bring a miscarritwo out-of-province doctors. They called age on herself and had come to him for one, using a code sentence to identify the assistance, and then she and Carl signed purpose of the call and show that they’d it. Carl handed over an envelope with $300 been OK’d by someone, they supposed. He cash in.it. wanted to know exactly how long Wendy Then she went into a back office where had been pregnant. There was some diffia nurse administered a local anesthetic culty getting in touch with the other doc- ‘and the whole thing was over in about 15 tor, so they decided to follow up on the minutes. Carl nervously waited in the refirst. 1 ception room and after about half an hour Wendy chose a K-W obstetrician to see the doctor called him in and said everyto find out how far along she was. She dething was all right and gave him some antided to level with him and tell him her tibiotic tablets for Wendy. He then joined plans;-she figured she was in no shape to Wendy for about an hour as the .effects lie. That was a mistake. wore off (she was sick to her stomach and The doctor heard her story and then nauseous) and then they returned to the launched into a ten-minute tirade about hotel. being responsible, about taking the conThe next day they caught a train back. sequences for her *behavior, about how Wendy was experiencing a heavier than many women he had coming to him asking average flow but other than that she felt why they couldn’t have children, about OK, just a little tired. ‘. * * * the high mortality rate in countries where abortion is legal (a lie). Be refused to W.endy and Carl are still together, perhave anything to do with Wendy and she haps closer now because of their harrowfled, from his office in tears. That blast ing experience. They are thinking more of was of’course all she needed to hear in her marriage,’ but still in the future. Whether / present mental state. it comes or not, their lives will be much They talked it all out again, all the pros fuller because they were lucky enough to and cons. They decided they wo,uld get ~ get help when they needed it. There will married if none of the leads worked out, be no unwanted child, no rushed marriage. but they would keep trying until there Unfortunately, thousands of others in 1 were no more possibilities. similar circumstances are not as lucky.

/-

friday

77 October

7969 (70:23)

367

13


most liberals agree on many of the lissues involved in abortion policies--individual frt~~dotn of choice, the inability of punitive law to do good. the plight of women whose lives will be damaged by denial of abortion. But even among those of us who flatly say the abortion laws must be abolished, there remains a queasiness about killing an unborn baby. Perhaps it is a good sign for our .‘souls” that we do feel this unease. Some will defensively deny that a fetus is alive at all. They will call it a mere blob of tissue. Catholics maintain that it is fully as alive as the mother. Biological life exists in degrees and probabilities. If we take sentience as a major characteristic, mammals are more alive than plants, and human mammals even more so. Most of us believe this unconsciously, as evidenced by our eating habits--we eat plants with no qualms, mammals with some quilt (or become ethical vegetarians), but are horrified by the idea of killing a fellow human in order to eat his flesh. Clearly mothers are sentient, mobile, and otherwise more fully alive than fetuses. But the situa-

tion here is not static--we know that the fetus has a high probability of becoming a liveborn child, even an adult. Thus if the term murder is to be extended from “depriving of (fully-realized) life” to “depriving of the chance for such life’,‘, then abortion must be murder. But wait: the separate ovum and sperms comingling in the uterus also have a chance to unite and be born alive. Hence contraception must also be murder. every month of her life, exAnd even further: cept when already pregnant, a normal teenager or adult female will have a fertile egg waiting in her uterus. Thus, if she deliberately fails to get pregnant every time she is fertile (whether by contraception or by abstinence, then she is preventing a human life from beginning--and thus committing murder. When we carry this argument to its “logical” conclusion, it appears that the human species must choose between (a) murdering sperms, ova, or fetuses; and (b) starting new lives at every possible opportunity. Historically all cultures have chosen murder--by restricting copulation to marriage by honoring sacerdotal chastity,

by mechanical or medicinal contraception, -by sexual abstinence on fertile days, by abortion, or even by infanticide. Until recently, technology has been inadequate to utilize enough of ’ the earth’s resources to support unlimited population growth. Now that technology is vastly more efficient, the earth itself is not sufficient to support the present rate of growth. Since all cultures limit birth, the argument between Catholics and abortion advocates is merely one of methods and percentages. (The ovum in a 12-year-old’s uterus has perhaps a 60% chance of live birth if only someone will rape her in order to spread the gift of life, while the fetus in a healthy white-middle-class housewife may have a 90% chance) Considering the amount of birth prevention practised by all parties to this dispute, especially celibate priests, the difference between them seems hardly enough to act righteous about. Finally, I submit that only a tiny handful of us have any business denouncing pacifists, preferably those who are also ethical vegetarians. Persons who support the deliberate murder of adults and liveborn children (in wars and capital pun-

ishment) cannot consider human : must be bon e Vietnamese chill sperms must not an adult man be F Indeed, when 1 ortion, those hu life, we find th those reactionar blood of trim+ people who mak earth. The hands of 1 blood of adults, lives of fetuses. synthesis of the point of life judgment, henc fetus to be born to be bombed f being a rapist, c Jehovah.

..,a thousand times and more: uvery year the youngsters are becoming more and more vocal In their lack of respect for the morality of their elders. Many factors are creating this alientation-the main one being the inability of those with power to behave in accordance with the morality they profess. Let me give you a concrete example of the immorality of the power elite which contributes steadily to the erosion of respect for the present social order. What happens when a naughty little girl gets herself pregnant here at McGill? I have a large number of case histories to draw from-1 have the face of a father confessor and I’ve listened to many tales and have served on more than one “committee.” Abortion is by no means a rare happening here. A good proportion of the young girls I know have had abortions. The “statistics” are at best guesswork-due to our criminal morality-but in Canada probably one in every four women has one or more abortions during her lifetime; there are 100,000 to 200,000 abortions per year’, perhaps 1,000 deaths per year. Quack abortions are the largest killer of young Canadian women after automobile accidents. I know a very sweet McGill girl who died of a butcher abortion. About one in seven Canadian women bears an illegitimate child at least once in her lifetime. I’ve seen pregnancy happen to the most unlikely kids. It happens to nice girls more often than it happens to sluts. Girls who have been brought up with a rigid code and nothing but talk-experience are. the most frequent victims. They are the ones who can’t cope with a real seduction when it hits them- they’re always sure it won’t-and they are the ones who are least able to tell the diffclrence between immature and mature men.

At first, panic Here’s the way it happens at McGill. The girl gets more panicky as it slowly dawns on her that she is pregnant. Usually the first person she confides in is the strongest, most mature girlfriend that she knows of on her floor at RVC-then she collapses into an hysterical heap. The girlfriend immediatey organized an abortion committee. When the reality is upon them, theological arguments which were once real to these girls just vaporize. Sometimes there are McGill boys on the committee. The girl prefers to keep the boy who did the deed off the committee unless he is capable of doing Joe jobs like what the pregnant young raising money. No matter student thinks of the father, her girlfriends think of him as a sexual zero, a know nothing. Adults are seldom trusted on the committee and for good reason. The girls know very well, for instance, that the McGill Health Sdrvice will not offer help when ’ help is desperately necessary-after all no adult wants to put his job on the line just to help a defenseless the young woman. The adults have lots of sympathy, same kind of sympathy that good Germans had for Jews in 1943, useless. The adults talk morality; they are much too cowardly to practice it. Only in an extreme emergency are the parents brought into the committee. The girl either doesn’t want to hurt her parents or doesn’t want to add a lot of emotional stress to an already trying experience or she simply doesn’t want to add a lot of emotional stress to an already trying experience or she simply doesn’t trust them enough to have an open communica-

14

362 the Chevron

tion relationship. Most McGill girls manage to hide their abortions from their parents very successfully. Ministers of the various religious faiths are worse than disgusted; they are blamed for creating the situation. One girl told me very bitterly, ‘Those men ! Christianity was invented by a male God who laid an innocent virgin and left her! The purpose of the committee is two-fold-to find the most suitable abortionist who is not in jail and to raise the money for the abortion. If the committee is sophisticated-and it often is, seeking advice from medical students, etc-the preferred abortionist is a doctor who uses the dilation and curettage method. A quack is used and death risked only as a last resort. In this’case a wise committee has already lined up a gynecologist willing to check over and clean up the bad abortion. Some doctors are evidently so callous that they will not even do this. Let me recreate for you some of my memories.

What

price english?

It is exam time. A young woman who has just that morning had a butcher abortion in a filthy house is writing one of her english exams. She is pale and weak and not at all her usual charming self-but an abortion is no excuse to miss an exam. Her friends are outside, waiting, ready with a car to pick her up after the exam or before if she faints and gets sick. They didn’t want her to go to the exam but she insisted. She desperately didn’t want to take another loss. Afterwards she was brought to a student apartment and carried inside and lovingly coached for her next exam. No grown-ups allowed. The grown-ups are butchers and everyone there knows it. I met a friend at the Bistro in the afternoon-a McGill girl from a wealthy Westmount family. She was very drunk and made me sit down. She was just back from a trip to the States for an abortion on money loaned to her from a married girlfriend. She had to pay the man five hundred dollars and when she got there she found out that she had to sleep with him, too. She was desperate enough to do it. That’s not something you can tell your parents about-but something you have to tell someone. She was Catholic. ‘Now I know what Catholics really believe in’, she said. She took off her $200 cross and threw it under the tables and that started her crying so we had to leave the Bistro because she didn’t want to cry in public. She started to rant and rave. She called everyone she knew a bastard-this from a girl who never swore. She cried and cried. And she cursed herself for believing in everything she had ever believed in. And she cried. I held her up to keep her from falling-she was that drunk. The cold wind and the beauty of the falling snow was good for her. When we got to the top of the mountain at the lookout she saw a handsome man standing there looking out over the city and said ‘Look at that! ’ And then she started to laugh. But I couldn’t tell if she was still crying because the snow was melting on her cheeks. Once a timid freshman with long hair and the face of a 14 year old girl knocked on my office door. She talked to me about math in a tiny voice then she talked about being too depressed to study, and then about sad love affairs in a voice so soft I had to lean over to hear. Then. she started to sob violently and talk about poitry.

She was from out of town. Her classes were so large and impersonal and she was so shy that she had made only one friend here at McGill, a boy who had laid her and left her. She lived at RVC but was close to no one there. I put a fourth year girl on to her who knew the ‘ropes because she had been thru it herself. They took care of her. Do you want more’ ! I know fifty more stories like that about McGill girls in trouble. I am angry as I write this.

Judge

hypocrisy,

then act

Judge this world which tortures its own rosy cheeked daughters with humiliation and terror and fear and pain and guilt, which subjects them to unnecessary disease, maiming and death. Judge this world which talks about the sanctity of an unwanted life that it isn’t willing to care for or love or feed or educate-on. a planet that is strangling from overpopulation. Judge this world which talks piously about a passive unthinking, unemotional chemical thing, in which there has been zero emotional and material investment, as if it were a life-and yet treats the mother like so much garbage who deserves her fate. Judge the Canadian government which murders a thousand young girls in a most horrible way. Are you going to become a doctor? You will witness desperate girls you’ll have to turn away because of the law, girls nearly bleeding to death, dying girls, girls dead of a quack abortion. ‘Your elders witness this crime daily-and do nothing. They are too cowardly even to speak out against a law which makes common nazis of them. Will you be a coward too? Are you going to become a ,lawyer? You will be asked to uphold a law which can’t be enforced, which breeds contempt for the law. You are going to find yourself prosecuting doctors whose only crime is that they helped a young woman. Your elders are accomplices to crime which the state commits against its women. Will you let them teach you how to be a criminal too? Or are you going to fight for the total abolition of the abortion law? Are you going to become a religious leader? Your elders are quite willing to humiliate and maim and torture girls who are audicious enough to violate the sexual laws of God? Are you? Are you going into politics? Every member of the Canadian House of Commons is an accomplice=in the murder of 1,000 Canadian women every year. Your elders have excellent excuses for their role-the same ones that were used by Adolf Eichman. Can you fight? Are you going to become a wife and mother of a daughter? Your little girl may grow up in a world where she has to take a trip to a dirty filthy butcher shop. Don’t think it won’t happen to you. Daughters will be daughters. She’ll never tell you about ther trip and you may have to do without grandchildren. Make sure your daughter always has available competent medical help. Get your husband to work on blowing that abortion law to hell. When you join the power elite, if you want your children to respect you, you’ll have to earn it. That is something your parents have yet to learn. Some of this respect you can earn by reaking the state’s t,yranny over the bodies of its women. No’ woman should ‘be forced to bear a child she does not want.

.


vince me that they really n absolute value, If fetuses if deformed, then why are better dead than red? If Jled with Koromeir, how can ocuted? : [amine the opponents of ab! defenders of intrauterine any of them are precisely vho clamor loudest for the nd. foreigners. - The same #t-uterine life such a hell on atholic Church drip &h the t pleads with us to spare the an think of only one logical ro positions : that the whole laracter-testing and moral I must help every possible st it will have its fair chance :ing Asian, electrocuted for Isted in hell by a mr;levolent

I.

,

..

J

.

Wendyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story is a true account, although names are fictitious. The article at the top of this page tias written by Jefferson Poland and is reprinted with permission from intercourse (UPS). The major feature below was written by&ald Kingsbury, a professtv at McGill University in Montreal and a contributor to the re- cently distributed Birth cod-o/ handbook. Artwork is by english â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;major Johanna Faulk, Chevron staff. 1 -.

.,

.

friday

77 October

7969+(70:2Z 3) 363

15


The muthematics QUICK TRIP VARIETY 347

by Ron Thompson Canadian University

It now appears, at least in Montreal, that if the police stay home, the people will riot. An editorial writer for the Ottawa Citizen speculates that the “police...had no way of knowing what havoc their absence would create.” Apparently the events in Montreal on OCtober 7 were a surprise. But that goes against allthe facts.

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All that tuesday, on Montreal radio stations, there were constant urgings that citizens be cautious, that they stay in their homes, that elderly people living alone spend the night with neighbours.

of IcawWoderMontreal has the most murders and bank robberies per capita of any city in the country. Gangland killings have been frequent front page news. That is why the police struck-to make that point. If the police are absent, they don’t “create” the havoc, they merely stop keeping the lid on it. The Montreal police have become very efficient at keeping that lid on. They demonstrated how efficient they were when they didn’t show up for work. By the end of one day in the middle of the week, the newspapers were only reporting ‘major holdups and robberies-23 of them.

In the Quebec legislature, opposition leader Jean Lesage was talking of the “threat of anarchy” posed by the striking police and firemen..

Two persons had been shot to death, millions of dollars of property had been burned, smashed or stolen.

Laws were already on the books making it possible to force the police back to work, with heavy fines for officers, heavier fines and jail terms for union officials, and possible decertification of the unions if the police and firemen did not return to work on orders from the legislature. The army was ready to move in.

When the police came back at 1 am the ‘riot’ ended. They arrested twice as many people in a couple of hours as the Quebec provincial police, on duty with reinforcements for the entire day, had made. There is, it seems, a delicate relationship between mass violence and the number of cops that can be mustered to keep the lid on it.

The government and the media were more than cautious about the ramifications of a police strike. It would be foolish to assume the police were not aware of what they were doing.

Montreal was not devoid of police protection on October 7, the QPP were there and the army had been called in.

The kind of violence that swept downtown Montreal is not new to major cities in North America these days. It was not even new to Montreal. The events of St. Jean Baptiste day during the federal election campaign, the massive student demonstrations with 5000 to 10,000 people in the streets, the ongoing bombings in the city-all these indicated to the police a climate of dissent which they constantly had to face at constant personal risk.

But the cops were too few and too ill-trained to keep the reaction in the streets from occurring. What is unnerving in the wake of the events in Montreal is the analysis of what was wrong: somehow it is seen as the fault of the police for “not being there. ” From one end of the telescope that kind of deduction could be made; the police were absent, violence occurred, therefore the violence was ‘created’ by the absence of the police. So the way to make certain, ‘that this never

occurs again’ from that point of view is to do whatever is necessary to keep sufficient numbers of police on the streets. That can be done through force, or through higher and higher salaries. That solution begs very important questions, makes some very questionable assumptions. First of all, it assumes that the violence is only related to the number of police. Secondly, and related to that assumption, we zre required to adopt a view of man who is only orderly in the presence of police. Thirdly, it ignores other possible causes for violence. The police may act as a lid keeping the pot from boiling over, but perhaps the heat is coming from somewhere else. Three years, ago, when the Watts riots erupted, there was an investigation of the roots of the unrest in the community-it may have been superficial, but at least it was done. Now, the causes in the community from which the dissent and the militancy erupt are no longer examined. They are merely assumed without being articulated, and ignored.

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The response* to violence now is that there are either not enough rules or not enough cops to enforce them. At Sir George Williams University, the response to the destruction of the computer center was a new discipline code, repressive in the extreme, which in no way answered the discontent of the students who had occupied the building-it merely laid on more explicit and severe retribution for such actions. In Montreal, the response was to get the police replaced immediately and forced back on duty as soon as possible. In Ontario, the committee of university presidents issues a working paper entitled “Order on Campus. ” If you weren’t careful, you might think there was a plot.

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,

by Wayne +

Smith

Chevron staff

;

Cordon Lightfoot paid his yearly visit to Waterloo last week-end and left without stirring up too \ niuch enthusiasm-either his’or his audience’s ’ Although an avid fan I must admit that I was one of the few people present who enjoyed his-concert even though both performances in the jock ~1 building were well attended. His first set included many of the songs from his recently released album recently reviewed in the Chevron. Of these at least two numbers deserve a mention. is a typical Lightfoot Appro.aching lavender ballad, which lulls rather then excites, an effort which one gets ‘from most of his songs. ’ In contrast 24-hour blues, a country. and western influenced blues number, shows that contrary to popular opinion Lightfoot , is beginning to experiI/ ment in various musical fields. Other numbers from his / last album. -are just .-more Lightfoot,, nothing really exciting but good listening if you like him. y The second set brought. many old favorites including perhaps his ^ best known song the Canadian railroad zri/ogy;-, with which. he ended ,‘the con_ ,I cert. - * ’ _ But this wasn’t .exactly a typical Lightfoot perLformance, for remembering his seeming reluctance for change he has altered his routine greatly. ’ Unfortunately. he has not yet mastered the ability to talk freely and natually with his audience which although very difficult to do greatly enhances a perfornier in the eyes of an audience. The almost total elimination of his humorless stage jokeshow- _ . ever shows that he has improved. Another important difference this year was the replacement of bass ‘. player John Stockfish with Rich Haines who was noticeably feeii$g his way - throughout theconcert. - -

* by Brendail\lilsok

‘/

Cfievron staff-

\

’’ .

_

,

4’

,-,’

“1”

Cord Chapman, math 3, playing with Doug ,Andrews, University of Toronto, won the master’s . pairs event. at the regional bridge championship, .8 ’ heldin Rochester,’ N;Y. last weekend. Winning..this event is a great honor since most of the ‘top bridge filayers from Ontario, .Ohio. andNew York state were in attendance.at this tou.rnamerit, and the event is restricted to players who have won at least 100,master points. (Master points are awarded by. the American contract bridge league at all tournaments and at club games). 1

1

It has always been obvious that Lightfoot had great rapport with Red. Shea, his lead player, almost to the exclusion of Stockfish. Whether or not this is the reason Stockfish left and whether or not Haines will overcome this barrier remains unkIlOWIL -+ \

i

bCC?LOB

Co’ntinuous DAl-Lyfrom

I

I:30

‘.

pm

Lightfoot’s heavy reliance on Shea, _who if .anything is better than-ever, makes one wonder what _ would happen if Shea ever left the group. As for the usual comments: the sound system was good in ‘the ront row, fair in the middle and very bad at the back and on the bleachers. The echoes produced by a room as large as the gym: nasium” easily equqls those of a miniature grand canvon. ’ r Next to. the verbal annoyance expressed by Lightfoot about the parking situation which made him park a good distance from the phys-ed building and which- brought cheers ‘from the audience who had to. do the same, the biggest surprise of the night was Lightfoot’s rendition of a pseudo-hippieradical-anarchist protest song which put down sarcastically but.. well everything from lake pollution to police violence with the Vietnam war thrown in for fun.’ In fact the whole song is a very funny take-off on today’s sick society, and while the audience cheered they.’ could’ not help , but realize that he- was often singing about them in a way which wasn’t necessarilv complimentarg. “, The name of the masterpiece Waithg for dobmsday to ‘6ome is unfortunately missing from the titles on-his new album, but at least we know that somewhere in his head Lightfoot is studying the correct line. I’ ,G More of this type of song could do much- to imrove Lightfoot’s image ,at Waterloo. . I

I . /

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All the players are well experienced at tournament play because of the restriction and therefore ., the competition is very keen, _ Chapman and Andrew; won over 149 other pairs .in, his two.-session -event with a score of’ 410% (212 and 193!&), with second biace being won with , a score of 396. It is very hard to score 200 in a bridge session and to put, two 200-scores back-toback requires excellent play with very few (or no) mistakes. . This is the first big win for this pair of’ bridge . players. ’ c / b

Qnd Dakihg rHit : - . They went to school to learn-about

-

I love . . . She e&y way! -

1

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frhay

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17 October

1969 (l&23)

‘365

17

.


Ballet

RESERVED SEATS FLOOR IN REDS $4.54 + $.46 (tax) $5.00 BLUES $3.64 + $.36 (tax) $4.00 /

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WLU

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by Una O’Callaghan Chevron staff

When the Royal Winnipeg ballet company arrives at Waterloo Lutheran university monday afternoon they face some formidable problems. The Lutheran gymnasium in which they open monday night is well-known for its bad accoustics, not to mention antique lighting and a poorly constructed stage. In such a pitifully inadequate setting one can’t hope for the type of performance which won rave reviews for the troupe throughout Europe, South America and the United States. With luck, however, the technical excellence of the troupe will survive the hazards, and their witty and lighthearted repertory will be enjoyed by a large audience. Under normal conditions a performance by this youthful Canadian company is a theatrical delight, innovative, irreverent and overflowing with exhilarating spontaneity. Director Arnold Spohr, who is largely responsible for the company’s prominence in the ballet world, is not confined by the great traditions of ballet.

Movie by Marty

explores

Nova1

In Hegel’s master-slave dialectic the master becomes enslaved and the slave becomes master .when each becomes conscious of his respective position. This is the case in Bird in Peru. Jean Seberg (Adriana) is the slave become master and there are scores of masters become slaves. The film takes place on a beach in Peru, which serves as a giant graveyard for large gulls which live on stone rocks far from shore. The men in Adriana’s life are also dying, and Adriana pays homage to the large vulture waiting for death and picking at the carrion, for she too picks at the bodies of her spiritually dead slaves. Adriana is a nymphomaniac capable of some of the most outlandish sexual acrobatics. She hates herself, particularly her sinful yet uncontrollable men are attracted even body. Unfortunately, against their will to her strange lust. They become

members

always

)de deux.

master-slave

Chevron staff

-new

Interested in all forms of movement, he has searched the world to discover all known kinds of dancing, from Bushman to Balinese to Ballet. Despite it’s title, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet company does not try to emulate the style its British namesake or any of the other great classical companies of Europe. According to Spohr, the company prefers to be a medium for comment about the contemporary scene, using Canadian dancers, choreographers and composers. Unfortunately, works with typical Canadian themes such as Shadow on the prairie and Rose L atulippe, will not be included in the program monday night. Two short ballets which top the program Aimezvous Bach and Sri// point were well received during the company’s 1968 tour of Europe and the U.S.S.R. Still point by Todd Bolender is danced to a strong Debussy quartet. It’s a tale about a young girl caught in desperate solitude between two young couples, which’ signify past and future. Also included in monday night’s program is the Don Quixote pas de deux and the Giselle peasant pas

scene

hollow men, living only for the experience of her body. Adriana’s one great wish is to die and yet she finds it nearly impossible to exterminate the hateful lust with her own hand. Finally, she resolves to carry through but is saved by a new master. Adriana, desiring to be dominated, desiring to die, can only dominate and kill. Her men wanting to rule and kill can only be ruled and killed. And so it goes for the gulls and the vultures, Adriana and her men and for you and me. The photography of the film brilliantly reflects the parallel between the birds and the human characters. The eerie beach in Peru is screeching with the sounds of dying birds as the humans screech at the torments of their existence. Jean Seberg is magnificently erotic, reflecting most poignantly her hate-love by seductive grins in the midst of her most intense agonies. I was thorougly engrossed and excited by Birds in Peru.

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Cgmera . cciptures . essence of Joyce’s Ulysses I

by Jay Per0 Chevron staff

Any attempt to film James Joyce’s Ulysses would prove impossible, as the- inclusion of most of the book would result in a terrible movie. There is just too much in the book which is not told in the main plot. To watch the film, however, is to see a film about the book rather than merely a translation of the novel from the page to the screen. The film borrows some of the incidents that occur in the book, such as the views of three people, Bloom, Daedelus and Bloom’s wife during 24 hours of their lives. The long interior monologs of each of the three, especially Molly’s, take up most of the film. The selectivity which was necessary for a good film about Ulysses, unfortunately does not give much insight into the depth of perhaps the most important piece of literary fiction of this century. For Joyce, the interior monolog is a route of access from a rather mundane plot into the vastness of mythology and the subconscious.;. This access is the thread that will unite the fragmented existence of contemporary man to his own immediate past, and then beyond to the myths and images of the unconscious that form the most basic elements in the nature of man. But the kind of depth and confusion of time, sequence, and identity that is a consequence of this goal in Joyce’s novel, is next to impossible . to translate to film. This problem is heightened for the film be-

0 (I) a

aa

‘.“THE LADY’S NOT FOR BURNING”

cause the confusion of time, sequence and identity is approached by Joyce through the interior monolog. We must be able to watch something on the screen during the monolog that is both interesting and relevant to the intentions of the words being read. This is accomplished in the film through the use of the camera which moves from quick flashbacks to long fluid shots of abstract forms of sand and water, and to shots of eastern statues of gods. This makes the screen not only lively with interesting pictures but captures the relevance of the monologs for Joyce’s own intentions of integrating the self of his characters in time and myth. Since what we see on any screen is merely the surface of objects and people, it is usually the case that when a film tries to translate a book we are impressed by the puppet show quality in the action, the hand of the invisible manipulator is always at work. To escape this, the camera must refrain from the usual method of focusing on real objects, or else maintain a point of view by focusing on a world that somehow dissolves the limitations of surfaces. One scene in particular stands out in this regard. Bloom while walking near the beach sees a girl leaning on a rock. Both characters go through a long series of sexual fantasies about the other. None of this is explained in any way but is made extremely clear by the work of the,camera.

There is no physical contact between Bloom and the girl. Nothing to allow us from a third person point of view to understand that anything is taking place. But the camera has not remained on the surface. It moves the viewer into the psyche of each of the characters alternatively. We are not seeing what a camera would but what each of the characters sees and feels. Nothing is forced onto the scene, the manipulator has disappeared, and in this comes the intensity of both this scene and the movie. The director has accepted the limitations that the nature of film places upon any exploration of a novel. These limitations make the goal of a film version of Ulysses impossible. Only a small aspect of the novel has been tackled but within this scope the film has succeeded beautifully. We are drawn into the consciousness of each of the three characters of Bloom, Molly and Daedelus. Although we cannot reach the depths of the human character to the same extent as Joyce we are shown glimpses of the vastness that lies below the surface of each of us. For some it is only a glimpse of this depth in ourselves that opens the gates. For others it is a long journey of discipline and error. To ignore this depth is to sink sleepily into an anonymous road to collective suicide. Ulysses has the value of recalling Joyce’s reminder to 20th century man that it is only the artist, the man who knows himself, and the depths of his own personality who can create a way towards life for humanity.

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Rugger warrior Dalje Goodrow strenuously clears the ball in Waterloo “s 26-O win over Mat.

Powder-puffers do their stuff

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ONTARIO

At the close of registration for fall recreational teams, several activities were short of the required number of entrants. As a result, the entry date will be extended until next Wednesday for all team activities. The greatest need for teams is in hockey and basketball with openings also in broomball and floor hockey. To register pick up a form at the phys-ed department. A wide variety of individual activities are also underway, about which information is available at the jock shop. The hockey wa!riors began their pre-season ’ tryouts on

monday at Moses Springer arena. The team has a new head coach in Bob McKillop with assistants Ian Young and Bob Norman. Among the over one hundred players auditioning are twelve of last year’s second place edition of the pucking-about warriors. The dribble-with-theirhands warriors also began practice this week under their new coach Mike Lavelle. They also have a good return strength and should prove strong this season. Anyone interested ip trying to play either hockey or basketball on the varsity level should contact the appropriate- coach at the phys-ed department.

A bulletin from the women’s intramural athletic council : “Who’d ever dream that those sweet little girls could be transformed into such mean defensive That’s righttack!es. Yup! flag football really does something for a girl. Crowds of guys along the field’s edge coach loudly or just plain laugh at the absurd tactics. The competition is really stiff. Renison leads league I with St. Notre Paul’s a close second. Dame is out in front in league 11 with Habitat west not far behind. These heroic players can bc recognized by a stiff-legged walk and a mean look in the eye.


.

by Peter Marshall Chevron staff

Behind a solid defense and an offense which caught fire. in the second half of the game, the football warriors defeated winless M&laster Saturday, 14 - 13, for their first regular scason victory of 1969. ’ For the first time this season the running game seemed to be able to move the ball with some authority. The winning touchdown was set up by one pass and four running plays-the ground plays accounting for more than 30 yards. ,The last two times the warriors had the ball Chuck Wakefield . gained 21 yards on four carries and Doug Downer had one exciting 23-yard run. The offensive blocking in the’ second half was the best it has been all season. The defense . played especially well after the first quarter. With the exception of one sustained march in that quarter the MCMaster offense had great trouble moving the ball at all. The defense was. led ’ Standing Performances backers - Warren Hull --Koch and a strong front Brian Westell making tackles ” . . in .- his first--start lenslve tackle. (

with a towering 55-yard -single. Three plays after his first successfuly fake punt,- Lockington kicked a field goal and made the score 3-l for Mat. The lead stood until the warrior. punt-return team scored a touchdown midway through the next quarter. McMaster was’ punting from their end zone and Stu‘ Koch got through to b1ock the punt. Ed Scorgie recovered’ in the end zone for the touchdown. Knill’s convert was wide. Mat took the lead in the third quarter Water1oo lost the ba11 when a third down snap went He was hit Over Wll’S headas he kicked the ball which went directly ‘Out Of bounds. The defense stiffened and Lockington’s second field goal made it 7-6 for Water1oo. The next time Mat ,had the ball they were forced into ‘a punting situation at the warriors 37 yard line Lockington threw the touchdown pass to Kozowyk and converted it giving marauders *the lead 13-7. Watmlnn

v

mrtnlnvd

Mat-

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UCIClI3C

DANCING ALONG

BLUE MOON ‘HOTEL

travel to London for the Western homecoming-the day when the Mustangs invariably play their most spirited ball game of the year, the day when a flat team will be destroyed. LEAGUESTANDINGS

w aterloo McMaster

(35 0’3329OO~L-~~~ 10

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The questions are. smaller in victory, however, and the team did have more cohesiveness in the second \hqlf Saturday than it did against Queen%.

hadlv

by out- in the final quarter-the Ma& by line- offense was only 33 yards-and and Stu -uut together a 50 vard march line with for the final touchdown. The several major score came on a spectacuat de- lar catch by Rick Wiedenhoeft of a clutch third down pass from Dave Groves. Paul Knill added Mat quarterback Al Tanner the winning convert. That catch was dropped for losses several over the heads of two defenders times j as ‘good pass coverage gave the line time to get to Tan- ~~re~i~a~~~~~~t~~~~m~~rli~~ ner. Defensive backs Ian Woods in ? the A1AU ur”yy= quarter. 1 F=J and Dave Crichton added inter1?eptions,;%he the‘ crucial last There ’ were.‘?* several bright -c eacn -~ ‘in a-1nair. -II= minutesA- 01 spots and a few question marks for the warriors Saturday. The The only two costly mistakes main bright spots’were the good were made by the punt-return running game in the second half, team-or ‘rather the same costly +hd an,,nA UlC 3u UllU Aa-bFnYbnne-and-l9 more mistake made twice-as Mat cni ritd offnrt 211 irni “y&A auuu toam“UUIIA “IIVI v UI1 UL” und. _ punter Alec Lockington faked, two punts and completed passes Also, Dave Groves was throwThe first ing much better. He seemed to to -wide open receivers. one set up Lock&ton’s first be throwing long less -often but field goal and the second went with much more authority. He for a touchdown to end Ned was able to find his receivers Kozowyk. somewhat . easier and didn’t -_.L_ throw for ~---.. Era1 1s wnen m _--- - the _--- ball ._-_-- UD -= --Ma~~$~ers” y@ weapons on he couldn’t find them Saturday were @#@ker Bob ,Baytar-who caught$five ‘passes for 75 yards-and Alec Lockington ho punted, kicked off, kicked QllU culllylt:Ltxl Lilt: LWU ,yasses off fake, punts. Punter Paul Knill put the warriors ahead in the first quarter

impressive enough to prove he belongs in the starting~ backfield? Couldn’t Gord McLellan be freed from running the middle of tie line to realize some open field running in which he exeels? , I . * And finalfy, is ,KniYl really capable of a 42yard .field goalanother of which warriors tried‘ on Saturday?

Chuck..

Ship’ment

Wakefield

-Jeff

look

Standout

warrior

linebacker

Bennett, the Chevron

Stu Koch blocks McMaster punt for first Waterloo touchdown,

,

Sizes

fri&y

17october

1969 /10:23)

369

21 -I


. > no currjiculum, no-lectures, hopefully j&a big . . bunch bf petiple talking about their p’roblems and 9xperiences in alternate prep journalism. especially:for .’ $heiron staff&but everyone welcome.

.

Sknturdaf 18 odober (tomorrow) in the s * catipus cetiter. would you believe / I starting -1 at *3Oim? , aL__ I. . NEXT CHEVRON STAFF MEETING-monday 2,O October 9pm in the -Chevron office. Qne agenda item-should the Chevron allow blatant I male chauvinism (printing p,ictures of women just because they’re women). I ,I_ -.

,

Look,, I’m back. After ,a brief two, weeks in Aca- . erected to keep people out without tickets, and pulco basking in the suni my heart strings have dancing. will go on till eleven o’clock, when a city noise bylaw will force the event to expire. , dragged me back to Waterloo. What’s this winter stuff’ I keep hearing about. I thought *we’d gone Food will be supplied by the vending machines in the campus center at a very low cost. -All is through all ‘that last year. I&D we ‘have to ‘do it all over again? Something should be done. not bad, however as tickets will go to all bona I’think we should have a’moratorium on winter. - fide graduates for. the asking. Others wishing to Lets all stay away from classes on the day of the attend will. have to cough up around $3.75 a couple. first, snowfall and go skiing. ~ . * Not bad for a square dance, now is it? * * 1: *** Guess what? The library isn’t going, up three . ;Litter in the campus center is ~getting to be - floors, its going up four!Well not-really, but I’such a problem that people are starting to actually have it from usually unreliable sources that it was - do something about it. Just’ yesterday, I saw one planned for three.. ,,Therefore, it is safe to assumea few hundred leaflets asking that we’ll have. eleven floors. :. The top floor will _- group -people distribute to throw all such notices in the garbage of course be vacant .most of the$ime, but it will be when they had finished reading them. Now that’s used for sit-ins and take-overs so the usual library a great idea, but today another group went around service won’t be disrupted. . leaflets asking people not to distribute. ’ Some of you ‘may be wondering what all the . distributing leaflets because of the litter they create. digging around the biology greenhouse is for. Well : Things like this seem a little silly at first glance, -on that very spot they are going to install a giant, but then again, if we fill the place with pieces of mirror to. reflect sunlight’ which would normaIly paper, there won’t he any room for pop cans. be blocked by ‘the additional floor .of the library. Either that or the people’s campus center -board See,, there’s a sMuti for everything, so ‘don’t may well lock the building and clean it up. And to ‘worry about a thing. 1. * * * <, make sure it stays clean, it can stay locked which \doesn’t solve a thing. Five hundred copies of a, Informed sources within. the ‘federation have clean up or get out. flyer will be distributed next , informed me that because of tight money, this week. year’s grad ball will be held on’the square in front of the phys-ed building. A snow fence ‘will be _ Ta ta for now. ,’

/

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*

GRINNELL, Iowa (LNSFl@O BOY Scouts turned out for a “marijuana x pull-in” recently under the sponsorship of .the local law. enforcement agency. Equipped with samples -of their prey, generously supplied by the sponsors, the industrious youths fanned out through the city and its en.virons with instructions to

pull up the’hemd the city dump. ,

and deposit a

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Iowa. The point, being, that an ‘informed citizenry is an enlighten- _ ed mass and should destroy the dopeon contact. ’ . 2 _

i

‘The day’s haul came , to, eight I tons. ’ . The ‘ ‘pull-m” was designed, ‘deputy sheriff Gene Rodberg explained, to publicize the large amount of marijuana growing wild in ‘Grinnell and throughout

,

Iowa grass isn’t highly regarded, but it’s still a possession bust, and Iowa lawmen have been known to pull people out of suspicious corn fields.

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Wunes look” not glamorous; it’s ci seven-month strike

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TORONTO-CUP-Last march a group of suburban housewives took off their clothes, donned barrels and waited for the press. It didn’t take long for the women to find themselves splashed through newspapers across the country. People laughed at the pictures of the semi-nude barrel-clad women. But behind their for-the-press smiles, the women didn’t laugh. Strikebound employees of the Hanes Hosiery plant in Rexdale, these women used the barrels in an attempt to embarrass Hanes and publicize the strike. Officials at Hanes head offices in North Carolina must have smiled as the women in the barrels unknowingly advertised for the company they were fighting against. Semi-nudity is nothing new to Hanes. They use it to sell their high-quality, expensive hosiery through super-slick advertising pushing “the Hanes nude look”. It sells. As a gimmick to publicize the strike, the barrel incident was a long-term failure. After the initial flurry of publicity, both the press and the public forgot the strikers. The Hanes workers were used to being ignored. For six years women’s wages hovered around the minimum ($1.30 an hour). The company refused to pay hospital or medical benefits. Although 90 percent of the workers were female, Hanes refused to consider maternity benefits. A woman could come back to work if a, job were open, but in the process she lost all seniority. “We asked for raises and they refused,” says Mary O’Sullivan, a striker. “With rising costs we found we had less money than the year before. ” “Every departmentwent in to ask for a raise. The company said they would look into it. ” When the situation did not improve, the women decided to organize. Inexperienced but determined, they opened their phone books, found the listing of the textile workers union of America (TWA) ahd phoned for help. The union’s task was easy since the women had organized themselves. All they had to do was pass around the membership cards to the 85 percent of the Hanes employees willing to join. All the workers asked for was guidance and direction and the legitimacy of a union to ensure their gains. The company and the union negotiated for seven months, but still there was no settlement. The strike began march 3. The workers demanded that the company increase wages, provide maternity leave, and pay all hospitalization and medical insurance benefits. The first day of the strike, 35 of the 145 workers crossed the picket line, but the mood of the other 110 was optimistic. The march 27 edition of the “panty-hose special,” a bi-weekly newsletter distributed by TWA to the strikers, reflected high hopes and enthusiasm. “Despite the rain and the snow and the wind the spirit of the Mane’s strikers continues to be high,” it read. “Rain or shine, the strikers do the bunny,hop on the picket line. ” “Of course we expected to win,” says Mary O’Sullivan. “We wouldn’t have gone on strike if we hadn’t.” But the union was more pessimistic from the beginning. “We knew it was a tough company,” says Jim McConnell, TWA business agent. “We’d worked with them in the United States.” The battle was between an American union and an American company, but the Canadian workers of the Toronto branch-plant were right in the middle. That was last march. Now in October the strike continues, but you’d never know it. Last monday at 7am four strikers formed a feeble picket line in front of the Rexdale plant. They carried no signs and wore no placards. Aside from a few disheartened growls directed at the strike-breakers, the tiny picket line remained silent. Incoming workers ignored the pickets, and only the police kept close scrutiny. Two of the three policemen stepped out of their cars to ensure that the strikers caused no damage. Satisfied, the police left only to return in a half hour for another cursory view of the scene. When they returned the picketers were sitting in cars to wait out the rest of their three-and-a-halfhour duty. One by one the strikers have drifted to other jobs, leaving only 60 of the original 110 officially on strike. The enthusiasm has evaporated and now the atmosphere is one of waiting it out until the bitter end. The Hanes workers had legitimate grievances,

a large union, and the will to fight out the battle. \\ What happened? Although the company refused to offer wage increases during pre-strike meetings with the union, soon after the strike began the company sent letters to the strikers’ husbands and wives offering wage increases if the strikers returned to work. “It was more of a bribe than anything else,” says Mary 0 ‘Sullivan. Strikers bundled up the letters and sent them back in a Hanes box with a note saying “Thanks, but no thanks. ” Under Ontario law a company must deal with workers through the union. Because Hanes violated this law by sending letters to the strikers, TWA put the case before the Ontario labor board which grantedthe union the right to prosecute the com-

pany.

But the union didn’t take advantage of this opportunity. “We didn’t prosecute,” explains McConnell, “because we wanted to keep the avenues open for negotiation.” Although little violence occurred on the picket line, Hanes requested and received police protection. Last june, three months -after the strike began, the company tried but failed to establish an injunction against picketing. TWA refused to stage an aggressive strike. “If you are aggressive you get an injunction right away,” comments McConnell. Although 90 per cent of the Hanes workers are women, men hold the most important jobs. They are the fixers who keep the machines running. Six of the nine fixers joined the picket line but the tactic failed. The company simply imported fixers from their plant in the United States. Under Canadian law it ‘is illegal for a company to import strikebreakers. Canadian border points have a list of all strikebound companies. But according to Ernest Fanning, district administration supervisor of the department of immigration, “if a person is coming to Canada on a temporary basis, he can’t work. If he is coming on a permanent basis we don’t care where he is going. ” When the Varsity informed him of the situation at Hanes, Fanning asked, us to write a letter so the department of immigration could investigate. McConnell says the immigration department has investigated Hanes. “We applied to the immigration department about the fixers from the United States. They said they would not act as long as the people were employees of the United States company. ” After the strike began Hanes had 35 workers. Now they have 97. To increase productivity the company bolstered shifts from eight to 12 hours. When a strikebound plant regains 80 per cent of its former productivity the strikers are eligible for unemployment insurance. A government investigation of the Hanes plant reported productivity at 63-65 percent of the prestrike level. The strikers cannot claim unemployment insurance.

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In the battle between the company and the union the workers have come outas the losers. “Since we have been on strike,” notes Edna Shaw, “the company has raised the starting rates to $1.50 and now pays 50 percent of hospitalization. “If they had given us those benefits before, we probably wouldn’t have gone on strike. ” “If the company would just let the union in, I would be happy,” she said. “The workers already have the raises and benefits we wanted.” It is doubtful that the union will be admitted. Ninety-five workers in the Hanes plant have signed a petition asking that the union be decertified. At present the Ontario labor board is considering the application and will give a decision in two weeks. If the board allows a vote to be held, all workers hired since the strike will be eligible to vote. Because strikers have drifted to other jobs, at present workers in the plant outnumber those on the picket line. Thus, votes against the union outnumber votes for the union. Last week Mr. Stafford, manager Rexdale plant told the Varsity:

of the Hanes

“The whole thing is in the hands of the Ontario labor board, At the present time we would rather not get involved in any newspaper controversy. “If YOU call back in a couple of weeks perhaps we can give you more details. ’ ’ His voice, confident and cheerful, was the voice of a man who knows he has enough votes to decertif y the union. friday

17 October

7969 (70:23)

377

23


Address

letters to Feedback, The Chevron, lJ of W. Be The Chevron reserves the right to shorten letters. Those typed (double-spaced) get priority. Sign 1t - name, course, year, telephone. For legal reasons unsigned letters cannot be published. A psewdonym will be printed if you have a good reason.

feedback Radical problem them get dysentery

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let LL

I have heard from a reliable source that the administration wishes to close. liberation lunch (LL). Their reasons, as I understand them, are most humanitarian. Although I am convinced that the administration has the best interest of the students at heart, I feel compelled to suggest that the administration defers an immediate act .of good for the long term benefit of our community. Certainly their concern for. student health in closing LL is commendable. It is obvious that the sanitary conditions of LL are-far surpassed by the antisepic devotion to cleanliness practised by food services. Surely, one is reminded of a hospital when one eats at any of the food service centers. I propose that here, concealed in the mundane affairs of our little community, is a bold solution to the radical _problem- at Waterloo. Clearly, it is but a matter of time till food poisoning strikes the customers of LL It is safe to assume that these customers are radicals for who else would be so perverse as to expect better food for less money? Picture, I ask you, a confronsuffering tation : the radicals from weeks of dysentery, the administration conspicuously full of the stuff of battle! Ah, can you doubt the outcome? Let LL remain open; further I suggest that the administration subsidize it, to hasten the course of nature. The immediate problem is how to finance this subsidy. Of course, next year it can be charged to the students as an incidental fee, might I mention $22 as a round (fat) figure. However, in the interim I humbly propose a luxury tax of 8 percent on food services’ receipts. This can be passed on to the customers, some of whom will gladly pay for the privilege of better-bred eating companions ; the remainder will confuse it with the recent increase in prices which you must agree were most modest. As an immediate result we will have the bestfed radicals in North America, which is highly desirable, for if I may quote my favorite philosopher, “a full belly is the womb of a soft conscience”. I anticipate ethical objections from the administrators to this plan but I am sure that their conscience will be assuaged by the following argument. Appeal to the administrative law “the end justifies the means”; for this law there are so many administration precedents on campus that no right-minded person could deny the legality of such action. One then applies the axiom of our society which states that laws are ethical. consideration An imminent is the rumor that the radicals are planning demonstrations, hunger strikes and free eat-ins against food services. Certainly at this time we cannot give these irresponsible elements who foolishly expect improved service, a rallying point. I fear that to close LL would send the misinformed sheep of our community into the enemy’s camp and the administration and their few loyal followers would suffer an ignominious defeat .

‘“”

What a cruel and ironic blow to food services, the very model of optimal administrative planning on campus. Worse yet the damage to our public image-no new grants, no mobile trees, no new administrators, no red carpets, no armored cars for the campus police. In short, we will be deprived of essentials. Perhaps I am an alarmist, but to underestimate the forces of darkness may be fatal. We cannot allow fairminded attitudes and sportsmanship to lead us to defeat. Remember, history will not record how we played the game but who won. In closing, I would ask those who support this plan to encourage the administration to adopt it; for those unenlightened souls who oppose it I commend you t0 LL: YOU’11 get more to eat than you pay for! LEROY

JOHNSON grad math

Disgruntled warrior fans dislike stadium dissection

Who is the demigod that dissected Seagram stadium during that most recent display of athletic prowess-referring of course to the Queens-U of W football game? Why is it (and who is responsible for the fact) that the best seats in the house are classified as reserved and then offered for sale to the public at an extra high price, while the students and/or staff who have purchased season’s tickets, thus supplying the university athletic department with a certain minimum guaranteed income, and who incidentally pay the $22 athletic fee (in the case of the students), are relegated to the far-distant ends of the bleachers? Is it because those who have determined this policy feel that the public at large needs an extra inducement, i.e., better seats, to entice them to debase themselves enough to come and watch the Warriors play, while it is felt that the students will attend no matter what? IS it not high time that it was recognized that the athletics provided and .paid for on campus should be intended primarily to benefit the community of scholars, the university itself? And who was the pushy guy guarding the aisles leading not only to the reserved seats, but also to those seats left for the others? JOHN EDWARDS planning 2 DOUG KOEGLER geography 2 He will deal sado-masochistic

justly

with reporter

After forcing myself to read the 10 October 69 Chevron article “Lemmings to the sea”, I note theI following : 5-“But ordinary Paragraph charity work like car washes and shoeshines is sane and hum an compared to the sado-masochistical activity called miles for millions march. ” Paragraph ll-“Miles for millions marches would be harm-

less if they were just fun (which they are)....” Now sir, it is not extremely difficult, even for an almost illiterate engineer, to draw the obvious conclusion. Sado-masochism is fun! Well, just let me state that I most righteously protest! This type of irresponsible statement, when published in a newspaper, is sick and sexually aberrated. Have you considered what this can do to the minds of -young children? reporter should be Your stripped naked, and handcuffed in a helpless position to a leather then be covered table-and beaten soundly with a rubber whip. Once his/her/its buttocks are a proud, beet-red color, then maybe he’ll think twice about writing crap like that in the future. It just happens that I have the required punishment equipment at home in my basement. In the name of decency, point out this cad and redeem youselves. I will mete out the just punishmen so that we all may be spared! DENNIS KASTNER mechanical 3B Thanks for your help. We checked on the reporter and discovered he was once detained for questioning by the campus cops who became suspicious because of his night& walks around the ringroad. Your request will be brought up at the next staff meeting. -the

lettitor

Radical fringe group is not capc$de of cleanliness

Without a doubt, the campus center is one of the most disgusting buildings on campus. The building smells from the lect through the unconcern and slovenliness of the student users. I don’t think one can honestly say we need more janitors to keep the building clean, when most of the problem can be attributed to students too lazy to move five feet to the nearest garbage can. The prime users of the building, (the anarchists that is, complete with the radical fringe group) should perhaps stop becoming so righteously indignant over government and big business pollution of Canada’s air and water, until they are capable of keeping their own immediate environment clean. Until then, fuck the revolution. DAVID BILLINGS arts 1 Since the Chevron office is on the fringes of the garbage heap you refer to we know the problem only too well. ft is impossible to place the blame on any group. The worst offenders in july were a group of phsy-ed students who ate their lunches in the great hall and left a dozen or more trays of dishes from the coffeeshop lying around ever)r da y. The most anarchistic element in society, such as the motorcycle club members who dropped in a couple of times, not only didn’t put their feet on the furniture, but also put their pop cans in the garbage receptacles. -the

lettit.or

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Addtess letters to Feedback, The Chevron, l&f,W. Be. conci& The Chevron rest&ves ihe right to shorten let_ters. hose typed (doubl&spaced) get priority. Sign it - name, cobtie, vear; telephone.. For legal reasons unsigned fetters cannot be published. A pseudonym ‘wi// be printed if yoir have a good mason. ~‘.‘.~.V.~ Y._.A... .v .~._..:.:.: +:.:.x::.> .:.. <.:.: w.q.~~~~~,, q.y,:.:.:<+,+,. _..q&&$ “i,.~~,~ ,......... y.,..........,... .#.< ..,. < ....>.. $g:.~zyyw. “..““.‘-““‘.‘2’.rr ~V.~.~~AV.~. :.......I:.:... ,,,, ...I y... ,,x,.,,, ..:.v:>;.+ i ,.,,., P. ,.., .‘.* .i,... .:yg’.,:,,:;, ,~::.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.. ,,,,. x,~ ‘.f+.% “‘~.~.‘~~...‘:.:....~,...~: A..... .,...:.: ,it.%. ~~ ,.:... .,,* ‘.:,.:.::::;;“~. ‘.s.:.:<.:...:g .Fv.+z. I*.~..:.,.,. .v.. ....*..A ._.,, .>y.&, _A....: ,._,,...<. ,.... :~~~~,~~~~:?~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~;:~~~~~~~:~: :~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ .‘:~.~:.~~~.~.:~::~~.. i‘.‘.%w. .......x.AP.::+, ....,.., ~y,.:. ~,~,... .*V<...<.>..~ +..s. ...<.>..\..h><~ *:..,,.> ‘?E A.. ‘.’Y_*.A%:...,~:.: .:.,.:.: ~~.~.~.~.~~~~:,.~,~.:.:~~~~~.~~:::~::::~~~..:~:..~~~~~~.~~~~,~~.:~:::.:...:.....:...~.~..~... . ::i,~?~:~:~:,~~.:~~~::~:.:.:.~.:.~~ : r~w4..-.. r,.,\:t.@~.:..E...:.~ ...~:.~.~.~.~.:.:.~.~:~~ ....A\ .fc’~~, .*.<.. ..:...:,... .r:.*....v..s ._.....,,y . II:: Y.. .,A 3+s ..A ..% .....y,.e *h.,... ...pz .>,,. x4,. <Y ,... I.A\,. .. ...qp<f.f * .A.\y.:~:.~:~:.~:~~:.::~~::~~~~~~~~,.~~~~...:~:.: v‘3.,..* R.. ...*;.f_,>&...;.;. ..*’ 9,&... .:0,~~~~..~,~.:~~.~~:~.~~.~.~ .A.xz.:.x\,.. ... ...A.......

Proof that Chevron is anafchistk commie rag is Hypothesis : the Chevron a perverted, . filthy, militant fascist, commie rag. . Proof: vicious rum&s have been circulating - among certain lately elements on campus to the effect that the Chevron is a perverse, insipid, uninspired, perverted com,mierag. Maybe. This same slanderous gossip goes on to postulate the implication of using student funds for such a non-representative publication to arouse the righteous indignation of the good citizens of Uniwat. This is comletely and utterly inexcusable! Maybe, I personally have heard people maintain that the Chevron does unequivocably not follow a proI corporate or militant capitalist philosophy! Maybe. ’ The official purpose of the Chevron as set’ out in their. own L manual is constituted primarily of four major premises : l To continually strive to emphasize the rights and responsibiiities of the student as a citizen. l To act as an agent of social change. l -To stimulate a state of student awareness. l To examine issues the pro.fessional press ignores. ’ Let’s briefly examine these four premises. Point one: rights and responsibilities. Some of us often like to withdraw into an embryonic womblike stage. Here we can be devoid of all those horrible freedoms and’ rights and rdsponsibilities, nurturing. forever on the omnipresent umbilical cord of God, country and mom’s apple pie. (I wonder if they eat apple pie in Biafra? Does anyone know?) , Our society can only continue if we have law and order. And t6 have law and order it is our duty, our right, even our responsibility to ,unquestioningly obey the law (for the sake of order). agent of social Point - two: change. Social change can only’ be desired. if we concede a society or a world without total ,perfection. Are we really ready to concede that? Our society has given us penicillin, electronic brains and, heart transplants, to mention just a few. (I wonder if the people of Vietnam have much trouble with computers ? Does anyone I know?) 8Point three : student awareness. Awareness somehow allies itself in my mind with rights and responsibilities. Why should we be aware that a Canadian NATO withdrawal may in the future aid a Russian decision to march into Yugoslavia. 3 I see no reason that we _should hold any responsibility in the matter. (Two , summers ago I was 40 miles from the Czecholovakian bord-’ er. That night on- television news I saw a Russian tank machinegun a seventeen-yearold girl. I walking on the streets after curfew. ) Point four: issues ignored by .’ the professional press. Approximately two weeks ago the Chevron printed a story obviously not related to the students here (St. Monica House affair). They printed this story in blatant disregard of what was

mental somersault he says lawyobviously a wisely-taken decision ers are asses while it is reallyy of the elders of Kitchener-Waterloo not to publicize the matter. . the law which is an ass. (I can understand fully that He says that lawyers derive substantial incomes from archaic it should not be our concern laws that maintain the status that public institutions are treating people still, much the same quo. Then why does the’government in power of which he, is ,as in the eighteenth century j. Conclusion: the Chevron is a a member not introduce new legislation to do away with these perverted, filthy, militant, a& laws? ’ The onus ‘is on him and his archistic, fascist commie rag. Corollary : Anything the Chevfriends in power, not on. the in-dividual practising lawyer. ron represents, -you, the student, exemplifies. It is obvious that he has no It’s your paper understanding of tax laws when therefore it must carry your views. It is >even supported by he says lawyers work on loop-, holes to get around corporate your money. Since the Chevron will print most anything subtax laws. Tax avoidance (conmitted one can only assume that trary to tax evasion) is quite the students of the University of proper and in fact suggested Waterloo are completely satby the tax department.. isfied with their student newsHe tells lawyers to work for paper. nothing even more than they alBERNIE MOHR ready do* No profession, craft or trade psych I does as much for the poor as lawyers. Doctors in most provinces of Canada are paid for-serEducational system breeds vices to the poor 90 percent of denat ion, fuctionulism ‘their scheduled fees by’ the taxpayers ; pharmacists, I believe, Although my observations may 70 percent and they are demandbe naive or superficial I have ing 90 percent, I _ gather from found the Canadian educational newspaper reports. Yet lawyers in system tends to produce people. British Columbia get for criminwho are well-versed in their al legal aid cases approximately area but otherwise somewhat 10 percent of the usual fees and narrow and limited. they receive no monies in civil This is unfortunate for sevlegal aid, cases and must aderal reasons. vance out of their own pockets The time spent ‘getting a- unicourt costs and versity education is often the _ _.-fees, sheriff’s other disbursements. only time in one’s life that one In New Westminister all pracwill be exposed to the diversity tising lawyers participate in cthe that exists or potentially exists . legal aid ,scheme and in Vanat university. j . couver hundreds of lawyers proUniversity is the ,place where vide free legal aid to the poor. ideas should be tested, doctrines In European countries includchallenged and horizons broadened,

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or almost full fee for legal aid tellectualll J, and politically as well work. In B.C. all this legal aid as em0 tionall y . work is done by the lawyers By specializing in one area. a on, a voluntary basis since the person sees the same people, hears the same ideas and learns federal ’ government has conthe same discipline throughout tributed nothing to legal aid and the provincial government only their stay at university. about one-tenth of what the The lack of communication, unOntario government provides per derstanding and ability to relate that exists between the various capita. ’ faculties is catastrophic. Indeed There’s not enough legal ‘aid ; yes, some laws are outrageously it is a microcosm of the problems that have beset our society. archaic; and the formalism of ~ Canadian laws would astonish I Iam not offering any dramatic lawyers from other countries. solutions but rather I think it is Who can change all this? The important to recognize that the problems are best twoAgovenments. Who is then the _ -_ of our - society dealt with through compassion - ass?T Perhaps Munro wishes to reand understanding. eonsider his rash accusations of The educational system that breeds alienation and factional2 a fine profession which has usually made the last stand against ism is doing little towards this end. , dictatorships and suppression . and where individual members BERNARD GLICK have not been afraid to take on _ grad chemistry an unpopular cause. ’ I _ Fereral minister and

sland---”

health Munro

and welfare has maligned, AL,

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nrof ession. It has always been a cheap trick of politicans to seek< favor with the majority by deriding and slandering a minority group, be it a religious group, a racial or ethnic group, a profession or any other minority group. The difference between a statesman and a politician is mainly one of- quality. The politician has generally a poor image, while the statesman has outgrown an opportunistic need to please. Munro .. . . is a politician, s-w..I I and . .. a well paid one. With a fantastic

B.W. BAUMGARTEL New Westminster, B.C.

Cur owners not urnuse& symphtiny stiikefs-sticker Would the S.O.B. who has invested himself with the ‘divine right to plaster “Toronto symphony” stickers on other people’s cars please have the guts to identify himself. Whole hordes of parking lot users, although they may support this concert, do object to having to remove the blasted stickers afterwards. Hoping to see you after the concert with a pail of water’ and some soap, I remain, Pissed off JOHN PARSONS friday

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17october

1969 (lo:231

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’ “All I ask is that, in the midst of a murderous world, we agree to reflect on murder and to make a choice.” -Albert The above is taken from an essay about war, in particular about the second world war. Even then, war threatened again. Thirty million fresh corpses lie around us, This is the text of Walter Klaassen ‘s speech at Wednesday’s anti-war mor’ \ atorium. Klaassen is chaplain at Conrad Grebet college and is a professor of religious studies at the university.

he says. In another war it would be three hundred million. Now it may seem strange to a group of people like this to be asked to reflect about murder and make a choice. Have we not made a choice? Is it not clear from our record as a people that we are for law and order: Do we not faithfully support a system in which the murderer gets his just desserts? Did we not help to keep capital punishment on the statute books? We don’t let people get away with murder. We have made a choice and resolutely oppose murder. And yet supposing we said this, we would not have begun to come to terms with Camus’ request, for it is an extremely difficult exercise to which he calls us, and if we really take him seriously and actually reflect on murder, we will find ourselves facing questions we may have answered, but without really thinking about it. . A community is quick to render harmless in haste a murderer in their midst, but what about armies of men bent on murder and supplied with weaponry to make their slaughter quickly and efficiently? Why is it almost impossible to move people to act against war, not only by refusing to participate but actively working against it for peace? I believe it is because we have not begun to reflect on I murder. Here are five reasons why we do not readily do this. For most of us, war is far away, we know nothing about it personally, and we find it hard to accept personal responsibility to do something about a conflict on the other side of the world in which our country is in no way directly involved. It does not concern us. And yet if we agree to reflect on murder we will discover that to think that a distant war is of no concern to us is to live under an extremely dangerous illusion. We can no longer separate ourselves from any segment of the world. Unless a solution can-be found, the Vietnam war could still escalate into a nuclear war. We do not reflect on murder because we do not believe that killing in war is murder. We say that the men in uniform who kill do so not from a desire to kill but because they are ordered to do so in the context of a larger issue. We say the soldier is not responsible and therefore any killing he does is not murder. Murder is killing with a desire to do so. But does the soldier have no choice at all? It was a basic principle of the prosecution at the Nuremburg war crimes trial that men, including military men, are responsible for their actions. By our own rules applied in judging others it seems clear, therefore, that the soldier has a choice, thus his will to kill constitutes murder. The readiness to kill is at least some-

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times more than mere obedience as was clearly demonstrated for us in Beryl Fox’s documentary The mills of the gods, where we actually heard the pilot of a bomber expresswith the greatest satisfaction that he enjoyed killing as many Viet tong as possible. This point could be documented many times over. Therefore, if we take seriously what in North American culture has been emphasized as the pillar of democracy, namely the real possibility of making personal choices, then we are forced to say that anyone who engages in war commits murder because he does so on his own choice. We find it almost impossible to reflect on war as murder -because bf the mystique that we have woven around it. Probably none of us whose heart has not beat high at some time because of a description of an act of war, be it only Tennyson’s Charge

of the light brigade.

The books we used in public school and the ones we borrowed from the public library all drew us at one point or another into the power and sorcery of this mystique. Power, noise, rolling drums, imperious trumpets, color, drama-all of which we have then seen repeatedly with our own eyes at the memorial parades on november 11. Who can remain unmoved at the playing of the last post-Yes, it captures us. Worse than that, we have been caught up entirely in an ancient notion, much fostered in the nineteenth century, that war is noble, that it calls for a heroism that brings out manly qualities of courage, discipline and fortitude. It calls for the readiness to sacrifice all that o’ne has, even life itself. While we emphasize the virtues of war we close our eyes to the cost-which is that war produces insensitivity in men, brutality, carelessness about life. .Jt ma-

tures all those dark impulses within us that cause the grief and destruction among men. But the cost to the one participating is only a part of the cost. He at least can defend himself. But nowdays when thirty helpless tribesmen suffer a ghastly death in napalm and burning grass huts all’ we can say is, “just one of those things that happen in war. ” Who can measure the depth of irresponsibility in that callous cold-blooded statement? That is the way we put out of mind the limitless grief of the mother who has just seen her innocent children roasted alive before her very eyes. Ernest Hepingway put it clearly and forcefully : “They wrote in the old days that it is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country. But in modern war there is nothing sweet or fitting in your dying. You will die like a dog for no good reason.” It is because of the mystique of glory and virtue that surrounds war that we cannot conceive of it as murder. Only a shattering of all these hellish illusions will bring us on the way to reflect on murder. Another important reason why we resist reflecting on war as murder is the view we take of the enemy. Rarely in the history of warfare has the enemy been considered noble. Not only that, rarely has he been given the status of a human being. For the Greeks and the Romans, all outsiders were barbarians. For the Jews, all outsiders were Gentiles. For the Christians in America, Britain and France, the Germans were huns or blonde beasts. For the Christians in Germany, ,a11 Jews and Slaves were sub-human types. For the Americans in Vietnam, the Viet Cong are yellow vermin, and for the rest of us at home, all Asiatics are the “yellow peril”. The enemy is not regarded as human,

Camus

and therefore, killing him cannot be called murder. If they are not persons with names and individuals but featureless replicas of one another, as we tend to think especially of the Chinese today, then we can talk about killing. but hardly murder. Why for example was such an effort put forth to rescue white missionaries in the Congo, while no similar effort was made to rescue a much larger number of blackskinned men, women and children who were repeatedly in similar extremity? Why has there been no military action against Rhodesia when it is predictable that, were the color roles reversed, action would have been swift and ruthless? Is it not because whites would be fighting whites ? We do not seriously believe that people with different skin color and, to us, strange facial features, people speaking a different language from ours, and carrying an alien flag and giving loyalty to different political traditions are human in the way we are human, and therefore we cannot conceive of killing them as murder. This is a malady that affects all men and Mennonites represent no exception to this in any way, even though we claim to know better. Is it any wonder that we find it hard to reflect on murder? . And finally we find it difficult to reflect on murder becquse it forces into our quiet, rich, full lives an unwelcome and most annoying intrusion. We do not want to be bothered, not only because we find it distasteful, but because we know that if we begin to reflect on it, it will cost us something. We know that never again will we be able to enjoy what we have all by: ourselves, for we will be conscious of the hungry and the persecuted and the dying and the maimed and the wasted in body and in spirit. They will be with us at the table and in our living rooms in the quiet of the evening and in our visions in the night-time. But we want to be alone: and we are prepared to see whole nations atrociously put to death by someone else in order that we may be alone. That is why we are not readily prepared to reflect on murder. The legitimacy of murder and the view that human life is trifling-this, says Camus, “is the great political question of our times, and before dealing with other issues one must take a position on it. But before anything can be done, two questions must be put: ‘Do you or do you not, directly or indirectly, want to be killed or assaulted? Do you or do you not, directly or indirectly, want to kill or assault?’ All wl-10 say no to both these questions are automatically committed” to think out the consequences of this answer. I have attempted to show what some of these consequences are: l The recognition that the world is one community ; @ The rejection of all ideas or theologies that obscure the central issue, of the value of human beings ; l The utter abjuration of the mystique of the glory and virtue of war ; @ The unqualified recognition that all men are human like we; @ The renunciation of our desire to be alone in this world. If we can face these consequences, we have begun to reflect on war, and we have begun to make our contribution to the end that man may prevail.


Mystifying

,

the red horde

There are still people who be- it has for delivery even smaller. lieve that the United States is Nixon continually refers to the a& making a great sacrifice in Viet- ~ growing power, belligerent nam to save freedom and demo- tude and increasing aggressivecracy from the great red Chinese ness of China, when China’s horde. only real interest in southeast It is immaterial to such people Asia is access by trade to its rice. that there are no Chinese troops in Vietnam, or that if the United In the name of freedom, the U.S. backs corrupt oligarchies States and its allies left Vietnam there would be a quick end to in the fringe countries. In the less than totally corrupt governwar and no aggression. This theory ignores the real ments, senate majority leader Mike Mansfield found recently lack of military forces o,r desire to use such forces on the part of “there was little expression of fear in any of the countries visited the Chinese. The entire Chinese gross na- of an attack or invasion from tional product in equivalent buy- China. ” ing power is less than the U.S. But according to a paraphrase of a quote in the New York Times, spends on its military. Nixon “is convinced China has in uniform barely that the way to avoid becoming involved more than three times the nuiber of men the United States is in another war in Asia is for the United States to continue to play currently maintaining on China’s a significant role” in Asia. ’ fringes. Keep the horde myth alive by China’s nuclear force is a mere token-its stock of bombs is sending troops in ready to fight the Chinese horde. small and the number of vehicles

Students

right when right

withdraw their services in large Student participation in decision making has always been tolerated numbers if the science society as long as it is meaningless, and had requested that? The answer is an obvious no. occasionally encouraged when it chairman Noel Hynes can be used to advantage by the Biology said in his memo (see page 1) people who run the place. The science society, it seems, that he is “in entire agreement decided it opposed the objectives with this stand against dictatorof the group proposing a campus ship from the left.” from the right moratorium to protest the VietDictatorship or the center or whatever the nam war. First of all, there are the other side is called is alright questions of who the science though. society is or represents (it was Anyone who disagreed with almost dead not too long ago) Hynes had the privilege of telling what type of meeting actually him this in a ten-minute meeting made the decision in the name of at 5pm last friday. One other thing that is amusing science students and whether is Hynes’ statement about findthe meeting at which the decision ing a substitute. Say the science was made was publicized. But the main consideration is society demanded that all faculty try to be good teachers. Would one of using the proper-channel substitutes for student viewpoint to further the Hynes arrange ideological ends of the elite in those who aren’t? . Not likely, because he’d probably have to the science faculty. The obvious question is, would substitute with the faculty members who participated in the antithe dean and department chairmen even allow the faculty to war moratorium.

More Gazette than Mao The Gazette quoted Chairman Mao on Wednesday, but not in the process of observing the antiwar moratorium or an other noble purpose. The quote was rather a. filler that attempted a legitimate law and ordersmall number There are a society who, of people in our disregarding the public interest, We do wilful/y break the law. not propose to let these people On the contrary, have their way. proper legal action must be taken against them. It would run counter to the popular will if they were not punished.

While

we agree

with

Mao on

that one, the kind of laws he is referring to are not in any way similar to the ones the Gazette probably would like to se’e enforced. Mao was referring to offences against people more than property. And in reply, we offer the Gazette the following quote from the people’s philosopherOur duty is to hold ourselves responsible to the people. Every word, every act and every policy must conform to the people‘s interests, and if mistakes occur, they must be corrected-that is what being responsible to the people means.

It’s eminentlv Suddenly, for no apparent reason, an open meeting of the presidential search and nominating committee is called on four days’notice. According to the press release, “the purpose of the meeting will be to discuss the draft of the procedures the committee proposes to follow in its continuing deliberations. ” But the draft procedures are no thing new. The same basic material was published in the Gazette’s freshman special a month and a half ago. The only new thing added is the tentative decision of the committee to have the “guests” give addresses in a particular place (the arts theater) and at a particular time (one hour at four o’clock in the afternoon). This attention to detail is ridiculous considering there haven’t even been any visits announced for “guests” yet. And what purpose is there in having an open meeting to discuss time and place of prospects who haven’t been named yet? The real purpose will probably turn out to be that there aren’t any “guests” coming-no serious prospects for the administration presidency anyway. The reason for the hurriedly called open meeting of a committee{ that has been meeting in secret is to create an illusion of activity -in reply to charges that the whole procedure is a sham and the result a foregone conclusion. Chevron columnist Knowlton Collister has been predicting

J

ridiculous

for some time and with reasonable proof that Howard Petch will be “drafted” for the job and he will “reluctantly” accept it. Senior faculty and administrators who run this institution admit among themselves that Petch is the man and have been playing the charade accordingly. One other item gives away the frantic nature of the con;mittee’s plans. Their statement of draft procedures to be discussed in this morning’s meeting contains a glaring error that gives away their game. “When all of its guests have indicated to the committee their final decision that they are bl are not interested in the office of president, the committee will then recommend a nominee to the senate and the board of gov,ernors . ’ ’ The committee’s terms of reference, as the committee would know if they were seriously searching for a president, says they are to recommend two to four candidates for the senate to express a preference and the board to decide. The committee may well have “several eminent individuals (who) have responded favorably to its inquiries and have indicateh an interest in further discussions with the committee” We will, however, be surprised if any candidates the committee has found sufficiently eminent (other than Petch, who is not currently a candidate) are seriously considering the administration presidency. ’

Canadian University Press (CUP) member, Underground Syndicate (UPS) member, Liberation News Service (LNS) and Chevron International News Service (GINS) subscribers. The Chevron is published tuesdays and fridays by the publications board of the Federation of Students (inc.), University of Waterloo. Content is independent of the publications board, the student council and the university administration. Offices in the campus center, phone (519) 578-7070 or university local 3443; telex 0295-748; circulation 12,500; editor-in-chief - Bob Verdun. Someday soon we’ll get orgelized. Lost in this issue’s confusion: Pete Marshall, Brenda Wilson, Andy Tamas, Bill Webb, Jim Bowman, David Rees-Thomas because he felt guilty about eating our pizza, Marty Noval, Una O’Callaghan, Renato Ciolfi, Wayne Smith, Anita Levine, Brian Soucie, Nigel Burnett, Brian Light, Tom Purdy, Jeff Bennett, Ales Xmith, dumdum jones, Jim Klinck, Allan Class, Wayne Bradley, Jay Pero, David X, Louis Tucker, Andre kelanger, Bob Epp Bob Epp Bob Epp because he works so hard and we forget him so frequently, Stevie Izma, Al Lukachko, George Tuck, Bruce Meharg, Carol Tuchlinsky we forgot last time too, Ross jock,Taylor was around but didn’t do much, and a hithere Stevie Ireland wherever you are. I n case you’re wondi ering, Knowlton Collister won’t stoop to allow his name in this list, but he said don’t forget to hassle the presidential search committee at 11 this morning in the B.S. room.

friday

17 october

7969 (70-23)

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Reality Hollow eyes, Stare UP In some defoliated rice field, Somewhere,nowhere. Red sores itch, A white carcass, Under a greedy blue sky. Yankee commando, And\commie rat, Grind the churn Of human swill. Red faced execs., Laugh in glee, In dollar signs, In revenge, At Wall Street Journals. The generation gap, Is laid to rest, In some defoliated rice field, Somewhere,nowhere. By jealous old men. O,, country, Our world, Right or wrong, Or in flames, Or never. Screaming voices, Drift silently, To police barricades, And bloody wooden phallus, And economy size cans of mace. Red teeth, Clench barbed wire, Puked up, â&#x20AC;&#x2122; By the Savior, Of mankind, I And animal kind, And no-kind. -Dean

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,Barner

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1969-70_v10,n23_Chevron