Issuu on Google+

Mcrutiou president Steve Ireland voted for repvesen tation y population for seats on student council.

This unidentified student voted to allow Renison and other minority constituencies to keep their seats. Chevron photo by Reinhard Opitz

~wer perverts by Ken Fraser Chevron staff

What has one head, two arms, two two ears and votes 134 times? An election rigger?-Nope. Boss Tweed?-Wrong again. It’s Chalmers Adams, Renison’s council rep. With 134 proxy votes in his backpocket Adams commanded a majority at Monday’s general meeting. The pocketful of proxies allowed him to successfully beat back a motion which would have abolished Renison’s seat. Much of the business passed with no opposition. The meeting approved bylaws on board structure, referendums and ------------_----__________ legs,

editorial ---------__-__--____-------

Page 75

general meetings of the Federation of Students. The only departure from the rubberstamp routine was a motion by Stewart Saxe, external chairman, to leave the name of the literary journal up to the editor. The meeting decided to keep the nameLiontayles +nd Saxe’s motion was defeated. The item which brought Renison’s proxies to the meeting was proposed amendment to bylaw one on distribution of student-council seats. The motion, introduced by Bob Verdun, civil 2A, provided for aggregating constituencies if they do not warrant a seat under representation by population. At present this means 280 students for each full seat. Renison has only 77 students. The other constituency which might have lost its seat is architecture. The change would not have taken effect till next election in any case. There were no architecture proxies at the meeting because ti but one of the 34 architecture students are off campus on work term. The one architecture student working on campus is Martin Ward. After the meeting he commented, ‘(It doesn’t really bother me. Soon we’re going to have enough people anyhow, so we can wait until then.” Verdun explained his motion was intended to correct certain deficiencies in the bylaws which allowed for unfair representation. He used the University of British Columbia% experience to illustrate. At UBC each school or faculty has one representative-frolm the 85 librarianship

students to the 4$l&member arts faculty. Efforts have been made to change this setr up but the special interest groups have control and block an attempted reform. Verdun warned there will soon be more small schools on campus and urged that his amendment be passed before the situation becomes impossible. Federation president Steve Ireland proposed splitting the motion into two. The first part of the motion would then grant a seat to groups entitled to a fraction of a seat greater than a half. This would correct a situation like math which is presently entitled to 4.8 seats, but only gets four. Ireland supported this but opposed the second part of Verdun’s motion which would group small constituencies like Renison and architecture with larger groups. Ireland spoke highly of the contribution which had come from Renison citing such people as Tom Patterson andstewart Saxe. He said everyone identifies with his academic unit and feels it is his home base to some extent. This feeling, Ireland believes, should be recognized by thefederation. Decisions on council aren’t made by representatives voting on behalf of their constituency, but by people who areworking for the best for allstudents,according to Ireland. Verdun launched into a loud rebuttal, charging Renison 44couldn9t give an hour of their time to present their case but let their, baby sitter come instead.” Adams objected on a point of personal privilege and Verdun was ruled out of order. The ruling was challenged. Verdun was supported by a majority of thosepre sent but Adams used his 134 proxies to have him overruled. Adams defended Renison’s right to a seta saying t?& is a federation of students and federation implies representation of units. Contributions are made by units and Renison has made some quite exceptional contributions to the university. “1 ask only. the status quo.” Dave Blaney, arts 2, disagreed. C’Their contribution must have been rather thin if a change in a council seat is going to change their contribution.” In the final voting, Adams’ proxies were used to pass the first part of Verdun’s motion and to defeat the second

rep by pop

part. The vote on the second part, counting proxies, was 104 in favor and 149 opposed. By the time the vote was taken members of EngSoc A had collected 48proxies and these were being exercisedinaddition to the 134 held by Adams. The defeat of the second part of Verdun’s motion produced an anomalous situ% tion which was not readily recognized. The first part of the motion had deleted cehin sections of the bylaws. Because the second part of the motion was defeated these sections were left blank. The effective result of this passage and defeat was to exclude Renison and architecture of any representation at the next seat redistribution. Ireland then introduced a motion to restore seats to Renison and architecture but speaker Jim Lindsey ruled him out of order on the grounds that bylaw six prohibited bringing up unannounced motions. However Adams used his proxies to again overrule the speaker and the motion was allowed. At this point, Verdun conceded defeat

and urged passage of the motion saying, “No representation is worse than unfair representation.” In the aftermath of the great debate two motions passed quietly. One was another motion of Verdun’s removing the restriction that no group could hold more than half of the council seats. The last motion, put forward by Brian Clark, arts 3, makes it now possible for the Chevron editor to come from another campus. Previously, applicants for the position had to be members of thefederation at time of appointment. After the meeting, Lindsey commented that bylaw six seems useless. “The bylaw is supposed to keep people from bringing up unannounced business, but now anyone can bring up new business by getting the speaker overruled.?’ Orlin Wood, the federation% lawyer, refused to comment on the conduct of the meeting. He did offer the legal opinion that the general meeting is the ultimate governing body of a corporation and the aourts would not interfere in their internal affa.irs.

You can ‘t see the votes but there they are. Of course Chalmers Adams, Renison rep, looks calm cool, collected and confident. With his I34 proxy votes he had Monday’s general meeting in the bag.


Interviews

for

SUMMER SALES EMPLOYMENT

back

and

Petch

University president LG. Hagey is easing himself back into that big swivel chair behind the walnut desk on the library’s fourth floor, “1 expect to be able to return to my office work on a fairly regular basis from now on and will gradually take up the responsibilities that were transferred to Dr. (Howard) Petch as acting president,” Hagey said. Hagey has been on leav+? of ab= sence since late November for therapy following throat surgery.

with

urseries Limited will

Magey’s

be held

is glud

He has learned esophageal speech, whereby air is swallowed and released from the stomach instead of the lungs to speak. Dr. Petch academic vicepresi-

dent, will continue as acting pre sident until Hagey is cc?nfident enough of his health to take over the full job. ‘*I’ll be glad to see him back,” said Dr. Petch, rushing between a budget meeting and a long-dis-

tance phone worn out .”

call.

rc19m getting

Thursday, February 29th , Student See Placement

office

for

interviews,

m3Y

DNFECTIONERY

FAMOUS

time

Hem

FOR CHINESE

LICENSED

and

UNDER

TAKE

FOOD

LCBO

OUT

AND

E: 742 - 4488,

CUISINE

RENOVATED

King

St.

RESERVATIONS

team takes fifth Grant Gordon, poli-sci 3, andRick Powell, arts 1, formed the affirm-= ative team, while Joe Surlch,polisci 3 1 and ,F ritz Stoecker , history 2, took the negative, Sue Surich, grad English, was the judge for UofW. The topic of debate was “The United States should adopt a policy of isolationism,”

The house of debates from the University of Waterloo placed fifth in competition with 40 other teams at the McGill debating tournament this past weekend.

N. Phone

faculty and staff members willing to speak on the U of W or a variety of other subjects. “Why is the investment market like a gambling casino?” or “The postglacial flora of Ontario peatbogs and muskeg,” are among topics to entice prospective donars o Bruce Marr of the board of governors is in charge of arranging speakers a He assured the Chevron, in response to last week’s editorial, that all board members are behind the fund 100 percent, and that their personal contributions have been in for several weeks.

742 - 4489.

Tuking 100

murr donors

$ impresses

The half-million-dollar student gift to the Tenth Anniversity fund impresses and surprises prospective donors B Murray Davidson, head of the ,university’s fund drive, says there is a good response in Toronto, London, Montreal and the’ K-W area. SO far $1,758,427 has been collected--nearly a third of the $5 ,Overall the 500.000 objective, drive is going well. Any organization can obtain an afterdinner speaker through the There are over 70 fund office.

)N1Ezw AND AMERICAN

RECENTLY

ORDERS

WON

place

742-1351

Teams from Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Western, Brown, and RMC were among those ampeting.

$200

REPRESENTING

OF

24 BUILDERS

BETTER

for

your

work

Electrical engineers - here’s your chance to win up to $200, Papers on any topic related to electrical engineering -- work reports, theses, anything--can be submitted up to the U of W branch of th6 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Papers must be in by March 4.

HOMES.

The winning paper will be entered in a national competition wfth winners from other schools. Waterloo placed second in last year’s contest, For more information contact Prof. G. Dufault, of the electrical engineering department, local 3343.

SHIRT CORNER

LAUNDERERS KING AND UNIVERSITY 10% Student Discount

report

kgel’s

UNIVERSITY

sucked

and Suxe is named

Stewart Saxe has been appointed e&or-in-chief of the Chevron. The appointment takes effect

BILLIARD

May Nagel

University LADIES

and

King

WELCO’ME

Confectionery

Previous Wednesday

- TV

I

Phone

and Duke

KING

Streets

742-1404

Kitchener

KERNEL CORN 6 14 oz. tins $1.00

Valu

,...I...

2

- Phone

A subscription

482

The CHEVRON

class

mail

fee by

the

included Port

their department,

annual

1n applying for editor, Stewart Saxe said he had some new approaches. Youthful ideas perhaps?

Dragon Chinese FROZEN DINNERS. . .I4 oz. tin 65c

743-1651 in

Office

editor the

Jim world.

meeting

student

fees

entitles

Ottawa,

and

for

U of payment

W

students

to

of

portage

in cash.

receive

the Send

Chevron addresr

by changes

mail

pre-Chevron

during

of&campus

promptly

to:

terms. The

Chevron,

photo by Stew’s

Non-students: University

$4 of

Waterloo,

annually.

POP

Authorised Waterloo,

of everyone

“I’m worried about people who think XT1 walk in and t&e over as a dictator. Not only wouldn’t I d0 that but it is against all my principles and anyone who worked with me on Orientation 67 knows it.*’ The present Chevron staff voted to choose Saxe and the board of pubs agreed.

Ontario

Top

SQUARE

into

to the board

the present policy having a say.

& UNIVERSITY

Top Valu FRUIT JUICES . . . . . . D.. 3 48 oz. tins $1.00

WATERLOO

out

Saxe and the only other candidate, Dale Martin, poll-sci 2, answered questions from the staff of the Chevron. On staff partlcipation in editorial policy-making, Saxe said he intended to continue

Open Daily 8 to Midnight Sunday 10 till Midnight

Ontario

steps

In his application to the board of publications Saxe, poli-sci 3, stressed his experience with university student affairs and newspaper work.

ACADEMY

Corner

1 when present

as Ontario.

second-


New exec mixes the old and i7e.w In &wing contrast to Monday’s 67 council. He was one of Steve general meeting, another part of IreIar@s special appointments last the federation% business was quiyear. etiy transacted Tuesday night. Bhey is the only other returnThe 1968-69 council held its ing member. He inaugural meeting primarily to took over when ratify the president-elect’ s nom& Paul Olinski reinations for executive positions, signed The executive for the new counp t&e-arts chaircil year are Tom Patterson, hisman last summer. tory 2, vicepresident; Joe Givens, Joe Givens was mech 3B, treasurer; Dave Young, a lowly member of grad poli-sci, external-relations council last yeas: chairman; Dave Blaney, history 2, but he seems to be creative-arts chairman; Geoff coming math I, ,Moir, qticw. board of publicaCalvert, Moir and Koval are all tions; John Koval, new to council though not to student sWstics 3, studCalvert has been active ent-activitie s activities. chairman, and Ian on the quaIity of education commitCalvert, physics 3 tee, Koval is a Circle K member from way back re executive officer. the joint math fap John Worden, poculty-student lbsci 3, was ap commlttee, Koval Dave Young pointed speaker. is a Circle K After a lot of work and help Iler member from way was able to come up with an amazingly experienced exec board in back recently active on the joint view of what was available. math faculty-&lYoung brings extensive training dent committee to council. In past years he has and Moir hasbeen 1 served as chairman of the boardof Geoff Moir active in commustudent activities--he was the first nications research. one--and of the board of external On council two years In keeping with past Custom, relations. before even Iler, Young spent the Brian Iler moved the appointment 1966-67 year as of executives, read their ap~lic* vicepresident of sons and each was ratified unanithe Canadian Unimously without debate. on of Students. The new executive board, along Patterson is next on the list of with the new council, will assume responsibilities. Monold-timers. This federation day at the annual joint meeting. will be his third Following a banquet the Ireland consecutive year council will officially turn its conon the execboard. Joe Wvens Speaker of the 6& trol over to Iler’s group.

President-elect Brian Iler mixed experiences with some hidden new talent to jill the 1968-69 executive board. Only two of the seven named were voting members of council.

Federation

flunks

by Bob Verdun Chevron staff

The faculty has flunked its midterm in parking-if student council’s discussion on Monday is any indication. In reporting the operations council decision to abolish parking fees, federation president SteveIreland asked council either to reaffirm or rewrite its standing policy of making users pay for parking “as long as the cost is publicly justified.” Ireland first pointed out that faculty have the majority of members on the operations council. Reading from operations’ minutes he pointed out some of the fallacies. The faculty brief claimed fee collection was inefficient. However, university accountant Arthur Headlam said the costs of collecting the parking fees were negligible. According toIreland,poli-sciprof DonEpstein felt there was even more than the principle involved and had called the parking fee a financial hardship on some faculty members. In contrast, federation business manager Peter Yates said after tne meeting that heconsidered the $2 a month fee an $8 a month raise after working downtown where parking costs were $10 a month. The main contention with the faculty Posi~on was the ‘pruning of security costs’ which would

the faculty

come about if the parking fee were abolished. Ireland interpreted the action as making parking -open to anyone, including students, on a-first-come, first-serve basis. Reservation would requirepaying a fee to cover security. The result as one onlooker remarked would be a new game of ring-around-the-ring-road as drivers looked for a choice space. This was the general feeling of the council, and even Provost Bill Scott concurred that the faculty would not like losing their priority in location. The discussion dragged along until external chairman Stewart Saxe attempted to finish debate. 4dWe have better things to do than talk about parking. If the faculty wants to waste their time, it% their probleMhe student council is more intelligent than that.” Council reaffirmed its position that users should pay for parking. They passedafurther motion _ stating conditions under which they would accept the operations council% decision. Only if all forms of reserved parking were ended would student council accept the abolishment of parking fees. The motion will be sent to operations council, whose original decision is still awaiting action from the president’s council.

Trimesters not paying by Ken Fraser Chevron staff

The University of Guelph wants two and a half million dollars. Their trimester system has run into financial problems although it has been an unqualified success academically. But because of small summer enrollment this term‘ running the program cost more than was brought in by tuition fees and govr ernment grants. Last summer only 600 students were on campus making many of the classes very small. Operats ional costs were not met. Guelph’s academic vicepresident Dr. Bert Mathews said the university will have about 1200 students this summer term. However this will not be enough to make ends meet. Only in 1971 when the summer student population reaches 2000 will the budget balance. Former U of W registrar Al

Weekend

Gordon, now assistant to the deputy minister of university affairs, said Guelph’s third semester would be more costly until it was fully operational. He admitted that Guelph’s request for two and a dollars I4 seems half million rational enough to me.” Other sources indicated that the government would probably be re+&ant to depart from its formal unitgrant system. If the government played favorites with Guelph, other universities would be sure to complain. U of W would be among the first to scream. Although Waterloo does operate all summer it isn’t squeezed financially because not all courses are offered. U of W academic vicepresident Howard Petch confirmed Waterloo is not in the same pc sition as Guelph. “For a trimester system to be

events

slashed

Because of student apathy, several of the events planned for Math Weekend have been cancelled, said Gary Stevason, math 3A, at the MathSoc council meeting this week. The most important event to be thrown out was the student-faculty banquet and semiformal planned for Saturday night. A grand total of fourteen student couples had bought tickets as of Tuesday evening, and mathsoc council faced with a financial loss, was forced to cancel. In its place an animal dance with the Brass Union will be held at Caesar’s Forum. Other activities cut were a tlddleywinks tournament, a faculty-student hockey game, and a skating carnival. Refunds are available _-at the Federation office.

economically feasible you need a large student body or you have to phase the students as we do with the co-op program.” In a study he did at McMaster several years ago Petch discovm ered it would be fiscal suicide for McMaster to institute the trimesl ter program unless its enrolment was 8,000. Guelph currently has 4,300 students. Petch conjectured the government had encouraged Guelph to undertake the trimester program and was thus somewhat obligated to support it. This was confirmed by an editor of the Ontarion, Guelph’s student newspaper. He said the pro= fin&al cabinet was committed to the trimester program and them iversity administration was confb dent the government would extend some sort of assistance.

by MathSoc

In another exchange, mathsoc council defeated a motion by president Jim Belfry concerning compulsory fees. Belfry reported that he, BrianIler, presidentelect of the Federation and the 0the.r four society presidents had agreed on a compulsory fee levy. There would be no avenue for refunds. After debate council adopted an amended motion by Doug Yonson, math lB, that would provide a method of refund. *** Elections for the 196&69 MathSoc council will be held March 6. Voting will be computerized; the ballot consisting of a mark-sense sheet. Nominations are open until 5 pm Wednesday andforms can be obtained from the Federation office.

Smallwood’s university has got its man in our Dr. Charles Preston. He’s joining Memorial U in late summer.

Prestom

heads

Sergeant Preston always got his man but it looks like Joey got our Preston. U of W’s chief headshrinker, Dr, Charles Preston, has resigned as head of counselling services. He will end three years of service in August and join Memorial Univer sity of Newfoundland in St. John%. Preston isgoing to Memorial be cause he feels that university has a more positive approach to counselling.** He says he willbe happy to get away from the constant fight for funds. Last fiscal year, the university refused to expand counselling services. Following a suicide on campus and a student-council motion calling for policy review, consent was finally given for an increase, but only proportional to Friday,

for Nfld

increased enrollment, Preston has considered leaving before, but Provost Bill Scott said 441 don’t think anyone can say Pre ston is leaving the university because he didn’t get the budget he asked for. I think It’s mainly the offer he got from Memorial.” The problem, however, did not seem to be Preston’s salary but the general lack of funds forcounselllng services. It is believed that Scott privately shares similiar worries, according to a Fedem tion of Students spokesman. In Newfoundland Dr. Preston will plan a preliminary year for the island’s sole university so students from the pre-university system, run totally by religious organizations, will have adequate prepare tion. February

23, 7968 (8: 32) 1483

3


Museum

features

bids,

snakes, rocks Good news for animal, bird, snake and rock lovers. The University of Waterloo has a museum of natural science. The museum is devoted to two main areas of science-biology and earth sciences. The biology section features 20 stuffed animals including a snowy owl, lemming andporcupine, 60 skeletons including that of a moose, a seven foot snake and an elephant’s skull. Also on display are a whale foetus, 50 species of preserved snakes, fish, moths, butterflies, poisonous insects and reptiles. The earth sciences section includes samples of rocks, minerals and fossils. “It is hoped that the museum will prove useful to students, particularly those infirstand second year,” said John Sapwell+ curator of the museum. ‘*A student can drop in at any time during the day and reexamine some of the things he has been working with in class,butin a more careful and time consuming manner.” Most of the items on display are the property of the university and have been collected in connection with teaching and research projects over the years. There has been a rapid building up of specimens within the faculty of science within the past two or three years. A few of the items are on loan, from such places asthe Royal Ontario Museum.

Elephant bones .from Ceylon (left) are one of the displays in the new Museum of natural sciences.

Cathy Schiel admires the bison skeleton featured‘in

Careers

the museum. Among the other displays are butterflies

HAMILTON

in Teaching

BOARDof EDUCATION

with

An expanding system requires secondary school teachers in most subject areas. We are particularly interested in applications from prospective teachers of math and science. Representatives of the Hamilton Board of Education will be on campus to interview grad students on

THE BOARD QF EDUCATION, CITY OF LONDON THE LONDON GRADUATES INTERESTED

BOARD OF EDUCATION INVITES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO IN DISCUSSING TEACHING The

Secondary

interviews Again this the Ontario

year the London school trustee’s

schools with

PROSPECTIVE WHO ARE

MON., FEB. 26, 1968

to preliminary We invite you of the registrar:

its representatives.

board will adhere to the code of ethetics council in hiring teachers for September

of 1968.

February 29, 196

ursday, from

10 a.m.

in Chem-Biology Suptof Director

484 The CHEVRON

Secondary of Education.

Schools

to 4 p.m. Room

to arrange

Mr. D.A. Cooper Superintendant

n

I.R. Sanderson, W.D. Sutton,

and the cast of a 100 million year-old dinosaur egg.

an interview

of Secondary

Mr. C.T. Chairman,

Lowe, QC. Board of Education

Mr. G.E. Director

Price of Education

on 252 Dr. S.G.

French,

chairman

with

Schools

the office


GRAD BALL 68 TICKETS

ON SALE

Feb. 26 - March

1

only SPONSORED STUDENT FEDERATION

The weekend in the woods-billed as an informal seminar-turned strong New Left point while Audrey Lasichuk (left) kibbitzes.

A weak by Brian

otit to be just that. Ron-Rumm

Chevron staff

Ever spent two days trying to argue logically with a living brick wall or tried to reason with som+ one who believes everything you say is complete nonsense? If you had been at the Weekend in the Woods seminar you would realize the total frustration this. can create. The original purpose of the weekend was to allow an intelligent exchange of ideas and concepts among the students. What actually happened was comparable to a freewheeling personal fight involving personalities rather than politics. A group of active students represex#ng the poIiticaI left had intended to use the meeting as a sounding board for their policies. But alI it took was strong oppow ition from one representing the extreme political right to crack the board over the frustrated leftist heads. From that point on aH efw forts were concentrated in trying to banish the rightest from group discussions. On every topic presented, the

extremeist’s contradictory views were clearly heard. In view of this ulceration it is surprising t&t any conclusions were reached. University Services such as the book store, library and physical plant and planning came under the greatest fire. The conclusions reached on these included: 40 student run operation should be ,condemned by the administration because of competition with an enterprise such as the university-run book store. -the library should be stocked with books before money is spent on such things as a faculty club. -PP&P should not be permitted to hold a monopoly on repairs but rather establish a competetive system which would effectively lower prices. Other points were brought out during the debate with membersof the faculty. Prof. Robert Hudgins of them eng seemed dismayed by students who take professorial word as law. “A professor% job is to set up a critical attitude, not to mold stu-

What sort of information on library useful to include, in your opinion?

This Summer? Find Out Why live

service

would

You Should At

THE CO-OP PHONE: 745-2664 Or

be most

WRITE: WCRI

You can assist us to plan this programme by completing questionnaires which are-available now in the Circulation Depar tmen ts of bo th libraries.

139 UNIVERSITY

AVE. W.,

WATERLOO

ic

r

I MONDAY 6:00 - 11300 pm CE 2532 SSc. 132 ssc. 354 ssc. 355 SSc, 228 EL 208 EL 209 ML 216 ML 232 ML 236 ML 334 MC 1052

(41) (25) (22) (24) (19) (30) (30) (16) (17) (15) (17) (60)

TUESDAY 6:00 - 1l:OO pm

WEDNESDAY 6:OO - 1l:OO pm

CE 3517 (45) ML ,232 (17) SSc. 302 (12) EL 211 (96) ML 334 (17) ML 338 (16) MC 1052 (60)

CE CE SSc. ssc. EL EL ML ML MC

3517 3518 228 301 106 208 236 311 1052

(45) (54) (19) (14) (32) (30) (15) (18) (60)

FRIDAY 6:OO - 1l:OO pm CE 2531 (41) CE 2532 (41) ssc. 210 (17) SSc. 225, (14) SSc. 228 (19) SSc. 355 (24) Sk. 357 (24) EL 106 (32) EL 208 (30) EL 209 (30) ML 216 (16) ML 236 (15) ML 315 (15) MC 1052 (60) (60) Bio. 295 (60) (60) E 1313 (60) (60) E 1318 (60) 3:00 a. ,mI* and will continue

THURSDAY .6:00 - 11~00 pm CE 2532 (41) CE 3518 (54) ssc. 225 (14) ssc. 301 (14) SSc. 302 (12) ssc. 354 (22) EL 211 (96) ML 232 (1’7) ML 315 (15) MC 1052 (60)

Bio. 295 (60) Bio. 295 (60) Bio 295 (60) Bio. 295 E 1313 (60) E 1313 (60) E 1313 (60) E 1313 E 1318 (60) E 1318 (60) E 1318 (60) E 1318 These rooms have b ?n made available at the request of the Studc ks’ available x 11 2:00 or Council and with the co-operation of the -administration. The Execuextension. tive feels that such study space will be of maximum benefit if it is (clip this ad for handy references

rABLET ARM CHAIRS

(white sweater) pounds a

NEED A PLACE TO STAY

The Library, in co-operation with the Audio- Visual Cen ter, is planning to produce a video taped orientation programme for students, Fall, 1968.

FACILITIES I’ABLES AND CHAIRS

OF STUDENTS

Both professors feel the greatest education of all is personal development. The seminar, billed beforehand as a weekend in the woods, broke up early Saturday evening as most or the organizers and the faculty departed. When asked why they had left so early, a participant said one particular student’s prescence (‘ made any further discussions futile.” A few people stayed over Sunday not wanting the food wasted.

dents,” he said. Some comments on examinetions: -Prof. Hudgins,: lsExams are not meant to be statements of ol”t iginality but rather a regurgitation of course material.” Prof. Brian Hendley, philosophy; “Exam~ should be given throughout the term to test for acquired knowledge, however the final exam should be the students own views on what he has learned from the course?

Students! What’s Your Opinion?

you.

ACTIVITIES

end in the w0ods

Doda

Thank

BY BOARD OF

SATURDAY 9:00 am to 6:01 CE 2531 (41) CE 2532 (41) CE 3517 (45) CE 3518 (54) ssc. 210 (17) SSc. 225 (14) SSc. 228 (19) ssc. 301 (14) SW. 302 (12) ssc. 345 (14) SSc. 355 (24) EL 105 (72) EL 204 (60) EL 207 ‘(60) EL 208 (30)

It’s new. It’s exciting. It can be a little complicated, too. But, listen. Life can be easier for you. Tampax tampons the modern internally worn sanitary protection- all but do away with “difficult days’: You may not know it, but Tampax tampons were developed by a doctor over 30 years ago for girls just like you. You can’t.even feel them when they’re properly in place. But perhaps the best thing about them is that there’s a nothing to interfere with your normal activities. You keep on doing whatever you want to -completely unhampered. Always feeling confident and secure. And remember: both the Tampax tampon and its container-applicator just flush away. What could be simpler than that? Try Tampax tampons now. Available in 3 absorbency-sizes -Regular, Super and Juniorwherever such products /---z-i are sold.

ELOPED MILLIONS

1press

for this

TAMPAX CANADIAN

- ad sponsored by the Student’s Council)

Friday,

February

TAMPONS TAMPAX BARRIE.

ARE MADE CORPORATION ONTARIO

23, 1968 (8:32)

BY

A OF

DOCTOR WOMEN

ONLY

BY LTD.,

485

5


Need

pocket

money?

Well, the Chevron needs money some we can give you a cut.

too,

Set design

-

and maybe

research

if we get

Simple deal: We need ad salesmen. We pay 10% commission. Drop in at the office anytime--see the secretary or anyone in the ad department.

744-6111

According to resident director Mita Hedges, the theater is what the circus always has been to people--something to appreciate, Like the circus, the theater encompasses many activities: one of them is art. As part of the series of noon art lectures, Mrs,, Hedges discussed art in theater on ThursUsing the upcoming major day, production, Royal hunt of thesun, which takes place in 17th--tentury Peru, she talked about the role of art in planning stage productions o “Various elements of a production cry out for design.” Art

local 2812

LET US

_ SAVE LOTS OF MONEY

YOU

20% - 50% OFF BOOKS AT

Death

S. (OPP W’LOO

of a President

- Reg. $12.50

PAPERBACKS

- Educational

HARDCOVER

- Gift

MICROSCOPES

SQUARE)

director Nancy- Lou Patterson is assisting with ‘Royal hunt of the sun’ and student designers are busy researching details. It is important that costumes and props be appropriate to the location and time of the action. Such informal don may be obtained from paintings, sculpture and literature. Costumes and settings must be theatrical as well as appropriate, Some authentic costumes are difficult to present on the stage without modifications. In ‘Royal hunt of the sun’, the costumes have been designed to conform with clothes worn by the Incas and Spanish in Peru, but they include

books

now $6.95

DRIVING

Thus art is not only a source of information for theatrical productions, but it is also a means of enhancing the effect of the performance on the stage. Mrs. Hedges feels that originality is important in anything students design. She admits that with modern plays originalitypresents some difficulty. ‘Royal hunt of the sun’, for example, has been prtiuced both on Broadway and in Chichester, England--which has an apron stage sin&tar to Waterloo’s. Both productions involved excellent (and expensive) designing and it is difficult to plan anything as fine withour duplicating some of their effort, said Mrs. Hedges.

MATINEE SUNDAY 2 pm EVENINGS 8 pm

- texts - RADAR

Attempts are made to styleproperties and settings after contemporary objects and designs. Many of the patterns used in this play are stencilled from native materials and pottery of Peru.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT 4 DAYSONLY FEB.25 to 28

745-2941

(all areas)

- TELESCOPES

details which add to the color and spectacle of the stage production.

WATERLOO

THE BOOK NOOK 38 KING

demancis careful for props, dress

ALERT

-

GLOBES “IN”

POSTERS

- 10% OFF

l l

1 Mail This Coupon Or Phone For 1

.OBLEMS?

a

sit the

I

urn Tree Too Gift

RENTALS LEASINGS I

EUROPEAN CARSSERVICEI

62 RICHMOND STREET,W. SUITE1002, TORONTO1, ONT., CANADA I

boutique

18 Albert

St. Wloo

or the small parent

shoppe

4 Erb St.

at East.

SONNY’S DRIVE IN. LIMITED 443

HIGHLAND ROAD KITCHENER

WEST

UNDER NEW MANAGkMENT

Creative SUN.

Arts

FEB. 25

8:30

FILM

Admission

by Series ticket 29

THURSDAY “One

Day’s

day’s

fishing

Charcoal

SERIES

12:15

FILM

Meet

AL116

EXPERIMENTAL

THURS.-FEB.

Calender 576

I I

- The camera

records

the fisherman’s

highlights tackle,

of a

coupon

“Oysterman”

- The story

of various

I _______-______---------------------------

a FREE

cold

drink

Science Society

stages of oyster

Free admission.

FEB. 29 - MAR

2 8:30

UNIVERSITY “Royal

Hunt

Theater

of the Arts

of the Sun” the conquest

- Peter Shaffer’s

$1.25

Students

COMING

ON MARCH

MARCH

FESTIVAL

Presents

for

your

p.m.

3 -----

hamburger

--_--_ and Pries.

IO

3:00

p.m. - Stage band p.m. Choral

- Orchestral Directed

Free Admission at Theater Ext.

by Alfred

Semi-Formal

\9

Concert Kunz

I

DINNER

ticket Box Office

SCIENCE

ML254

2126

OF STUDENTS-CREATIVE

486 The CHEVRON

r

$.75

OF MUSIC

8:00

744-6111

with

to 2

FRIES

epic drama

of Peru and a man’s search

immortality Admission

IO a.m.

10 until -----

FRENCH

Second Annual

DRAMA:-

concerning

6

is worth

on BUN,

hrs. WEEKDAYS

and SATURDAYS

---------_-------------This

STEAK

Bill

I

cultivation.

FEDERATION

Store

DOGS,

and

technique

and catch.

Tickets

HOT

up order. FRIDAYS

AL116

observing

HAMBURGS,

1860-pick

only

SERIES

Catch”

Broiled

Mike

ARTS

BOARD

SATURDAY, MARCH 9,1968

1

IS

DANCE

I 1


College ‘entertainment excels Village bpafhy by Doug Yonson Chevron staff

It’s Saturday night and You don’t have any booze. Nothing to do, right? Wrong, if You live in a church college.

Chevron

on records

Canadian

invades

by Ron Saito Chevron staff

The Esquires: away. Bunky

-The fiv-t. Paul’s, Conrad Grebel, Renison, St. Jerome’s and Notre Dame, provide an ambitious program of student-coordinated entertainment on weekends. Most are open to anyone-resident or not.

Get on BS300

up andget

performance: monotonous recording: loud vocals stereo quality: good never cease to Liner notes amaze me. Like “This one will blow your mind. ” It may, too. Other than the itwo hit singles &Get on up’ and ‘Get away’, which strangely sound similar. The album is an abortion of acceptable instrumentals, put down in favor of (‘ mellow dissonances”. Dissonant they are-the lead singer is consistently flat and the hartmony isn’t. Many of the 12 cuts werewritten by the group and are new, except for ‘Groovin’ and ‘Woman’. The former with a good bluesy backing and the latter In true r&b style; neither vocally potable. In fact, if It weren’t for a change of beat, there would be little difference between numbers (except for ‘Everybody’s laughing’, which approa ches listenable.) In conclusion, again from the liner notes, (I music industry..,

Gap

scratching their heads in amazement wondering where and how this group got their sound.” The Union Gap: Woman, Columbia CS96 12

woman,

performance: strong recording: good stereo quality: good The Canadian invasion continues. This time it’s Corporal Kerry Chater of the Union Gap. And, as with other transplanted Canadians, he adds the final touch to give the California group its polish. If General Gary Puckett’s vocal on dWoman, Woman’ grabs you* you’ll be pleased with the rest of the album which includes Johnny Rivers’, ‘By the time I get to Phoenix,’ the Bee Gees) ‘To love somebody’ and a umque arrangement of C her’s ‘You better sit down kids’ (but not thenew single). Although none of the ensuing songs matches 4Woman woman’ on feeling, the smooth, full sound Is pleasing not-too-quiet listening. With its demonstrated vocal and instrumentad ability, the future should see much more of the Union Gap.

“‘And then there was the women who, when told her son was wanted by the police, said there was no accounting for some people’s taste.’ t That was Fairly evident of the long-armed humor that highlighted engineering night last Thursday. A veteran of the ‘( chicken circuit”, Kitchener magistrate R.H. Fair effectively presented some serious problems in the law as many a mlnor downed a brew at the back. The theme of the magistrate’s talk was the need for change in some laws and imprisoning pramt&es. Ccc anada has more people in prison per capita than any other country. Society is rejecting the tend-

plumbers

*

Award

winner

held over

..~*~.~*~.~.~*~.~.~.~.....~.~.~...~~~~~~~*~.~.~.~~~.~.~.~.~.~.~...~.~...~.~.~.~.......~~~b...*....~*~*...~.*~*...‘.*.‘~*.*.’~*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.*.’

l

.

about

ency to greater parole. It costs $3000 to $3800 annually to keep a man in prison plus about $300 or more a month for dependents. “Legislative bodies must make the necessary changes, but until it strikes one personally it Is too easy to close the doorandforget.” Fair managed to insert some more legal humor and was then presented with a glass-bottomed silver beer-mug-full-of-beer that he had to chug before he could keep. Other features of the evening included a donation of $100 to the Tenth Anniversary fund from the ill-gotten profits earned in EngSo& September (66 bookstore. The proverbial boatraces provided the night’s climax althougha

on shows

ship. Michael York may well The Waterloo is featuring ‘A man for all seasons’, thus poshave suffered a fatal setback to poning ‘The penthouse’ yet ahis still budding career. Probably the most enterprising At the Lyric ‘Grand prix’ gain. is the Missing Peece coffeehouse rolls on and on and on... Although this was shown here held Saturday nights at Grebel. last year, it easily? warrants a The grid bristles with formuNow ln its second year, it’s repeat performance. It more la ones, coughing, bursting into simply &(a place on campus to sit than deserved the half dozen revs, then whining and shriekand talk about anything you want,” academy awards it picked up ing as the drivers adjust their says Art Dyck, one of the student in such categories as best actor, check the rearview fimxles, organizers. “We serve coffee and best picture and best director. mirrors and spread their hands donuts, and usually have some enThe story centers around the on the wheel. tertainment. It% strictly a nonafflictions of Thomas More as The only problem is that profit organ&&on-we charge no he strove to balance on the obJames Garner is the center of admis@on.” scure tightrope separating Caeattraction in all this action so sar and God. He is attacked on St. Jerome’s and Notre Dame that the panorama and spectacle all sides by the slings and arstudents conduct awell established of a hair-raising grand prix rows of friends and foes alike, folk mass each Sunday night at start is lost in the petty close and finally toppled by a Judas Notre Dame. &‘We have several ups of the star’s square jaw and clerk who had originally purtalented folksingers who participsquinted eye, sued him doggedly seeking an de,*’ said Adrian Bernardi, St. Through Monaco’ s tight apprenticeship, .Jerome% rep to council. twists and hairpins, cutting Paul Schofield as More is \ In addition, Saturday is reser through the opaque drizzle of brilliant, supported solidly with ved for general mayhem in the Spa, banking around the freeway fine performances by Wendy coffee shop, and there is now a track of Mexic-lways there Hiller as his loving, but very movie series presented every are the inevitable multi-angular human wife, and Robert Shaw other week. shots of Garner seasoned with as Henry VIII, victim to his own Again In the religious end of similar closeups of Yves Montpassions and passionate to the things (these are church colleges, and and his Ferarri’ sf rant axle. extreme. you know, St. Paul’s conducts a Granted that these are the stars, ‘Smashing time’ hadanoticestudent-organized Sunday evening but why must those beautiiul ably short run. The reasonbe service--“religious to an exten& long shots of sportscars driftcomes apparent after suffering although last week we discussed ing around fast curves orsnakthrough an incredibly boring se&*’ said one resident. ing through S bends be continutime as effeminate males and d%tudent council at St. Paul’s ally sacrificed for a view of Twiggy-like frails cavort presents several dances,” he went Garner% determined teeth in through a slapstick series of pie on, d‘ but our major extracurricular Montand’s rearview mirror? tossings and paint spraying that activity is in Intramural sports. would have been hooted off a Some of the finest racing We try to get everyone out for our vaudeville stage. shots ever on screen are here, games-we appear to get result.0 Rita Tushingham made the but the film editor got carried Leave it to Renison to produce best of a bad show but Lynn away in the Expo-like multi-imthe intellectuals. A group of RenRedgl we went down with the age frame. isonites conducts an open forum ‘... *-~~.......,.,*....................*........*.......*.~*~**~~******~****~‘***** .*. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..*.................~.......*.......--*--**-’***-***--~-**--’* every week. “We’re just a group of students murders’ promoting the intellectual side of Wttle discussion,” said Stan Suds, newly elected council rep.

The good Anglicans have achieved such a sense of tolerance that they allowed an NDP MP, Max Saltsman, to speak to them Sunday. Generally, the forum is a highclass bull session. Also, Renison presents a casual hootenanny-type night every few weeks,” with such performers as Poor Charlie Robertsonfrom FASS Nite,” said Suds. ‘&Most of the entertainment is by the students.” And all hail for the Village-the only visible sign of imagination emanates from West 4. Each Tuesday night the residents hold something they call West 4Rum. 9t% just a bull ~ession,‘~ says Don Gerber, don of West 4. ‘cWe get 20 or 30people there, and more come and go? There are speakers most weeks: recently, an insurance man dlscussing investment and finance and a ministelr--r‘discussing re= ligion, I guess,” said Gorber.

The Union Gap --Woman, woman

Fair wcwns

Chevron

Feiffer

j by Ailey

comes

Bailin

TORONTO--‘Little murders’ by Jules Feiffer-Theater Toronto’s second play at the Royal Alex;l. costs a student only $1 for three hours of thoroughly humorous entertainment. The lines of the play have a beautieul snap to them-like Feiffer% comic strips. For instance, when the photographer is pestered to tell his future parent&n-law about the subject for his pictures, he goes througha long history that finally brings him up to the present: “Fve been shooting shit for a year now*‘. Another snappy play on words occurs when the priest describes

.

.

alive

a man who masturbates as l&at peace with himself?‘. Underneath the humor is the description of how a manbecomes aggressive. The photographer-he used to hum while being beat upin the end joins the rest of chaotic New York City and starts shooting people for an entertainment. Eric House turns in a superb performance .as the distraught father. Amelia Hall and Maureen Fitzgerald were good as the mother and daughter. However, Richard MOMette (the hangman in ‘The drummer boy’) again seems a little too pleased with himself to do a good job of acting.

crime

mop would have been useful to deal with spillage. The contest was won by the out-term team in a fantastic 20.7seconds. Every member of the team was an accomplished one gWw. The tugboat trophy for the slowest time was nearly won by the faculty team but some spoilsport undergrads out-sipped them. , The faculty team stars wereacademic vicepresident Howard Petch and civil prof John Shortreed. As anchorman Shortreed had only downed his first glass when Petch started his second. Shortreed then stopped Petch’ s drinking arm and used the tugboat trophy’s funnel to down his second glass. Friday,

l

. .

.FeDnrary

23, 1968 (8:32)

487

7


DONSHIPS

- RENISON

Incorporation doubts aired by arts faculty

-

COLLEGE

The College invites applications for dons (men and women) for the academic year 1968-l 969. Forms may be obtained from the College Bursar and should be returned no later than

I

MARCH

r

15,1968

I -

For

the best

food

and

courteous

service

I

/

RESTAURANT

&

Host:

Peter

Waterloo 10%

Shopping

STEAK

Waterloo

Centre,

ON

DISCOUNT

HOUSE

Faclaris

STUDENT

744-4782

MEAL

CARD

FASS NITE ‘69 Needs ca Producer Persons to:

interested

and

in these positions

a Director

should

send applications

Arts

Box

Office

BY MARCH

lifetime

insurance

“There exists in the area an independently chartered organization known as the Federation of Students of the University of Waterloo which undertakes a variety of programs on behalf of the students of the University of Waterloo and in the interest of the university. For the support of these programs students may pay a fee at the time of their registration. However membership in the Federation and financial support of its programs is optional and is to be determined by the free shocie on the part of each individual student. ”

Purchase

policy

on every

diamond

,-;:::. . . . . l . . . . . ~...................................,.,....,...,,....... =)..........................~..,....,.............,...,.~.

.

.

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

.

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.,

.

,

Peter Warrian, another council exec member added that the university cannot designate which programs the federation may or may not stipport. **rric

.

.

COLUMBIA See this and other glorious diamond treasures priced from $100 to $5,000

Walters 151 King

St. Ask

Credit

Jewellers phone

W. Kitchener for

our

student

FRIENDLY at Guelph,

Brantford,

discount

WALTERS

in any

of your

STORES

St. Catharines

and

Gait.

7444444

..,......*.......*.*.*.

488

The CHEVRON

44Non consultation of the colleges by the 1:: administration was their doing, not ours, “After last night’s general meeting each con.. :I: stitiency is guaranteed at least one seat.” @ee 1:: story on page1.) $i Minas said the current concern isn’t with the .:. ::: federation. i:i C4There% no feeling of underhandedness,” he 2; said, .*. .:. The administration lapsed by not consulting ::i the colleges during the incorporation proceedings, iii Minas felt. iii “I do feel the administration has made some $ commitments it shouldn’t.” ::: Minas noted the federation is the only body in .*. :‘:: the university which is given money with no strings

iii

i:i attached,

$ i:i :.:

budgets of the faculties and departments subject to university scrutiny.” .*. Sa.xe felt there was a basic difference and mixf&ivithin the whole university.” .*. 2: UP in the word “university.” .*. He continued, saying the federation hasbeen r:r .*m $ too hands off about its own policies, yetfeels it has $ ’ *#Only when the term includes both students @me right to examine university policies. i? and faculty can we talk of one system for budgetary .*. One of the most disconcerting aspects of the i:i control. .> I don’t really know who is responsible for The w&er&y budget is not iz disagreement to Petch iUS been the lackof SpeCuiC 2: spending my $565. fi objections by the faculty. $ made public. .*. .> “Pve never heard anyone say the students :i: “That $22 student-activity fee is spent by $i are doing such-and-such which we don’t like-just i:i People who are responsible,” said Saxe. $4 oh they mjght do something.’ And this is one of i$ “They’re responsible to the executive, to council .:. i$ the things that* s so frustrating”. ::I itself and to the 7,000 student constituents who can .-. .*a , ‘*’ exercise their control in various ways,” =.,,..,,....i..~.*....==......,.*.

8

Ireland told the meeting that the federation PrOJ Wyn n Rees had followed the proper procedures and everything had gone through the correct channels. .*.

:.:.:. Faculty-student haggling over incorporation :. zihas caused concern in administration circles as well, :.:? .‘* Dr, Howard Petch, vicepresident academic, .:. :<feels that a person’s view on compulsory fees de3: pends on what 44you grew up with.” :..*. J’There’s seemingly a lackof communication .:. ::: and understanding on the part of many faculty mem$i hers on the status of the federation now that it’ s in$ dependently incorporated.” .*. .> Students too should share some of the fault, $ Petch added. .*. C4Just as the students feel it proper to ask .*. ?i why th,e university is doing such-and-such it :i: seems appropriate that the university could say &his program worries us’ and open it to a forum .

by

Rees was worried about what guarantees there were for continued college representation and felt such representation should be assured.

:.

.;.

created

Minas felt something had to be done for 196s 1969 about the federatio-dministration arrangement . However Ireland wondered why the present situation couldn’t continue. rrIf we’d been fiscally irresponsible I could see your concern. But the students are behind us.” The German and Russian chairman, Prof. J. W. Dyck, said some students he had been talking to have dou@ts about the federation’ s value. “It seems strange in a democracy thatwe say students must be a member of this body.” Saxe reiterated that membership in the federation is not compulsory. Only the student-activity fee, which is collected by the university, is mandatory. Prof. Wynn Rees, principal of Renison noted one of his major objections: 44At no stage was the Renison administration ever consulted about the move of the Federation of Students. We sa.w no draft of the move: We only heard about it in the fall when the move was done .‘*

..*.

.2 ii. Petch sees both sides -...

Model TR 112125$125. from the “Diamond Treasure” Collection

asked

The student government is not responsible to the university for the expenditure of the money, explained Ireland, but rather to. .the_. students. Regular .audits, however, are submitted to the university.

Ireland pointed out that the motion wasbasically inaccurate. “The University of Waterloo collects a$22 student-activity fee which it turns over to the Federation. This is a compulsory fee collected by the university, not the federaation. The fee is not Dean Minas optional.” He added that while the fee is compulsory, membership in the federation is not. “We had a case last year where a student didn’t want to be a member of the federation, so his name was struck from the list.” Stewart Saxe, chairman of board of external relations, backed Ireland, emphasizing that it is the university which makes the student-activity fee compulsory. After Ireland mentioned that for years universities have collected student fees, Prof. James

we sell.

department,

“Before incorporationthe check-signers were personally responsible and sometimes the amounts reached $15,000.” Ireland admitted that in reality the university still has the ultimate control. “They can cut the fees or even discontinue them s” he said . Prof Warren Ober, English chairman, wondered if the university could control the monies once they had allotted the amount to the students.

Arts dean J. Sayer Minas wanted to know Steve Ireland’s reaction to the motion. He also asked why a rejection of it by the artsfaculty council would benefit the university.

SAVE 10%

STUDENTS! on Any Free

8

chairman of the history the analogy was correct.

‘&Are other student bodies c6rporateY Ireland replied incorporation by the Federation of Students was undertaken only to free its officers from financial responsibil’.ty.

Abbott’ s motion went on to recommend including the paragraph in the calendar as a university regulation or at least as a regulation of the faculty of arts. The present admission letters make no mention of the Federation of Studentsor of its programs.

FASS NITE ‘69 c/o Circle K Club Creative

Cornell, whether

Just what are the problems around here? A brief and informal meeting Tuesday between students and arts faculty tried not only to discover questions but also to answer them. The students were invited to a meeting of the department-head section of the arts faculty council to help clear up questions arising from the Federation of Students’ recent incorporation. After some discussion the profs voted toopen the meeting to the Chevron. A primary area of concern was philosophy prof William Abbott’s notice of motion introduced at the last arts faculty council meeting. His motion would have the registrar include this paragraph in all letters of admission sent out to arts students:

l

.

l

.

l

.

l . . . . l . . . l ..>.............*..s....*.......*.*, ‘.-CL.....

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

*U.L.*,*

.

.

l

.

l

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

“The

l :- are always

.

,

l

.,.

.,


i’

MARCH*

I

SUNDAY

MONDAY

FEB. 25

TUESDAY

FEB. 26

1968

WEDNESDAY FEB. 28

FEB. 27

/ THURSDAY

FRIDAY

.SATURDAY

2

FEB. 29

.

Car rally-nite Experimental

FilmSeries

AL?16

Joint

8:30

Meeting Council Room

- Old

Board 7:30

and

Royal hunt t. of a.

New \

& Senate

for

the

sun

Track

.

.

.

.

.

.

Engineering

..I....

, . . . . . . Basketball

3

hockey

championship:

5

4

5

.

II

. . . . . .

. . . . . , . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . ,

7

6

Movie

film

“Moonf

leet”

series .

“N.Y.N.Y” experimental Archie

Bolsen’s

& other films first

Noon

drama

“Realism”

exhibition gallery

- “Fantastic to the

- ” PO20 Seagram

Art’,’

31st.

Thursday “North

anni-

Land

versary

Art

11 \

University Theater

. . . . . .. Village

concert

- Arts

12 “Art

13

Seco

of

Lecture

the

Consuls

Overlanders

- Contemporary-

Canadian Canadian

. .

. . .

. . .

. . . .

. . .

Ceasar - Village

& the .

Semiformal

Intercollegiate intercollegiate

Basketball Hockey

. . . . . . . . .

14

Championships Championships.

Acadia. . Montreal.

. . . . . . . . .

15 Concert

theater

Arts

^.

16 “Riverside

Singers”

Theatre

Beware

,

St.

Patrick’s

18

19

20

21

25

26

27

28

23

Day

Sweet’s Birthday International film series

Pat

24

Keep

up to date-post

this

calendar

29

on .your .

I

- Villagg

. , . . .

17 -’

.

place team ..I.. Arena). , . . , . .

I

Ides: Weekend.

l

of first (Varsity

Bay”

& Psychology’:

Arts

Neekend - court - Toronto I I

I9

Singers” Dance-Little

Film series to Hudson

Canadian Art -Villiage weekend.

10

Hockey

playoffs playoffs

8

Concert International

Semi-formal

-Toronto-nOOn

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . Intramural

-

and Field championships

wall

Friday,

February

23, 7968 (8:32)

489

9


Chevron

sports

(w aterloo): The Chevron sports staff has decided to jump the gun CQAA and select its “Official” hockey and basketball all-star teams early. the schedules don’t Although close out until tomorrow night, we fed that performances to date

PERSONAL

LOST

First United Church, Waterloo square, welcomes you. Sunday worship services 9:30, 11 am; Kairos 7:30 pm. Transportation? Call 74!%8487 ot 74%7979.

Will the person who got the wrong gray overcoat at FASS Nite reception please contact security, 3211. They have your overcoat andgloves.

DEAR CHRIS: Try Feel youngs again.

If you took the wrong gheefing night, callEd, I have your coat,

faulk dancing. LOVE DON.

Mr. and Mrs. Twisty Face announce the engagement of their daughter Pastey to Twisty Face, son of Mr. and Mrs. About Face. ‘suDaHnq

Lppa~

coat at en742-9998.

My light green duffle coat hasbeen switched with someone else’seither in physics or the federation office. If You’ve got it, contact Tom Patterson at the federation office, local 2814. TYPING

JOHN--Captain America kie. From THOR. FOUND Gray overcoat ception. Please local 3211. .

at FASS contact

Textbook-Poems Browning. To claim 7420749.

by call

is a gun-

Nite resecurity,

Robert Howard, .

Typing-English uP and deliver ranged. Miss 2632.

or German-pick to university arHelga Birke, 576

FOR SALE Bicycle, man’s full-size, perfect condition. Generator, Carrier, milometer, mirror. Single speed. $35. 742-5369, Leica shutter tripod,

m

names

staff

C, f2 Summitar lens, l-l/1000. light meter, gadget bag: filters, etc:

$100. 5369.

Original

Kitchen condition, 3396.

cost

$500.

table and 4 chairs, Call 744-6111

742

good local

ACCOMODATIONS &bedroom student furnished apartmentincluding desk-vailable for summer term. Phone 74% 2474. 1 double room, single beds, kitchen and washroom faciuties. Call 744-1528 or apply 91 Blightwood Road. Waterloo. Unfurnished 3-room apartment for rent--immediately suitable for grad couple. Phone 576-5577 after

6.pm.

Move to a prestige address and escape oppressive living condi= tions. Rent our spacious threebedroom suite for the summer. Only 10 minutes walk to school. Will furnish if required. Apply Smith, 170 Erb St, W. Apt P 6, Waterloo. Phone 578-4302 (availab1e Apri1

OQAA

doch at defense made the second team. Along with Cooke, others to head up the first team are goalie Jim Horton (Guelph), defensemen Pete Speyer (Toronto) and George Lackenbauer @&Master), centre Paul Laurent (Toronto) and left winger Ward Passi (Toronto).

are sufficient to get a line on all players. HOCKEY On the hockey squad Terry Cooke grabbed the only first-team berth for Waterloo as Toronto dominated the ‘Crazy Legs ’ selections. nailed down the right wing spot. Ron Smith at centre and Bob Mur-

27)g

l-bedroom apartment for summer Furnished if necessary. term. Three-minute walk from university. 578-1736. New furnished one-bedroom apartment available for summer term. All utensils, linen, utilities provided. Ten-minute walking distance from university. Reply E.K. Sutherland, c/o the Chevron. Unfurnished apartment on Hazel Street‘ available next term. Phone sue, Joanne or Nancy, 74%9946.

CLASSES

KITCHENER

in AND

THIS

COURSE

CAN

*Increase reading speed 3 to IO times *Improve memory and retention *Cut paperwork, note taking

READING

Briab E. ller, President-Elect

of Students of Waterloo

*Study effectively at 1000 w.p.m. *Read a short novel in 30 min. *Get a better degree!!

DYNAMICS

INSTITUTE .

uses r

Wd?rkmmna

Feb.

23 OQAA Championships at Guelph I

WOMEN’S SPORT DAYS Sat., Feb. 23 &24-Bask& ball championship Waterloo LNTRAMURAL

3ASKETBALL

rues&y,

taking notes, making maps, diagrams, charts and underlrnrng sectrons rn text books etc. When you make your mark with a North-Rite “Dart” marker pen your comments and notes stand out bold and clear. If the cap is left off even for days the permanent ink will not dry out. bleed, fade, or Every drop of the giant ink supply IS used for writing ! Ink won’t smudge, penetrate paper. Variety of colors with matching barrels.

c, .

Feb., 27% 1968 - Court A 6r30-7t20 pm St, Jerome’s St. PauPs 7130- 8120 pm Sci. vs Eng. ih3b 9320pm North vs We&

ST. LAhlBE‘R'T.'QUE.

THAT MAKES A POINT

OF QUALITY

28 Vil@e champio& SNP Feb. 29 Overall eh=P ionshlp

RECREATIONAL

G pm *Machines BASKETBALL Tuesday, February 9230pm Falcons

f-M&s

vs Coss&

27 vs

3-A-Civil

vs Orient

Wednesday, February 28 9130 pm Engine room

pm South vs E&

vs

&B.

Mech Gap vs 3-A-Civil

jocKEY

THE COMPANY

ship

Feb.

HOCKEY & Tues., Feb. 27 Wilson 10~30 pm. Cossaks vs Turbines Wed., Feb. 28 Wilson l&30 pm s Fryers Flyers vs oaks Thurs., Feb. 29 Queensmount I( Pm-~Sagros vs Grad PSJ vs Thurs Feb 2g Queensmoti

Court BW0- 7:20pm Renison vs Con, Gm. 7x30- 8320 pm Eng, v&Math CHAMPIONSHIP ROUNDS MOII., Peb. 26 Queensmount

Feb. 28 Wilson 9:06 pm Faculkyvs. Village

VOLLEYBALL PLAYOFFS PUSHBALL MO&, Feb. 26 Faculty champioti mP Tues., Feb. 27 Residence champ

Thurs.,

-

8:30- h20

retail.

Wed.,

wed.,

WRESTLING

Fri.,

pen

TELEPHONE

Schedule

BASKETBALL Sak.., Feb. 24 Toronto vs Warriors 6x30pm Seagram gym Fri.,

fine line marker

Street,

fees tax deductible

1130pm

You will find many for the new

.

Wood-

Atheletic

490 The CHEVRON

HAMILTON

41, King William

Federation University

HELD

HELP YOU..

-Evelyn

WERCOLLEGXATE HOCKEY Fri., Feb. 23 McGill vswarriors 8~30 pm Waterloo arena Sat., Feb. 24 Laval vs Warriors

10

the selections were Bob Navetta, McMaster ‘s Pete Wheatley and Western’s Dave McGuffln. Navetta is theleague’s toppointproducer and a near flawless performer. McGuffin,never a starter for the Mustangs $ specialises in entering the game from’the bench and bagging a pile of points. Wheatley is a solid rebounder and scorer. Two Warriors, forwards Sol Glober and Neil Rourke, made the second team. Joining them are Windsor’s Chris Wydrzynski up front and backliners Greg Poole (Western) and Mark White (Toronto). Rourke has been an aggressive rebounder and tenacious defender in every game while Glober has performed sporadically--vacillating between excellence and mediocrity. Hisscoring touch can be about the best in the circuit when he’s right. Windsor’s

REGULAR

seven representatives from the Federation who shall represent distinctive constituencies such as the various faculties, colleges, residences, Applications should be addressed to the office of the President of the Students and will be received until Tuesday, March 5, 1968 at 5:00

W. Ireland,

teums

One class per week - 2% hours, for 8 weeks. Practice in your own time. Use study materials.

Applications are now being received for the positions of Federation representatives to THE COUNCIL ON STUDENT AFFAIRS, advisory to the Provost, Student Affairs and responsible for developing major guide-lines in the non-academic areas of student life which are the responsibility of the Provost: Counselling Services, Health Services, Off-campus Housing, Foreign Students, Residences, Student Discipline, etc.

Stephen President

Up front

Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics Course

Attention cigarette smokers. If smoking cigarettes is a problem for you here is an opportunity to do something about it. Thepsychology dept. is conducting treatment research on the elimination of smoking cigarettes. The treatment will demand approximately 10 hours and wili be completed by the end of the school year. There isno charge for this service. If you are interested call Miss Hoeglar at 744-6111 local 2880.

FEDERATION OF STUDENTS UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO

There shall be and important W.C.R.I. etc. Federation of p.m.

dream

Joining Murdoch and&n&h on the second team are netminder John Wrigley (Toronto), defenseman Jim Miles (Toronto), right winger Brent Imlach (Western) and left winger Bob McClelland (Toronto). Imlach is actually a centre but such a good one that it was felt his absence from an all-star team would be unfair. Murdoch oddly enough has not been performing at maximum capacity according to Warrior coach Don Hayes. Even so a below-par Murdoch is still better than practically anyone else in the league. Smith ,has been an all-around star in recent games while Cooke is the loop’s leading sniper. BASKETBALL The cage teams were chosen on a three forward-two guard basis. Waterloo’s Mr. Moves’, Doug Lockhart, took one guard post along; with ex-team-mate Bruce Iemister of Toronto.

a

10~00 pm Vill.vs Rekidmce s=TmG Tues.,Feb, 27 Wilson 9r00 pm - EveI’Y Thurs. Gft, P:OO - 3:OO pn Waterloo Arena Residence vs. Faculty


win oQwcrA

i Bananas by Karen Wanless Chevron sports

The Bananas Waterloo won! The years first are champs! trophy has been -won by girls! What’s the excitement all about? Last weekend in Montreal at MacDonald college, at the OQWCIA volleyball championships, the winners were the girls coach, manager and trainer of Waterloo’s womens varsity volleyball team. This was an east-west meet. Teams from the east were the ’ University of Montreal, Carleton, I MacDonald and Sir George Wflliams. Windsor, York Lutheran, Ryerson and Waterloo made up the teams from the west. Carleton (was the team to beat in the east section. They cameinto the- tournament with an undefeated record but provided no competition for the Bananas who wonthematch in three games straight. ‘Ihe second game played onFriday was against Sir George Williams. Againwithsuperiorplaying the Waterloo girls easily won the match. Coach Pat Davis had high praise for her team for “every single player poured out an all-out effort. Some kids played far better than they did all season.” Saturday Waterloo had two loyal supporters. Peggy Heighes flew down Friday nght to cheer the Paul Sol.omonian, 3A girls on.

co-op math student, came with his radio to listen to the CanadianRussian hockey game. But Paul soon discovered that when two highly skilled teams like Windsor and Waterloo meet the competition is bound to be exciting, The first game on Saturday was against MacDonald. The Bananas had a little trouble getting organfzed in the first half of the game but Waterloo still walked off with the match. The Montreal team put up a real challenge. These gir@ would go after any kind of ball even if it was heading for the bleachers, but Waterloo still won. The win against Montreal put Waterloo in a first place de with Windsor, who had also won all their games. Windsor had won the championship last year, Both Waterloo and Windsor play high calibre volleyball, and throughout the season a sort of friendly rivalry had built up between them. Both teams hoped they would have to play against each other in the deciding match. Waterloo won the first game by. a score of15913. ButWindsor came back to win the second 15-7. In the final game Bonnie Bacvar had Windsor stumped with her hard overhand serve. She served 10 straight points. The serve went back and forth between the two

volleyball I \

First row, (1 to r) Lois Bigwood, Elizabeth Lang, Bonnie Bacvar, Linda Brklacich, Nora Campbell, Fran Philcox, second row Mary McTavish, Eleanor Koop, Pat Davis, coach, Jean Wells, trainer, Linda Byte, third row Jan Roorda, Allison Edward, Sue Gerth and Barb Ritchie. team did so welL teams with the score going up great too, The whole team is point by point. The 15th point was finally made. Waterloo had won! All the girls derserve mentlon for their fine playing. Eleanor Koop played a fine tournament. She could go in as a subsdtute at any time for any position and be depended on to do a fine job. Barb Ritfhie, Allison Edwards, and Jan Roorda did a tremendous job as spikers. The setters were

great f Fran Philcox, Bonnie Bacvar and LindaBrklacichperformed well. Pat Davis felt that it was strong second line that made first string that much better. was through their spirit and competition all season that

her her It keen the

Mary Mctavish, team manager, should take a lot of credit for the fine showing. Mary kept everything organ&d .but she also-kept the girls spirit high with her humor and songs. Jean Wells, girls basketball trainer, joined the volleyball team at Christmas, and has been with both groups ever since.

Golden by Dave Hevenor

Queen’s goalie Norm Douglas foils warrior Terry Cooke but Cooke later gained revenge by scoring two goals as the Waterloo squad romped to an easy 9-1 win last Friday night.

.wcwfiors fall to third

W&tern It was a long bus trip home for the basket bati Warriors Friday. The team had. just lost a 79-66 decision to the Western Mustangs, and the loss made first place look very-far away indeed. It was not the defeat that h.urt so much, but how the game was 10s t. The Warrior squad played as well as the ‘Stangs if not better, but just couldn’t find the basket. They played a nightmare game, hitting only 28.9 percent f ram. the floor. Meanwhile Western was building up a 55 percent shooting average in the first half. Even though the Warriors were bettered in the they still shooting department, managed to stay close and trailed 42-31 at the half. In the second half both teams played on even terms, and except for a brief Waterloo rally, neither team could gain on the other. ‘The Warriors were behind 1742 after ten minutes of the game had paused, but the score was not in= dicadve of the play. TheWaterloo

jinx

-.

cotitinues

squad made several good moves but were unable to finish off plays. Meanwhile Western was scoring several easy baskets on fast breaks, and led by 11 points after 20 minutes. The second half started as if the Warriors were going t0 run the Western team right out of thegym, as they narrowed the gap to 3 points in less than two minutes. However the shooting again went cold and the Mustangs gradually pulled away to me 13 point margin. Doug Lockhart led the way for the Warriors with 18 points and a strong two way effort. Larry Sob01 added nine points andnIne rebounds ’ and Neil Rourke pulled down 14 as thewarriors controlled the boards. Greg Poole and Dave M&fin paced the ‘Stang attack with 21 ami 23 points respectively. They typified the Western shoot@g as Poole scored on IO: out of 14 shots and McGuffin hit 10 our of

16.

.

The game was a rough one with very few fouls called on both sides. This hurt the Warriors as the Western defense was doubled-teaming the ball. This type of defense usually draws a lot of fouls but the refs didn’t call them. As a result, the Warriors were consistently tied up and either threw bad passes or were called for a jump ball. Had the refereeing beenstricter the game .would have been entirely different. The JV squad lost a heartbreaker to the Western Colts as they went down to defeat 55;54. The Pioneers held a 36-23 lead at half-time and led by four points at one time. The JV’s came back to cut the lead to one point but time ran out, For the Pioneers, Sauli Ahvenneimi was high man with Mpoints. Ike Fishler -added 11, Dave Shaloff played an outstanding defensive game as he pulled down sixteen rebounds.

Gaels

_.,

_ The injury riddled puck Warriors came up with a fine second and third period effort to defeat the lowly Queen’s Golden Gaels 9-1 at WaterlooArenaFriday night, The game started slowly with very ragged play by both teams throughout the first period. The Warriors missed the services of defenseman Bob Murdoch and left winger Orest Romashyna, who were both injured in Toronto game Stu Eccles opened the scoring for the Warriors at the 1:43 mark when he stuffed the puck in the short side past goalie NormDouglas, Laird McConvey evened the score’ at 7:40 when he beat Warrior netminder Larry Copeland. The period ended in a 1-1 deadlock and it appeared as if the 500 Warrior supporters were in for a disappointing night. But midway through the second period McConvey picked ‘up an interference penalty along with a ten-minute misconduct. Five seconds later the usually ineffecdve

B-bailers

The Warrior: wOrap*up theschedule this weekend at home to two Qtibec teams. Tonight McGill visits and tomorrow afternoon it’s Laval.

end third

WINDSOR (Staff)--The University of Windsor Lancers used ball and board control to dump the Warriors 96-79 inbasketballwednesday. The Lancers moved into first a 8-l season place, spa-# record. This one loss was handed to them by the Warriors 69-66 earlier this season, so the Warriors could yet take the playoffs. The loss leaves the Warriors in third spot with a 6-3 record, two points behind Western. Windsor opened up an early 2317 lead and eventually widened it to 48-29 -at the half-time. Inept shooting-a poor m-and weak rebounding left Windsor almost Friday,

Warrior power play put Waterloo ahead to stay as Terry Cooke scored from Joe Modeste and Don Mervyn. From this point on it was au Waterloo, as they scored four more unanswered goals intheper-iod-by Ron Smith, Dan Hostick, Mervyn and Dave Rudge-to up the count to 6-l. The Warriors continued their domination in the ‘third period, scoring three more times. Smith tallied tinassisted while teammate Doug Jddoin was serving a penalty. The Warriors again scored while shorthanded when Cookewas nicely set up by defenseman Larry Banks. Jodoin completed the scoring with a power play goal. The Warriors receivedtheusual fine performances from Smith, Cooke, Modeste and Mel Baird.

complete control of the backboards. The Warriors managed to stay even in the second half, as Windsor subsdtuted liberally with their secondstringers. The oQAA playoffs will be held next weekend on the first-place team’s home court--Windsor at present. The Lancers, Mustangs and the Warriors will represent the Western Division. Last scbedtiled start for the Warriors is tomorrow night at 8:30 in Seagram gym, with fourthplace Toronto Blues. At 6:30 the Pioneers host St. Dennis Morris Highschool from St. Catherine& Seats are at apremium,so come early.

February

23, 1968 (8:32)

491

11


OQAA

Ted Symbaly arts 2 executes one of the shots that helped him win the intramural billiards tourney held Tuesday at Twin City Billiards. Ted triumphed over Phil Dietrich engineering 1R in the best

- -

- _ -

_ . - -

-

- - -

of three

‘-J

- . - .

- -

J

Them

finds_ - - - - -

_ I -

-

High

. - - -

werp

-

, -

- .

ninm-six

-

‘““‘,

School

mtmnts.

Y - w -

- . - “ . - . w

Teaching

Opportunities

I

in

1.An experimenting, 2. Unmatched

outdoor

3,Attractive Contact

progressive

system

recreatibnal

attractions

salaries

Principal

P. H. Hennessy,

Student

Placement

Office,

Port

Arthur

Waterloo

Collegiate Campus,

A

TEACHING OPPbRTUNlTlES Graduates interested in the teaching profession or wishing to obtain information regarding teaching opportunities are invited to visit the North York Board of Education’s representatives at -

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION’ ONTARIO

FRIDAY, MARCH 1 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

FOR THE WEEK-ENDS

OF MARCH

newspapersbe-

2 and 9,

INTERVIEWS ARE BEING HELD AT DON MILLS COLLEGIATE INSTITUE 15 The Donway East, Don Mills F.W. Minkler, B.A., D. Paed, Director of Education 12

492 The CHEVRON

pull

best Village East 2-0, championship,

giving them the

A special word should be put In for all the tug-of-war par&ipants--$hey had to do battle in the ice and snow in freezing weather. This is hardly conducive to par& cipation. Congrats to all youhardy characters.

rdy-really?

If you want to see whether your bomb can really stand up to our ‘rough Canadian winters’, you’ll have a couple of opportunities In the next week, Roth the Math and Engineering Societies are holding car rallies as part of their respective Weekend celebrations. Run on some challenging country roads near Waterloo, the rallies will be a test of navigational skill and driving ability, not of pure $The car with the least speed. points lost will be declared the winner. There% always a lot to talk over at rally’s end and the Engin-

eer% sure picked a winner when they set the finish for theirs at a local pub. Tomorrow morning the Math rally will be run. There are still some openings available in the75car field. Next Friday night the plumbers hold theirs, with entries limitedto 60 cars. Memories of last summer’s War Trek? rally immediately come to mind. On that occasion many drivers wound up miles off course, but the Engineers hope to have the route more clearly de= fined this time.

_

Our large display advertisements will appear regularly in the Toronto ginning on Wednesday, February 28. IF YOU ARE IN TORONTO

men

The battle of the tug-of-war titans was decided last Thursday February 15 at Seagram Stadium. When the to urnament concluded, Renison was first with 12 points, Village East second with 8 points, and Science third with 6 points. In the round-robin tournament, Renison defeated Science 2 games to 1. Renison then easily defeated

FOR THEBOROUGH OF NORTH- YORK

LONDON,

available

Tickets for the OQAA hockey Master Marlins at 6~00 o’clock in play-offs in Toronto to be held on the playoffs. In two previous meet= March 1st and 2nd will go on sale ings the Mat squad lost 3-6 in between periods of Warriorgames Waterloo and w in Hamilton. Friday and Saturday. However the Marlins are a tough Tor&ht the Warriors take on the team and it should be an interesting McGill Redmen and Saturday they contest when the two meet. meet the LavaI Rouge et Or.Game In the other preliminary game times are 8:15 and a00 pm rem the Toronto Blues will meet the pectively. ’ fourth place finisher, probably As it stands now, the Warriors Montreal Carabins. The winners will probably be playing the Mw - meet for the league title Saturday.

Renison

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION

1137 WESTERN ROAD,

tickets

in his morning if they feel they can wrestle. Otherwise the Warriors will have to forfeit these divisions. Bill Hedderson at 137 lbs. could surprise his opponents if he hits his potential. New comer Randy Freitag will compete in the 145-lb. class while Steve Gard will be wrestling in an injured condition at 152 lbs. Durable John Stothart and John Grosdanoff will be entered at 160 and 167 lbs. respectively. Warrior judoist Steve Harris is competing at 177 lbs. despite a hurt back. At 191 lbs. either Bill Poole or Charlie Smith will give it a try+ while in the heameight division it wili be either Smith or Dan Young. None of the Warriors have been seeded, so that they will have to survive a preliminary match to gain the quarter finals.

Institute,

ALLDAY FEBRUARY 28

ALTHOUSE

in Guelph

GUELPH-The Warrior wrestc lers will be trying to salvage something out of the o&AA championships that begin today at Guelph. After a series of preseason meets that netted only one victory in ten s&ts and an unbelievable streak of injuries, Waterloo is entering the finals with guarded optimism, to put it mildly. In their latest competition, Warriors got crunched by Western in London last Wednesday, 36.6. Coach’ Ed DeArmon, who still thinks he has a dark horse, rates defending titlist Guelph and Western as the teams to whip. He also thinks highly of Toronto and Mc= Gill. De Armon hopes to field a man in each of the ten weight categories for the single-tickout toum ey. Doug Houghton (l23 lbs.) and Paul Drohan (130 lbs.), both with painful injuries, may be weighing

Pluyoff

PORT ARTHUR, ONTARIO

wrestling

Bruce C. Bone, B.A., C.A. Chairman

Womens b-bull chumpionships Girls will be invading Seagram Siakium this weekend forthe o&WCIA basketball championships. Seeding of participating teams has been established over the la& month in preliminary playoffs. b the western divisiontheUniversiQ of Waterloo is tied for first place with the University of Windsor. Carleton and McMaster are tied ‘fortop spotlntheeast. The tournment will, be staged

on an elimination-consolation is. The games start at noon on Friday and continue every hour and a half until 7:OO p*m. The tourn+ merit will then resume at %OO on S&urday morning. Thechampiob ship game is scheduled for 1130 in the afternoon. Interested fans are welcome to attend all games of the tournament. There is no admlsslon charge. The Bananas see action for the first time Friday at 430.


Not

wind,

something

snow

or

else

is

sleet-

wrong

It seems, that whenever a university event flops the organizers maon about lack of interest and spirit on the part of the students, In some cases this is at least part of the problem, but as often as not this lack of interest has been spawned by a lack of information. I don’t know if the Winter Weekend was a success or not. I hope it was. However, I am sure it would have been more successful if someone had remembered that a sizable portion of the student body is now off campus on their work terms. On the address cards given us before we left for parts unknown, it was carefully explained that we paid for and were thus entitled to receive the Chevron during our workterm. Perhaps the “Magical mystery computer” doesn’t recognize a check mark or possibly a human was given the opportunity to botch things up for a change. In any event, I have yet to receive a single copy nor have any of the co-op students I have spoken to. GARY GOULID engineering IA (Lindsay, Ontario} I address this letter to the editor of the Chevron on the unfounded assumption the paper still exists. The work term is 30 percent gone m

Not

-

-

anti-American

and I have yet to receive a single copy 0 Let’s dig out those job reporting cards and let the isolated workers know what’s happening in the world of books, booze and bell curves, DON TYRRELL math 3A (Ottawa)

Well, here’s your last chance, Look carefully at the address at the top of this page. Now go to your~‘#$‘&&()*C%-& address files (if in existence) and change the address so that it reads like the one at the top of the page. DOUGLAS MCLEAN math 2A (Weston, Ontario)

Where the hell is it? Ithasbeen over a month now since the Chevron has supposedly been published, How can we- possibly have any school spirit when we don’t know what’s going on at the best university in Canada. MIKE GILLIES engineering 1A FRED SCHELLENBERGER engineering 2A ED LOPONEN engineering 2A (Manitouwadge, Ont.) In previous years the Chevron was run in a pretty efficient manner and out-term students started

-

just

ca different

I have not received any feedback on last week% column on American corporateliberalfascism, but in view of the violent reaction I received from a few lines I did earlieron America in the Caribbean, perhaps I should set a few things straight. I am not anti-American. Everyoneassumes that if one is critical of something in the U.S. you hate the U.S. This is far from true. You can not hate a people, especially a people as warm and generous as the Americans. What you hate are systems which perverts the good will of a people and turns them into tyrants against their own will, I am writing these articles to present a different way of looking at things in the world. There may be inaccuracies in my writing; Ihope you will find them. My views may be incomplete, All 1 hope to do is present a &agile framework in which to interpret events, and present a slightly more sophisticated viewpoint than ‘(We are the good guys and you are the bad guys.” * In writing about corporate-liberal-fascism as a world force, one major problem occurs. Why do I make a distinction between corporate-liberalfascism and the classical Marxist description of imperialism? While CLF may resemble the old concept of imperialism in its style and operation, it differs from it in method and the psychology of those who pursue it. British imperialism of the 19th century was accepted by its operators as agoodand necessary thing, It wasapopular system and the masses approved of it as well as the ruling elite. Nobody denied Britain was an imperial power. At the same time, there was a certain amount of responsibility in British imperialism. Even though you had taken over some backward heathen land, it was the white man’s burden to make sure that the natives were uplifted. It was this policy that brought about the gentle destruction of the empire in the 1950s and 60s. American corporate-liberal-fascism is a far less responsible imperialism. This is because it is an imperialism employing free enterprise in target selection as well as operation. This means in

receiving their issues less than a month after the start of the workterm, I don’t know what caused the foul up this time, but I suspect that somewhere along the line someone is not doing his job properly. Whatever the trouble is, I suggest that you correct it without delay, JOHN SHORE mech eng 2A (St, C atharine s, Ont.)

Please send the Chevron to the above address. I am on a work term and have returned my pleasant card but am not receiving the paper. RON STOLTZ MATH 2A (Pointe Claire, PQ) etc etc etc etc etc. HELP. Please stop with the letters even. Our circulation manager is being snowed under with all the complaints. But its not our fault. We rely on the coordination departmen t, the registrar’s office and data processing to supply us with mailing la bets. It seems that there was a

problem. According to Peter Roos of the registrars office about a third of the work-team addresses were incorrect until a week ago. That’s what made the fall-term marks late. Denis Eaton of the coordination department said, “It has nothing to do with us now. All the information from the job cards was turned over to the registrar’s office. We’re as concerned as you are” The Chevron is now using a corrected set of labels and if out-term students filled in a job card they should be getting the paper.

Chicago but

some

trip

great

freak-out

The organization of this year’s engineering grad trip was very good, and the stay in Chicago was excellent, but the actions of some of the “adults” on the trip back left much to be desired. There is nothing the matterwith

good natured fun when it is not at the expense of otherpeople-people who do not wish to make asses of themselves. If one wanted to see how agroup of so called civilized people could degenerate, as in “Lord of the flies”, he should have been on the train from Chicago with these “senior students”. HOWARD W WATSON mech eng 4B

Next

time

buy

an

ad

Thanks to all who made this year’s FASS performances a sucThanks to those who took cess, part and those who fought for, tickets. FASS ‘69 is already being planned. The theater is booked for February 5-8. TOM ASHMAN BILL LUSIGNAN PETER MOORE LOUIS SILC ox

outlook

areas such as Latin America, the large corporations that have invested there have been less than enthusiastic about social reform. The Alliance for Progress is an interesting failure and American corporations have taken to raising amounts of money given to their tame governments. This is somewhat reminiscent of the early days of unionism.) At least in the bad old days, when you took over someone’s country you built roads and sent a few of the local elite to your universities. It may be objected that America is spending vast sums on foreign aid. This is true but most of it is spent in the U.S. and the aid program is not connected with economic penetration by American capital. The two are distinct. The other major difference betweenCLF and imperialism lies in the way the American people view their system. To the average American, it is inconceivable that the freedom-loving nation of 1776 and all that has become the conservative imperial power of the 20th century. Arnold Toybee said at the University of Pennsylvania in 1961: “Today American is no longer the inspirer and leader of the world revolution, and I have an impression that she is embarrassed and annoyed when she is reminded that this was her original mission...America is today the leader of a worldwide anti-revolutionary movement in ,defense of vested interests. She now stands for what Rome stood for.” If the American people are not willing to adthey are imperialists, the same is even more of the rulers of America. It is with great diffithe Americans admit they are not in Vietnam for the sake of the Vietnamese, but that they also interested in stopping RedChina, whatever means. Still, it is this thought of stopping RedC hina ,ad various other bogies’ that animates American foreign policy. If this were not the case, would men like Walt Whitman Rostow hold the reigns of power? The next column in this series will deal with examples of American foreign policy inaction and its successes and failures. mit true culty just are that

Friday,

February

23, 1968

/8:32)

493

13


About

What’s miniskirt

This column is reprinted from the Lance, University of Windsor, where Hogan is a chaplain. by Father Tim Hogan

health

-

and

how

obvious reveals

here is that the more than fe-

male legs-it exposes masculine disunity, that “beast in the belly” moralists used to speak about. And it raises the question: is man’s erc, otic drive a blind and brutal lust or is it a creative source of energy? And if it is the latter, as we all know it is, then where have we gone wrong on sex? Why doushers have dirty thoughts on the way to communion, why did Vatican officials release a statement outlawing miniskirts within the Vatican, why are most men secretly indignant at the erotic atmosphere we live in? It’s an intriguing question.

I preached a sermon recently using miniskirts as the jumping off point. Some people wanted a copy of the sermon, but I didn’t have one-there was none. Sermons are spoken not written. Here in general is what I said. fm interested in miniskirts. As a social phenomenon they provide an opportunity for cultural reflection, especially reflection on our sexual customs. The very fact that miniskirts have survived longer than the average fad and have been taken seriously by dress stylists and the fe male population in generalisitself a healthy sign. I mean, there’s a certain overt yet honest and therefore healthy sexiness about miniskirts that the plunging (or vanishing) neck-line simply doesn’t have. Breasty go-go girls tend to reinforce contemporary oralfixationminiskirts remind us that women are not only mothers but persons. Or do they? A group of ushers in amidwestem parish complained recently to their pastor that they were plagued with dirty thought on their way to communion because so much female flesh was showing,

Mental

I think the answer has to dowith a kind of pessimism, if not despair, about the very possibility of beingin-love, or rather, of staying-inlove. Somewhere we’ve got the idea that all love impossible to create a warm, human, and loving intimacy which is also enduring and stable. And if love does not endure then sexual intimacy is really oneform or other of mastrubatior+it is short-lived, short-circuited and self-directed. Aren’t young lovers today taught to despair of their love? You’ve heard the story, “the honeymoon

to deal

with

it

by Ed Penner student emeritus

Jt has come to my attention that Charley Preston, the head of counseling services has quit because he says his department% budget is too small this year. Howard Petch, acedemic vicepresident, says Preston is leaving simply because he has been offered more money at Memorial U. Regticiless of the truth, we are without a counseling head to take care of the less stable among us, and it is to fffl tnis void that I take pen in hand this week. After all, without counseling there to restrain them, the neurotics will be out to inflicttheirneurosesand hangups on us.

^

:

i , $, I;: . I ,,, ,$ : j

,> ,

and

miniskirts

. j 9 > ’ ;‘,*. b : ^ i ,r ., Inl:“, 2 : . , , i , hl

f:

%$::<‘-t,;;:

i

,,tl,

i ” I I

-;.“*

*:

For this reason that I plan to include in this column a list of the various types of weirdosone may run into on this campus, and describe in layman’s terms, their dominant characteristics in order that you may avoid them at all costs. l The first and most dangerous type is Suzy Timebomb. Suzy is usually found in first-year arts and has probably come from a private girls’ school; her parents are always wealthy. When Suzy came to U of W, she expected her professors would be a curious blend of

dirty-minded

is over, baby-come back to reality --get off that cloud.” Hollywood hasn’t helped, nor have the majority of popular love ballads as both present the human situation as either utterly bleakor totally frivolous, but in any case chronically loveless. Why have we given up on love? We’ve given up on people. People are limited, finite. We know thisand baby, do we ever know it, It seems this is all we know about people. And, of course, by limited don’t we really mean closed, flat, one= dimentional, predictable? Love is based on a belief in other peoplfaith that they can tram+ tend themselves, that they are precisely unpredictable, full of surprises, So often a promising relationship dies precisely because one of the partners assumes he has exhausted the personality of the other, that he “really know~‘~ the other person, that there is no more to be known. If this is really be lieved, nothing more will happen, nothing more can happen. Game over&his: is when the couple settles down. But let’s get back to our reflection on miniskirts. Miniskirts

Timothy heavy and Albert Schweitzer. When it became obvious they were not, she stopped going to classes, and in fact has not attended any since November. Neither has she informed herparents of thisfact. ‘<They wouldn’t understand”, she will tell you. u They’re too successoriented.” Another disappointment for Suzy was tie lackof it+ tellectual stimulation which she felt she would find in conversation with her fellow students. Expecting to be intellectually stimulated 24 hours a day, Suzy finds mostly bridge games and discussions of who won the football hockey game and who drank the most beer last night. Finally, in October Suzy joins a group she considers her intellectual and spiritual peers. This group has two passionate beliefs and topics of conversation: that they are the first generation to throw off the shacksexual hangups” and les of a hat they call “Victorian that they are also the first to note that the military industrial complex fosters war. Suzy especially enjoys denouncing Victorian sex hangups and emancipated women and so on, until someone calls her bluff, takes her cookies and she finds that her first affair has ended very badly, not at all as she had expected. . It is now February and Suzy Timebomb is rapidly becoming just that. By this time she has either slashed her wrists (but not very deeply) or has threatened to Suzy is now becoming very dangerous, many times. especially to any man who comes in her path. She talks more and more about the virtues of free love, and the her voice has taken on a tinge wickedness of Vietnam; of hysteria. Show her the slightest bit of attention and she will become a millstone inseparably fastened to your neck. But worse, take her at her word, love her and leave her, and the authorities may find her suicide note addressed to you1 Yes Suzy is in a bad way and if this year is running true to form there should be four or five of her

ushers raise the question of sexuality and have pushed us into a discussion of love. This is right-there is a connection. Lust is loveless se-r rather, lust is sex without personal reference. Lust is anonymous, impersonal, unspecified. Lust occurs only in a loveless environment. (One wonders about the ushersand what kind of sexual intimacy they had achieved in their married lives). In any case, the problem of love vs lust is not a question of controlling (‘beastly” sexual drivesbasically it is a question of the personhood of the lovers. What’s at stake is the possibility of people being-in-love, the possibility of achieving a deep, authentic, warm and life-giving intimacy, the kind of relationship that goes beyond and much deeper than a few frantic and ‘masturbatory sexual encounters. The quest for just such a rela. tionship is the most real thing w bout human existence. So, young lovers, when you are told that the honeymoon is over or that you should come back to reality, forget it. People loved.

who say that have never

running around right now. (Girls should note that there are also severalTommy Timebombs running around whom it would be best to avoid.) l There is anothertype of hung-up student-closely related to Suzy Timebomb-named Sally Ugly. Sally, (who has a male counterpart) cannot, or is convinced she cannot, compete sexually with her pears so she concentrates on achieving straight A’s orbetter. If her average slips, stand back, or you may be drowned in the flood of tears or worse. l A new phenomenon this year is the Paronoic potHe is convinced that everyone arouna him is a head. narc out to get him. He can be easily recognized as he feels under your lepels for a badge or screams when you touch him on the shoulder. Come to think of it, you should not associate with him at all. The narcs MAY be watching him. They’re everywhere, you know1 0 Girls should be especially wary of delicatelooking yaw men who take them out andafter the date begin to weep and confess that they have never made love to a woman and they are afraid they are homosexual and if they could make love, juStthis once, great mental anguish would be lifted from their shoulders. But it turns out that they REALLY can’t make love and then there are more tears, and more anguishuntilftnally the girl ends up with a new confidant-d little else. And on it goes--hangups too numerous to mention. So until counsel@ services gets more money, or a new head or organized or whatever it is they need to do, keep your eyes open and proceed with caution. *** KOREAN CRISES DEP’T: It has been reported to me. that the United States is planning to solve the present crisis by cutting North Korea off the Asian mainland and towing it across the Pacific for use as a Berkeley parking lot.


It’s just plain ridiculous e Election results in arts were directly proportional to lengths of sideburns: Tom Patterson led, followed by Cyril Levitt, Dave Cubberly and Katherine Dilts. m A pattern? Editorials in the Globe and the Telegram called on The the government to resign. Star said don’t resign. The K-W Record said there are arguments for both sides. l Renison’s council rep before Chalmers Adams lived in the Village and took all his classes on the main campus. They didn’t need a resident babysitter then. Why not?

Only at Waterlootheran could there be a parents association that holds family days. l

0 We wonder where “the newspaper of its time”-Math Mediumpicked up this: “Eventually, someday, someday, we will get organized.” WE ought to know. l “To face the unspoken unguarded thoughts of a village full of tarts who say you must protest you must protest it is your diamond duty ah but in such an ugly world the true protest is beauty.“-Phil Ochs. (Not ridiculous)

Villagers are required to check their firearms with the Village council, according to their information and regulations booklet. The same paragraph prohibits “explosives, airguns and other offensive weapons and pets”.

l

l York must be the only university around to practice sexual discrimination against gingko trees. They’ve planted scads of male and female gingkos miles apart from each other on that lonely 475acre campus. It seems ‘too much fraternizing results in a “malodorous fruit.“(-Toronto Telegram)

“‘And if anybody

Constipation The Federation of Students has a new game. I t’s called general meeting and is designed for all ages from three-and-a-half to adult, Anyone can play and anyone can win. Let’s divide the question: 1. Rules The guys that knew the rules Monday were the student-council types, who dominated the meeting

else can’t count. . . ”

of the corporation

and kept forgetting that most people aren’t used to their game and that its technicalities bore them. A useful cry for beginners is “Point of information”. It can be used to suspend the meeting while you find out what is going on. For instance, when subamending is incrementing, or you don’t know where they’re going to put the question, stop the world and ask. 2. Proxies. The first thing to realize about proxies is that there are no rules about them-yet. Except a possible jail sentence for falsification. The most exciting thing about proxies is the absolute terror you can exercise with them. You can demoralize the average foe with a

just a plural expression on your \ face. If you have enough, not only can you win votes on the actual motions, but you can keep your opponent off the floor with motions of personal privilege. If the speaker does not accept you can challenge and overrule with your majority. There’s only one problem. If you vote down a motion you don’t like, make sure it doesn’t erase too much. You might not have the two-thirds you need to put it back. ‘There’s another general meeting March 4. If you want to brush up on your rules, the federation office has the 30 copies of Roberts they bought for councillors in 1965.

A member

of the Canadian University Press,the Chevron is published every Friday (except exam periods and August) by the board of publications of the Federation of Students, University of Waterioo. Content is independent of the university, student council and the board of pubiications. Phone (519) 744-6111

local 2497 (newsroom),

2812 (ads), 2471 (editor).

Telex 0295-759 editor - in - chief: Jim Nagel assistant editor: Brian Clark news editor: Rich Mills

A new way to ward off a cold? No, the furnace federation building. Nurse Sadie Wood (left) and hardt took advantage of the 50-degree temperature erature experiments on the first patient to walk in

fbiled again in the old secretary Janice Burkto perform cold-tempthe freezer door.

SPOtiS editor: Tom Rajnovich entertainment editor: Nancy Murphy photo editor: Brian Doda

Suggested we work afternoon instead of sitting CUPman Kelsey was here last week with cheer. around. Getting orgelized. Ha. And notice musical chairs in the masthead again: ass ed’s job is to get other people off theirs. News dept has shrunk: Ken Fraser, Andy Lawrence, Dale Martin, Glenn Broomhead, Pieter Duinker, were the faithfuls this week, Sports: Archie Bolsen (asst editor), Karen Wanless, John Thompson, Bill Snodgrass. Ads: Mike Greenspoon, Julie Begemann, Photo: Reinhard Opitz (darkroom mgr.) Gary Robins, George Smit, Rob Brady, many more. Circulation man Jim Bowman. And the rest whose names I can’t remember at 4 ayem. Next week, Kelsey. 8,800 copies

Friday,

February

23, 7968 f8:32)

494

15


2% Lounge, 1:OO. St. Paul’s evening service. ken Father Mat. 7:30.

Today HOCKEY vs McGill. Waterloo Arena’ 8: 15. Women’s BASKETBALL championships. Seagram gym. OQAA WRESTLING championships at Guelph. Men’s SWIMMING at Toronto, HUNGARIAN Students ass”-

Wayne stocking

important meeting. SS302, 8:O0. ALG-NIGHT PARTY featuring Nowe Sound, horror movies, fire works diaplsy, FREE popcorn. Village hall’ midnite - 5.

gram, 6:15. DANCE with the Brass Union, Caesar’s Forum, 9:OO. Missing Peece COFFEEHOUSE. Conrad Grebel, 10-l.

Tomorrow

Sunday

HOCKEY vs arena, 2:O0. BASKETBALL

Lava&

Waterloo

vs Toronto.

Experimental film series: AL 116, 8:30. MathSoc BRIDGE tournament.

Se*

Stat& ccainpus cops up on teargas reason

DETROIT (S p e c i a l)-Thirtyfour cops’ three patrol cars’ a budgetquarter-million-dollar add five men, teargas equipment, rifles, shotguns and don’t tellanyIt’s Wayne State Univerbody, sity’s security department, *The security director’ Donald Stevens, denied that his department had ordered teargas, but the student paper, the South End’ found proof that the requisition for gas guns and masks had gone through, Stevens publicly defended the need for gas but maintained that the student body didn’t need policing, His department has little contact with students because (495 percent of our work is done off-campus.” The university police patrol part of the city of Detroit’ answering police calls when xequested. The riots last summer were the main

for

expanding

the defense

Thursday ROYAL HUNT OF THE SUNdrama till Saturday. Peter Shaffer’s epic dramaabout the conquest of Peru and a man’s search. for immortality. Students 75$, rJ”:ers $1.25. 8:30, theater. Thursday film series. ONE DAY’S CATCH: highlights of a day’s fishing-fisherman’s tackle’ technique and catch, OYSTERMAN: stages of oyster cultivation. Free, ALl16, 12:15 noon.

iMonday Ticket sales for Village Weekend during Lunch and Supper. Red Dining Hall. University parish film MARNIE. Free, ALl13, 8:OQ. CHESS Club meeting. Continuation of champ! ,.rship tournament. ss caf, 7:oo. GRAD BALL tickets go on sale. Federation office 9-5; physics; engineering and artsfoyers noon-2

Tuesday

took pictures of homosexuals, Each time the university has admitted its deception when evidence was provided to the cant rary o The university’s main argument for a security department was campus protection, A confidential department report on security actions during the summer riots showed that most of its time was spent protecting localbusinesses and chasing snipers and looters outside the campus itself. In an editorial, the South End said the university’s integrity is at stake, They renewed a request for a review student-f acuity police ‘I Every operation as well board. as action of the university security department should be a public matter, open to public investigation,”

arsenal’ Stevens said. He revealed that there was no subsidy from the city for any of the off-campus work. Students at Wayne State are upset because the security department got more money in a year with a tuition fee hike academic budget cuts. They are also disturbed at what looks like lies. The teargas denial is part of a series of disproved statements from the security director, Stevens had given figures for the past and current budgetswhich were not correct, Last spring the university denied the security department was keeping files on students’ that the department aided in off-campus drug raids, that the department

ation office. Spear

FRENCH club guest speaker: Donald Gauthier: “The trip”. ML commonroom, 8:30. Ticket salesforVillage Weekend continue, same time, same place. HISTORY society meeting. All interested history types welcome. SS208, 400. Government engineering as a career for engineers. P145, noon. HUNTING films. EL107, 7:OO. Meeting of all aspiring LAWYERS. Prof. R.J. Gray, asst dean Osgoode Law School. AL213,3:30. CHEMICAL Institute of Canada meeting, Two films and norninations for next year’s executive. B271, 8:OO. Progressive Conservative club elects officers. AT216, 7~30.

DR. MURRAY will be appearing at the

Book

Mom

February 12:30

- I:30

Autographs

26 pm.

on request.

Folksongs, Ballads and Blues (Dominion Record LP 1275) with Roy Guest and Murray Young (University of Waterloo professor) is now available at the Universit y Book Store, $4.48 each.

COUNTRv AND WESTERN music club. Final meeting of year to elect officers; jamboree, BOOZERAMA. 7:30, AL105. MATH SOC council nominations close 5 pm. Math office or feder-

University

Store

to sing songs from this and his forthcoming albums on

Wednesday

FEDERATION

YOUNG in person

Dr. Young recently appeared on a program in Toronto with Vanessa Redgrave

OF STUDENTS of Waterloo

Notice

is Hereby

Annual

Given

of the

Meeting

of the Federation of Students, Unitdersity of Waterloo, corporation under the laws of the Province of Ontario,

a to

be held Monday, March 4, 1968 at 8:QO p.m. in Room E 1301. The directors of the Federation will be appointed at this meeting, in accordance with Section 3 of By-law Number Any

stereo

A great Get it and you’ll songs that could With ‘The have

have ten see chart

‘The Staccatos’ Guess Who?’ groovy

music

Both

Coca-Cola

brand new action.

on one side and on the other, you’ll to liven

and

Coke

MARCH 1,2,3

are

any

registered

for a dollar*

album miss

branded Coke.. .and the Interested? Full details

in cartons

party.

trade

Don’t liners yours.

marks

which

*Plus

ten

identify

only

one

dollar

product

liners

branded

of Coca-Cola

-I ntercourse -Saturday -Eng. Sot.

STAR TREK!!

( 496 The CHEVRON

Annual

ten cork

must be in

Meeting, Brian E. Iler

Stephen W. Ireland President

Coke.

President-Elect Federation University

of Students of Waterloo

Ltd.

LOUIS!!-one competition nite 8:30 pm food services members $2.00 per couple

WEEKEND of

- Non

Canada’s

members

top dance

!

MARCH A293 bands!!

$4.00

-Friday nite car rally to finish at “Blue-Moon” in Petersburg -get applications early from federation of students building -$I ‘00 first fifty only

BRQOM BALL TOURNEY

SEE YOUR REPS

item for the agenda of this meeting

album’s

! ENGINEERING

Featuring:-BENNY

16

plus

other

the hands of the President of the Federation by 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, February 28, 1968, to be considered by the

of Coca-Cola.

cork

the

it. Just

1.

-Laurel

TICKETS

Lake

- 6 man teams may register at Eng. Sot -24 reasons to win!! -compete Saturday at 10: 00 a.m.

Office

at Noon

ENG. FOYER 12:OO-I:00


1967-68_v8,n32_Chevron