Page 1

c

Volume

THE

8 Number

UNIVERSITY

27

utheran by Sandy

Savlov ,

Chevron staff

Waterloo Lutheran students w nored their student council wednesday and went on strike. Students boycotted classes wednesday to protest the dismissa.I of two radical teachers. They ga.t% ered in Lutheran% main atis iuyer to demand explanations for the dismissals of polisci pti Dr, George Haggar and psychology Ie+ turer Gray Taylor. the e istration refused to attend. The Cord Weekly, Luther&s student paper, felt that reasons given for the firings were ins@flcient and called the strike, Student council did not support it, Some four to five hundred concerned students came to hearHag= gar, Taylor, student reps andhope fully administration officials. C larification was what they ww ted but at no time did the administration formally acknowledge the meeting. Cord editor Linda McKenzie chaired the meeting. She Ied sff by explaining the issue and intffoduced a representative of thep&sci students. Cliff Shannon poli sci 3 read a petition that had previous& been presented to Dr. Frank Peters academic vicepresident. The p titian, signed by most of Lutheran’s political science students, expressed their concern overtheap parent lack of academic freedom, Shannon said he and several other students would not be returning to WLU unless the issue was resolved. Hangar

‘/‘wo .1&y

reiterated

sluv~~s ji~r next Purr, pkumin~

his

pc&w

OF WATERLOO,

Waterloo,

admiti

Ontario

Friday,

January

19,1968

stri

ignores

and asserted his right to be formally told of the real reasons for his dismis Sal. A letter from university president Henry Endress said Haggar was “obviously unhappy...and un. sympathetic to the purposes and operations” of WLU. Gray Taylor then told how he had been dismissed, not because of his teaching ability, but rather on a charge of I4 unprofessional conduct.” He cited two possible incidents which might have led to this charge. One was a run-in over parking regulations and the other involved the library. Dr. Guna Subins, an assistant professor of geography, took the floor, criticized Haggar and supported the administration. He suggested that there were perhaps more reasons than those publicly stated for Haggar’s dismissal. Student vicepresident Rob Brown gave council’s position. He explained that they had withdrawn support of Haggar andTaylor Monday night, preferring to wait until the Canadian Association of University Teachers had completed its The council held a investigation. secret meeting. Mark Hopkins, who had resigned from council over the withdrawal of support came forwardwith a resolution appealing for academic freedom and strongly supported the position of Haggar and Taylor. After listening to speakers for two hours, the dissatisfied crowd dispersed knowing little more than they had before the demonstration.

vwek “s uuction, 2, consider

Bev their

Mundel, arts 3, and vote Jbr president.

WLU students applaud questioned the dismissal . ‘i.-.-.-.-.-o-.-.-~-.-.-. ‘.*.*...~.~.*.*...~...*.=.-.*.=~~.*

. .

. .

. .

. .

. . .-•-. . -. . .

during radical

Wednesday’s protest staff members, Gray

. . . . ..~...............~.............................................................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . l . . . l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . e ._.-.-.-.=-._.-.-._.-.-.-.....-.-.-.-.-*-...-.-*..-.-.-...-.-.

Not student

Study by Brian

a speaker of two

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The-y in Lutheran’s arts foyer. TajJlor and Dr. George flagger.

. . . . . . . . . . . . l . * . _. . . _. _ . _ .~.~.-.-.~.~.~.-.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.~.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. . * . . e . . . . * - . . . . . - .. - . - .. - . - .. - . - .. - . - 0 .-. . . . . . . c . . . . . . -- . . . .. . . . t. . . . -. . . . -.

.

.

.

.

revolution

urges

Clark

Chevron news editor

“There is at the present time no such thing as a student #right9 to representation in the university government,pp according to a study paper prepared for the Committee of Presidents of Universities of Ontario, The 210page report will be re leased on Monday. The Committee of Presidents is meeting today, Dr. Ted Batke, U of W*s development vicepresident, was a mem__._..__.~~~~.....~..~....Page 19 Camels and committees _.______.---.-.-.....-..--ber of the subcommittee that prepared the report. The report rejects the assumption that the *‘community of scholars will perform its functions better if it is organized along political lined9 The paper is not a declaration of policy but rather “seeks to place the matter of student ino volvement in the context of the universities basic goals.p9 The report makes two basic assumptions, “that there is room for improvement in university govern? merit, and that the approach to improvement must be through civilized discussion and the exercise of rational judgement.” It rejects politicalpressure tactics based simply on thenumber of supporters. “The only legitimate power within the community of scholars is the power of the intellect.$$ Making the whole university a democracy-based on the adversary principle-would yield nothing more than a sham democracy, according to the report. The report points out distinc-

renaissance

tions between consulting and involving students in the decisionmaking process. It advocates stum dent participation on departmental and faculty committees, where they have direct interests. The report questions whether student representation on the board of governors would improve auniversity’s primary functions. But student involvement would lead to a better understanding of the mone tary workings of the university. According to the study the functions of a university include serving the needs of society, facilitating individual student8 personal development, increasing industrial productivity, training members of the learned professions, improving physical conditions of mankind and exploring the fundamentalvalues of contemporary human exist+ ance. But the report states that the primary purpose of theuniversity is “the preservation, trans. mission, and increase of knowledge.” The committee then evaluates objections from various sources about student involvement at the summit of university government: ‘. Student leadership changes too often. But some students admit that their contribution will be qualitatively different. Students don’t have enough The study quotes Dr. Robin tike. Harris of Queen’s University that it would take 10 hours a weekeven for a person familiar with the university-to become a competent university governor. The study says, “It would not advance the primary objectives of the university to have either junior or senior scholars deflected ser-

iously from scholarship by excessive work on administrative bodies .$$ Top-level decisions demand delicacy and confidentiality. The report agrees with a YorkUniversity student brief that studentparticipants are not only the repre sentatives of the students but of the whole university just like any other rep. “openness as an absolute principle could lead to abuses just as unsavory as those associated with secrecy.$$ An agreement would have to be made about confidences before students are seated. ‘{The increasingly wellor&nized national and provincial student movements are geared for political action and hungry for power. Local student leaders become indoctrinated with ideas of student solidarity and are instructed in devious methods of attaining group objectives which do not promote the individual university’s welfare and may indeed be inimical to it,$* But it reassures its readers with ‘Student letiers by and large are intelligent, independent and honorable, and it is difficult to believe that many of them could be easily indoctrinated.pp The report concludes: “The important thing is to reach an honest understanding of the differing attitudes, and try, together, with mutual respect, to improve the university and its contribution to the society of which it is a part. Working alone the students might produce a revolution. Working together the university could effect a renaissance.p’


Tables

THE CANADIAN ’ METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE offers

professional

PHYSICS

careers

AND

(GENERAL,

to bachelor

graduates

in

MATHEMATICS

OR

PHYSICS

MAJORS,

AND HONOURS COURSES) as - (about 15 graduates required)

METEOROLOGISTS

Successful candidates are enrolled, a full salary, in a 2 year Master’s degree course in Meteorology at McGill University, the University of Toronto, or the University of Albert (Edmonton). and METEOROLOGICAL OFFICERS - (about 50 graduates required) Successful candidates are given a 9 month in-service training program and then *posted to the various civilian and National Defence weather offices across Canada. These opportunities offer competitive salaries, challenging work and numerous employee benefits.

INTERVIEWS JANUARY

plant and planning,said Wednesday that the students could have the

furniture in the arts coffeeshop returned the way it was if that was what they wanted. Arts rep Dave Witty said that Lobban will be asked to return the furniture as a result of a committee meeting This should clear

on Tuesday.

up a situation disatisfaction,

that led to general

a petition and a delegation dent council.

ON CAMPUS:

to S~LI-

Apparently the decision to change the coffeeshop to a lounge was made 2 years ago when a search for lounge spacewas begun. A provost% committee including

22 and 23,1968

Full details, applications and interview available at your Placement Office.

refurn

The tables will return to that campus sanctuary of dining and discussion, the arts coffeeshop. That is after the red tape is untangled. “That administration has seen that the students do have as one of their inalienable rights to sit big institution-like tables on hard chairs instead of in casual groups on soft lounge chairs ,” said one student. Bill Lobban, director of physical

appointments

/+agey

President J.G. Hagey back a$ his desk wie said acting president Petch.

103

University POST

Ave.

SHELL

King .Ontario 100

Wat@doo,

Phone

Licensed

-

Mechanic

W.

Apathy is immoral

Sundries

Depot

for

BELMONT CLEANERS

&

Phone

TAILORS

742-2016

University

orner

LADIES

and

Daily

the

Midnight

REPRESENTING

Canada

Business 576-4950 Home 578-2785

courteous

24 BUILDERS

& STEAK

Host: Peter Shopping Centre,

OF BETTER

m3!

I+(343

FAMOUS

LICENSED

FOR CHINESE

UNDER

TAKE

PHONE: Corner

2

390 The CHEVRON

AND

LCBO

AMERICAN

AND

Faclaris Waterloo

742 --4488,

class

students.

collect committees

more

) ten more

This week students

were

placed on the council for student affairs and the engineering, math and science library operations colflmittee. There are seven students on the student affairs council. This is the biggest delegation of students

744-4782

seats ever placed committee.

Kraft

&UNIVERSITY

fee by

CHEESE

8 OZL pkge

the

CHUCK

69c

Road

included Post

SLICES 33c

Lean GROUND

742 - 4489.

subscription mail

RENOVATED

in Office

their department,

Oh! But did he ever return? annual

student

fees

entitles

Ottawa,

and

for

U of payment

W students of

postage

to in

receive cash.

the Send

Chevron address

by changes

mail

during

off-campus

promptly

to:

terms. The

Chevron,

Non-students: University

$4 of

Waterloo,

annually.

Authorized Waterloo,

on an administration There are 22 people

on the council. Federation president Steve Ireland didn’t place much importance on this representation. “The council is only advisory to theprovost. It’s not a decision-making body,” he said.

Top value FRUIT JUICE 2 48 oz. 69c

CUISINE

RESERVATIONS

Weber and Bridgeport

reps

Verdun pointed out that Wel>l steps Dictionary defined Aryan as “relating to the Indo-European family of languages** and that English was listed as anIndo-Europe an language. A further comment by Verdun was that he felt the Aryan Affairs Commission was at least as important as the records selection committee and thus deserved not only recognition by the board but a.lso a voting seat on the board. H.D. Goldbrick, chancelor of the Aryan Affairs Commission, ispresently vactioning in the Bahamas and was unavailable for comment.

HOMES.

RECENTLY

A

math

lMTN

FOOD

OUT ORDERS

Two more

HM HOUSE

KING (

service

Students

IIi!@Emm RESTAURANT

Waterloo

whereby air is from the of the lungs to

The percentage of turnout for the elections was typacle the only 23$, of the voters showing, The best percentage of voters came from those students in 3A, 347’0~

Bob Verdun, interim president of theCommission, saysheplans to appeal the decision of the board. Already a request has been made to student activities chairman Brian Iler to bring the issue up at the next meeting of student council.

Life

w

- TV 8 to

KEARNS

King

WELCOlME

Confectionery Open

I’

two

In a meeting last week theboard rejected the Aryan Affairs cons& tution on the basis that ##there are no such things as Aryanic language@.

“Enjoy life today while saving for tomorrow”

VOLKSWAGEN

(formerly Central Motors) FOR AUTHORIZED VW SERVICE With a Student Discount COMPLETE COLLISION SERVICE 745-m 1 Xl0 KING E. 1 For the best food and UNIVERSITY BILLIARD ACADEMY

Of

elects

9

stomach instead sp‘(1 was amazed at his esophagal voice,‘S said Petch. “He said he went on long walks in Florida alone, talking steadily to himself. But there’s been a dramatic improvement in the last ten daysthere’s really no problem undestanding him now at all.”

The board of student activities has decided not to recognize the remidly formed Aryan Affairs Commission.

BARRY

Crosby

and released

BSA rejects Aryan Affairs Comm,

1

hrd

speech,

In the MathSoc elections held on Wednesday , Douglas Brown CW and Gary Stevason (m) where chosen as the two ~0-0~ reps to Math co~cil~ AlsO ruDning we= Gary Williamson and Doug Yonson (lB).

742-1351

OFFICE

Groceries-

esophagal

swallowed

a method

turnout

Poor

N.

be

Howard

monh

a monU1,

years.

had to learn

SERVICE

St.

“So the nasty old administration didn’t turn out to be so bad after all. Alid soon the arts coffeeshop will ring again with the cheery young voices . . .3 notrump...double ..four cokes...fascist pig..double . ..eight diamonds . ..X. ” a spokesman said.

Hagey has been resting inFlorida following throat surgery in October that removed his larynz and left him without a voice. He had been suffering from throat cancer He

GERRY’S

should

caf

went ahead and changed the larger part of the coffeeshop into alounge over the Christmas break, since the temporary lounge is now a language lab.

within

to return

for several

MORROW ONFECTIONERY

to arts

student representatives decided that a lounge was needed for the arts theatre building. At that time they debided to use another room on the first floor which would be made into a language lab when the funds wereavailable, Then grub shack (food services) would be finished and the coffeeshop would not be required at a high-output. This decision, made two years ago was ratified five months ago according to Lobban. Thus PP&P

as Ontario.

second-


High costs force Village

Attempts Waterloo

to circulate Compendium Printing refused to reproduce

‘68 order forms were delayed by at least this picture on the order form flyer.

Compendium Compendium ‘68 the university yearbook, is already in trouble over alleged abscenities. A photo that was to be used for advertising was rejected by a local printer. The caption was to read,t’You’1: find the funniest people-between the covers...of Compendium ‘68.93 The rest of the copy was an order form for the next yearbook. The photographer, Glenn Berry, math 2A, said, (‘We (he and the

YO by Brian

photo

a week

when

censored

girl) took the picture in complete Berry claimed that innocence.” both of them were wearing shorts and it was the wide angle that distorted the true length oftheexposed legs, c’hairrnan of the John Shiry, board of publications, asked George Roth, university design consultant, to produce the layout and get the flyer printed. Roth asked Waterloo Printing Co. to produce several thousand

copies of the flyer. Walter Niergarth of Waterloo Printing refused to handle the pri.nthgjob. When askedwhy he replied,‘lAny information you want, you get from George Roth. Leave us al--P. 93Iulle: In a letter attached to the returned copy for the flyer, Roth said the printers refused on the grounds of a potential federal offense.

candidate

Her

Any man who seeks the presidency of the Federation of Students is faced with many challenges. The most crucial of these is the quality of education program, There is a need for much more thinking and questioning at this university about the way we are being educated, I propose a major teach-in on education next year comparable to the International Teach-in at the University of Toronto. There is a growing feeling today that students are full members of the university corn munity e Only with full student participation in the government of the community can the university realize its goal of developing fee, creative, thinking and acting human beings. Full participation can only be achieved with open decisio-making. Waysmust be found to ensure that students who par+ ticipate in university councils are truly representative and responsible to their constituents. The university’s librariecrecently rated worst in Ontario-must be impro--_------------_--_-------Questions and answers Page 10 - 11 Checkpoir? t pontificates Page 77 Penner talks to Pooh Page 78 Editorial Page 79 ved. We need more books, longer hours and more study space. Good libraries are a mainstay of the university and students must be prepared to take every measure to ensure that we have them. Better communication between student council and the student body is essential. Efforts such as this year’s %-a~elling-circus” council meetings shall continue. To supplement coverage by the Chevron, more council newsletters will be necessary and the feasibility of a 50wait AM radio station willbe investigated. Our faculty societies must be strengthened in order to provide students with more and better activities and effective representation at the faculty level. It is necessary to assure the societies of financial support and improve liaison be

Kelly

In which we are introduced to the pooh ~did~e and learn that some Good Things are near at hand: One day b when it was weathering rather Fiercely outside, Rosemary and all her friends and relations said wens if they want to know, we’d better tell them... So, they did, And this is what they said: . ..=..when Edward bear said that he would like an exciting name all to himself, Christopher Robin said at once that he was Whme-th*Pooh. Piglet, though jealous of Pooh, has more education, and Pooh doesn’t mind,’ being a bear of very little brain. Pooh travels on his head, likes bunny, and has many friends. His friend Christopher RobinisHelp ful; Tigger is Bouncy; Rabbit is very Efficient; Piglet squeaks a lot; Owl is clever at everything but spellingt Eeyore is sad and Gloomy; Kanga and Roo are quite Family. These are all our friends. They stand for, well, Good Things, like watercress sandwiches,. balloons, Birthday Parties and adventures (mostly in the lOO-aker We would remind everyone that a wood). vote for Rosemary is a vote for Pooh. The Good Things are in danger of being lost in that enchanted place forever. The Pooh People want to bring them back to you. All it takes is an X.

by Cyril

Levitt

The student body of this university being sold down the road to tokenism

All residence fees are rising next year with the Village increase being the largest. The cost of a single room at the Village will be $960. In a memorandum distributed to Villagers this week warden Ron Eydt explained the reasons behind this hefty increase. First, the fees this year were too low and there will be a deficit of $48,000. This is due to a poor prediction on the cost of operating the Village as an entity of 26 houses. The business office now says that the fees this year should have been $880 for a single rather than $850, Dr. Eydt went on to say that in budget discussions last year apro, posed fee structure was arrivedat by planning on a five percent increase in saIaxies and food. This leads to a figure of $920 for a sin= gle room next year. At this time senior university officials pointed out the Village was supposed to be self-sufficient but yet it was not being charged for heat, light and water. This item would add $80 a year t0 residence fees. The ancillary services committee agreed that the Village should pay for its heat and power but de tided to implement this over two years, Thus the fees this year will be $960, $940, and $920 for a single, interconnecting, or double room.

There will be an automatic increase of $40 in the following year. Dr. Eydt pointed out that fees at Western will be $1000 and $1050. at Windsor. At the church colleges, fees are going up but are still generally lower than at the Village. St. Jerome% fees are going up $75 to $835 for a double and $I95 for a single. The situation is similar at Conrad Grebel where fees are rising to $835 for a double. At Renison, however, the fees will be $900 for a double and $975 for a single, These various fee structures were presented to a meeting ofthe board of governors last night for ~pr0va.l.

CHEVRON STAFF Discussion

and

Shenanigans (i.e. party) TONIGHT Call the office itor for details

or any edOY a ride.

See ya there.

Y

tween the Federa&ion council and the societies . Where the collective student voice may have some influence on an issue of social concern, student council has a responsibility to take a stand. While student council may lead student opinion* it cannot take stands objectionable to the majority of students.

by Rosemary

fee hike

is and

abdication. Student leaders picture themselves in the role of politicos, of men who work quietly within the system to effect change. But that change has not been forthcoming. Instead they have become a part of the system and have accepted a stilted view of student participation in running this university. The adrninistr&ion allows few students membership on a number of committees within the structure. After that, all decisions made by the university are deemed a&ptable since a student was involved. This gives the impression of MEANINGFUL participation by the student but is in fact a farce because the tokenism that it represents is a barrier to FULL involvement by the student. The professional administrators use tokenism to channel student revolt into predictable paths. I propose to find more direct roadsto change-change that can be meaningful and will result in, total student involvement. Mario Savio, leader of the Berkeley Free Speech Movement has said/(There comes a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious that you can? take part, you can’t even tacitly take part.” The Duff-Berdahl report on university government in Canada the validity of Savio% statement, and consequently the administrators allow student tokenism which serves to grease the machine but not to change it in any fundamental way,, The time has now come for the student to share and share fairly In the running of his university. Issues such as our inadequate library are a function of the present system. Council has tabled recommendations for change in the library but the student body demands that changes be made now, before the final examination period.

by Mike

Pratt

Mike Pratt has come to the University of Waterloo after several years of practical experience in the working world. He has worked in the West Indies for the

Canadian government and spent two years as a structural draughtsman. He has come here with a firm conviction of what a real education should be, completely agreeing with the Dec&uz&ion of the Canadian student (published by CUS) which says: “Education is a contributory social process, the essence of whichisanexpa ding awareness of men’s socialandnatural environment through dialog and co-op erative intellectual effofi. The principal goal of education is to serve society by developing the full potential of all citizens as free, creative, &&iking and acting human beings and therefore to serve society by helping to achieve equality of the essential conditions of human living. The student lmust discover, examine and assimilate the knowledge of his environment and must develop the ability to cope with and transform it. l’The Canadian student has the right to establish democratic, representative student associations. ReaHzing that educational reform will not come in avaccuum or without a continuous examination and possible transformation of societal values and institutional arrangements, the associates must be free to ally themselves with other groups in society which have similar aims, “The Canadian student, as a full member of the academic community and society has the right and duty to participate in shaping an environment conductive to the accomplishment of these aims and to make basic decisions about the condition and nature of his intellectual activity and the goals served by educationdl fnstitutions.*$ Mr. Pratt has found that education at this university is not the contributive social process which it should be. In OFC der for this goal to be realized, the students must be involved as much as possible in the life of the university. For involve ment there must be more communication between student council and the students. Mike is interested in a real education; he believes you are too. Give the Students a chance-Vote Pratt. Friday,

January

19, 1968 (8.27)

39 l

3


Ontario 742-1404

Phone

and

Duke

Streets Kitchener

Ontario

by H.D.

Goldbrick

the retired rhetoric

WATERLOO

SQUARE

- Phone

NASTYHAU, THE BAHAMAS-(Formerly staff)-Academic anemia (the search for truth, money and marks), Waterloo weather (the Vancouver of the east) and bigoted Twin City student hatemongers (and KW’s amateur Larry Solway) finally got through to me. I just couldn’t take it any longer. So I cashed in on my favorite charity-the Visit an Orphan in the Bahamas Fund. It all goes to prove a couple of old cliche adages3*Charity begets at home and Honesty pays but dishonesty pays better? This Bahamas bit suits me just fine. Here I bask in the company of some of the finest mafia-type gamblers and toplevel land-swindlers, not to mention such mentionables as Adam Clayton Powell and the cast and characters of this year’s power shift at Waterloo-

743-1651

Happy Valley SKI RESORT Ontario

Walkerton ONEW

l NEW ALPINE

T-BAR

*GOOD

FOOD

“SKI LESSONS

*DANCING

CHALET

*WEEKEND

RATES

SKI SHOP AND SKI RENTALS

kets FASS IS A FACET FAUCET

TO GALA A KNIGHT ONLY!

CALL f LOCAL

FASS’N YOUR SEAT BELT

PRICE

=l OR $1.92

26 34

FASSIBLE

FRIDAY JANUARY

FASSIST

FOOD SERVICES LOBBY ENG. & ARTS FOYERS FEB. .. .. .-

T

FASSTBACK THIN

K

TIES

THURS.,

February

38 KING S. OPP. WLOO SQUARE745-294 1

16, 1968

-NO CHARGE

The following

914 WED’S NITE tHRN EYDT 924 SATmA. MAT $.88 $.97 SAT.KNYTE

positions

FOR SPECIAL -

are

1

VS. U. of T. Waterloo Arena 8 p.m. Tickets available at Seagram’s and arena TORCHLITE PARADE (bring your own torch if possible) led by U. of W. band to . . Food Services SOCK HOP featuring the Magic Circus IO.95 p.m. 7% or $1.00 at the door.

open

WATERLOO

immediately

of th,e CHEVRON *Ad salesman - commissions are paid - must have a car *Administrative assistant - to handle ad layout and book work *Design artist

SAT.,

FEB.

Building,

Chevron office,

3

AM & PM - OLYMPICS

at Laurel Pond (timetable

will be out shortly)

SNOW SCULPTURE judging 10 a.m. - Theme - Comic Characters invade news of the day eg. Charlie Brown drafted to Vietnam CONCERT at Kitchener Auditorium with the Everley Bras. and the Rooftop Singers 8:30 p.m. Reserved seating tickets $3. SO, $3.00, $2.50, $2.00

2

Two SLEIGHBELL BALLS (semi-Formal) at Paradise Gardens, Guelph, and Food Service. Licenced under L.C.B.O. Two bands each 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. $6. per couple Tickets for Sock Hop, Formals and Concert will be on%Sale in ML and Eng. Foyers Starting 10 a.m. Tues. Jan. 22 4

392 The CHEVRON

SQUARE

SH 4-2781 Custom gunsmithing Rebarreling Rechambering Restocking

epartment

ADVERTISING

Apply at the Federation

FEB.

FEB.

CHEBOOK NOOK ORDERS

HOCKEY

FRI.,

ISSUE

Submission date for writings, drawings photographs

STIKES

TICKETS per PERSON

2

THEN USE OUR STUDY NOTES COLLEGE OUTLINE SERIES STUDY MASTER - MONARCH ETC.

FASS BACK Winterland’ ‘68 EVENTS CALE

FASS

FASSTIVI

7 8 10 10

26thAT/.27AM

STUDYING?

LES publication”

Board of Publications Federation of Students

SPRING FOR TICKETS FEB.9th FRYED PERFORMA-NCE

FASSINATION

-+w

LIONTAY “the new literary

theran-V i 11 au m e, Speckeen and other sunworshippers. The latter group is apparently here to set up the University of the Bahamas. A likely story. Would you believe courses in casino business administration, social work for destitute gamblers, basket-weaving and scarfing?* 0 So the good Lord willin’ and the seas don’t rise, I’ll be sticking to the beach. That is except for the odd frontHne report as the Chevron’s southern outposts bureau. 0 But don’t forget my mother, Mrs. Horace Dung Goldbrick,, She’s living in New Hamburg now, and in addition to promoting sno-carts she’ll start a few crusades to keep Waterloo County klean, So watch out, Sandy Baird-the Kitchen- Water Rag is on top of her list. She’s already declared CHYM beyond hope. (She calls it CRYM.)


EngSoc will study courses

The Slave Auction

‘Do your ears hang low?

will be held on

Do they Can you A lot of these days EngSoc A society’s

wobble to and fro? tie them in a knot.,.?” students are frustrated by blah course-s, but is fighting back. The curriculum committee is evaluating tours e content in each of the engineering faculties four departments . Critiques of two courses from each department will beforwarded to the engineering faculty council’s curriculum committee. The committee had asked for the critiques.

24th

\cVed. ‘I January

At 8:30 pm in the Village BLUE DINING HALL (NOT. THURSDAY, JANUARY 25th AS PREVIOUSLY ADVERTISED)

The critiques will outline the present course content and the relevance of the course to its department. Teaching methods will not be investigated.

NOW Evening

The basis for the critiques will be the course? relevance to its engineering d epa rtment , chemical, civil or mechanical. electrical, The big question is: Should the course provide fundamentals or teach manipulation of a handbook? Some profs say that fundamentals develop a handbook, a handbook provides formulas to churn out answers t ” said one. All the questions covered. in the critiques boil down to a basicdecision. “Is Waterloo a big assembly-line-type f a ct o r y or do students come here to beeducated?”

show 8 p.m.

Mats Sat - Sun - Wed at 2 p.m.

“I.,

.

LI

letter

I”r.L

JULIE ANDRI%VS AS htiL!mIE Singing, Dancing,

MARY

Delighting!

TYLER

AMMIRE CAROL

,::

CHANNING

:.“’

JAMES

:

ONE-

FOX

Debates

vote

words

We hate to do it, but this time of year we resort to stronger language. Like “mark” and “down” and “save” and Youth”. We opologize to the keeper-ofthe-profit column, but we msut ever say “loss”!

PLAYING complete

four

InRGSS HUNTER’Sproduction

soon

The House of Debates would like you to vote. Elections are being held for speaker, deputy-speaker, treasurer, and two clerks for their organization. The polls will open at ‘7:00 pm. January 24th. All students are eligible to vote.

of

Adults Eve $2.00 Mats Sat Sun $1.75 Wed. $1.50 Children all shows $1 .OO

OFF

ONE-

OFF

Notice

is hereby

OF WATERLOO

given

of elections

for

the

1968-69 term of office, seats will be as follows:

positions

the distribution

Creative

of

of

winter term spring term Environmental Studies Graduate Studies Mathematics: regular programme winter term co-op spring term co-op Physical Education & recreation Renison College St. Jerome’s College Science

Engineering and Mathematics spring term elect representatives in the spring term.

students

will

24 at 9:00

am

Nominations

Close

January

31 at 500

pm

14, 9:00

am to 500

are

available

in the

THURS. JAN. 25 12: 15 NOON DRAMA TRANSCENDING (A psychological drama. entry in the C.U.D.L.

pm

Federation

The Students’ Council and officers of the Federation will assume office March ‘T, 1968 for a one-year period. I

(Series Tickets

only)

and Decoration)

WED. JAN. 24 4: 15 Theatre of the Arts EARLE BIRNEY LECTURE BRITISH POETRY OF THE 1960’s Free Admission

January

forms

SUN. JAN. 21 6:30 & 9:00 AL1 16 INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES METROPOLIS (Fritz Lang U/S.A.)

TUES. JAN. 23 12: 15 Theatre of the Arts ART LECTURE WITH SLIDES ART AND.ANTHROPOLOGY given by Dr. Joan Vastokas of the University of Toronto, Free Admission

Open

Nomination

Calendar

MON. JAN. 22 12115 AL1 16 ART FILMS (Maori Arts and Culture: Carving Free Admission

Nominations

February

Arts

SUN. JAN, 21 8:00 Theatre of the Arts THE WOODWIND QUINTET From the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto. Free Admission - Tickets from Theatre Box Office Ml254 Ext. 2126

4 4 3 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 3

Arts Engineering:

Elections

St. W. Kitchener

Phone 744-5271 STUDENT CHARGE ACCOUNTS

REPRESENTATIVES TO STUDENTS’ COUNCIL For the Council

HALF

TECHNICOLOR

OF STIJDENTS

UNIVERSITY

OFF

ONE-THIRD

213 ring

FEDERATION

FOURTH

office

Theatre

of the Arts

one act play which is a farcical This is the University Drama Co. Festival. Free Admission

THURS. JAN. 25 12:15 AL1 16 THURSDAY FILM SERIES “UN ITED KINGDOM” England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. Two filmes showing the geographic regions, important resources and major cities. Free Admission Federation

of Students

- Creative

Arts Board

, 1

.

Friday,

January

79, 1968 (g-27) 383 ” ‘. : _ \’

f

C I .

5 ‘A-


State

Michigan

U. not

Juliet’s by Julie Chevron

Begeman staff

“Romeo and Juliet” is one of Shakespeare% longest plays. It takes a great deal of skill to maintain the interest of the audience throughout the five acts. With the exception of Act 1, which moved rather slowly, the Michigan State Players kept up the pace admirably. ‘\ The minstrel-like musical introduction and ending, along withthe colourful period costumes added, considerably to the medieva atmosphere of the play. Another clever touch was the setting up of a PlatfOITn to resemble that of Stratford% stage. Franc0 Carracci, who played Escalus, the prince of Verona, definitely represented one of the low

Stratford

role welLmastered points of the play. His speeches were practically impossible to understand, his bearing was stilted and awkward and he appearedvery unsure of himself. Mercifully, his appearances were brief but he managed to pr6vide an unfortunate anti-climax to an otherwise skillfully contrived ending. An effective contrast to his somewhat insipid wife, Capulet, played by Paul Mea&am, gave a polished performance with impeccable articulation. His television and theater background stood him in good stead with his excellent grasp of the part. Another supporting actor worthy of mention is Romeo% friend, Mercurio, aptly portrayed by HarAlthough his perold Rick Hite, formance was relatively brief, he gave a convincing performance as

The skin of our teeth, a Thornton Wilder play, was presented’ last weekend in a semi-professional production by the Michigan State Players.

a loyal and stalwart fiend, considerably more mature and a great deal wiser than the young Romeo. One was never aware that he was acting. He simply WAS Mercurio. Joel Plotkin, who playedRomeo, is an actor who simply exudesvitOne is aware of him the ality. minute he enters onstage. He does, however, lack sincerity in the first half of the play. The melancholy evident in the traditionalimage of Romed s character is missing. Although his dramatic lines are a little over-acted and there appears to be a suspicisous resemblance to Richard Burton in Romeo% explosive outbursts of speec-r. Plotkin has a hint of personal magnetism that has a great deal of audience appeal. A sincerely enchanting performance was given by Marti Maraden who played Juliet. She expresses an appealing innocence and a reserved manner but shows a great deal of spirit in her rendition of the role. She is not simply a pre& ty young girl who has been easily wooed and bows to fate. She is above all an intelligent woman whose love for one man becomes her life. Mrs. Maraden is well onthe way to becoming a professional actress. If her performance of Juliet is any indication, I suggest that hers might be aname to remember for future reference. Comic relief was provided by Juliet% nurse, Jill Goldwasser, who was an extremely convincing combination of bawd and a suspicious protectress of your young charge. Her servant Peter, played by Michael Oberfield, provided a certain amount of humour but somehow came off as a clown who was not really very involved with his part. One tends to view all Shakespearean productions with Stratford in mind. A sense of relativity must be maintained in judging such a group as the Michigan State Players. It is true that only a few of the actors reached professional levels in this play, but on the whole, they are certainly a first rate university company. Their 4Romeo and Juliet?’ had certain impe~ec~ons, but it did no discredit to their well-established reputation.

MSU escape by skin of teeth by Malcolm Chevron

Fauquier

staff

“The Skin of Our Teeth$’ by Thornton Wilder is apopular piece in amateur theater, and was pre sented here as first in a series by an advanced amateur company. Last Thursday evening’s opening performance by the Performing Arts Company of Michigan State University unfortunately provided a catalog of many ills which beset an inadequate production. Whereas many professionalperformers have a certain charm and ease with which to manipulate their way out of onstage accidents, this company merely became moreand more tense, until nerves seemed ready to join the general state of collapse. Everyman in America, as Wilder% play attempts to be, contains elements of the theater of Pirandello and Brecht, as well as the American Broadway tradition of the past 40 years, But these elements requirefluidity, incisiveness, perception and sensitivity in direction, production and performance. While these qualities were occasionally appar-

ent on our stage, they never occurred in sufficient density and coincidence. It would appear that this play is deceptive to the arnateurperformer, since it is very easy to take the script at face value. Wilder has provided lines of some depth (not necessarily philosophy for the ages), and the lit&s were frequently appreciated by the audience in spite of distracting delivery onthe part of most actors. Although it is only natural that a compaw of players would be upset at the holocaust of production flaws presented in the first halfhour of Thursday’sperformancstwo slide projectors conspicuously out of order, a wig that flew off the leading lady% head, a breakaway chair that broke too soon, and so on and o&e actors seemed never to recover. Indeed there were moments, especially in initimate scenes, when it seemed as though the play would grind to a halt altogether. The academic influence upon amateur theater may at times be instructive, but in the case of the under-rehearsed Michigan comp-

any, the various (( methods” of acting as presented in textbook and classroom do not mix well on the stage. Mumbling Actor% Studio performances (serious and satirized) were thrown together along with pure innocent ham, Sundayschool gravity, grade-school recitation, and that most delightful of all styles: Pure Acting Ability. This last was witnessed in only one performer. Deborah Dabek, as the daughter of Wilder% Everyman, was exquisite. Her keen sensitivity, sweetness, freshness, her un-hoky delivery of lines and her flexible features were the delight of the evening. This actress refuses to allow herself the pomposity of an 4‘actressyD* voice, so often attemp= ted by amateurs. ’ If everyone who saw her compares her with Miss Sandy Dennis of greater fame, they will find these young ladies have many excellent qualities in common. Fewer performances, held on weekday afternoons, at minimal prices, would put Michigan state’s Performing Arts Company into a proper perspective on our campus.

The Michigan State Players presen ted Romeo and Juliet at the university last weekend. ’ Colorful costumes and minstrel music added to the atmosphere in the theater.

Lightfoot previews New album.at WLU A standing-room-only audience jammed the WLU theater-auditorium Saturday night to hear Gord Lightfoot at his best. Performing a concert for the first time in over a month, L&h& foot was understandably a little loose and he later admitted that both he and accompanistsRedShea and John Stockfish were ((a bit off musically and artistically.~* They were the only ones who noticed. The customers. were treated to his now-famous standards ranging from ‘Early morning rain* and ‘Steel rail blues’ to the bloodstirring ‘Canadian railroad trilogy,’ which must certainly rank as his masterpiece. The major part of the performance, however, was taka up with cuts from his upcoming album. Songs on the new album include Black Day in July, his comment on the Detroit uprising, Pony Man, a lighthearted ballad with a refreshingly pleasant melody, and BOSS Man, a hard driving tune

which will be the single release for the LP. The major work is undoubtedly the Mountains andMarianne, the tale of a young man tr;ir velling the country on a motorbike, All of Lightfoot% trademarks as witnessed in Trilogy and Earty Morning Rain are especially evident in thts important piece. It is his personal favourite and at the end of the song he told the crowd that “when you write a song like that you feel so damn good... Let% sing it again!)’ And he did1 The performance of this song not only revealeda musical accomplishment but perhaps yielded a key to the success of Gord Lightfoot. He doesn’t present a facade on the stage as other performers are wont to do but instead his enthusiasm is real. Lightfoot continues his college tour with a concert tonight at the University of Guelph in conjunction with their Winter Carnival. Judging from his reception at Lutheran, the pendulum of his popularity is on the upswing and does not promise to fall for some time,

Gord Ligh tfo6 t performs with exceptional warmth and--ahem -spirit ot a very captive audience at Waterloo theran. Friday,

January

79, 7968 (8:27)

395

7


The Chevron

HARVEY’S Enjoy the adventure

of thrifty

good eating

and see what --

you

new

treasures

find

in our tantalking

will

CHARCOALED

BROILED

of taste

FfAMBURGERS,

HOT DOGS and CHEESEBURGERS

King & Weber 745- 7282

See the.

Stereo

For a complete line of radios, tape recorders, and accessories; play of paintings and sculptures

10% Student to all with . 85 King

St. South,

I.D.

cards opposite

portable TVs stereos, plus an extensive dis-

by Gord

ir 9

depths

Wilkinson

staff

As usual in the KitchWitch area there are no middling picturesjust good and hellish. This week% typical. If your Vast Wasteland has been on the blink for the last year or so you can tune in the reruns of ‘Hatari* featuring John Wayne as the original great white hunter, and ‘The nutty professor’ with Dean Martin’s former sidekick, This dynamic duo is at the Odeon until tomorrow. And then we have PThe gentle giant’ and ‘Red tomahawk to round out your viewing pleasure till Wednesday, The Lyric stands pat with $Valley of the dolls’ foranotherweekI guess they must really be packing in all those campus narcs. The Fairview is also adamant about Millie th e mod-1 suppose Kitchener’s Mary Poppinsfans will just never fade away. The Waterloo still comes on as the most aware place in town (the most hip to all you diehard hippies). ‘War gam9 and its partner makes way fo4ou should be-

THEATRE

Sunday,

Catherine Spaak and Horst Buchholz in a villa . . .in a garret.. inacar... inapark.. . onacouch.. . onabeach.. .starin a movie the empty canvas showing at the Odeon. RevtiThe sassination performed

persecution and asof Jean-Paul Marat as by the inn-&es of the

SERIES

OF THE

ARTS

Jan. 21 *p-m-

WOODWIND

QUINTET

FEDERATION

and Hindemith Box Office -AT254

OF STUDE,NTS

CREATIVE

cards

the Capitol.

depravity’s

Will play vvorks by Beethoven, Haydn Free admission - tickets from Theatre 744-6111 Ext. 2126

Discount or A.T.L.

Druma

SUNDAY

. .

Arts Shop

and

on

ARTS

-

BOARD

Asylum of Charenton under the direction of the Marquis de sade’, Basically a debatebetweenMarat and his commitment to mass revolution, and De Sade and his preoccupation with individual sexual gratification; the performance finds the ultimate peak of drama in the lowest depths of human depravity. Itps slated for a week beginning today. ‘The empty canvas9 premiers this weekend at the Odeon for a one-week stint. A few choice claims by the PR. boys should just about cover this one: ‘JExciting things happen in a villa.& a garret..& a car...in a park...on a couch...on a beach . . . . . never is love more wild or abandoned. .)$ Pll give you a h-they ain’t talking about painting-by-numbersl

theatre

ANXIOUS?

THEATRE OF THE ARTS

Phone 742-5481

Sunday,

January

28

TENSE?

~:OOP~

The couselling ducting treatment test anxiety.

UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

service is conresearch on

If you become very anxious and tense when you have to take examinations, this is your opportunity to do something about it.

Performed by the University Orchestra. Alfred Kunz - Conductor works by Mozart Handel Haydn

If you wish to participate please visit the counselling service on the seventh floor of the library building and see Mrs. Simpson

Admission Free Tickets from Theatre Box Office AT254 Ext. 2 126 Federation of Students - Creative Arts Board

Act immediately

GOLD NUGGET RESTAURANT 38 King Street

North

FEATURING: NOW PLAYING an extraordinary film! “THIS WAR GAME” “ESPECIALLY ON SUNDAY” featuring Catharine spaak.

pius

AND

396

The CHEVRON

ROOM

*The best home-style cooking and pastry you’ve ever tasted! *Hot dinner sp ecials daily, ranging from 7Oc to $1.20 *Free delivery. $3 minimum order. 744-0887 *Take-out service No cover, no minimum.

COME IN AND MEET THE BYERS FAMILY! $

DINING

Waterloo

744-0881


Is u of by Archie

w going c and W? Pike, Wynn Stewart, and George Hamilton IV have all recently had songs that were big hits on thepop charts. Just a few days ago LnKitchener 5000 people, Young and old alike, saw a big western-music concert, and they all went home srnfling. Local radio and television stations have country music shows of one kind or another. Even 1967’s “in*’ movie, ‘Bonnie and Clyde*, owes much of its appeal to the spirited bluegrass picking of Flatt and Scruggs in the background. With so much interest in country music evident several students decided to form a club on campus*

of hillbillies whining away as if their vocal chords were in their noses. With such artists as Dean Martin, Conway Twitty, the Everlys, Ricky Nelson, Gene Pitney and even Ian and Sylvia, singing more of this type of music, the public has become aware of the true updated brand of C and W. In addition a number of country smger have made fmpressions on me record-buying market. For aamPle* Eddy Arnold, Johnny Cash, Buck Owens, Jim Reeves, Marty Robbins t Glen Campbell, the Statler Brothers, the Brown% Skeeter Davis+ Roger Mifler, Ray group

Bolsen

Chevron sports

Last year when the Chevron, in conjunction with the Campus Sound radio program, surveyed W aterloo students on their musical tastes, country and westernmusic exnerged at the bottom of the ballot. One short year later wefind that the university has a C and W music club and that-the Everly Brothers, recent converts to country music, will be performing at Winterland. What’s happened to bring this about? Y0 Apparently today’s adolescent is starting to shed the false image of country music-a

ung

Talk over your future with the Bell employment reps when they visit your campuson

Virginia and Gladys by Odjig, an Ojibway Indian, is among the 40 Indian paintings in the theater gallery. A lecture on art and anthropology accompanies the exhibit Tuesday at 12:15.

ENGINEERING RADUATES

JANUARY

25 & 26

GRADS-TO-BE-IN: HONOR MATHEMATICS HONOR MATHS & PHYSICS HONOR ARTS CIVIL, ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

TECHNICAL SALES& SERVICES INDUSTRIAL campus

January

DIVISION

interviews

26,1968

Ask at your Placement Office for informative booklets and arrange for an interview now!

SunOil CompanyLimited Friday

Jan.

26th

(8: 30 p.m.+)

Grad.

EEKEND in t

House

Party For your entertainment summoned “At enormous expense” all the way from swinging Gait!

“The

Bell Canada

U of W style - cosy cabin

Camping;

Mushrooms!” ADMISSION:

males $1.50 females $1 .OO with activities card - ‘? price! INCLUDES: An appetising supper

LIONTAYLES

SPRING Submission writings, drawings

cots - food

and

about the

Friday,

pm to Sunday,

noon

FREE!

Complete and

return to Weekend in the Woods, Federation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..~..............~......~..............~................................

Transportation

provided -

of Students

ISSUE date for

NAME................................................ABDRESS.......................~.. R-KJNE..

16,

. .

l

. , . . . .YEAR..

. . .-. . FACULTY..

. . a Xhoiceofvveekend l

Feb.9-

11..

=. e Feb.

16

18..

. . .

Iamapplyingbecause.......................................................................

photographs

February

- comfy

IDEA EXCH

Landslide

“the new literary publication” Board of Publications Federation of Students

0

1968

Sponsored by

Board

of External

Relations-Federation

of Students

and S.C.M.

Friday,

January

19, 1968 (8:27/

397

!?


VOTE WEDNESDAY

Dialog

An informal several

hours

with

between three of the presidential candidates lasted for as Brian Iler, Cyril Levitt and Mike Pratt exchanged views and dialog

Three of our candidates for president of the Federation of Students attended an informal Chevron gettogether Sunday night. Mike Prutt, arts 1, Cyril Levitt, poli-sci 2, and Brian Iler, civil 3B, sat down for a couple of hours to discuss and explain their views, policies and ideas about student government and the upcoming election. Rosemary Kelly, English 3, was out of town and unable to at tend. Her comments appear separately below. The three were questioned by Chevron news stafi the editor of the Math &Iedium, and several interes ted onlookers. I Why ident?

are

you

I

* running

for

pres-

Why are you running for president? ILER: *gf~e worked with past presidents and have seen the job as a challI think IDm capable of doing the enge. job. There are lots of things to do and Pd like to see them done? Iler continued, describing first the issues-the issues that really “ sandbox”’ involve no important principles. “The societies are weak and perhaps compulsory fees should be re-investigated. We should re-examine the possibility of closer ties with Waterloo Lutheran? Iler feels that the local image of the university can be improved by using the Athletic fees should local media more. be in the hands of students. In broader areas, Iler believes that the quality of education, university government and studedt involvement within society will be important issues in the next year. He intends to implement recommendations of Student council’s quality of education committee and go ahead with plans for the fall teach-in on education. Iler feels his experience in organizing Tenth Anniversary Week will be valuable in setting up such a program. “Students have many reps on committees now,” said Iler, “but a way must be found to make sure they’ re responsible and to get reports back.” Iler believes that student council should promote involvement in the world by taking stands “on which most students concur,” As an example he mentioned the recent ban on South African products made by council, LEVITT: ‘$I want to offer an alternative, not on issues per se, but on the

10

YOUR

398 TheCHEVRON

whole concept of university education. Serious things are wrong at this university. Pursuit of truth should involve facThe administration ulty and students. has grown far too large. It must be reevaluated. IZve seen that student participation can lead to tokenism; three or four students on a committee can be useless.” At this point ILER interjected. tt We realize there’s student-administration and student-faculty opposition but we must go through legitimate channels before action is taken.” LEVITT argued: rcIt takes student council three or four years to get anywhere. It took them four years to get anything done on the bookstore. Things are now more chaotic than before.” ILER disagreed. “Students are being consulted on that committee and we’re entirely happy now.” does not feel this is good enLEVITT ough. tt We need student power, political power, perhaps as much as 50percent rep resentation. Otherwise it’s only tokenism. (‘1 see these problems as a manifestation of something greater than theproblems per se. Student apathy, for example, is a result of this university as a giant

Cyril Letitt: “. . .we need student power, political power. . a” machine, therefore alienating the student. The educational machine tends to isolate the university student from pursuit of knowledge and our own Federation seems to have accepted it. ‘(The noble purposes of the university are presented in addresses but forgotten in everyday life.‘8 PRATT: tg Students do not associate themselves with the student government at this university. There is a great voidbetween the Federation of Students and the average student. tg On this campus there is no such thing as student apathy. Every student I know is very interested. The problem hasbeen the government reps talking down to the students. The people in power are concerned with image outside the university before they’re concerned with the situa-

ideas. Topics in university

presidenti

ranged from government

the quality of education to library space.

tion within the university. “Students are interested in student government but it just isn’t being presented to them properly. They should make more use of the media-radio, and television, as well as the Chevron. Maybe dial-an-activity or dial-a-report as well as more council newsletter would help to project the-internal image more so than the external. We have to get the people here to know what’s going on. ttThe present administration has had some success-it’s got first-year students like me interested. Pm not running on my own. Pm representing first-year students.” LEVITT agreed with Pratt on the problems of internal workings. “The way the university is structured today it’s virtually impossible to bring the student into the process. There is too much bureaucracy. We must restructure the university to make the students feel a part of it. The students must realize that what they feel, say and do does have effect. To get this, fundamental changes must be made.‘L

How can changed?

the

power

structure

be

LEVITT: ‘8 With the type of people who talk a& talk we can get nowhere. There was no action on the bookstore untfl300or 400 students showed support. Student leaders and student council should take stands and promote them by any means? “The president of the Federation shouldn’t be a dictator but must provide a modicum of leadership to the student council. g4The administration expects tt responsibility .)* That is, students can play ball but can’t attack sacred cows of the university. *t Students are supposedly able to think yet- the Village situation for themselves is an enlightened monarchy where rules are imposed from without, ILER noted that the present realtionship with the administration is fairly good. 9n the summer they agreed to let student council decide what groups to recognize. They look back on the bookstore strike and see that students are gaining power.” PRATT felt that the administration seems t ‘to be giving in to any reasonable student demand”. However LEVITT sees the situationin a different light. “The administration tries to make student protests look great-free speech and all that-but they don’t want you to hit the sacred cows. All the talk of student power starts to ruffle many people and they’ll do anything to stop a shift in the power structure. Perhaps the administra-

to

cumpus

cops

to secrecy

tion saw the Dow protest as an attack on the coopetive system. Of course the real o@&ion was that students weren’t consuRetl.~B PMTT questioned LEVITT whether student council should have supported or reject4 actions like the Dow protest. LEYD’T felt that council should have taken a z&and based on a consensus of students which probably would have meant a refe37emlum,

HQW especially

do its

you feel highschool

about CUS, program?

LIZ-: *%US is attempting to follow the Company of Young Canadians with its flee hi&schools. These take the hangups out of re%rupar highschool but they should go after ail grades from kindergarten through highschool,” ILER feels that the present lecture system is antiquated, %omeone once said Ie&ures were out of date when the printing press was invented, Through the quality or;P education committee there is hope for more stimulating lectures.” LEl/TI”T doesn’t like the idea that many people come to university only to be able t0 g& something out of life. g%% kind af hard to see the university as a truth place, The free universities in California offer alternatives. The ordinary universities give training rather than learning and put too much emphasis on economic aspecti? ILER -pointed our Toronto’s Rochdale College as another example of what can be done w%h higher education. PRATT <said3 “As a first-year student Pm not sure I know the answers, I will seriously study the problems. When I choose a course I don’t look back-not like the present wishy-washy leadership.”

Mike Frau: “. . . when I choose a course f don ‘t look bath- . . . ”


candidatedler, LEVITT: “1 would give strong supto CUS, especially in its policies :erning the university student as mem; of the world community. This gives rection of the future to US. Students t be involved, and should have a say, Le future.” %ATT agreed. “We’re the people ‘re primarily affected by the charges g on in the world. There% tremeni power in the world student body.”

ihould we use CUS 3s or for services?

primarily

‘Uil

Iler:

Z.S~tl

both CWS’ iCUS’ services 1 . . ” “.

l

. I Ijaluc>

ee agreed that the newspaper must rein independent from student council. LEVITT feels secrecy is a very cru1 issue and thinks student council luld have ((engendered mass support.” udents have to flex muscles in this blem of secrecy as they did in the kstore? PRATT wondered if perhaps student ncil was just waiting for the ‘(perfect de.?’ LEVITT wants something done about library situation “this month, not next r. Next year% just not good enough. ? time has come to say ‘OK, we want it final exams.’ The student-council Iit seems to be to put it off-it’s effectly tabled till next year. PP and P can ve now. There’s room for them-we e done a private study.” e candidates Dir qualifications

Cyril Levitt is 21, enrolled in poli-sci 2 and comes from Toronto. In highschool he was on the debating team , the United Nations and currentevents clubs. He was an early member of CUCND (the Combined Universities Committee for Nuclear Disarmament, the predescessor to SUPA. ) He spent one year in science at the University of Top onto. Levitt has been active in the de

for

LEVITT indicated he thought both e of importance with each one initiatthe other. PRATT too felt both were of equal le. ILER said he valued both CUS ideas their services. PRATT questioned Her why there had n no demonstrations this yearwhenthe xte study committee on university govment refused to abolish secrecy. “There was enough fervor to carry & demonstration.” ILER admitted that the student counhad compromised. (I But it was a favorable compromise &use this wasn’t a decision -making back to the senate Y. It only reports ch will consider opening its meetings the time to consider. the report.” PRATT feels the Chevron should icize student council more, to create :e interest, LEVITT, however, thinks thechevron doing a good job at present and all

were asked to explain for the job of president.

Brian Iler is 22 years old, in civil zineering 3B, and comes from Guelph. He ran the first Circle K slave day, ich was a success, organized a FASS oduction, which involved working with ople and taking care of administrative tails. He was chairman of Tenth Anrersary Week in October which meant Irking with all levels of administration d faculty from all departments. He’s en on council for two years, serving 1st of this year as chairman of the ard of student activities and also sitting a student rep on the senate study comttee on university government. “1 think Pve been around long enough 1 know the situation. I feell?m qualified run the bureaucracy.“’

4‘.

, . this rnon th. not next year, not good enough. . . ”

next

year’s

bating club supervising a successful tour to Rochester. He belongs tothecanadian Jewish Congress being the only youth member on its anti-Nazi committee and helped draft the anti-hate legislation it presented to Parliament. On campus he has been active in the political-science union, the folksong club, library committee, the quality of education committee, the Students for a Democratic University, and the Student Christian Movement. Vrn terrible--this is a pretty long list of bureaucratic credits.” (Heusually advocates leaving activities unstructured.) “Oh yes-in the summer I drive trucks.)’ Mike Pratt is 20, in first-year philosophy and psychology, from Acton. In highschool he was president of the debating club, was in public speaking, participated in model parliament and was a member of the Anglican Young People’s Association (which often take political As an army cadet in the West stands). Indies he was anofficialCanadianin&ucHe’s been out of school for tWo tor. years. “1 think I’ve experienced quite a few extremes as far as life goes that qualify me to carry out this job. I’ve also got quite a few people behind me to help. “As well I do not have a mental stasis on sexual prohibition,” he joked. 4rA~~~~ ding to Freud this will enable me to devote full attention to the job.”

What spapers?

is the

role

of campus

The Pooh Kelly,

English

but must also offer leadership.” “I agree with the Chevron’s ILJER: present publicity policy. The main role is news* but features on the main topics The discussed tonight are important. Chevron should probably be devoting more atterition to these kind of topics.”

um

What is your pus cops?

opinion

but I do want to find more ways to get co-op students involved? LEVITT: “engineers have the toughest job of anybody on campus in some ways. They’re getting job t&ning as well as other education. Because they’re here four months and off four months it’s hard for them to get same benefit.”

of the cam-

PRATT: *‘The rigor of their courses leave them open to utiliz&ion by brainwashers. They tend to vote as a blocwhich Mr. Iler here seems to be hoping for. But you can’t really blame him for that.”

PRATT: “They perform a useful, necessary function. The university can’t consider itself outside the law. Student government shouldn’t automatically reject them,” LEVFL’T: 44We need some authority - to keep things inorder. But other campuses have two--how many do we have? 301 351 They multiply every once in a while.” ILER: “They’re necessary. However they must be fairly lenient with students when ihey get carried away with pranks. The campus cops seem to be doing a good job, but students, faculty and administration should have control over them .)’

Who should ttees and what have?

run judicial commipowers should they

. , I do want to get co-op students more in~~obed. . . ” I‘

L

LEVITT: c%tudents should be entrusted with the meting out of punishment. The university should have no say in this. ILIER2 Y%udents should be responsible for disciplining their own. They should not be punished by the university authorities for criminal offenses as happened at Western this year. The civil authorities should handle these cases,” PRATT agreed with the views of the other two. The three candidates agreed that athletic fees_ should be in the hands of students.

port

3,

did

How do you leadership?

perhaps 1 can match this peptic ulcers with my ideas . . . ” ‘6

.

.

.

One onlooker planned to do engineers. HLER:

asked anything

ller if he special for

4JI won’t be playing

attend the Sunday evening meeting but she did finally agree to talk over the phone.

Confirming something which many people have suspected, Miss Kelly admitted her campaign was “kind of a joke? “Pm running although there’s no hope of winning.*j “Mostly what we’re saying,” she re vealed, “is that student politics isn’t a matter of life and death. Not that iI% trivia-but the campaign is a reaction against the super-activist. We sit around and watch the activist getting serious Well we think the opabout Che Guevara. posite is Winnie the Pooh.” Miss Kelly admitted another reason was to“help interest people inthe election. “pm not against student activism. Pm against pseudo-activism.‘” She later said that she preferred these comments not be printed. We’d rather get the message across as a joke. The whole point is lost if we

stand UP and say ‘Look, a joke.’ ”

favorites

you guys, we’re

and sup-

evaluate

the

present

“La!& year’s president LEVITT: was a good individual. He acted honestly but I don’t feel he went far enough. He acted to the best of his ability as far as his ideals go. Pm a little disappointed in council in generaI. They hemmed and hawed too much, espec&&lly on secrecy and the library? PRATT: “Ireland wasaterrificworker and achieved quite a bit. 4( But Pm not running against Steve. I agree with Cyril about council. They haven’t done enough? ILER: (J Steve’s done a terrific job in my estimation. There% a terrific executive board this year-I’d give my eyeteeb to have them back. Council has done a terrific job and has become involved a lot more?

campaign not

What kind of campaigns do you plan to have?

. LEVITT: “1 plan a word-of-mouth campaign as much as anything else. my main opposition is Iler--perhaps I can match his peptic ulcers wi& my ideas? “Mine wiIl be a grassPRATT: roots campaign. Pll push ideas, not personality . This election wi.lI be fought to bring out issues? ILER: Vll be speaking at residences and distributing flyers and posters. Pm at a disadvantage because I have to work all day?

new-

PRATT “They have the same role as any newspaper but I, would like to study other campus papers in the summer.“’ LEVITT: “The paper must be a for-

Rosemary

Pratt

Levitt,

.

Do you plan structure of the ents?

any changes in the Federation of Stud-

PRATT: *‘This must be studied. Pm not stupid enough to say I know anything about it at the present t.ime.‘s LEVITT: “It would be silly to make recommendations now. I would like to make council as flexible as possible. Its philosophy should be ‘Come let’s reason together.’ )* ILER: “I’m pleased with the board

The pooh campaign with its stars Rosemary Kelly and friend Winnie.

system. We were the first to decentralize--our board systemand other campuses are following. “1 would like to see changes with the societies. .Right now they’re in limbo. The question is whether to allow them a rep on council or on the board of student activities. Another problem is that people on committees must be made responsible, as the Chevron editorial last weekpointed out .1* Friday,

January

79, 7968 (8:27)

399

11


Intramurals

Hockey Warriors reach for the tom I

The U of W Warriors kept pace with the U of T Blues in their battle for first place last weekend by making a clean sweep of their second Quebec road-trip of the season, Last Friday the Warriors made it six straight, downing the Lava1 Rouge et Or 6-1 while the Blues chalked up their eighth straight with a 7-3 victory over Guelph. Saturday the Warriors defeated the Montreal Carabins for the second time in a week. The victories moved the Warriors further ahead of the third

outscored the ‘Stangs 4-1 in the last period for a 8-5 decision. In Quebec City the Warriors built up a 6-Q lead beforeNormand Cote spoiled goaltender Dave Q uar rie’s shutout with only 16 seconds remaining. Ron Smith, Orest Romashyna, Stu Eccles, Mel Baird, Terry Cooke and Bob Murdoch each tallied once for the Warriors. The pressure of the 150 mile road trip from Quebec City back to Montreal must have affected the Warrior% play Saturday as they had to come from behind to defeat the U of M Carabins 6-5. TWO weeks ago the Warriors beat the same team 6-2. The score was tied one-allat the end of thefirstperiod butthecarabins took a 4-3 lead into the third. Smith and Cooke lead the Warriors in goal scoring with seven each.

BRIAN

swing

A full slate of activity is lined up for this week in intramural competition. The Basketball League resumes activity Tuesday at St. night David’s gym in Waterloo with eight games scheduled.

into

in late February. This tournament will determine the LntramuralVolleyball champion. 0 The Intramural Badminton Tournaments are coming up. The singles tournament will be held on Monday and Tuesday. A few openings still remain and persons wishing to enter may phone their entries to local 3156 at Seagram Stadium. The doubles tournament will be held on Monday January 29. Entries for this event close on Thursday. As in the past the Intramural Tournament may be used to assist in the determination of Waterloo’s Intercollegiate Badminton team.

0

On the same night the Hockey League returns to action with three games scheduled for Wilson Arena. Another threematches are set for Wednesday also at Wilson. l

Volleyball will be organized on a recreational basis this term. In effect this means thatthegames will be conducted on an informal basis without any officials.

RECREATION There, has been a very good response to the appeal for basketball and hockey teams to participate in Recreational competition. Intramural Director Paul Condon said, “‘If we had our own ice

Teams that participate regularly in the Recreational Volleyball League will then be eligible for a Volleyball Tournament to be staged

action

surface we could schedule ten hours a day just with Intramural and Recreational hockey games alone.” 0 Mr. Condon also mentioned that the tournout for Student Skating on Thursday afternoons has been go*, There will be one minor change in the timefor this activitystarting immediately. Skating will take place between 1 and 3 instead of between 1:3O and 3:30 as before. 0

Upcoming events that are presently in the planning stage are a Men’s Intramural Billiard Tournament, the first ever held on campus, an outdoor Tug-of-War contest to be staged in Seagram Stadium and a Pushball competition also scheduled for the stadium. Dates, times and procedure for these events will be published in the Chevron and on the blue posters around campus.

ILER HAS THE EXPERIENCE,

COMPETENCE,

AND

ABILITY

YOU WANT

IN ‘A PRESIDENT RONSMITH * * * * * * *

place McMas ter Marlins who share third with the Western Mustangs, Both teams have eight points. U of T leads the O,Q.AA. with 16 points but the Warriors are right bebind with 14. The Warriors stand a good chance of taking over first while the Blues are in Austria representing Canada in the World Student Games this week. By the time Toronto returns+ Waterloo will have played nine games including last night’s encounter with the last place Guelph Gryphons. Next Friday the Warriors will face the Western Mustangs. In their first meeting, the Warriors

member, Student Council, 2 years member, Executive Board chairman, Tenth Anniversary Week member, University Government Study chairman, Board of Student Activity producer, FASS Nite ‘66 co-ordinator, Slave Day ‘66

BRIAN ILER the

experienced for

THE CAMPUS UNlVERSlTY

JACKETS

UNIVERSITY

JEWELLRY

rings,

TOILETRIES

& DRUGS

10% discount

SPECIAL

recording

lapel pins, tie tacks,

tape $3.00

NTERCOLLEGIATE

(1200

ft.)

Jan.

20 Warriors &Lutheran, 2:00 pm Fri., Jan. 26 Western vs Warriors, 8:15 pm Waterloo Arena 3ASKETBALL sat. Jan. 20 Windsor vs Warriors 8:15 pm Seagram Gym Ned. Jan. 24 Warriors at Toronto 8:15 pm KRESTLING Ved. Jan. 24 Warriors at Ryerson 7:30 pm VOMEN% SPORT DAYS ?i. Sat., Jan. 19, 20, Badminton Championships at York ‘ues., Jan. 23, Volleyball 6:30, j

Basketball

8:00 pm at

York

9:oo

12

p.m,

Wilson

DAILY

Monday

Wilson St. Jerome’s vs St. Paul’s

1l:OO p.m.

Wilson PWs.Ed. VS West Waterloo Renison vs Grads (EX) January 24, 1968 Wilson Con. Gre. vs co-op Wilson NorthvsSouth Wilson Arts vs Eng. Waterloo East Prac.

11:OO p.m.

Wednesday, 9:00 p.m. 10:00 p.m. 11:00 p.m. 11:00 p.m. BADMINTON liFd

pm

Mon*$ Tues., Jan. 22nd, Singles Competition

BASKETBALL Tuesday,

January

23, 1968 Sci VS

400 The CHEVRON

Math

23,1968

-

Court A vs 6:30 - 7:20 pm Arts

Math 7:30 - 8:20 pm Sci. vs Grads vs 8:30 - 9:20 pm St, Paul’s

East 7~30 - 8:20 pm North

vs West

and year of graduation,

Available

at

PARR &WALLER

links

St. Jeromea s Court B ,’ I 6:30 - 7:20 pm Phys.Ed vs

NTRAMURAL

FICCKEY Tuesday, January

OPEN

10:00 p.m.

1OCKEY ;A.,

cuff

faculty

Hockey sticks (curved or regular blade), Ping Pong Racquets and Balls, Frisbees

EQUIPMENT

Sonex

President

SHOP

University colours Variety of sizes and colours

SPORTS

candidate

Gold - Winter, Fully Crested with Fall and squall jackets available.

SCARVES

TOQUES AND SWEATSHIRTS

Committee

Curling

to Friday

SHOES

brooms \

12:45

150

King

St. W.

PhIone

745-7124

p.m

p.m. to 4:30

This virile gentleman

is getting

in shape for the ,\

\

’/

/

/

WINTERLAND 9 68

OLYMPI


A/s

lose first gafne

Cage&

by I Mac68-64

squeak HAMILTON-The

basketball’

Warriors came on strongly down the victory,

Warriors established themselves as one of the teams to beat in the OQAA western conference Wednesday when they defeated the McMslster Hamilton, Although

Marauders

68-64

One of the major factors in the win, according to coach Dan Pugliese, was the hustling defense the Warriors showed.

in

It forced the Marauders to turn over the ball on errors and violations 25 times, compared td only twelve for the Warriors. This played a big part in the Waterloo victory. Leading the Warrior scorers Doug Lockhart, with 17 were points, Sol Glober with 16, and Jaan Laaniste with 14. Bryan Brown, Larry Sobol, Neil Rourke, and Glober all rebounded well.

is O-3 in have lost all three by very close scores. Wednesday’s game was no exception as the Warriors never led by more than five points at any time. They took a quick lead and held it throughout the first half, only b lose it with a minute to go in the half. Andy Martinson and Pete Wheatley scored ten points each in the first half to give the Macmen a 3433 lead. Although Wheatley got nine more in the second half* Martinson only scored two and the --

league

McMaster

play,

they

Coach Pugliese was happy to see that the team held up under pressure. Since recent games seem to Indicate that the teams in the league

‘68 b-bull

Wurriors

strong for league title

contenders

Webster (44) fight for a rebound against the McMaster Marauders.

in Wed-

Wrestlers pinned down by Ryerson matmen by Bill Snodgrass Chevron sports

In a wrestling meet thatexhibit?d muscle, sweat and a few bad Dreaks for Waterloo, Ryerson Rams of Toronto upset the Warriors 30-14 Wednesday at Seag-

r2u-n gym Of the ten matches contested, the visitors won four by a fall and two by a decision. The Warriors

Last

night%

hockey

scoreboard

wcwriors

11

Guelph

1

Wurriors hosting highschool

b-ball

Three out-of-town teams and one from Kitchener will make up the field in a special highschool basketball tournament tomorrow morning at Seagram gym. At 10 Hamilton Hill Park meets K-W Collegiate, followed at 11:30 by Niagara Falls Stamford vs Bra&ford St. John%. The two winners will meet for the tourney title at 5 after the losers precede them in the consolation at 3:30. Warrior basketball scouts will see an outstanding player in St. John’s John Dignan, rated by Mc’ Master coach Bill Fowler as one of the best backcourt prospects in Ontario. Warrior captain Neil Rourke is also a former St. John’s player.

gained two falls, while the other hvo matches ended in draws. Each fall or pin scored five points for the team, with a decision gaining three and a draw two for each side. Getting the falls forthe Waxriors were John Stothart in the 160-lb. class and Bob Munroe (167 lbs.). The draws camefromBillHedder+ son (145 lbs.) and Steve Harris (191 lbs.). After the meet, coach Ed DeAr% mon said that the team shouldhave done better, although they lost a couple of very close decisions. “Due to the illness of three regulars,‘# he contiued, ‘<we had to use a few new boys, who did quite well under the circumstances.** Nevertheless it% obvious that deArmon$s grapplers still have a way to go to round out theirconditioning and perfect their wrestling skills To make matters worse, War+ rior Rick Leroux tore ankle ligaments in an exhibition match and will be lost to the team for the season. Hedderson suffered a _ slight shoulder separation but is expected back for Monday’s practice.

Exchange

Bench support for Coach Pugliese’s charges at the start of the year was great, but resignations by Bob Howse and Steve Chris have hurt the depth. The situation still looks good though, with rookie strength coming through. Larry Sobol, Dave Idiens, and Ted Edwards, who hold promise for great things in the future, may get the chance to %how their SW’ soon. Two possible starting guards, are Artie Webster, a guard for last year’s JV team, and Stan Talesnick, who started two years ago and has returned this season, Talesnick just recovered from a leg injury, has played very little so far. He did look good in the game against Guelph, however, scoring several points and controlling play when he was on the court. Ty Burch, formen Guelph star, has looked. good in all his games. He% be the number one reserve at forward, The Warrior league record now stands at 2;o. The team won its first game 81-46 against Guelph and Wednesday beat the McMaster Marauders 68-64.

bined youth and experience to gain a fast, tall, fine shooting team; he Although the regular season is also has several players who can only one game oldforthe Warriors break a game wide open. . basketball team, a tough elevenThe best news Warrior basketname exhibition schedule has given baU fans can hear is that Neil fans m idea of what to< expect, Rourke is back. Neil, captain of The Warriorsfinishedwithafive the team, can always be counted on esh 10~s preseason record, to play well. He adds strength, but suffered only one POSSE aCat+ scoring, and rebounding ability, m university team. ~ and that necessary intangible, poise, to the Warrior team. They defe~ed Bmcka Queens, and Ottawa by lopsided scores, Combining with Neil at forward totalling three hundred points and will be Sol Glober, who possesses allowing only 127 against these , one of the best shots on the team. schools. They lost 94-77 to WatSol averaged over eighteen points erloo Lutheran. a game and added rebounding The Warriors are again in the strength to the team during the exbwh u Western di~sion, ahibiaon Season. long with Windsor, Western,TorStarting at guard will be a threeonto, McMasker, and Guelph. ’ year veteran Doug Lockhart, who Almost anY team Could Win it last year played for U of T, and this year, with the exception of rookie Jaan Laaniste, a star from Guelph, yho, though vastly imEast York High School in Toronto. proved, is still not quite up to the Lockhart and Laaniste both are level of the other schools. The fine scorers and playmakers, and Warriors have the potential tofinshould help the Warriors in their ish on top this year, if the players quest for a championship. can stay away from injuries. Happy news for fans is the apCoach Dan Pugliese has one of pearance in the line-up of 6’9” the stronger teams Waterloo has rookie centre BryanBrown. Bryan had for a few years, and is looking is the team’s top rebounder and anfor a good season. He has cornother potentscorer.

by Tom

Larry Sobol and Art nesday nigh t’s game

are fairly even, this could be abig factor in the Warriors’ drive for a championship. * ** Unlike their varsity counterparts, the JV team went down to defeat 51-45 to McMaste? s freshmen, They were ahead 15-14 after a lackluster first half which was devoid of offense by either team. Although their perfect 7-O record was on the l&e, the Pioneers seemed confident, and failure to take advantage of a weak McMaster def ense cost them the game, Dave Shalof led the pioneers with 11 points, while Boby Wynne had 14 to pace the Mat attack, The next game for the JV and varsity squads are tomorrow against Windsor.

to nail

Rajnovich

----

Ty Burch’

____ _

Sol Glober

Dave

Idiens

season

tickets to&y Due to a lack of communication, a notice to the effect that (c season tickets for the Windsor b-ball game would be traded in on Friday morning only*’ was left out of last weeps paper. Therefore, if there are any left, these tickets may be exchanged Friday afternoon at Seagram gym. Season tickets will not be honored Saturday night.

Ted Edwards

Larry

Sobol

Bryan

Brown Friday,

January

Jaan LuaiCw 19, 1968

(8:27)

40 1

13

-

_-


Varsity

grapplers

They proved this on Saturday at Seagram gym when they lost to a more experienced University of Toronto team by the respectable score Of 2p14.

It takes time to build a competitive team in any sport. AskWarrior wrestling coach Ed deArmon. Neverthelesss at this early stage in the season the Waterloo matmen are coming along at ahealthy pace.

I

In actual competition the score was 19-14, but without a competitor in the 1230lb, class, the Warriors automatically forfeited five points.

4

Support Support

The biggest upset of the meet was Bill Hedderson’s defeat of defending college champ Rick Kesten of Toronto in the 145-lb division.Although he was in a higher weight than normal, Hedderson group

Chevron Advertisers rl

Improving

.

STUDENTS! SAVE 10% on Any Free

lifetime

inSUranCe

Purchase

policy

on every

diamond

we Sell.

to

fought his way to M

win on points.

Others who scored points for Waterloo were John Grosdanoff in the 1770lb. class, Steve Harris at 191 lbs., and Charlie Smith in the heavyweight category. Harris was the only one to win by pinning his opponent. Smith’s victim was all&a~ football lineman Alex Squires, In the most’ exciting bout of the day0 John Stothart gamely came from behind to just miss outpointing Toronto captain Larry Bobbett in the 16%lb. division, Stothti lost 8-7.

Bill Hedderson appears to have his Ryerson opponent in an inescapable hold in Wednesday’s wrestling meet at Seagram gym. However, the man on the bottom rallied to earn a draw is this ,145lb. category match.

While To ronto was wrestling without five regulars, it must also be noted that Waterloo% squad is dominated by rookies.

FinIay

Chevron Shoebox by Archie

gym

Bolsen

It% not the University of Waterloo’s business but it% about time someone spoke up. The mousehole that the University of Toronto calls a gymnasium should be outlawed as a site for any intercollegiate varsity sports. Better known as Hart House, this basketball layout is shorter and narrower than any floor in Any player new to this Canada. gym always has trouble adjusting to these restricting dimensions. Along one side no more than a foot from the out-of-bounds line there is a wall, a frightful awakening to any player who takes a wrong step, The spectator seats on the other side are a.lsopz%ti@ally adjacent to the floor and the areas behind both baskets are filled up with chairs to accommodate overflow crowds. And that’s not all. For those paying fans who come a little late there is makeshift seatiilg along a track running above the floor in

by

See this and other glorious diamond treasures priced from $100 to $5,000

Wcalters 151 King

Credit

Jewellers phone

St. W. Kitchener Ask

for

our

student

discount

in any

7444444

of your

FRIENDLY WALTERS STORES at Guelph, Brantford, St. Catharines and Gait.

Sales iII Run

4

402 The CUEVRON

rom

-beaten

Warrior distance star Bob Finlay, running in the Knights of Columbus meet in Boston Saturday, finished third in the one-mile run. His time of 4:05.7 placed him behind Sweden’s Ulf Hoeberg and Villanova’s Dave Patrick in the nine-man field. Hoeberg set a blistering pace early in the race and held on to win in 4:02.3, Patrick is the onIy runner to

sports

Chevron sports

created

,

Waterloo% only win infour exhibition matches held after the meet came from Rick Leroux’s pin in a 191-lb. scrap.

Along with Toronto, perennial champion Guelph and Western appear to be the powers in the sport this year. However, the Warriors have several individuals who could put the team high in the standings at February% championships in Guelph.

Model TR 111100 - $100. from the “Diamond Treasure” Collection

A~

muses

in Boston defeat

sounds athlete’s

gallery fashion. However, the view this provides is incomplete unless the fan sticks his neck out over the edge. Waterloo can feel proud of Seagram gym, itself no palace, compared to Toronto’s hole. Every game played in Hart Hole turns into a revision of the whole intended style of basketball. Every game played in Hart Hole turns into a revision of the whole intended style of basketball. All action forms up the centre of the court, to avoid playing in the cutdown areas on either side of the basket. Battles for rebounds turn into mob scenes* and the playingeneral is speeded up so that it looks like one of those old Keystone Cop chases. It can’t be that U of T doesn’t have the money. Certainly ti Waterloo can build a 4,000 seat coliseum, Toronto can do likewise. In fact, their women’s phys-ed building puts Hart House to shame. As long as Toronto continues

record

holder

Jim

off foot

with their present facilities, they% never be a basektball power, It% not coincidental that Windsor and Western have dominated the sport in the 50% and 60%. The Blues last won the league title in 1958, a poor showing for acampus of over 20,000 students. Of tour se, this only makes things easier for Dan Pugliese’s cage Warriors, but it also stunts the development of the league and the calibre of the game its members play. Tomorrow night the two top American college teams, UGLA and Houston, will be playing in the Astrodome. Is it any wonder then that Canadian basketball lags so pitifully behind its US counterpart. If the executive of the league share these opinions, they should lay it on the line to Toronto. Waterloo Lutheran has more right to be playing in the OQAA league than Toronto ever had. Until they put up a decent facility, the Blues can satisfy themselves by playing Brock, Ryerson, and Trent.

Campaign JA

world

Ryun in the last two years. Competing for his track club, Toronto Olympic, F in 1 a y said, “1 decided to run the mile to gain some speed for the longer distances. I want to register a 4:02 this winter.” Finlay is taking this weekend off but will run in New York and Philadelphia in the nexttwo weeks.

- FEB. 2


Windsor finally whs tiger from Bananas by Kathie

Parrish

“Dollars

third in the competition Windsor and McMaster.

Chevron sports

Friday and Saturday the Waterloo Bananas competed in the University of Windsor’s Women’s Intercollegiate Athletic Union sports &Y. The badminton team topped Waterloo’s total points as Jean Richmond and Sue Wolfhard each finished with PO records in the ladies singles division. The doubles team of Paula Scott and Joanne Ferguson was downed by Guelph and Lutheran but won their two remaining matches. The basketball Bananas were ut+ able to match past performances, noticably missing three of the more effective team members. Although they easily trounced Guelph and Waterloo Lutheran, they were defeated 17-14 by the Windsor Lancerettes, and by a somewhat more decisive score of 25-15 by McMaster.

Cash in on your artistic talent. contest to choose a crest.

behind

The volleyball team placed second in their games, losing only to Windsor, and winning the re maining three matches twogames straight. ARsonEdward, Jan Roerda, and Bonnie Bacvar were consistently strong players. lncidently, HAPPY to coach Pat Davis1

For Doodles” The ‘University

of Waterloo

Flying

Club is conducting

DESIGN CRITERIA 1. Crest must be distinct and in good taste (no cartoons). 2. Relatively uncomplicated for easy reproducability 3. Originality must be shown 4. En try must be made on 8%” x 1 I ” paper. ELIGIBILITY You must be a current Flying Club member or a Federation whose $1 Flying Club membership fee accompanies en try

BIRTHDAY

PRIZE The prize

Waterloo was third place in the competition overall, trailing Guelph and the winning Windsor Lancerettes. Although in the WIAU sports day held here just six weeks ago, the Bananas captured the coveted Tiger trophy donated in 1965 by Windsor, it will now go for the first time to Windsor until the next sports day.

will be $25 or 3 hours

of solo flying

a

\ of Students

member

on our aircraft

FINAL DATE OF ENTRY January 31, 1968 12p.m. MAIL TO: University of Waterloo Flying Club % Federation Building, Waterloo, On t. The decision

of the judges

will be final and no en tries will be returned

Attention. Students, Post Grads, Faculty

Donna McCallum and Jan Fletcher played excellent defensive games; Jackie McKillican~ Bonnie C ronin, and Marilyn McClelland fought hard on the offensive for the Bananas. The team placed

Do YOU read as weI1 as our graduates?

Curling Martin Britten Finch Wilton Gilchrist Duncan Stephens Bryant Brown

results 2.5 8 8 8 9 9 7.5 3 had

Holmes Rajnovich Hawkins Laking Chase Coulter McKenna Stetski the bye

8.5 3 3 3 2 2 3.5 8

HERE

ARE

SOME

RECENT

Beginning Rate

Comprehension

Ending Rate

Comprehensior

Name

Occupation

W. Paul

High school teacher

352

55

2045

68

P. Cushing

Engineer

248

95

1900

80

I

J. Anderson

University

317

75

1900

81

I

E. Debicki

Student

274

60

2160

82

Student

The Average

Canadian

Our Graduates Kitchener - Waterloo’s newest Men’s shop “BROWN’S”

Reads 7 Books a Year.

comfortably Read 7 Books ACT NOW!

Take this positive

step to self-improvement

a Week!

by enrolling

irt the

distinctive styling and fashion for the University man and the young executive.

Introductory

RESULTS

-Evelyn Wood

Offer

10% STUDENT

READING

8

Plan

DISCOUNT

Campaign

On al I purchases totalling $5.00 or more Present your studen t I.D. card at time of purchase

Now

DYNAMICS our

“OPEN

HOLIDAY

INN,

to attend

Room,

MONDAY

22nd

Learn how this course can increase your reading and retention capacities. Classes start February.

COURSE HOUSE”

KITCHENER

JANUARY

speed between

7:3op.m.

3 and IO times, cut your paper

work,

improve

your

memory

Get acquainted now with the smart shop for young men

116 King. W. Kitchener Next to the Lyric theatre 578-0080

-Evelyn Woodr/

Over 350,000 Graduates in Canada and U.S.A.

READING

DYNAMICS Suite 201, 41 King William Hamilton,

Ont.

INSTITUTE

A Governemnt approved course INCOME TAX DEDUCTABLE

Street

525-5630

Friday,

January

19, 1968 (8:27)

403

15


Mean

M&y

Surich

an

McG apolo~

owes y

Wednesday we were present at the Hammer house coffee hour which was held for the benefit of the presidential election campaign. During a discussion with the presidential nominees Wednesday at the Hammarskjold House coffee

FOR SALE Conn B-flat clarinet, high quality, fibreglass case and reed trimer. (New $160) $80. 742-2478. 1966 Fiat Spider convertible, 4speed Phillips FM-AM radio, cinturato tires, excellent condition. 22,000 miles. $1,495. 57&4867. 1962 Rambler classic stationstandard transmission. weon, Good tires, in good mechanical condition. Phone Elm&a 669-3371 after 6. One size-5karate suit, usedonly Phone 576-9857 after 5. once. ACtiOMMODATION Room for two male students in new ret room, washroom facilities with shower, $10 per week. Apply 95 Mayfield Ave or 576-5022. Room available in apartment near university. Transportation cm b armed. cdl 57&5go4. Male student to share double room breakfast facilities $10 per week, 41 Westmount Road, Waterloo 578.1183 after 6:30,

hour, Mr.’ Marty McGinnis, unleashed a slanderous attack on a student, Jo Surich, a friend of candidate Cyril Levitt. McGinnis owes Surich and Levitt an apology for disrupting the presentation with character deformation and misleading trivialities. BRIAN GRUPP, history 2 DAVID KARDISH, arts 1

“Anti-Americans idiotic,” says

are Yank

While visiting at U of Won leave from the University of North Carolina I have found the intellectual fact of anti-Americanism occasionally amusing, sjmetimes well justified, but often rather silly. The most idiotic example of this

PERSONAL To

Kingston, Friday February 2. Return February 4. Call 7455265. LOST One lady% brown clutch bag. REWARD. Call 578-1615 after 5. WANTED Male & female students to contact potential trippers for Canada College Week in Nassau. A fabulous week of luxury with hundreds of fellow university students from across Ontario at the Montagu Beach Hotel. The price is$242.70, eVe@hing included. Get 21 sales and go free. Contact Ross Helling at 744-6111 local 2812, nights 5780443, or Mike Parker 578-0443. Babysitter wanted Friday morni@Zs for one baby. Telephone74s 4356. Glenridge Park area. TYPING Looking for a good typist? Call 743-2836 for fast, neat, accurate work. Kitchener.

Student for English two adults. 743-1063.

tutoring

for

Canada College Week in Nassau After exams at the end of Apriland the beginning of May, take a charter flight to 6 nights and 7 days of luxury at Montagu Beach. Breakfast and dinner included, $242.70. Your Waterloo rep isRossHell.ing, phone days 744-6111 local 2812 or evening s 57 &0443. Reform Jewish congregation requires teacher of Hebrew-April 1 to May 30, 1968. Teach-ershould h aVe some experience and possibly al SO be able to teach Jewish hist orY. Interestedpersonphone 74% 1132, Mrs. Ethel F&idy . India-Canada Association celeb ra t es India’s Republic Day on Saturday, January 27, 1968 at 8 pm in food-services bldg. Special attraction-variety entertainment and snacks from India. Free admission. DON’T MISS IT.

fad that I have seen to date& Dale Martin’s article on Pete Warrian’s visit to and “analysis” of Puerto Rico (Jan. 12). The implication made is that America% military presence in Puerto Rico is for the purpose of oppressing the native population. The fact is that there is a preponderance of military bases in the warmer parts of the U.S. simply because it is more economical to locate them there. Warrian’s assumptions are as absurd as to suppose that the troops at Fort Benning are there to quash the independence of Georgia or that the flyers at Vandenburg are keeping the lid on California. One must also remember that Puerto Rico has periodically been given the opportunity to opt for one of three statuses: complete independence, commonwealth status or full statehood. Each time the voters have overwhelmingly voted for commonwealth status, even as recently as 1967. Satehood would entitle Puerto Rico to voting members in Congress and at the same time oblige her citizens to pay income tax at the mainland rate. Evidently Puerto Ricans are satisfied withhaving neither taxation nor representation. On the other hand, the low tax rate has induced an industrialization of the island withoutparallel in Latin America, Without it Puerto Rico would have a standard of living much like that of Haiti. Instead her per-capita income exceeds that of any Latin American nation,

Independence, on the other hand would impose a quota on the rather considerable emigration to the mainland, whereas at present Puerto Rfcans hold U.S. passports with all the freedoms and restrictions they imply. Puerto Ricans are subjected to the same selective service laws as any other U.S. citizens. To compare the draft rate of poor Puerto Ricans with middle-class mainland whites is so deliberate a distortion as to be’ useless. Incidentally, I am told that, disproportionately many men in theCanadian armed forces are recruited from the’ impoverished Maritimes. How does Warrian account for that? With regard to the refusal ofthe United States government to have Puerto Rican independence discussed in the United Nations general assembly, I would remind Warrian that the status of Puerto Rico is a dome&i-ot an international-issue. It would be more appropriate to discuss on that floor the matter of a free Quebec (although Canadian officials bristled when a European chief of state so much as mentioned it) or Welsh independence from English exploitation or the separation of Ukrania from the rest of the Soviet Union. Martin’s article merely supports the well-known truism that if you have an opinion, you can usually distort enough facts to back it up. MARK E, WATKINS vislting associate professor of mathmatics


Orientation

At long last, we have a presidential election on this campus. And four, count them, four candidates. Or is it three candidates? Despite her advertisements, I am not against In fact I think she is doing all Rosemary Kelly. campus politicians a great favor by saying that student activists take themselves too seriously. If they didn’t, Steve Flott wouldn’t have ulcers, and Steve Ireland would be able to tell you he wasn’t aware he had only 41 days left in his term of office. So it is with a sad heart I must tell Miss Kelly I cannot vote for her. This must be, for even she does not take her candidacy seriously. The same must be said for the formerposterposter, Mike Pratt. His running is somewhat like Miss Kelly’s except that he is not funny. In fact, Pratt is downright vicious. lLfyou read the Chevron interview with him, you will see that he attacks Iler for brainwashing the engineers to vote for him as a bloc. I suppose by this comment Pratt hopes to win the support of engineers by telling them that they are brainwashed. Some hope! That comment ranks with the saying of Southern segregationist faced with a negro candidate “1 guess you gotta expect him to ask the nigras to vote for him.”

We are left with t!he first name on the ballotIs he worth the trouble of voting for? Brian Iler. The answer has to be nearly unqualified yes. Iler is one of the most competent stud& administrators ever produced by this university. At the same time, he has a completegrasp of the ideoHe has adopted enough of it logy of the activists. to ensure that he never returns to the sandbox school of politics. . Iler is the one student WQO can bind together all the diverse campus elements and lead them united to the councils of this university. Iler is also the only person who can give the new student council., to be elected in February, anything approaching the unity of purpose the current Without this unity, the council has exhibited. council will achieve little and student politics will be set back more than a year on this campus.

Iler’s only handicap is that he is too goodnatured. He thinks too well of people and is hesitant to chide people who err. He is even slower to deal with people who oppose what he believes in, and a president must be a strong believer. It is to be hoped he will learn to act with dispatch. It is saddening but true that a president must be a politician-for a non-political president is as good as no president. Iler is the man for the job if he can grow to fill it. I have no doubt that he will.

group

A lecherous old man, a nubile young girl, a wishy-washy father, a remote neighbor and a hysterical mother-these are the characters in the play ‘Transcending’ by David C reigan. Directed by Neil Walsh andproduced by Tom Britten, ‘Transcending’ is a hilarious account of agirl who has failed her exams and who seeks solace from two of her neighhours. But then her father decides to kill one of them for wanting to sleep with her. The plot of this fast-moving farce is somewhat complicated by the use of 17 scenes in the one act. With an excellent cast of Jacqueline Hornby, Ann McGillis, Sheila Redmond, Dave Dither, Fred Nobes and Peter Moore, this play will be one of the bright lights of the season. ‘Transcending’ is being prepared by the university drama company as an entry in the Canadian .a

Manitoba CO-op

joins business

One more co-op residence for Canada. A ‘group of students from the University of Manitoba will soon be incorporated as Manitoba Student Co-op Housing. They already own one large house and rent rooms for about $6b a man@. Presently the students are seeking help from Interprovincial Federated Cooperatives to pur-

‘68

for

With a bit of the traditional and a few progressive ideas orientation is under way again. Until dates are set for registrar tion, no final plans can be made. The old regular slave day, dances, steer roast, lectures, tours, faculty days and concerts-are definitely on. Peter, Paul and Mary, Simon and Garfunkle and The Jefferson Airplane are possibiles for the concert. Initiations will be held by the colleges, while the university will concentrate on orientation with a teach-in. The voice of orientation past

suggested a head archon to save the chairman from Laurel Creek. How the off-campus frosh are handled will contribute to the suecess or failure of the week. Orientation’s keyword is “together’*. “The philosophy of orientating people will be greaSly helped by keeping them on campus,” said chairman George Loney. The organizational meeting was well attended by arts, math and science. Come on you engineers, you can show more spjrit than that. Watch the Chevron for announce merits of the meetings every second Tuesdays at 7:30 in Bio. 164.

CO” - ,OP

The most appealing candidate from an ideological point of view is Cyril -Levitt. He has the rhetoric and mouths all the accepted phrases. He is the candidate most willing to wave the flag of revolution. He is running on issues, so he claims, and not on the basis of past experience. And yet his grasp of revolutionary thinking is weak. Otherwise, how could he come out with a statement like “Come let us reason together.” This quote, made famous by Lyndon Johnson, is a keystone of the deeply conservative philosophy of consensus. It would be far better if Levitt had said: “Come let us act together.%’ Thus this revolutionary is shown in his true colors, and the voter trudges onward seeking a leader.

APPLICATIONS* now

available

for

.

non residents for

winter

\ term

$170.00 It is always difficult and sometimesdangerous to predict the future. The neti council is not going to be the same as this year% either in policy or procedure. The old hands such as Ireland, Warrian, Saxe, Bryce and others will not be back in council. The new council will be much more hesitant about taking drastic action. Therefore a strong president with a soundprogram is needed. And the choice is yours on Wednesday.

-Space available for residents for summer term last minute vacancies for both girls & guys available GOOD FOOD - NO FAGS REQUIRED *Will receive priority in Philip St, residences next fall. Apply 139 University Ave. W. 745-2664

FEDERATION OF STUDENTS

\

Drama

organizes

showing

University Drama League’s festival to be held at Western Jan. 2&27 at the Talbot College theater.This is the first time an entry has been sent from the University of Wat-

farce

erloo. A special preview performante-free-will be held in the Theater of the Arts on Thursday at 12: 15 noon.

UNIVERSITYOF WATERLOO

Notice of Election The election to the position Students, for the academic

of president, term 1968-69

Federation will take

of place

WEDNkDAY, ’ JANUARY24, 1968 Polls will open at 9:00 a.m. that day and will be located

or BEEN UP SO LONG, IT LOOKS LIKE DAWN

PAJAMA

TO

ME.

PARTY

56% s 2*

are the candidates

’ TAPEDTRAUMA

,C&m\ouS

NOWE

SOUND

for this

election.

ILER BRIAN KELLY ROSEMARY LEVITT CYRIL PRATT MICHAEL

SINGLE.

Dorrs~~ DRESS! Co2 y, CASuhL

p.m.

ARTS - MODERN LANGUAGE BUILDING ENGINEERING - ENGINEERING BUILDING GRUADUATE STUDIES - PHYSICS BUILDING MATHEM.ATICS - MATHEMATICS BUILDING PHYSICAL EDUCATION - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RECREATION BLDG. RENISON COLLEGE - RENISON COLLEGE ST. JEROME’S COLLEGE -ST. JEROME’S COLLEGE SCIENCE - CHEMISTRY & BIOLOGY BUILDING Following

FOOD SERVICES

and close at,~5:00 as follows:

You must order

bring to vote.

your

student

chase an apartment block. John Braun, secretary-treasurer af tie group, says

identification

M.L. Chief

thatto do four

FELDSTEIN returning

card

in

Officer

each student will have hours work. a weak for the coq.

Friday,

January

19, 7668 (8:27)

405

17


What’s

fhe main John

H.D.

Johnston

Brian

Brohman

Steve

Ireland

English 4

The degree to which the candiadvocate dates student representation in university affairs. I

I really don’t give a damn, to tell the truth.

It should be the quality of education.

What elections?

Scott

Marg

The latest additions are two students on the council on university planning and development, one student on the university operations council’ seven students on the student-affairs council and three students on the engineering’ science and math library operations committee. There are over 50 students on committees in the university. These do not include faculty councils or curriculum committees. Ireland said student representation is not appeasement. 4aIt3~ become the ac-

nmu

math 1

on university

voice

our opinions”’ he said, ‘&Our most important breakthroughs were seats on the university-government study committee and the planning and development council.” In May Ireland was the only rep on the study committee but he managed to get two more student seats. Most of the student reps are appointed by the Federation in consultation with the provost or various faculties. Most of the committees have seats forbothundergrads and grads, Students are represented on these important councils and committees: -three students on the president’s advisory committee on ancillary enterprises --two students on the planning and development council -seven students on the campus-center committee --two students on +lheuniversity health and counselling services committee -three students onthe study committee on university government ---one student on the residence advis-

ments on the international scene’?,, MISS KELLY: 661 feel ingrevious. But to be more obtuse I think Student Council Inc. has a definitely nebulous role in erst

There comes a time in every man’s life when he must cast off the shackles of indecision. The time has come! At this period of crisis in student government I feel1 can no lon/ 1 ger remain silent on the matter of \ ’ t’ ;’ *‘f candidates for Federation presi.** Iii * dent. . . At last a candidate has come # forth whom I can unequivocally -* :’ \ . PENNER 4 A candidate in the trasupport. dition of such greats as Abel, Judas, Pomw, Beckett, Moore, -Charles II, Louis XVI’ Nicholas while international affairs as it the issues are in this campaign?” II, Neville Chamberlain, Thomas were, if you get my meaningl’ MISS KELLY: “As I have statDewey, Richard NixonandGollum. ‘l What do you think PENNER: Here follows the only in-depth, ed previously I believe the essenthe purpose of a student newspatial issues are sigagees, boummer exclusive interview with Roseper should be?” flanges, wennel sprockII-UQ Kelly (the Pooh candidate, the strivers, MISS KELLY: “Under the Pooh people’s choice.) ets and other important stuff.” administration the masthead wi.lI Miss Kelly is confident that all PENNER: “Miss Kelly, would be changed to puce and orange with other candidates will drop out after you say you have had extensive exa bar-sinister.” perience in student politics?’ they have read her clear-cut grasp 9Vhat will be your PENNER: MISS KELLY: “No, on the conof the issues and her uncompromfirst act as president?” trary, I feel I am unbiased by any ising solutions. ‘<Demand a reMISS KELLY; ‘(Miss Kelly, what previous experience of any kind.” PENNER: count .” PENNER! “Do you think student will your strategy be if the other “Miss Kelly, would should encompass intercandidates do not drop out of the politics PENNER: you please elucidate your position national relations and make judgerace?” .

406 The CHEVRON

Siestopalow

Student participation in university administration.

I thinkit’sallabig POOH.

cepted thing to do to put students on committees.,’ Clark Mecredy, assistant to operations vicepresident Al Adlington, agreed with him. U We wouldn’t bother with student representation just for appeasement, It isn’t worth itag, Many students have accused the Federation of partaking in tokenism. They feel that if students aren’t represented in large blocs they shouldn’t be represented at all. Tom Patterson, the Federation’s university-affairs officer, said that one or two students on an important body would be tokenism. “We have been making slow progress but we still have a long way to go. J4We won’t have achieved the community we’re striving for until everyone is equally represented in decision-making.,, The seven students on the new council for student affairs is the biggest representation. Ireland doesn’t feel this is particularly important because it is only advisory to the provost. f ll3ut allfactions will be represented and we’ll be able to

MISS KELLY: 6LWell you know the old saying..? PENNER: raNo.‘3 MISS KELLY; “Yeah.,, PENNER: “What do you think

Vic ..

50 students

ltOne council a week,j seems to be the administration,s motto this year. For the past three weeks the university adm.inistration has announced student seats on new councils or committees. Student representation on various bodies has been growing by leaps and bounds in the past year. This is probably a credit to both our liberaladmimstration and Federation of Students president Steve Ireland.

O’Sullivan history 3

There could be a major issue on extrauniversity affairs-the role of the student in society.

Goldspink

emeritus

W.G.

provost

staff

by Ed Penner

.

Prof.

Token;sm?

18

Tait

Mechanical 3B

It will be to see who can build the biggest sandcastle.

Student

Kathryn

elections?

Math 1

Goldbrick

by Frank

in the presidential

Math 2

Civil 2C

Chevron

issue

bode

ory building corn mittee, In the faculties representation is not so extensive. Just this year faculty councils have decided to consider student requests for a bigger say in curriculum and other business of the faculties. There are two students on the engineering faculty council. 9t appears tokenistic because of the size of fhe faculty council,,, said one student. lf But it,’ a big step because it opens the door for better representation.,, Recently the science faculty formed a joint student-faculty board where students can air their views. The board had its first meeting Monday, There are nine students on it. Also in science there are two students on a first-year curriculum committee. Chairman Dr. Alan Snyder of physics said he hoped to add another student this term. In arts, students have been involved in curriculum discussions since September. They also have observers on the arts committee for undergraduate affairs.

on activism ?” MISS KELLY: *‘I would be most redwiantly diversified to ~,.,, PENNER: Z6Well?” MISS KELLY: “Yes.‘, PENNER: ‘dYes what?,, MISS KELLY: “#Yes, I would.,, *(Ah, let’s move on, PENNER: Do you feel that there is discrimination on the present council?” MISS KELLY: J6When I am elected I will personally see to it that the top executive po sitions are held spades, kikes, spits, by Wops, Chinks, Gooks-Geeks (pick one), Micks and Frogs, not to mention Polacks.” PENNER: “Ahem, do you mean that ethno-cent&m will have no place in your administration?” MISS KELLY: t60h no. I mean that I will not obskatchulat.” PENNER: (6 What do your parents think o f your candidacy?” MISS KELLY: “1 don’t know. They were high when I phoned them.‘, PENNER: “There is a lot of talent in the present administration. Do you plan to make use of it in your Pooh administration?” ‘#Yes there are MISS KELLY:

a lot of potential Poohs on the present council. F’rinstance, Stewart Saxe may retain his present position on the board of external relations if he gives the pyramids back to Dr. Haggar. Steve Flott can have anything he wants. Steve Ireland will automatically be appointed past-president.” PENNER: 44Miss Kelly, is it true that you make your own clothes ?” MISS KELLY: own shoes.”

“No!

O&nly my

PENNER: “How do you plan to deal effectively with the thwarting tactics of the present university administration and boardof governors?” MISS KELLY: “1 plan to deal effectively with the thwarting tactics of the present university administration and board of governors.” PENNER: J4Ah.,.jres, well do you have any further comments to make?” MISS KELLY: “Just this, we have nothing to lose but lose itself.” PENNER* . (‘1 concur,, .


Camels and committees If a camel is a horse designed by a committee, then the report Student participation in university government is a camel designed by a committee of university administrators. It tries to be all things to all men and merely succeeds in confusing the reader. It embraces all viewpoints\ and makes no recommendations. It does not give the true feelings of the subcommittee that drew it up, although the reader gets a sick feeling of what they might be. For the optimist, it is loaded with all sorts of good intents such as ‘statements that the university should be made more democratic by involving people, that the university is a community of scholars and that there is an “egalitariansim” in the university. It almost seems the administrators agree with students who call for more student participation in university government. But are they really? The skeptic can readily find examplesof shoddy social and political thinking in the document. The opening paragraph says the university “exists for the preservation, transmission, and increase of knowledge”. All other matters are secondary. This is ivory-tower thinking. A university is composed of people. It is not an inhuman machine whose sole purpose is accumulating bits of knowledge. The un-

iversity is a meaningless concept without the human element. The university is the servant, not the master of man. As political philosophers, the committee members have both feet firmly planted in the 17th century. They say analogies between the unGiversity ’ and political democracy are faulty because the university’s citizens are not taxed and therefore do not need representation. Perhaps the administrators who wrote this little gray book have never heard of tuition fees. The committee also resorts to a specious legal definition by saying that a “right” is only a right when it is enforced by the law. Presumably the American negros of the 1850s had no right to be free. The committee seems to think businessmen are naturally endowed with the ability to run a university while all other groups are incapable of rising to such a great calling. The report does not make commendations on student sentation. The major concept to be that each university muddle through on its own.

any rerepreseems should

The report concludes that students by themselves will yield a revolution while the university as a whole could effect a renaissance. The students are waiting.

Enlightened journalism Council Last week we erred. member’ Dave Witty was unjustly criticized for not reporting to student council the proposed changes in the arts coffeeshop. Witty was only on an unofficial committee discussing a proposed coffeeshop for the social-sciences lounge. This committee had apparently considered a change in the present coffeeshop but none was planned when Witty left for Christmas vacation. This wasnot a committee of stcxdent council nor was it a committee to which the Federation appointed \ him. We did not intend to make an example of Witty, but only to use the case as an illustration of an issue

that still stands. If students are going to sit on committees it’s no good if we don’t know who they are, what the terms of reference are and, most important, what decisions are being made. As the number of student committee seats grows, the existing problems will increase in complexity, even more so when faculty societies choose some of the reps. All students on these committees must be ultimately responsible to student council through the society presidents in the case of society appointments. These reports must be made regulary enough to convey the process of decision-making in addition to the result.

Our ballot’s for Br’iler Brian Iler is the man to vote for in Wednesday’s presidential election. That’s almost a foregone conclusion. Let’s compare the four candidates. We can rule out Rosemary Kelly as an admitted spoof. She does deserve thanks, however, for reminding student politicians to avoid ulcers and for adding a lighthearted touch to the campaign. Mike Pratt makes it too plain that he doesn’t have/ enough experience to handle the job. Pratt should spend a year on council first, learning the ropesto make sure /he really wants the president’s chair after all. He just wouldn’t have time to do his homework after he was in it. Cyril Levitt presents the greatest challenge to Iler, though he will probably run quite a distant second. His challenge is that the present student government-and Iler is the candidate of the present government -has not progressed quickly enough, Maybe this has been an unspectacular year on the surface. But solid progress has been made under Ireland in gaining respect from faculty and administration for the student point of view. Remember Ireland himself was one of the main organizers of the bookstore event in 1966. If there has been dull con-

ference instead of direct confrontation this year, it was not through softness but through deliberate-and \ we think-wise decision. Iler advocates continuing this policy-using rational dialog instead of pressure tactics. This calls for an atmosphere of respect and confidence, which Iler has already gained, particularly through his experience with Tenth Anniversary Week. Everyone on campus knows Brian Iler-from President Hagey down to the janitor in the food-services building. They know what kind of job he can do and they have at least begun to trust him as a person. Much ground would be lost under Levitt as president because this confidence-in policies as well as persons-would have to be rebuilt. (We do not deny Levitt’s experience in leading political bodies, in organizing detailed programs and in coordinating volunteer workers. However, unlike Iler, none of this background was on campus.) We’ll vote for Levitt in the council elections in a few weeks-and we hope he runs. He needs a year as understudy to see how things look behind the scenes and to show us how he can perform. But for president this year we’re voting Iler.

A member

of the Canadian University Press,the Chevron is published every Friday (except exam periodsand August) by the board of publications of the Federation of Students, University of Waterloo. Content is independent of the university, student council and the board of publications. editor-in-chief: Jim Nagel news: Brian Clark features: Glenn Berry sports: Karen Wanless

What

a wonderful

new alarm clock the Village has provided!

I

intercampus: Rich Mills photography: Brian Doda entertainment: Nancy Murphy

Phone (519) 744-6111 local 2497 (newsroom), Telex 0295-759; Advertising Night 744-0111. tions chairman: John Shit-y;

2812 (advertising), 2471 (editor). manager: Ross Helling. Publica8,200 copies

Friday,

January

19, 7968 (8:27)

407

19


Ihis #by Betty-Anne

culture, AL116. s ion.

Burnie

Chevron staff

Today DANCE with theReefers

infood-

services bldg. 9-l. Moslem Students’

Association “EID FESTIVAL” Alll3 8pm. Programme includes brief talk, film from various Muslim COWtries of the world, refreshment of eastern

Welcome. Tomorrow MATH strays”

delicacies.

Brenda Wilson is practicing looking alluring for next weeks She and about 20 others will be on sale. Grad slave auction.

All

with

‘93-x2 bldg. Guys $1, gals 75#,

in food-services

8:30=midnigbt. Math

Free.

MINGLE

Sociexy members

SO@

A HAPPENZNG at Conrad Grebel. 10 pm. Coffee and donuts. Art supplies provided. Everyone welcome. No experience necessary. CHYM-FM 96.7 ‘@WHIPLASH*‘. Listen to interview with mcs. Richard Needham, satirist of Globe and Mail. Sunday THEWOODWIND QUINTET. 8 pm. Theatre of the Arts. Free* Tickets from theatre box office. Internatfond Film Series &LETROPOLIS. AL116. 6:30-9 pm, SERVICE for ECUMENICAL Christian Unity. St. Paul’s College Chapel. 7~30 pm. Dr. Lochhead-speaker. Participants: Conrad Grebel, St. Jeromes, Renison, St. Paul’s, Everyone welcome. CROSS COUNTRY SKI CLUB, AL244. 7:30 pi-n. Monday ART FILM.

on campus

week

“Maori

arts

and

carving and decoration. 12:15 noon. F ree admis-

mance only purchased by phoning local 2126 or 3413. After 1 am. Althouse Colleges EDUCATION MEETING with students interested club ground school. Flying in secondary school teaching. ATl17. 7 pm. Lectures on airAL116. 10 am. 85 2 pm, frames, aeroengines and theory of “UNITED KINGDOM’*. Film flight. Anyone interested in apriALll6. l2:15 noon. Freeadmission, vate pilot’s licence should attend. NOON DRh4A. “TRANSCENDSTUDENTS’ COUNCIL meeting. ING”. A one act play which is a village red dining hall. 7Pme psychological dram. Theater of the Arts. 12:15. Free admission. Tuesday Students ’ Wives Club. CHINE SE AUCTION. Faculy reading room, ROUND-ROBIN CHESS TOURNAMENT continnes this Tuesday in Eng. Il. Wives of U of W students cordially invited to attend. 8:3Opm. the SSc Coffee-Shop. 7-10 pm. UNHIBITED FASS ORGY. Food All welcome. services bldg. 10 pm to 6 am. ART LECTURE, “ArtandAnthAfter the hockey game, beer garrolpology ” by Dr. Joan Vasto$as den, and slave auction. Nowe Sound U of T. Free. Theater of the Arts. & Baden Beer Hall Boys. Single 12:15 noon. 52$ Double 92$. Dress-Pyjamas. LIBERAL CLUB. Nomination Sorry pillows cannot be provided. meeting for candidates for Student LECTURE by Michael Griffith. SS Lounge. 7:30-10. collrlcil. Biology 164. Noon. #4 in engineering careerlecture #5 in engineering careers leca career “LAW” as a career s cries I “RESEARCH”as ture series. for graduate engineers. Noon. for graduate engineers. P145. Fridav . l

Wednesday

E arle Birney Lecture. BRITISH POETRY OF THE 1960%. Theatre of the Arts. Free admission, C 8~ W meeting. Presenting “SONGS OF THE W ORKING MAN” ALl05.7:30 pm. Yearbook Pictures will be taken* CIRCLE K meeting. SS350 6:15 pm. Thursday FASS NITE TICKET SALES. Tickets for Fri. Nite’s perfor-

Sale of FASS NITE TICKETS for Wed. Thurs. Sat, Matinee & Sat. Nite performances. Foods ervices, arts&eater and engineering foyers. 7:27 am. HOCKEY vs. W esternMustangs. Waterloo Arena. 8~30. GRAD HOUSE PARTY With “The Landslide Mushrooms ” -LIVE ! I The Grad House. 8~30 pm. Jan. 26-28. CAMP OF THE BLUE OX. (Huntsville). IVCF ski camp. Speaker-Dr. Preston, head of U of W counselling services.

rientation . SZxty-eight

We for

the

1968

Need Orientation

Committee.

Bodies

Freshmen

A meeting

will

are especially

be held

on

Jan. 30

Tuesday, in CBI64 for information George

call:

Loney

578-2652 SPONSORED

BY BOARD FEDERATION

20

408 The CHEVRON

welcome

OF STUDENT OF STUDENTS

ACTIVITIES,

to join.

1967-68_v8,n27_Chevron  

of Haggar andTaylor Mon- day night, preferring to wait until the Canadian Association of Uni- versity Teachers had completed its investigati...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you