Page 1

Volume

7, Number

4

UNIVERSITY

OF WATERLOO,

Waterloo,

Ontario

Friday,

June

24,

1966

SHERBOURNE TAKES POST ..

-‘New en&neeri seebs challen Dr. A.N. Sherbournewfflsucceed Dr. Di.T.W right as dean of the faculty of engineering. Dr.Sherbourne’s appointment, for a five-year term, was made June 16 by the board of governors. Dr. Wright is resigning in order to- return to teaching and research. During the past seven years, hehas developed Waterloo’s engineering faculty into oneof Canada% leading schools of engineering. In recent years Dr. Sherbourne, as chairman of the university’s civil With a course schedule rally entrant waits for Peterson.

lashed firmly the “go” signal

to

his from

motorcycle, a starter Lloyd

Saxe off to SUNAC uneet in Israel

Dogs4brats and letters threaten rally drivers ..3..2..l..and the first car was off on. the annual Engineering Society car rally Saturday. Over 60 cars plus a number of motorcycles left parking lot A at minute intervals to navigate a tricky course, 93-mile cfoss-country three-quarters of which was unpaved. The route meandered in the direction of Elmira, cut across to Guelph and by devious lanes headed back to -ti aterloo. Winners were driver Mike Cleary and navigator Tom Staff who were assessed only 16 points for being 16 minutes late, and they will be presented with the Orr Motors trophy at a later date, Runners-up were Doug Barrow and John Langstone. At one stage on route, the competitors were asked to write a letter to a mailbox owner telling him how much they liked the box. The letters

illegal

were varied and humorous.W. Muir commented that he “had never before seen such a beautiful mail I box” and G, Gaber considered it” an honor and a privilege” to place his letter in it. Drivers and navigators alike were subjected to unusual hazards. One driver was threatened by a large dog which intended to jumpintohis car. A group of children sitting on a fence were seen directing drivers down the wrong turn. In the motorcycle section the 12 bicycles entered all finished the course, and then were subjected to an intensive obstacle course at Bridgeport Speedway. Nine cars failed to complete the route for various reasons. Rally organizer Brian Iler was unfortunately unavilable for comment, as he is recovering from a bad caseof licorice poisoning.

Stewart Saxe, second-year arts, associate editor of the Coryphaeus, has been appointed external vicepresident of the Student United Nadons Association in Canada and will represent Canada at aninternational meeting to be held in Israel later this month. Mr. Saxe recently returned from the annual national meeting of SUNAC inottawa at which he received his new position and also from New York where he attendedtheannual meeting of the American Collegiate Council for the UnitedNations as Canada’s observer. The Israel ‘meeting is the annual meeting of the International Student Movement for the UnitedlNations of which SUNAC is a member along with student UN groups fromover 25 other countries.

engineering department, has built his department into thelargest center of graduate studies in civil engineering in Canada. Last year he was also appointed as warden of the Village. Engineering is the senior faculty at U of W. It was launched in 1957 as the first cooperative education program in Canada and last year reached an enrollment of more than 1,800 graduate and undergraduate students. Dr. Wright, 39, joined the univerw sity in 1958 and was named dean of engineering in 1959, He was at that time Canada’s youngest engineering dean. He will begin a year’s leave of’ absence this month and will conduct research on structural engineering at the University of Mexico. He will return to Waterloo next year and resume his career in teaching and research. “swuding on the solid foundadon established by Dr. Wright will be a challenging task,” said Dr. Sherbourne* the new dean. “‘Our faculty has concentrated its efforts on attaining a size which would allow the development of a variety of programs simultaneously. Our efforts in the next five years must be directed to consolidating these programs and relating new developments to our present areas of strength.‘* Dr. Sherbourne, 36, was born in Bombay, India, but spent his youth in England. He received his BSc in mathematics from the University

g dean task

Prof. A. N. Sherbourne, civil engineering, will succeed Dean D. T. Wright as head of the engineering faculty. (Personal) of London in 1953 and then studied in the United States receiving bachelor and master’s degrees in civil engineering from Lehigh University in 1955 and 1957. He returned to England and completed PhD studies at Cambridge in 1960, He joined the University of Waterloo in 1961 where he has served as professor of civil engineering, chairman of the department and as warden of the Village. Since 1960, he has published more than 30 rev search papers in the field of the design and behavior of structures.

U to dose In observance of Dominion Day, university offices will officially close at 5 on Thursday until 9 on Monday, July 4.

speaker ignores hodesian query

The sudden influx of young ladies (along with a few young men) on campus was a product of the fourth annual United Nations Seminar being held here this week. The 142 highschool students are representing 54 nations in UN General Assembly and committee sessions. Between sessions they hear speakers on topics of interest to them and take part in a number of planned and unplanned social activitieS. The general themeof this year’s meeting is ?The price of peace”. Topics for debate and resolutiions are the Vietnam war, the control of nuclear arms, the Rhodesian problem and world population and food problems. One interesting deviation from the UN was created when the seminar administration slipped and allowed Rhodesia three delegates. A guest speaker from the British Information Services was,however, quick to spot the error and refused to answer a question directed tohim by one of the illegitimate delegates. The last session of the General Assembly takes place today and will

be followed by a ball tonight. Tomorrow the delegates gather in evaluation meetings and then finish off with a picnic lunch. Students of U of W are invited to view this afternoon’s session but other activities are open only tothe delegates. Among the speakers who addressed the seminar wereRomeo Maione, director of international affairs for the Canadian Labor Congress3 Gay Kroeger of the UN division of the

False alarm, A false alarm at the Village Wednesday night sent two campus policemen scurrying to the rescue. While one searched for signs of smoke and flames the other dashed off to check the boiler rooms. The second officer reached his goal, verified the safety of the heating equipment and attempted to depart, only to discover he had lockedhimself in.

Finding it impossible to attract anyone else’s attention, he was

department of external affairs, and F. R. Morgan from the British Information Services. Followingeach of the talks the delegates were given an opportunity to ask questions. Mr. Morgan especially came under heavy fire over the Rhodesian probe la-n. Directing the activities this year were Dr. K.A. MacKirdy of thehistory department, A, W. Rees, and W.E. Klos from St. Jerome% High School.

kop escapes forced to open awindow by-er-apt plying the pressure of a wooden board against the panes. Meanwhile the terror-stricken Village residents had left the confines of their study rooms to gather on lawns for what surely must have been the best-attended gatherv ing this year. i As we go to press the mounting damage toll has reached one broken pane of glass.

Dr. K. A. MacKirdy looks on as four of the high school students here with the U.X. seminar discuss the problems brought out during one of their busy morning sessions. From left to right are: Jane Warren representing Chile, Dr. K. A. MatKirdy seminar director, Kris Cesnulis representing Iraq, Suzanne Salvatore, Secretary General, and Ron Kanter, President of the General Assembly.

Cointoss settles vote The returning officer exercised his tie-breaking vote with a tradidonal flip of the coin to decide the fourth seat in the Student Council byelection recently. On close recounting two days later it was found to be a three-way de. A further flip of the coin gaveseats to Murray Ouellette and Brian Iller. John Bergsma had an expected good showing with over 70 percent of the votes. The chief returning officer, Don Weatherbe, commented on the poor turnout (33 percent). Many firstyear students preferred not to vote,

he said, as they knew none of the candidates who were all in the class of ‘69. Results of the engineering student Council election recount: Winners votes John Ber gsma 168 Owen Redfern 136 Brian Iler 111 Murray Ouellette 111 Others Doug Edward 110 Fred Brychta 94 Louis Battiston 74 Ballots Invalid

cast

241 .I0


The operation engineering

of a bubble-cap laboratory during

distillation colunin is explained the Engineering Weekend tours

Co-operative University

of

Department

Education

in the chemical

to a group Saturday.

Programmes

Waterloo of

A previously announced anonymous donation of $25,000 to the Minota Hagey Memorial Fund at the university has been doubled, Subscriptions to the fund, which willbe used to build a women’s residence ,in memory of the latewifeof President J. G, Hagey, now total$75,677. The mafor gift of $50,000, which matches the fund’s initial objective, has been made by Mrs. A. R. Kaufman of Kitchener e Mrs, Kaufman is the wife of retired induserialist A. R. Kaufman, who is a member of the university’s board of governors. “Mrs. Hagey was one of the out=standing women of our communky and I am pleased to play a part in honoring her contribution to the growth of Ms young and vigorous university,” said Mrs, Kaufman, “This gift is also in recognition of the personal sacrtikes ehae her husband, Dr, Hagey, has made in serving the universi~~~ as fts first presidene and in developing the university to its present high level of achievemen~,‘s Mrs. Kaufman further stated. “I have increased the originally announced donation so that the university can build a residence of up to 75 beds in keeping with the increasing numbers of women whoare now attending university and also going on to graduate studies,” she said, The Minota Hagey Residence project was announced lask fall follow-

ing the death of Mrs. Hagey, A COITUII&~~ headed by Prof.Dorothea Walter p dean of women, organ&d an appeal for $50,000 to faculty, staff, students, alumni and the Kitchener-Waterloo community. It was estimated that the residence, for 50 graduates and senior undergraduate women, would cost $350,000, of that amount $50,000 is required in gifts in order that the university may qualify for provinctil government grants and Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation loans for the balance. When the $25,000 anonymous gift was first announced it was on the condition that at: least the same amount would be subscribed from other sources, Thesegifts now total well over $25,000 and it was with this information that the gift was increased to $50,000, I Dr. T. L, Batke, the university’s academic vice-president, has been appointed chairman of a committee to prepare a residence brief for the architects, ‘The entire university communiOy is grateful to Mrs. Kaufman for her interest in this project,” said Dr, Batke. ‘%er generosity and that of the many people who have subscribed to the Minota Hagey Memorial Fund will permit LLS to plan a building which will reflect the contemporary needs of women in higher education,”

A two-week training course in computer science offered by the university was attended by 75 Ontario highschool teachers, Mathematics teachers from as far away as FortWilliam,Windsor, ’ and Kingston, participated in aseries of lectures and problem periods designed to equip them for teaching compueer science in the Nghschools, “Since experimental courses in computer science will be taught at several Ontario highschools in the fall, we felt that some guidancewas necessary,” said Paul Dirksen, course coordinator. “To this end, the computer science and math departments of the university decided to offer tis course.*’ The teachers received letiures on

programming and computer languages, and were referred to useful material for use in the classroom. They also gained practical experience in solving typical highschool math problems on the university’s compueer s B

Co-ordination and Waterloo

Placement Ontarlo

L

Volume 1,number

A. P. Gordon, the cooperative

registrar, has announced engineering programs:

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June 24, 1966

9

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Here’s action Village-style as Judy Eearzatto dances up a storm. She was judged the best go-go dancer out of the 12 who entered, at what was probably the last Village dance of the term. Plans are tentative for a hootenanny before the end of the term.


Belgium The Belgian bishops’ conference has announced its decisions on the future of the Catholic university at Louvain. Despite prssure from Flemish militants, the bishops decided against splitting the university and transferring the department of French language and literature to Wallonia. The bishops want to create institutions where Flemish and Wallonian students can meet in dialogue. The church leaders emphasize that they represent the chief authority in the university and that their decisions settle the issue, (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Frankfurt Main) England In November lastyear theNational Union of Students of England, Wales and Northern Ireland (NUSEWNI) at its councilmeetingin Margate decided to end its affiliation with the International Student Conference (IX, Leiden), and remain independent both of the ISC and of the Prague-based International Union ’ of Students (IUS). At its spring council meeting in Exeter in April delegates voted by a

Letters should be addressed to the editor. The Coryphaeus reserves the right to shorten all letters submitted. Letters must be signed, but a penname will be printed on request.

hother

bad

start?

To the editor: It was only recently that I came into possession of the Coryphaeus editorial of May 13, “‘Off to a bad and Mr. Sheppard% reply. start,” I feel there are yet more facts to be set straight. As Mr. Sheppard points out, the argument against the appointment of six artsmen to the executive is ridiculous. The editorial board seems to fail to realize that these positions demand experience, devotion and, above all, time. To say that the president should have been out hunting up people for these positions is inane, (Mr. Sheppard was only seeking candidates for the regular Council election because until a few hour-s before nominations closed there were not even enough interested people in engineering or SC& ence to fill those seats by acclamation.) Anyone who did not have the interest to apply when the executive positions were advertised would hardly have the ambition to handle an executive post well. As well, at least four of the e%ec posts, the four board chairmen, require constant attention that can only be achieved by the chairman’s

two-thirds majority to reverse the previous decision and to apply for full membership of the ISC. The decision, regarded by many as a defeat for the extreme left-wing elements in the union, was greeted with relief by most delegates. Ghana The National Union of Ghana Students @JUGS) reportedly has been revived by the country’s students to replace the Ghana NationalStudents Organizadon (GHANASO) which ceased to exist following the overthrow of President Nkrumah. Mr. Emmanuel Keddey, the provisional national president of NUGS recalled that the union, which had a long tradition of representing the students of Ghana, had been effectively initirnidated in early 1964 by the arrest or detentionof many of its officers. It was shortly after this, he said, that ex-PresidentNkrumah had imposedGHANAS0 upon the students of the country, G,BANASOhad been in effect the student wing of Nkrumah’s now-banned Convention People’s Party. Since the coup of the Feb. 24, consultations between the students representative councils of all the universities in Ghana had resulted

being on campus or working locally. This is unfortunate for some students, but it is one of the prices they pay for the co-op system. It must also be pointedoutthatall exec positions were approved unanimously by Council - including,engineering and science reps. The insinuation that I rode into office on Mr. Sheppard% coattails I find personally insulting. I actively campaigned for Mike becatie I considered him the better candidate, and I am convinced he will doan exm cellent job, It was my intention to apply for an exec post regardless of the presidential outcome, contingent of course on my own re-election in arts. The editorial also suggests that since science students have no SOciety at present, their views will not be represented. However for over a year Council has been operating under a constitutionin which students are represented by faculties and not through faculty societies, I would respectfully urge the Coryahaeus to get all the facts straight before offering criticism. To paraphrase your editorial, “If this is any indication of what we can expect from our new editors in the coming months, then it? going to be a long, hard year.*’ Steve Ireland, arts 3 vice-president, Federation of Students.

in the NUGS.

decision

to re-establish

mission to use lecture halls, and the program had to be held in the open air. At times as many as 2000 students were assembled in the university quadrangle, but the discussions were carried onin a completely orderly fashion.

in November last year that Univom has been censored. The president and secretary-general of the South African National Student Press Association (SANSPA), of which Unicorn is a full member, condemned the censorship of the paper. (SANSPA, Grahamstown)

Italy A two-day university strike throughout Italy took place at the beginning of May in response to rioting in Rome byneo-Fasciststudent groups. During student body elections there, a Socialist student, Paolo Rossit died in fighting be, tween neo-Fascist and anti-Fascist groups.

Nevertheless, around 60 police officers appeared on the scene on the very first day, April 18, armed with pistols and truncheons. They occupied the campus and checked students’ identity papers, whereupon conflict broke out for the first time.

Spain The University of Barcelona was closed indeftilitely by the Spanish authorities on April 28. Immediate cause for themeasure was a program organized by the “Free Association of Students” under the heading “University renewal week”. Lectures and discussions were scheduled on the history of the university; teaching, research and general studies; social and economic problems at the university,and eventual possibilities of a democratic alternative to the present government. Attendance at the event was very heavy, although university authorities had refused the students per-

Rhodesia ‘Unicorn”, student newspaper of the University College of Rhodesia, has been censored by the government . The latest edition of Unicorn appeared in April with the familiar white spaces. But a duplicated pamphlet containing the unexpurgated version of the stories censoredwas issued to students who wanted it. This is the first time since censorship regulations wereintroduced .:.f:.~,::.:.~:.:.:.:.~.:.:.:.:.:.~ 51~1:.:.:.:,:.1:.:.:.:.:.~:.:.:.:.:.: :‘;.::::.;.~..~:.:.:.x.:.:.: ......................................:. ....... ..... ........................................... ......................................................................................... , . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .

Groups of students then marched into the city to demonstrate for their freedom. There, too, they were dispersed by police. New conflict broke out each subsequent day, with thepolice repeatedly breaking up the student meetings and making numerous arrests. In the end the authorities saw no alternative but to close the university “until further notice”. (VSS/UNES, Berne)

. ...‘.‘.......‘...................... ‘,‘... * ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::~~::::~::::~:::::::::::::::::::::~.: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ‘ . . . . . . . . . . . . . ./&gy$g~j;;~~~ ....+....f...............‘..............................‘............................................:.... . . ..‘.........‘...55.. ..

f Six thousand students can carry a lot of diseases. Within the closed area of the university, contagious sicknesses could be passed on with alarming rapidity. However the administration does not require compulsory health examinations before admitting most students-a situation mirrored by most Canadian and American campuses. We strongly urge that a program of compulsory examination be implemented for fall registration. Students should be required to file a doctor’s report of an examination with the registrar’s office on a form provided by the university. corn-

ntion

pleted forms would then be forwarded to Health Services where they would be kept strjctly confidential. This method would allow the students to take the examination at a time convenient to themselves. If our university along with all the others fails to do this, someday all to soon we shall probab1.y see an epidemic of tuberculosis or some other tradgic sickness jar them to thej r senses. The government and the press will ask how it happened and the administrations will promise to do something about it right away. Why wait?

Published every second Friday afternoon during the spring-summer term by the student Board of Publications of the Federation of Students, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario. Offices are located in the Federation building, annex 1. Telephone 744-6111 local 497; Nights 744-0111. Member of the Canadian University Press. 2,200 copies. editor-in-chief: associate Saxe

editor:

Jim

Nagel

Stewart

photography: Dick Siegerswith Jim Alexander, Fred Brychta, Robin King, Leong features: Fred Brychta writing : Brian Armstrong, Ailey Bailin, Nancy Bloomfield, Lesley Buresh, Allen

Class, Doug Gaukroger, George Harris, Brian Iler, Barry McNicol, Owen Redfern, Jim Storm

creative Rankin, circulation:

layout: Bob Davis-with Ray Ash, Rick Kendrick, Wayne Ramsay, Ray Vilbikaitis cartoons: liason: ination;

George

Loney

Ron Walsh, coordMarlene Zillikens,

Board of Publications - chairman David R. Witty, brecht. Advertising deadline: Friday 5 p.m. previous noon week of issue. Telephone 744-6111 local 471.

arts board; information

lithographed Signet Ltd.,

Circle

Tom services K Club

by Elmira Elmira, Ont.

car-y-phae-us . . . L, leader, fr. ‘Gk koryphaios, fr. koryphC summit; akin to L cornu 1: the leader of a chorus 2: the leader of a party or school of thought -Webster .

advertising to issue.

Wdaw,

manager Classified

June

Ekkehard Heideads: Wednesday

24.

1966

(7:4)

3


rou

DVU for - --

one-act -

ite

-

Tour by three’, an evening af one-act plays, will be presented by the combined efforts of the Drama Club, the K-W Little Theater, and St, Jerome% High School in the arts theater July 5.

Tickets may be obtained in the theater box office at $1 for adults The show and 5OQ for students. starts at 8:30 p.m. Pi-of W. Martin is the director of two of Anton Chekhov’s most successful plays, YC’he bear’ and ‘The proposal’. Both are amusing comedies centered on a total adherence Violent arguments beto logic. tween the principal characters end up with their falling in love. St. Jerome’s High School, Kitchm ener, is presenting ‘Sarah and the sax*. This play wonseveralawards for St. Jerome’s in the Ontario Collegiate Drama Festivals ) includ-

ing best actress in the finalcompetitian held here on May 6, The story takes place in a city park and concerns the problem of communication between an elderly Jewish woman and a negro beatnik who plays the saxophone. ‘A phoenix too frequent’, written by Christopher Fry and directed by Joan Gaskell, is a farce about awidow who, while mourning in her husband’s crypt meets a soldier and gets him into trouble and.,..but revealing too much would ruin the suspense.

Film

on sculptots

Epstein

and Moore

Epstein’ and ‘Henry Moore* ~0 films, will be shown in PI45 at 12:15 Wednesday. These are two of England’s finest sculptors shown in one program about their controversial work. ‘Jacob

A new chancellor and anew chairman of the board of governors have been appointed. Ira G. Needles of Kitchener is the new chancellor. The newly elected chairman of the board of governors is Carl A. Pollock, president of Dominion Electrohome Industries Ltd, in Kitchener. Both men have been active in the affairs of the university since its earliest days and are charter members of the board of governors. This fall the university will begin its tenth year of operation with an anticipated full-time graduate and un-

dergraduate enrolment of 5,400 students. Mr. Needles was president and chairman of the board of B.F. Goodrich Canada Ltd. when he was first elected chairman of the University of Waterloo board. He leftindustry in 1960 after 44 years of service with B.F. Goodrich and began a career of active retirement serving the university, many community organizations and national bodies ranging from the Canadian Manufacturers’ Association to the Canadian Highway Safety Council and the Stratford Shakespearean Festival, A graduate of NorthwesternUniversity in arts and business admlnistration, he has been a resident of Kitchener since 1925. Mr. Pollock, as chairman of the university !s board of governors, takes office at a period of exploding growth in the university’s business and financial affairs.

e

An engineering graduate of the University of Toronto, Mr. Pollock also conducted researchand studied at Oxford University on a Massey Foundation scholar ship. Hie industrial career has been spent entirely with Dominion Electrohome, a firm founded by his father in 1907, Mr, Pollock recently completed a term as president of the Canadian Manuand is also facttu-ers * Association

S A philosophy who has been active in an alcohol abstinence association says it is unfortunate that the only people who have demonstrated a responsibility for public moderation in drinking have been the abstainers. Their programs have not been effective because they are too negative “and man isn’t made for negad tive things ,*$ said Prof. Jean-Louis Allard of the University of Ottawa. Prof. Allard is a past vice-presil dent and former research adviser of Lacordaife, a F ren&Canadian abstinence association. He was a speaker last week atthe annual summer course on addiction given on campus by the Addiction Research Foundation, an Ontario government agency. In contrast to the scientific speakers that dominated the program for more than a week, outlining the extent, nature and unanswered questions of alcoholism, Prof. Allard took a philosophical approach to sobriety for responsibile citizens. He said sobriety (controlled, moderate drinking or abstinence) is a moral virtue. “‘But it is not enough to practice sobriety. We must feel responsible for the sobriety of thepeople around us and in the world.” And this could only be done through positive aims of creating a climate of sobriety and participating in education toward it. In an interview with the K-W Record, Prof.Allard saidthefailure of people to become involved in a public responsibility toward the use of alcohol is part of the ?mind your feeling prevalent own business*’ today in all phases of life. Advanced technology, material abundance and increased urbanization have contributed to this lack of participation and non-involvement. ‘We are in a society where people If we want a real are too passive, more persons have to democracy, There must be more get involved. personalization, and distribution of responsibility to more and more persons. A person is not a responsible citizen unless he assumes responsibility.” Stressing the futility of campaigns against drinking, Prof. Allard said he feels the best approach is that of Bishop Fulton Sheen: Alcoholism cannot be driven out; it must be crowded out. *a* All alcoholics have two basic problems which are religious problems, Dr. Paul Christie, a psychia-

d

The CORYPHAEUS

tris t at theDntario Hospital, Toronto, told a later meeting. He said alcoholics of all types have a. problem of identity and a problem of meaning and purpose and value, “These are basically religious problems. They are not just sexual or social or family although these factors all come in. “The major religions have always concerned themselves with these problems. “People come to use alcohol essentially as an attempt to solve their religious problems .” The religious practitioner is the only one equipped to deal withthese two religious problems of identity and meaning at their deepest level, he said, “Medical people must realize these problems have to be takeninto account and realize they are not equipped to go the whole way with the client, that nothing but the religious function can. “The client may not admit his problems are religious but they are. “I ask that these be seen as a primary area of concern,” saidDr. Christie. Religious practitioners are extremely eager to be involved, but there is a two-fold problem, he said. “There is still insufficient attention paid to human development and human problem behavior in the basic education in seminaries and the field work of clergy,

active in national Chamber of Commerce affairs. He is a member of the board of the Stratford Shakespearean Festival, the Ontario Research Council and a member of the National Design coLlnd. His many business interests include the presidency of Central Ontario Television Ltd., which operates CKCO-TV and radio station CKKW in Kitchener . He is also a director of the Dominion Life Assurance Company, the Waterloo Trust and Savings Company, Burns Foods Limited, the Royal Bank of Canada, and CrouseHinds Company of Canada.

Ira G. Needles ed chancellor.

has been (Personal

elect-

Carl board

studio)

A. Pollock of governors

is

the new chairman. (Belais photo)

ominion Day programs Radio and TV wiIl salute Canada’s birthday with several special programs. From a huge stage at the foot of the Peace Tower,CBCmTV willpresent a colorful Dominion Day show involving 300 performers from all the provinces, Dominion Day at 9 p.m. Radio salutes the occasion with a 900minute program beginning at 12:30 noon, in which reporters across the country offer on-the-spot descriptions of gala occasion% A sequel to ‘A senseof captivity*,

A proposal has been put forward to limit card playing in the future to the annex 2 cafeteria where part of the available space would be refurnished with suitable loungefurnr iture. Mr, Paul Gerster,administrative assistant to Student Council,pointed out in a memorandum to Dr. W .G. Scott, provost for student affairs that card-playing occurs in many areas. This new proposal would inconvenience arts and sciences tur dents more than engineers as they are further removed from the cafeteria, he said. As yet there is no word as to when this proposal r-night become law. The administration intends to create a common room from the hallway betweenchemistryandbiol“gY* in addition to the parts of the annex 2 cafeteria. Student Council officials noted however that this will stillnotmean any proportionateincreaseinlounge space.

Tenders closed puter building,

Wednesday scheduled

Why

immigrants

for

the mathematics completion in late

and com1967.

‘Satan’s choice’, a visit with the freewheeling meimbers of a Toronto motorcycle club, will be shown on the CBC-TV program ‘NFB pres ents ’ Wednesday night at 10:30. The ftimthe leather- jack- , eted riders of the highways and their role in a society they reject. It is r umored that some of the club members are habitues of the local Dugout restaurant.

come

The Tuesday film series willpresent ‘Why Canada?’ next week at 12:15 noon in P14-5. The color film examines why immigrants come to Canada and how SO many of them manage to establish a business or industry. The film for July 5 is ‘Family camping’, also in color. This film shows popular forms of family

for

the ‘Document’ study of Canadian prisons, will be shown Sunday night at 10.

to Canada

camping such as site camping, hiking trip, canoe campin.g in backwoods, cruise camping through travelled waters and trail riding inthe Rockies. Admission is free. The Tuesday film series is sponsored by the creative arts board, one of the boards of Student Council.

1966-67_v7,n04_Coryphaeus  

A further flip of the coin gaveseats Owen Redfern W.E. Klos from St. Jerome% High School. With a course schedule lashed firmly to his motorc...

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