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, WATERLOO,

NO. 1

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\II M E.XPANSION NFCUS CONGRESS MEETS AT SHERBROOKE Sherbrooke, Que. (Special to The Coryphaeus) - More than 120 student delegates representing 40 Canadian universities are meeting this week at the University of Sherbrooke for the 26th Annual Congress of the National Federation of Canadian University Students (NFCUS). NF$CUS, which celebrates its 36th anniversary this year, is hosting 30 observers from foreign countries. The University of /Waterloo is represented at the Congress by a three man delegation headed by Student Council President John Braun. Among the items under discussion are academic freedom as applied to the student press, fraternities and possible support for the Combined Universities Campaign for Nuclear Disarmanent. (A complete report on the NFCUS Congressi will appear in - the next addition).

NO QUORUM FOR STUDEtiT COUNCIL

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The Student’s Council met on Tuesday, September 18, for their first meeting of the new term. President John Braun called the council to order for an tinforma1 meeting after a 30 minute waiting period failed to raise a quorum. Claude Brodeur, the newly appointed Adminstrative Assistant (Student Affairs), was introduced to Council. He took an active part in discussions concerning the division and facilities offered in the new student offices located in Annex 1. The Awards and Constitution Committees did not present their reports but Chairman Paul Koch, Student Jacket Committee, announced that sample jackets would be available and shown to Council at their next regular meeting. Treasurer Dave Smith presented his report to the chair and he later submitted his resignation because of heavy academic commitments.

Love

In The

Bucket

Seat

The bucket seat is just one more saddening reminder of technology’s, genius for getting in the ‘way. The girl in a bucket seat on a moonlight summer night is not likely to slide closer to the boy behind the wheel. Its primary purpose is to keep passengers in upholstered comfort so they can enjoy the full smoothness of the miracle-suspension ride without emotional distract. In the American cars the girl’s escape is blocked by an imposing obstacle called the console. This is dangerously studded with mechanisms that set lights flashing, catch cigerette butts, and dispense facial tissue. This is Detroit’s ‘answer to how the Berlin Wall could have been built had the Communists only had the know-how. Consider the range of activity available with the all-purpose seats. In one car spotted recently at a red light, the following was seen: the girl had both arms around the driver and was kissing him warmly, the radio was broadcasting the news, the driver (offering his cheek to the girl) was talking on the radio telephone, racing his engine, and watching the red light. This was a vignette of a man trying to steal a moment with his girl while his car, his telephone, his radio and his radar-controlled traffic lights screamed, rang bells, howled and flashed lights at him to break it up. Now bucket seats threaten to make that stolen moment more difficult. A car’s original function was to get you out of the constricting, atmosphere of the parlour or the public glare of the front porch and provide a settee-like seat on which the growth of a human relationship could be measured inversely by the distance between driver and passenger. In final analysis, the bucket seat is just an armchair without legs, and armchairs are furniture for parlours, and parlours are what we started to get away from. What this trend could do, in effect, is turn the car into a parlour on wheels. II

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SEPTEMBER.

28,

1962

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6,000

STUDENTS

‘IN ‘70

A National Fund Drive to expand the University was launched early this week by the U of W President, J. C. Hagey. A goal of $11 ,OOO,OOOhas been set to cover the estimated costs of a Faculty of Science Building a Library, a Books and Periodicals Fund, Campus Centre and much needed scientific equipment. Provincial government capital grants are expected to provide more than 70% of the fund. Business&en and individuals will link hands to raise the remaining $3,000,000 and it is hoped that the Kitchener-Waterloo area will raise half this sum, W. M. Rankin is serving as the National Chairman of the Fund and Chancellor I. G, Needles is the K-W area Chairman. The faculties of Arts,. Science! Engineering and Graduate Studies currently have 1,650 students enrolled including. 3 00 out-term engineers. It is planned, to enrol1 2,500 students here in 1965 and this will increase to 6,000, students in 1970.

BRUNO’S BUS TO VISIT MAC. The Warriors play the McMaster Marauders in Hamilton tomorrow. afternoon with _a reduced squad of 28. Only one bus has been hired to take Warrior fans to Hamilton. Students interested in reserving a seat may do so by contacting Big Bruno at Renison College. The Warriors will play the Carleton Ravens on October 20 and Bill Fines of the Eng. Society is organising a group visit to the Capital. Mr. Fines will advise those interested of the rail and bus rates.

JUSTICE3

FREE DANCE TO-NIGHT -

The Engineering’ Society is sponsoring a dance tonight at the Seagram Gym at 9:00 p.m. The Harvey Smith Orchestra will provide the dance music. pue to the courtesy of the Athletic Departuknt, the Musician’s Union and Mr. Smith, 4here will be No Charge for admission.

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ENROLL

FRIDAY,

Sharon Ferguson emerges from the lake after receiving the water-justice of the St. Jerome’s College Magistrates.

David U. Umeh, newly registered Engineering student, demonstrates his native Nigerian dance and dress to his fellow students. Approximately 425 attended the dance held last Saturday in the Waterloo Mall. The evening was highlighted by the 66decappingy’ ceremony and Frosh were welcomed into cam@s life.

ST. IEROME’S HALL ANNUAL KANGAROO -COURT

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BEFORE MAGISTRATES J. GLEASGN &, W. MURPHY Barry Demeter v, the KrownCharged with being guilty of every possible crime, including being caught without a bib. Barry Demeter, who refused to plead guilty to these innumerable charges even after- several “exercises” at the command ,of the Public Prosecutor R. Wilson, was declared guilty by the honorable magistrates. Mr. Demeter was sentenced to put on a dress and go to Renison College asking each girl for a date. Mary Jane Taylor v. the Krown - Charged with distracting s an engineer from his work. Public -Prosecutor R, Wilson, in his address to the court, pointed out that “plumbers” are required to spend (all their time studying. Miss Taylor was ruled out of order when she attempted to speak in her ‘defence. The judges after reviewing the charge checked their notebooks for the judgements which they had worked out the day before. Miss Taylor underwent a change in her hair style to make her less attractive. Gary Marsh v. the Krown - Charged with not wearing his bib. and not knowing the house rules. Mr. Marsh threw himself on the mercy of the court and was subsequently sentenced to be manicured. Sharon Ferguson v. the Krown -Miss Ferguson &erupted the prosecution to point out that the court was improper, a jury of twelve peers being required. The honorable judges immediately interrupted (shut-up) to pass sentence. Miss Ferguson was ordered to wash the floor with a tooth brush. However because she continued to challenge the court. Miss Ferguson was commanded to’ take a dip in the university -pool. Court was recessed while the honorable magistrates of the C&t aided by a few unscrupulous freshmen gleefully watched Miss Ferguson disappearing into the pond. Mary Heien McDonough v. the Krown - Declared guilty, Miss McDonough was ordered to push a roll of tissue paper with her nose across the common room along a trail of water and ketchup. Jan Hagyard v. the Krown - Miss Hagyard, who was declarzd guilty of contempt of court for suggesting that the public prosecutor was under the weather, was made to walk blindfolded through cooked spagetti. Pandemonium struck the court while Miss Hagyard contemplated throwing the spagetti, but she decided 3gains this. At this point the honorable magistrates adjourned the court xnd left making a ast but dignified exit. The court clerk, unaware If the significance -of this, suddenly found himself snatched up by soup of ‘unruly freshmen. Mr. R. Weiler went for a dip in the chilly pond.

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Page 4

‘Ihs CORYPHAEUS,

/Golden Hawks Take t Waterloo Warriors 7-6

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I Last Friday night the Waterloo Warriors and the College Golden Hawks met at Seagram Stadium head on in a pre-season football exhibition game. The result was a 7-6 victory over the Hawks. The deciding factor in the game was a’blocked convert attempt in the final quarter. The Hawks deflected Jim Harm’s convert attempt wide of the uprights to thwart the Warrior’s bid for a tie. The first half was uninteresting and showed clearly that both teams were hampered by a lack of conditioning. The only scoring threats were two attempts at singles by the Hawks., Midway in the third quarter, the Hawks scored their maior on a well executed 48 yard pass -and run play from quarterback Millar to wingback Heinbecker. Drynan converted for what later proved to be the margin of victory. Early in the fourth quarter, the Warriors recovered a blocked punt on the Hawk’s 41 yard line and moments later, quarterback Nihill hit Harm with a 28 yard pass to take the ball to the Hawk’s 13. Three plays later, Atwood took a pitchout three yards around right end for the unconverted major. Late in the game, the Hawks recovered a Warrior fumble on the Warriors’ 22 yard line. Three plays later, Drynan unsuccessfully attempted a field goal and the Warriors took over on their own 18, but too late to get downfield to tie up the game with a single. The game, although disappointing to Warrior fans, was most indicative of the team’s potential. The coaching staff believes this year’s personnel to be better; than any previous season. However, only nine holdovers from last season and but one week of practices certainly handicapped the team. FROM THE SIDELINES The crowd of 1,884 (paid attendance) set a record for College Football in the Twin Cities . . . the Hawks reported eleven injuries with two players hospitalized temporarily . . .the Warriors had only 3 or 4 minor injuries. Hawks - Warriors , Statistics Yardage gained running ’ Yardage gained passing Passes attempted & completed Total yardage gained j First downs running First downs passing First downs by penalty No. of punts and yardage * Penalties and yardage

Hawks 85 138 7 for 16 223 6 ,4 1 11 for 328 ’ 9 for 95

Warriors 158 64 4for 19 222 7 3 3 11 for 354 4for35

Needs

Help!

Staff reporters are needed immediately for The Coryphaeus. In order to, produce a CAMPUS newspaper every week, all Fact& ties, organixations and’clubs shonld be represented on the paper. All interested in assisting and working on the Coryphaeus are asked to ,contact Editor Sid I Black at Renison College or at the newspaper% office located in Annex 1, Room A.

MAKE

MONEY

The Board of Publications requires solicitors for advertising. tidvertisements are solicited on a local and national kc& for publication in the student newspaper The Coryphaeus, the yearbook The Compendium, the handbook and the student directory. I _

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SEPTEMBER

28, lobe

Renis Anyone?’ The key to the ‘whole stor at Renison is . . . that it’s gone Who would have thought tha in one week so ’ many angel could be caught by the Devil Eye from the south? A funny thing happened tc me on my way’ to class - ant it’s all the phalt of that ash! An invitation: The appreciation shown by one Pre-Eng studen of the resident facilities will bc returned in equal measure, fo if he favours Renison once agair with his presence they have pro mised to usher him swi tly tc the Presidential Suite reserves for such\ guests, wherein he ma; sink with ease into the river-bed A cat’s paw was last seer where angels fear to tread on their wing. The better half have kindl! converted their smoking roon into. an extension of Hell’s Cor ner-perhaps that way they hope to kindle a few more flames. Renisonites use their bridg either with their feet or thei hands, yet they manage to ge ‘cross with both. Who spread ’the rumour tha the new coat of arms was to bf a kneeling moose? All annreciate the formal notI struck Thursday nights at dinner but I wonder -(does talk flo\ as easily at the head table a the gowns? My how time flies at Renisol . . . and flies, and flies,, and flies BullwinkI URGENT!

URGENT!

Photographers needed for the Board of Publications Are you interested? If so, be in Room P-145 at 5 p.m. on Mon., Oct. 1,

BY G. WHIZ The coming year may see increased rivalry between ourselves and the “College”. Snatching their cute little initiation hats was .a beginninghowever crude - and the year should see many more trifling acts perpetrated by both sides. Please do not mistake my intentions. I am neither counselling heightened rivalry nor am I condoning the resulting pranks; I am simply stating that all hell might break loose. Dwelling on this prank business for a minute, 1 had to chuckle at the wording in the “Welcome to Waterloo” booklet. Once a prankster is brought to justice, “action will be swift, fair, Grm and direct”. The boys on Mt. Olympus pull no punches, so as mother always cautioned, “BE GOOD”.

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LIBERAL CLUB A Liberal Club made it appearance on the Waterloo campus yesterday afternoon, her alding the arrival of varsity poli tics. The other parties shoulc not be far behind. Once they are organized 4 rivalry is sure to follow and a model parliament for this yea ir is now, a strong possibility. Th ie student election that normal1 precedes such an event wi probably make the fist Battl le of Waterloo look like a te,a party* Any and all interested in joining the Liberals may do s0 by contacting club organizc:r Richard Comber of Arts II.

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A word to the Frosh might not be appreciated at this time Jut consideration for others has never been my strong point so read and absorb. I have become rather cynical about the capabiliies of Frosh regarding campus activities and consequently have tdopted a “show me” attitude. Certainly you, as Frosh, should ook to others for guidance and advice, but please show a little nitiative in the process. University has the capability of developing :haracter and potential in its students but the door is more easily mlocked from within than battered open from without. If you have 3 mind given to analogies, I hope you will recognise this little blurb as a rap at the door.

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Occuring in the stands at Seagram. Stadium is a rather unfair practice which should be nipped in the, bud before it assumes the aspect of a ritual. Specifically it is this: when a mickey is discoverzd, those around the unfortunate owner are guilty ofI a serious breach of etiquette. They stand up and bring undue attention to the consumer by pointing many tigers in his direction. Is this action prompted by jealousy? Is it the idea of the accusers to provide the crowd with a laugh at the expense of the poor slob? What: ’ ever the reason the practice should be stopped because it is both un;sportsmanlike and against all tradition. I say tradition because mickeys in the stands have been, are, and always will be a part of our little society as it swings into the autumnal season. , ’ The authorities are perfectly correct in taking a fhm stand on this business of liquor on campus and they should be commended for it. But bear in mind that such commendations have been part of the University scene since the invention of the mickey. “Forbidden fruit . . . ” is a tired clich6 but nevertheless it is extremely apt. Grant us enough intelligence not to exceed the bounds of propriety.

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The Coryphaetis

FRIDAY,

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My roomate, a vigorous healthy farm lad; has become overly concerned at the rate at which my chest is sliding into my abdomen. He has taken it upon himself to remedy the situation. Consequently, the 5BX plan is fast becoming the bane of my existence. Running on the spot, deep knee bends, push-ups, etc., are having a more 1telling effect on my landlady than on me. She is a quiet soul who ’does not take kindly to great thumps on the ceiling. One of us will have l to go, either me or -the 5BX booklet.

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There was an emergency meeting called at Renison College’ Residence earlier in the week to discuss the lack of lighting in the parking lot. The question was put to a vote and the, girls carried the decision by the narrowest of margins. Happy blackout girls. Need I say more? i *

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, A commission of eight percent is paid on the total advertising solicited. About four hours of diligent work per week is Roaming around the campus, one can’t help noticing that MUSICAL NOTES the crude required. For further information and application contact: boardwalks and muddy sheep trails are fast giving way i , Music Director Paul Ber to a vast winding complex of asphalt paths. This complex lends Murray French III announced that two chart31 itself to endless possibilities, the first of which is an inter-faculty SHerwobd3-0450 groups and a jazz worksho P bicycle race . . . a “Tour de Waterloo” . . . along the paths, over have been organized on campu;s. and around as many obstacles as can be devised. Or perhaps the / The University mixed chart 1s “Waterloo Cup” would have more appeal. The lake back there is will rehearse Tuesdays and thke hardly twelve metres long but it is canoe size. The imagination male chorus Wednesdays iin staggers at the possibilities; the ideas run rampant. . . so rampant Room 246 of the Arts Buildir 1g I am unable to catch them. Two suggestions, Wa Wa Wee comSid Black, Ed Castoqguay, Richard Comber, Wallace Krawczyk at 6:30 p.m. mittee. Consider them; then let them lie fallow. William Lee, Ted Rushton, Sandra Saunders, Mike Topolay and The jazz workshop musicianIS George Welch. will gather each Tuesday everl* * * * ing at 7:00 p.m. in the Seagra m Published by the Undergraduate studeht body Of the University of Waterloc and its afEliated Colleges under the authorization of the Board of Public% Gym. Those interested in can tions. Letters should be addressed to the Editor, University of Waterloo As is my usual custom I shall close with a word of wisdom The opinions expressed herein represent the freedom of expression of E pus musical activities shoul from Reverend George Crabbe. respor&ble, autonomous society. contact Mr. Berg in Room 23 5 “A bird in the hand’will do you dirt”. Member: Canadian University Press I of the Arts Building; ,’

The CORYPHAEUS

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1962-63_v3,n01_Coryphaeus