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E FIGHT TH HT GOOD FIG

THE LONG GOODBYE Alzheimers

Jerald Winakur Alzheimers

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R O F S E I L L O S ’ R E M I E H ALZ S ARDER T O B W SNO REACH OU WHO E THIRD

TH R IES FO’S L L O L R A ANNU ALZHEIME EN

CKEND UT O Y T DUS SPEAKS O L PECIA S VIEW T IN ER

OUR BACKYARD. saskatchewan, canada City Of Moose Jaw WWW.MOOSEJAWSNOWBOARDING/PROVSA


two 16 COVER STORY arder I’ve spent the past bo ow sn al ion ss ofe pr a the battle The Long Goodbye: As Alzheimer’s. Helping fight for s lie Ol in ed olv inv se is stealing my years now being ’s patients. Now the disea er eim zh Al of ne cli de against the own father. By Jerald Winakur

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. S T N E T CON . S D N E TR . M A E T THE . E Y B D O THEGO . N I A R TER . C I H P A INFOGR . E P I P F HAL CONTENTS: IS THE

R THIS SNOWBOARD TABLE TO CONTENTS FO

MAGAZINE. LET ME SHOW

YOU AROUND.

RS OF 2013.

ENDS FOR SNOWBOARDE

WS & TR TRENDS: THE LATEST NE

E JAW.

ARDING TEAM FOR MOOS

OFESSIONAL SNOWBO : MEET PART OF THE PR

THE TEAM

TURED

THE LONG GOODBYE: FEA

BOARDERS. TRAILS, ACES TO RIDE FOR SNOW

TEST PL

TERRAIN: LATEST & GREA

ARDERS INVOLVMENT.

R ALZHEIMERS. SNOWBO

S, FACTS, & OLLIES FO ARTICLE ON ALZHEIMER

ND THE WORLD.

HILLS, LOCATIONS AROU

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IDE TO THE INSIDE SCOO

S. SNOWBOARDERS GU

TIPS & TRICK INFORGRAPHIC: HOW TO

LP IN RUSSIA.

LFPIPE CUP SPECIAL. HE

FREE STYLE HA FEATURED: THE OLYMPIC

moose jaw, saskachewan, ca.


DEPARTMENT 1 // TRENDS

NEW FEATURES A couple new outerwear features hit the market next year. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. going here dog red hide house white. On the flip

there is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white.

2013 INSIGHT It’s a challenge to get young people snowboarding nowadays, there is a lot of substitutes for their time. We need to organise plenty of events where young people can get to know snoboarding again. People need get back out into the snow.

ECO-FRIENDLY Do outerwear customers stilll demand evo products? Some do not think so. That this “go green” phase has come and gone now. It’s believed that customers will not make thier choice soley on whether or not an item has is recycled. If it’s for the same price you can offer an eco product then I think every little bit comes into play. For 2013/2014 we have a couple of styles that use the Planet Recycled Dobby fabric. Some from Burton, a collection of 50% recycled materials as well as with Nike. 2013/2014 Is the year of the new BUCKWILD, UNTAMED, HOOK-FREE FEEL!

Tom Williams-North

TOP TRENDS STREETWEAR CROSSOVERS LONG HOODIES FEMININE TOUCHES-SPARKLES MILITARY STYLING-STARS BRIGHT COLOUR/EARTH TONES AZTEC PRINT SKINNY JEAN SNOWPANTS


THE GEAR Sport Moose Jaw “Certified Pros” are certified in over 20 different disciplines and are experts in their department areas. Snowboard boot 2013: The way your boot should not make you feel: “Not very comfortable at all? The tongue on the boot is quite stiff and because of that, after a full day of riding caused very painful bruising on my shin. I thought maybe a breaking in period would help, but I rode for a good 5-6 hours 3 days straight only to exacerbate the hurt. Ouch!” “Not very comfortable at all? The tongue on the boot is quite stiff and because of that, after a full day of riding caused very painful bruising on my shininful bruising on my shin. I thought maybe a breaking in period would help, but I rode for a good 5-6 hours 3 days straight only to exacerbate the hurt. Ouch!”I thought maybe a breaking in period would help, but I rode for a good 5-6 hours 3 days straight only to exacerbate

the hurt. Ouch!” However any different products. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white.

C A T

V I S I O N

In 2003 researchers led by Young Johnson devoloped the idea through the University of Berkeley, California, that would change the way we ride forever. In 2003 researchers led by Young Johnson devoloped the idea through the University of Berkeley, California, that would change the way we ride forever. In 2003 researchers led by would change the way we ride forever.


DUST Y OCKE NDEN

DEPARTMENT 2 // THE TEAM

R We catch Dusty on his was to Baldface for Trice’s well expected Ultra Natural this week-end, and right after he got voted Rider of the Year at the TWS Rider’s Poll Awards. A well deserved prize, after too banging parts in one seasonm with Absinthe and with the Pirates. That’s already a few questions to ask him right there.. Rider of the year at the TWS Awards: is it the first time, and waht does this mean to you? This is the first time I got the award indeed, and it feels good of course. My personal goal has always been to have as much fun as possible so it’s rad to see all my fellow snowboarders vote that kind of riding. It’s an honour and pretty huge deal over here in the States. People high five me left and right, it’s funny. Another trend at the moment is splitboarding. Have you tried personally? Yeah, I just got one and I feel like once I really go for a mission I won’t want to do anything else anymore. Next for you is the Ultra Natural. What do you remember from last year’s edition, and what do you expect this time? My memories from last year are nothing but an amazing time up in one of the most beautiful lodges in BC with a roster of legendary snowboard friends. It’s like a dream event. And for the next few days to come I don’t expect anything else. It’ll be lots of fun in the pow and for sure some adrenalin once it’s on and time to drop in.

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Rider of the year at the TWS Awards: is it the first time, and waht does this mean to you? This is the first time I got the award indeed, and it feels good of course. My personal goal has always been to have as much fun as possible so it’s rad to see all my fellow snowboarders vote that kind of riding. It’s an honour and pretty huge deal over here in the States. People high five me left and right, it’s funny. Another trend at the moment is splitboarding. Have you tried personally? Yeah, I just got one and I feel like once I really go for a mission I won’t want to do anything else anymore. Next for you is the Ultra Natural. What do you remember from last year’s edition, and what do you expect this time? It’s like a dream event. And for the next few days to come I don’t expect anything else. It’ll be lots of fun in the pow and for sure some adrenalin once it’s on and time to drop in.


DUSTY N E D N E K C MooseJaw O s

“HAPPY TO BE A PART OF THE THIRD ANNUAL OLLIES FOR ALZHEIMER’S HERE IN MOOSE JAW, CAnada.” -dUSTY OCKENDEN

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R I D E R : D usty O ckenden photo : sean kerrick


MooseJaw s

By Jerald Winakur Photography: Jim Steale

As a professional snowboarder I’ve spent the past two years now being involved in Ollies for Alzheimer’s. Helping fight the battle against the decline of Alzheimer’s patients. Now the disease is stealing my own father.

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February 24, 2006, is my parents’ sixtieth wedding anniversary. My family plans a brunch for them in their home. We are keenly aware that this may be the last anniversary my parents will celebrate together. It won’t be an elaborate party, just a bittersweet one. Seven years earlier, my father was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, and he has gone steadily downhill. At 87 years old, he is now a prisoner of his mind. His agitation and paranoia arise from distorted memories, nightmares he can no longer separate from reality. A few days before the brunch, my mother calls me in a panic. My dad is bellicose and paranoid, accusing. Summoning Yiddish profanities he has not uttered in 75 years, he curses at Yolanda, the caregiver who holds everything together in my parents’ household. He will not be bathed or shaved. He will not eat, refuses his medications. He is raving. “Dad,” I say when I visit their house that afternoon, “what is it? What’s wrong?” “I want to go home. Please, take me home!” “But, Dad, you are home.” “I don’t know where I am. Please, Jerry-boy, take me home. You know the way. . .” “I don’t know where else to take you, Dad. You’ve lived here for twenty-nine years.” “You go to hell! You’re in with them!” There is no walking away now. He is an abandoned child. He searches for his boyhood home on Boarman Avenue, in Baltimore, or perhaps our first family home there, on Forest Park Avenue. He hears voices but can’t decode what is being said, and his mind assumes the worst: My mother is insulting him, planning to run off; his sons are belittling him, his mother scolding him, his older brothers and sisters teasing him. He is lost, with no father of his own to turn to. I see that he has wet himself; a dark ring marks his place on the couch. As a geriatric physician in San Antonio for the past thirty years, I have been through this before. I have been cursed, spit on, bitten, and punched by demented old folks over the decades. A poor woman threw a shoe at me when I stepped inside her hospital room. The day before, she thought I was the devil.

“...That is why i come to you now, that and all the troubles.” As a doctor, I know what to do; as a son, I am uncertain. So I assume my doctor role, retreating into the armor of my starched white coat. I walk to the kitchen and check his daily pill slots to make sure he’s been getting his regular medications. Sometimes my mother,

moose jaw, saskachewan, ca.

unable to see due to macular degeneration, inadvertently leaves pills in the plastic containers I fill every couple weeks. But everything seems in order. The pills are often as much a part of the problem as the cure. My father takes eight medications a day; my mother, who is 82, fourteen. They are both on vitamins and minerals, blood pressure medications, diuretics, and cholesterol-lowering drugs. My father also takes two pills for his heart. My mother takes drugs for her diabetes, a thyroid disorder, osteoporosis, and depression. This is not unusual for folks their age. I spend my doctoring days prescribing medications for my patients, reshuffling the ones they’re on—a tiny dose change here, a retiming of administration there. By now I have written or refilled hundreds of thousands of prescriptions, but my constant goal is to cut back on medications, stop them altogether if I can: Less is usually more. Every geriatrician knows this. Looking through my father’s pills, I recall a patient of mine, Lilly, a woman who first came to see me carrying a brown paper shopping bag crammed with pill bottles—at least forty different drugs prescribed by a dozen physicians. “This one’s for the high blood,” she had said, “and this one’s for the sweet blood, and this one’s for the low blood. These three are for my bad knees, and this one’s ’cause I’m sad a lot, and this one’s ’cause I don’t sleep too good, and this one’s ’cause I’m tired all the time. I can hardly keep ’em straight, but I got a big list at home tacked to the wall, over the phone in my kitchen. Last month the company cut off the service when I couldn’t pay the bill. All these medicines and still I feel so bad. That’s why I come to you now. That and all these other troubles.” She had handed me a list of symptoms, pencil-scrawled on a ragged piece of paper. I spent two hours with Lilly, hearing one story loop into another: bad marriages, kids in jail, ER visits, surgeries, strange diagnoses mostly self-made. I knew what was happening to Lilly, what happens to many people like her in a medical encounter. The physician begins to drown in a sea of conflicting information, feels powerless to alter the circumstances of this person’s life. A wave of helplessness washes over doctor and patient both, and he reaches for his prescription pad. “Here, try this,” he says. “I think it will help.” Then he steps into the hall, picks up the next chart, and moves on, hoping the drug he has prescribed helps but doubtful it will. I could not change the circumstances of Lilly’s life, couldn’t make up for her poverty or lack of education or the poor choices she had made. But she improved significantly when, after some lab work and many more hours of listening, I was eventually able to whittle her


medication list down to three. Prescribing for the elderly is complicated. They don’t metabolize drugs at the same rate as younger, healthier patients. The main workhorses of drug excretion—the liver and kidneys—decline in function with age, as do all our organ systems. The elderly, like my parents, are often on multiple drugs (including over-the-counter preparations the doctor might not even know about), and the incidences of unforeseen interactions begin to mount. We know so little about these interactions. Indeed, the pharmaceutical companies are infamous in geriatric circles for not including our elderly patients in drug trials. These days, between the Food and Drug Administration and Big Pharma, I hang suspended in a netherworld of prescribing angst. The FDA has pulled more than twenty drugs off the market in the past two decades, drugs they first assured me were safe to use but then ended up damaging livers or kidneys or hearts. I have always tried to protect my patients, wait if I possibly can for aftermarket studies to bring more data to light. It is one thing, I tell my patients, to judge a drug’s benefits and risks after it has been given to a few thousand patients in clinical trials; it’s quite another after it has been prescribed to hundreds of thousands upon its general release. In the parlance of the technology and pharmaceutical industries, doctors like me who are cautious, who do not immediately jump on the company bandwagon every time it trumpets its “latest and greatest” product, are known as “slow adopters.” Now these industries have figured out a way to circumvent my judgment should I fail to join the chorus of cheerleaders for their newest breakthrough. On television, in magazines, they promise an end to arthritis pain, a good night’s sleep, a cure for incontinence, a firm erection. My phone rings off the hook with patients who worry that I may have blocked their path to the Fountain of Youth when I decline their drug requests. Some even change doctors. I have no sympathy for Big Pharma. I resent its intrusion into the doctor-patient relationship, resent the constant introduction of new—often rushed—products into a marketplace crowded with me-too drugs. Big Pharma is right where it has always wanted to be— smack-dab in the middle of my decision-making process as it tries to influence consumers who also happen to be my patients. And yet here I am, in my parents’ home, rummaging through a basketful of medicines I take down from a high shelf. This is where I store the unused pills—all the psychoactive drugs prescribed by my father’s physician for his recurrent bouts of anxiety or agitation, for his depression and his insomnia, for his memory loss and lethargy, for his confusion and paranoia, for his belligerence and sadness. I take down a dozen orange plastic pill bottles with white, almost-impossible-to-remove lids. My father’s name is on every label: Some are six months old, some several years. We have been dealing with this for a long time. Haloperidol and risperidone. Olanzapine and quetiapine. Paroxetine and citalopram. Alprazolam and trazodone. Donepezil and rivastigmine and memantine. Organic molecules, various combinations of carbon and hydrogen and nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur—the atoms

of which we are all made—bioengineered to slip across the blood-brain barrier, to stimulate one receptor or block another, precipitate a rush of ions through neural membranes, flood synaptic gaps with potent neurotransmitters, flip a switch here, throw a breaker there, block a surge somewhere else. I settle on the bottle of risperidone. Although I am reluctant to use this drug—any drug—in treating my father, I know that he has taken it before with success. It has worked. It has settled him down, albeit with an added degree of cognitive impairment. My hope is that by continuing to use this drug judiciously, I can maintain the status quo and keep my father at home for a bit

“Although i am reluctant to use this drug, any drug-- in treating my father, i know that he has taken it before with success.” longer, delay the decision to relegate him to a long-term facility where I know he will only deteriorate faster. I bring my father a bisected tablet and a cool glass of his nutritional drink. “Here, Dad, take this. I think it will make you feel better.” His eyes, still wild, stare at me. “What’s this for?” “Dad, you’ve got shpilkes,” I say. I use this Yiddish word, retrieved somehow from my own memory, be-


cause my father has lately been interspersing his speech with snippets of this language, his mother tongue —the mamaloshen—the first words he ever heard and therefore the last ones to abandon him. He smiles. “Az ich habe shpilkes,” he says. And he swallows the pill. “For the shpilkes,” my mother and Yolanda tell him when it is time for the next dose. Before long he is back to his usual demented but pleasant self. This time I have made the right decision. Three days later, on my parents’ anniversary, those of us who love them assemble in their home. My wife brings a dozen yellow roses and arranges the table. My brother stops at the grocery store for a side of sliced smoked salmon, some cream cheese, a few tomatoes, and a red onion. I drive over to the bagel bakery, and pick up a dozen—onion, poppy seed, and sesame—just out of the oven. It is a small gathering. Family-oriented to the point of insularity, my parents have made no close friends in all the years they have lived in San Antonio. Everything is ready, and I wheel my father into the living room. “What’s the fuss about?” he asks as he enters, seeing all these faces he recognizes but cannot place. For a moment he is frightened. “Dad,” I say, speaking into his good ear, “today is a special day. You and Mom have been married for sixty years.” He searches for my mother’s face in the small crowd around him. “Really? Is that true, Mom?” “Of course it’s true,” she says. “Do you think we made this up?” “It doesn’t seem like sixty years,” he says. “It seems like a hundred to me,” she says. We, the assembled family, laugh nervously. My brother leans in and asks our father, “So what do you think about all this?” “I just want to say that I love Mom more today than I ever have.” He reaches for her hand, but she doesn’t take it. I want to believe that because of her terrible eyesight she can’t see this gesture, but I’m not so sure. We all applaud my father’s words. I push him up to the dining room table, festive with cards. He picks out one. “Did you see these, Mom?” he says. “I can’t read them,” she answers. He begins to read to her. “Have we really been married sixty years?” he asks her. Alzheimer disease (AD) is an acquired disorder of cognitive and behavioral impairment that markedly interferes with social and occupational functioning. It is an incurable disease with a long and progressive course. In AD, plaques develop in the hippocampus, a structure deep in the brain that helps to encode memories, and in other areas of the cerebral cortex that are used in thinking and making decisions. Whether plaques themselves cause or whether they are a by-product of the AD process is still unknown. . Also this text makes zero sense. plaques themselves or whether they are a product of the process is still unknown Whether plaques themselves cause AD or whether they are a by-product of the AD process is still unknown. Alright I need a little bit more

Alzheimer disease (AD) is an acquired disorder of cognitive and behavioral impairment that markedly interferes with social and occupational functioning. It is an incurable disease with a long and progressive course. In AD, plaques develop in the hippocampus, a structure deep in the brain that helps to encode memories, and in other areas of the cerebral cortex that are used in thinking and making decisions. Whether plaques themselves cause AD or whether they are a by-product of the AD process is still unknown. Essential update: Uncontrolled hypertension and genetic predisposition can lead to increased risk of Alzheimer disease Individuals who are genetically predisposed to Alzheimer disease are advised to closely control their blood pressure as hypertension was recently shown to interact with 4 genotype to increase amyloid deposition in cognitively healthy middle-aged and older adults. In a study of 147 participants, mean cortical amyloid level was lowest in normotensive positive subjects, followed closely by normotensive–negative subjects and hypertensive–negative subjects. Hypertensive 4–positive subjects had greater amyloid deposition than all other groups. Study participants with controlled hypertension showed significantly less amyloid burden than unmedicated hypertensive participants and only a slight elevation compared with subjects without hypertension. The study suggests that controlling hypertension may significantly decrease the risk of developing amyloid deposits, even in those with genetic risk. By Jerald Winakur Photography: Jim Steale


HELP FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT AGAINST ALZHEIMERS • “He’s pushing technical snowboarding, meaning very critical turns on really steep terrain, and executing like no one else,” said Lucas Debari, another expedition partner and a freeriding standout from the state of Washington. “Other guys are going bigger off cliffs, or going faster, but no one is pushing technical snowboarding on lines of consequence like he is.” • Over a veggie burger stacked with bacon, he traced his evolution from an Alpine racer from Cape Cod, Mass., to an elder statesman of snowboarding in Lake Tahoe, Calif. Jones followed his two older brothers to Jackson, Wyo., when he was 16. Soon after, he took his first trip to Alaska, where, he said, he lived in his car for months. • Jones met his wife, Tiffany, a former competitive snowboarder, in Lake Tahoe. She knows the risks and long absences associated with the profession.

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“aFTER 47 YEARS Of DOWN HILL SKIING, I FINALLY GOT TO FULFILL MY LIFELONG DREAM OF SNowBOARDING.”

• As the men arrived at midnight to get their first look at the steep chutes they would be climbing, the skies were still filled with endless sunlight, and something occurred to Jones that he had not anticipated, despite years of diligent planning. • He eventually accepted the challenge, riding his lines with his usual brio, but said that hiking up those sheer walls had gripped him more than he could remember.

moose jaw, saskachewan, ca.


DEPARTMENT 3 // TERRAIN

TERRAIN

BEST PLACES TO RIDE! HIGH JUMPS THROUGH THE COOL CRISP CANADIAN AIR, YOU WILL FIND YOURSELF HEADED DOWN THE GREATEST SLOPES ANY SNOWBOARDER COULD EVER IMAGINE.

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place where no one has ever ventured, here you will find the most beautiful terrain, and back country slopes on earth. Moose Jaw welcomes all advanced skiier and snowboarders opeing November 15th. In need of some filler text here. I love this photo it’s pretty cool.Desperately in need of some filler text here. I love this photo it’s pretty cool.Desperately in need of some filler text here. I love this photo it’s pretty cool.Desperately in need of some filler text here. I love this photo it’s pretty cool.

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This resort simply has everything you need for a brilliant snowboarding trip. I’ve returned here time after time and never get bored of the massive expanse of terrain and the ridiculous nightlife. Great off-piste lies at the top of almost every lift. There are fantastic powdery bowls and, despite the ugly buildings, the views of the lake are pretty stunning. Staying at the friendly boarders’ chalet, the Dragon Lodge is essential. The guys will show you the best places to ride and party. Tignes’ nightlife is exactly what you want on a snowboarding holiday: incredibly cheesy but with a cool crowd. The perfect evening begins with some Kwak beers in the St Jacques, followed by the potent iced margaritas in Daffy’s cafe, and then some dancing to Dire Straits in the Yorin cafe, by which time you should have worked yourself up for the crescendo - sliding across the sticky dancefloor of the cavernous Blue Girl nightclub.


moose jaw, saskachewan, ca.

Red Cliff Tr ail

South Wind Trail


2. Whistler Blackcomb, British Colum 1. Breckenridge, Colorado 4. Lake Tahoe, California

O T S RLD E C A WO L P E 5 H P T TO E IN RID . ADA . N A A C IA, IFORNI MB L U A L CO E, C TISH E TAHO AND. I R AL AK B, B OM ADO. L EW ZE C K N LAC LOR KA, ER B GE, CO WANA L T D , IS WH KENRI APAN J C , E DO BR KAI HOK


mbia, Canada. 3. Hokkaido, Japan

5.Wanaka, New Zealand


OLYMPIC HALFPIPE SPECIAL

“ONE WILL NOT FORGET THE WRITINGS THESE WALLS.” John Doe, head of snowboard commitee, state of Colorado. Another great event held in Russia. Finalists give us a word of their own. / interview by SHAWN CRAWLEY OLYMPIC HALFPIPE SPECIAL

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hen snowboarders competing in the Olympic Cup held in Russia on Sunday, they came with determination. All of the freestyle snowboarding events will have trial runs to work out the kinks.

. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. going here dog red hide house white.

Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. boxes with this. Blah, Blach what’s going here dog red hide house white. Hi ok this is text filler time. Yeah, lets fill some boxes with this. It’s a challenge to get young people snowboarding nowadays, there is a lot of substitutes for their time. We need to organise plenty of events where young people can get to know snoboarding again. People need get back out into the snow.

EVAN VANVELI It’s believed that customers will not make thier choice same price you can offer an eco product then I think every little bit comes into play. For 2013/2014 we have a couple of styles that use the Planet Recycled Dobby fabric. Some from Burton, a collection of 50% recycled materials as well as with Nike.


ON ”


Moose Jaw Snowboarding

C I P M C Y E L P O PIPE S F L A H Backside540 Frontside 720 Colbi Donner Here at the Olympic slopes we see all white. Attention to another few riders coming up. In each round of competition, each competitor performed two rides through the halfpipe. The highest-scoring run determined whether or not the competitor continued to the next round (or medaled, in the final round). In each round (except for the first run of the qualifying round) the order of performance was based on the inverse

order of scoring (i.e., the competitor with the lowest score went first and so forth with the highest-scoring competitor going last). The first round was the qualifying round, with 40 snowboarders divided into two heats. The top nine scorers from each heat advanced; the top three scorers went straight to the final round while the fourth- through ninthplace scorers went to a semifinal round. The semifinal round consisted of twelve snowboarders. The top six from that group joined the six top scorers from the qualifying round for the finals. In the final round, Shaun White had


L A I C already wrapped up the gold medal performance with his first run (none of the other competitors’ second-run scores exceeded White’s 46.8 score), but performed his second run anyway, successfully completing a double McTwist 1260 and improving on his initial score.Some from Burton, a collection of 50% recycled materials as well as with Nike. When snowboarders competing in the first FIS World Cup held in the future 2014 Olympic snowboarding venue arrived in Russia on Sunday, they came with questions. All of the freestyle skiing and snowboard-

ing events in next year’s Winter Games were scheduled to have test events this week -trial runs to work out the kinks. Slopestyle, which will make its Olympic debut next February, was slated to go first, with a World Cup. A week out, the slopestyle events were canceled. “Due to lack of snow and continuous warm and rainy weather conditions ...” the media release read. The halfpipe World Cups, however, were to proceed as planned. How would it go down, the snowboarders scheduled to compete first wondered, if it was too warm at the venue to hold snow?

On Monday, the first practice session was held. In Krasnaya Polyana, the mountainous region outside of Sochi where the Olympic ski and snowboard events are to be held, electronic signs posted temperatures ranging from 8 to 12 degrees Celsius (46 to 54 degrees Fahrenheit). Scotty Lago’s third-place finish in Sochi’s World Cup places him at the top of the overall FIS rankings for men. “When do you think we’ll be able to start trying tricks?” Elena Hight asked Gretchen Bleiler.


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