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UtahStatesman

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

The

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Today’s Issue: Campus News

Fountains encourage bottle reuse

Pullitzer prize winner Chris Rose speaks to new students in Convocation lecture. Page 2

Features

A FRESHMAN STUDENT fills up her water bottle at one of the new bottle-filling fountains in the TSC. ANI MIRZAKHANYAN photo

Week of Welcome calendar loaded with activities to kick off the year. Page 4

BY ROB JEPSON news editor A new student initiative has left an early mark on campus, adding new water bottlefilling units to drinking fountains in the Taggart Student Center and the MerrillCazier Library. As of June, these new units make it possible for students to drink from one faucet and fill up their water bottles from another. Diversity vice president Brooke Evans led the initiative. “The goal is to promote the use of our quality local tap water and refillable water bottles, thus reducing the waste of both plastic bottles as well as the fossil fuels that it takes to transport them,� she said. “Most bottled water is just tap water bottled then sent across the U.S. to consumers who then pay for tap water.� The initiative is part of Evans’ service learning capstone. For funding for the project, Evans went to assistant vice president for Student Services Eric Olsen. “(He) was extremely responsive and jumped right on board when I told him my idea,� Evans said. Though Evans proposed the idea and saw it through to completion, she said she did

not have an idea of how much the project had cost. A Statesman straw poll shows that so far the new fountains seem to be getting only positive responses. Skyler Saunders, a transfer student from Utah Valley University majoring in biology said, “I like it. Because you know when you fill it up (from the spout) you get that weird angle. You know, and it doesn’t fill up all the way.� “I like that I don’t have to prop up my knee while holding my book to get my water bottle filled,� said Ryan Beeter, a junior majoring in nutrition. Paul Perry, an incoming freshman studying aerospace engineering, said. “It’s just really convenient. You don’t have to worry about it.� The new fountains also keep track of how many times the bottle-filling function has been used. The unit with the most recorded water bottle fills is on the first floor of the TSC, which has been used more than 5,500 times. The next step, Evans said, is to get the support of the various deans and spread the

See WATER, Page 3

Construction updates for student uptake The presently-abandoned Art Barn is the future home of the USU Museum of Anthropology. It has previously housed horses, an art museum, labs and offices.

Sports

The new building will house RCDE offices and state-of-theart distance education classrooms. USU will be able to better fulfill its mission to serve the state’s diverse populations and communities with this new building, expected to be completed summer 2012.

Women’s soccer undefeated, starting the year off better than ever. Page 13

Construction on the new Ag building passed the halfway mark in May. Wiring, elevators and other mechanical features are in progress. The building completion is set for January

A 30-foot thermal energy tank is being put in the ground on the HPER Field. It will hold two million gallons of water that will be used to cool buildings all over campus. The project should be completed by December.

Opinion “Americans fought for years to ultimately attain the freedom of speech, and what a waste it would be if we did not take advantage of it.� Page 18

The graduating class of 2011 donated more thatn $5,000 to revamp the area around the iconic “A� by Old Main. It now sits on a concrete pad, which will stop it from sinking into the soft dirt near the Quad. Five feet of paver bricks surround the area to avoid it becoming muddy.

To allow easier access to the Ag building, Champ Drive was reconstructed. The project wrapped up 17 days earlier than expected and has created a better area for passenger pickup and drop-off.

Interact Now! Today: Check out photos from Saturday’s Gardner’s Market.

Added Value!

You’re going to love a new puzzle in this fall’s Statesman. And you can win restaurant certificates just by filling it out! Page 11

Online exlusives, blogs, a place to comment on stories, videos and more. Free Classfieds, too. www.utahstatesman.com

BY MARISSA CROOKSTON, MEGAN ALLEN

Outdoor Rec. pays to get more business BY LIS STEWART staff writer Aggies who want to try outdoor activities will have an added incentive to do so this semester with a $20 credit good for rentals and activities from the Outdoor Recreation Program, Brian Shirley, ORP coordinator, said. Equipment rentals are the most successful thing the ORP offers, Shirley said. The program, which also hosts classes and recreational trips, has seen periods of highs and lows. “I think it’s going to get people to realize what’s here,� Shirley said, regarding the credit. During the summer the ORP shop averaged about 30 customers per day, Kailey Burch, a student employee at the shop, said. With the credit, those from the ORP hope to bring in more than the usual number of peo-

ple in the fall and spring. Most rentals at the ORP cost $20 or less, and a one-day snowboard package for students is $22, meaning they would only have to pay $2 after the discount. Still, giving students a free $20 – essentially a coupon – to use at the ORP is somewhat of a gamble. Shirley said although a credit will be added to all feepaying student accounts this fall and next spring semester, it may not happen again, or may only be available to first year students in the future. “If the credit is extremely popular we’ll have to entertain how it’ll work out,� Shirley said. For this year, ORP staff will be working hard to ensure students know the program exists and what they can do there, since their fees already pay for THE OUTDOOR RECREATION PROGRAM sponsors outdoor it. activities and trips for USU students. It also supplies outdoor gear and book See OUTDOOR, Page 2 rentals at a low cost. Statesman file photo


Page 2

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011`

CampusNews

Journalist shares Katrina experience with new freshmen BY MEGAN ALLEN assistant news editor “Dear America, I suppose we should introduce ourselves: we are South Louisiana. We’re a fiercely proud and independent people, and we don’t cotton much to outside interference, but we’re not ashamed to accept help when we need it. And right now, we need it.� While Chris Rose was stuck in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, he penned a letter to America. He included it as part of the introduction to his book “1 Dead In Attic: After Katrina.� Just two days before the sixth anniversary of Katrina, 2,000 incoming USU freshmen gathered in the Kent Concert Hall to listen to Rose, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, share his experiences and the lessons he learned. Each year a committee selects a book to be used as the Common Literature Experience. Students taking the Connections class, along with anyone throughout Cache Valley who wants to participate, read the book and are invited to attend the convocation at the end of Connections Week. This year the committee selected “Zeitoun,� the story of a Muslim family living in New Orleans at the time of the hurricane. Abdulrahman Zeitoun ignored the warnings to evacuate the city, but sent his family to Baton Rouge. He stayed behind to take care of their home and their business,

thinking it would just be a couple of days. Among the crime and looting, during the weeks after Katrina struck, Zeitoun found himself in the wrong place at the wrong time, which led to doing time in a makeshift jail and a high-security prison. With no official charges given to him, no attorney and no contact with the outside world, his family – which by then was in Arizona – did not even know if he was alive or not. When Katrina hit, Rose worked for the New Orleans Times-Picayune and said he knew the chance to cover the effects of Hurricane Katrina was once in a lifetime. He jumped right into the battle, comparing it to a soldier who had spent 25 years in training only to get out just as a war was starting. “You just don’t do that,� he said. “These were the kind of things we’d been preparing for our whole careers.� Being in journalism is a great place to be in situations like these, he said. “I was one of the lucky few who got to get on their soapbox and rage about the world,� he said. “I got to get in the newspaper and scream. I didn’t have to hold it in.� Provost Raymond Coward called Rose a “writer, performer and a defender,� explaining why they asked him to come speak. While he was in Logan, Rose spent a lot of time interacting with students. He took an hour to meet with two Connections classes to talk about writing, then ate lunch

NINE INCOMING FRESHMEN WROTE ESSAYS hoping to be selected to attend a luncheon with author Chris Rose. They had the opportunity to eat, ask questions and discuss “Zeitoun� as well as Rose’s book “1 Dead in Attic.� photo courtesy Kaela Jorgensen, USU Connections

CHRIS ROSE, A PULITZER PRIZE-WINNING journalist spoke to incoming freshmen and community members about his experiences during and after Hurricane Katrina. He was the 2011 Common Literature Experience convocation speaker. KYLE PETT photo

with a select group of students who had won an essay contest to be there. Hurricane Katrina brought the people of New Orleans together, Rose said. “You got the idea that your neighbors actually had your back,� he said. The weeks after the disaster taught the people to fight and work hard. “If we lost the battle, we lost our homes, our jobs and our city,� he said. “The most important four-letter word in the English language is home. New Orleans is my home.� Josh Rasmussen is a freshman who participated in Connections. After the convocation, he said he was pleased with what he had seen and heard. “He was real. He was himself. A lot of people come up in front of people and they put on kind of this different face,� he said. “I connected with him a lot more because he was real. He seems like someone I would like to get to know.� Tenille Holmes, also a freshman in Connections, said she enjoyed reading “Zeitoun� because it helped connect Hurricane Katrina to her. “It’s easy to just blow off what’s going on when it’s just facts,� she said. “For me, learning the personal stories of someone – of one of the heroes – makes it much more real.� Rose spent the morning telling stories and sharing some of the lessons he learned during the Katrina experience.

Though everything is starting to work out, he said he went through many difficult times that changed his life entirely. He and his wife eventually got divorced, he became addicted to pain killers and dealt with depression. “When the storm came, it started knocking down the dominoes,� he said. Rose said whenever people complain about the “stuff � they lost in the hurricane, he comes back with “I lost my sanity and my marriage. I’ll trade you.� Six years later, Rose realizes that only the people of New Orleans really think about what happened. “The anniversary is this week,� he said, “but most likely people will bring up the fact that it would have been Michael Jackson’s 52nd birthday.� Things are getting better though, Rose said. Rebuilding has been successful and the city and its residents are getting back to normal. “We laugh more than we cry, and that’s a good start,� he said. “We’re happier, we’re funnier and still talking too loud.� To close his letter to America, Rose said “Don’t pity us, we’re going to make it. We’re resilient. After all, we’ve been rooting for the Saints for 35 years, that’s got to count for something.� – megan.allen@aggiemail.usu.edu

From Page2

Programming staff helps students participate in outdoor activities This includes an open house showing movies from the Banff Radical Reels Film Festival and Powderwhore Productions and setting up a Mongolian-style yurt outside the Taggart Student Center for a week in October. “Basically (a yurt) is a big canvas hut,� Paul Reinhardt, a student employee at the ORP shop, said. The yurts are raised, circular structures with a wood frame, roof, canvas walls and wooden floor that people can rent for a weekend in the mountains during the winter. A yurt comes complete with a wood stove, bunk beds and kitchen, Reinhardt said. The ORP has two yurts – one in Green Canyon and the other in Blind Hollow. Eight to 12 people can fit inside, depending on the size of the yurt. Typically renters need to cross-country ski to reach the yurt in winter, Reinhardt said. “The Green Canyon yurt is good for beginners,� he said. The Radical Reels Film Festival will visit USU Oct. 10. Shirley said these are short films made for adrenaline-loving types. They feature a variety of sports like skiing, rock climbing, longboarding and swimming. Reinhardt said, “It’s really cool. The films are really well done and make you want to go out and do something.� “Go out and do something� is exactly what the ORP promotes. “First off we live in a really awesome place for (outdoor recreation),� Reinhardt said. “Sometimes, some places it’s hard to get out and do stuff.� To Burch, a sophomore majoring in human movement science, said the fact that students get a chance to try outdoor activities is rewarding mostly for them. “I’m an outdoor person and it’s important for me to step away from school,� she said, adding that the nearby location of Logan Canyon provides a great opportunity for students to recreate.

Shirley said the ORP is also working with the HPER to get a wilderness first responder course going soon, and a course titled “Want to Be a Guide?� is in the works. The program currently offers activities in geocaching, river trips, backpacking and winter activities. The ORP will be holding an open house on Sept. 8, at 6 p.m., Shirley said.

“There will be food, music – not too formal – but people can come in and see the shop,� Shirley said. “We’ll have everything on display so people can see how they can spend their $20.� – la.stewart@aggiemail.usu.edu

THIS YEAR THE OUTDOOR RECREATION PROGRAM IS putting $20 in every student’s Aggie Express account. The ORP staff wants to help students realize the program exists and show them the outdoor opportunities available in Cache Valley and the surrounding areas. Statesman file photo

41 North Main Logan, Utah 84321 (435) 753-4870


StatesmanCampus News

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

More textbook options available in Bookstore

BY ARIANNA REES staff writer

Students hoping to save money and time buying textbooks this semester now have two more options, said USU Bookstore director David Parkinson. Those options are the bookstore’s new online rental and price comparison services, which provide students with access to lower priced textbooks. In December 2010, along with the bookstore’s switch to author alphabetization to make checkout faster, the option to rent textbooks was introduced to students. Over the summer the price comparison service was also created and perfected to provide the students with what they need all in one place. This semester the bookstore plans on heavily marketing these options and, Parkinson said, the biggest reason for providing them is because the bookstore must “compete or die.� “The idea of electronic textbooks has been out there for a decade. What does a student want in the end? A student wants the best price that they can get,� Parkinson said. “We’ve given students all the tools they need to find the right price.� From the bookstore’s homepage shoppers have access to a list of departments and classes by clicking on the “Compare� link in the top, left-hand corner. From there students can highlight the classes they will be taking and continue on to check and compare the average price of their course materials with prices pulled from search engines on the Internet. Books can be added to an online shopping cart and the student can go through each provider’s checkout process right on the bookstore’s page. Also on the homepage is a link that leads to the rental process. Students can rent books for a certain number of days from Follett Publishing, and at

the end of the semester, ship them back. Parkinson said this saves about as much as buying a textbook from the bookstore and selling it at buyback at the end of the year. “If you buy a textbook and you come see us at buyback, you pay about half the price of the book. If you rent the book, you’re going to pay about half the price of the book. So it’s about the same, but the student has to wait three months to get their money back,� Parkinson said. Student reactions to the bookstore’s new options are mixed. Melissa Johnson, a senior, said that her experience with the bookstore has been mostly good but at times frustrating. Despite that, Johnson said she tried the bookstore’s price comparison option and was happy with it. “I actually used it for one of my books. It was a lot cheaper,� she said. Johnson said she generally doesn’t choose to buy books online because of the length of time it takes for them to ship – a feeling that is echoed by many students. “It’s got to be cheap, and we’ve got to make sure that we can buy them here,� freshman Caleb Mairs said. Of the online services, he added, “I would definitely look into it if I had more information about it.� Other students were very open to the idea of trying out the bookstore’s services. “It would save a trip down here,� said freshman David Bowers. Bowers and Mairs agreed, the best outcome of buying their textbooks, in whatever form, would be to get the right textbooks at the right price. To provide the right price, Parkinson said the bookstore is taking several large risks. “It actually decreases our revenues, of course, because we’re selling an item that’s at a lower value, and because we’re working with other companies, there’s less profit margin to be had. So it

USU FFA chapter featured on TV The Utah State University Collegiate FFA chapter will be show-� cased Aug. 27-�29 on This Week In AgriBusiness, a weekly television program hosted by two of the coun-� try’s most well-�known farm broad-� casters, Max Armstrong and Orion Samuelson. The Utah State University Collegiate FFA chapter tribute includes information about the chap-� ter’s history, activities and commu-� nity service. It also includes several photos of university students and their participation in local activities. “We are very excited to showcase the great things that the students at USU have done for our campus and community to a national audience,� said Becki Lawver, USU Collegiate FFA advisor.

Official USU app launched this week

THE USU BOOKSTORE is trying to help students spend less and get the most out of their textbook purchases. This year students can rent books as well as compare prices with other companies. ANI MIRZAKHANYAN photo illustration

may negatively affect our financials, but it’s what the customer wants, so we have to adjust. “By renting,� he added, “we actually increase that risk because we’re also still selling the book. Being able to identify the quantity of how many we should have on our shelf gets tough.� Parkinson said that despite the risk, providing the customers with what they want is the bookstore’s overall goal, and he hopes that perspectives will change because of it. “What we’re hoping that you

learned along the way,� Parkinson said, “was, ‘Wow! The bookstore is competitive on most of those titles. Maybe that’s not such a bad bookstore anymore, is it?’ That’s our end goal. Compete or die.� He added, “The bookstore has a reputation for high prices. We’ve said for a long time that we’re trying. This website proves that we are. We want to kill the idea that the bookstore is overpriced. Instead we want, ‘The bookstore is my friend.’� – ariwrees@gmail.com

Student officer working to ban water bottle sales on campus you start restricting that on campus, where’s the end of it?� He said, “I would imagine that whoever is forming that opinion is not well informed on what water bottle sales are at the university.� Williams said he, himself, carries a Nalgene bottle daily, but on the days that he forgets to bring it he feels he should have the option of purchasing water on campus. Ben Wilson, a senior majoring in political science said, “I understand the sentiment. However, at the end of the day I believe that people should have the freedom to make wrong decisions if they would like to, including something so basic as if they would like to buy a water bottle or not.� Laura Andersen, a junior majoring in political science and economics and the president of the College Democrats said, “I think it’s really great initiative. Plastic water bottles are a complete waste of plastic that could be used elsewhere. In this situation you have to look at

PoliceBlotter Friday, Aug. 19 r6461PMJDFJOWFTUJHBUFETPNFJOGPSNBUJPOUIBU there was property being sold on Craig’s List and could belong to the university. The investigation determined that the property no longer belongs to USU. r6461PMJDFSFDFJWFEBSFQPSUPGGPVOEQSPQFSUZ An individual was in the Premium B parking lot on the east side of the TSC and located money in the parking lot. The money was turned into the booth attendant in the parking lot and was later turned into the police. Police have placed the money in safekeeping for 90 days until the owner comes forward. Saturday, Aug. 20 r6461PMJDFSFTQPOEFEUPBOFMFWBUPSBMBSNJO the Mountain View Tower. There was an RA stuck in the elevator that was shortly freed after arrival. Sunday, Aug. 21 r6461PMJDFSFTQPOEFEUPBMFXEOFTTJODJEFOU at the Quad where they found two individuals engaged in lewd behavior. Police issued citations to the individuals and released them.

Briefs Campus & Community

From Page 1

initiative across the entire campus. She also wants to hold a water bottle drive for students who would be willing to carry water bottles if they had one. “I do hope to ban the sale of bottled water on campus�, she said. “But if nothing else just encourage the sustainable alternative by bringing your own bottle and drinking local tap water, by making these filling stations more accessible as well as education about bottled water waste, etc.,� she said. While the installation of the filling fountains has returned only positive feedback, so far, the idea of banning water bottle sales on campus has gotten mixed reviews. Speech communications major Ben Williams, who ran for president of ASUSU executive council last year, said, “It’s a person’s own prerogative how they are going to spend their money, what they’re going to spend their money on. Also, to restrict water bottle sales on campus seems fairly communist to me. If

Page 3

r6461PMJDFBTTJTUFEUIF-PHBO$JUZ1PMJDFXJUI an individual that was suicidal. The individual was in the Logan Cemetery and was unresponsive. Officers located the individual and she was transported to the Logan Regional Hospital by Ambulance. Monday, Aug. 22 r1PMJDFSFTQPOEFEUPBTVTQJDJPVTCPYUIBUXBT found on the west side of the Center for Persons with Disabilities building. Further investigation found the box was being sent to another person. No further action was taken. r$PNQMBJOBOUDPOUBDUFE6461%BOESFQPSUFE that his mother-in-law, who is from China, is in Logan visiting and has not been seen since 12:00 p.m. While speaking with the complainant the mother-in-law returned to the residence. Tuesday, Aug. 23 r6461PMJDFSFTQPOEFEUPB'JSF"MBSNBUUIF Living Learning Community, building B. A student had burned some toast which set off the alarm. The alarms were reset.

the greater good. It’s not an infringement on rights. At the end of the day you can still make a consumer purchase. Is consuming that bottle of water really worth it?� Political science major Mike Smith and a former member of the USU debate team said, “If water bottles actually are a significant factor in environmental degradation then I would definitely support a top-down ban on their sales.� Evans said she suspects USU Dining Services might also have a problem with banning water bottle sales on campus, and that eliminating sales might disrupt USU’s contract with Coca-Cola, who supplies Dasani bottled water on campus. “The hope is that students will get into the habit of bringing their re-usable water bottles,� she said. “We all know that everyone has at least one, they just need to get the habit of always bringing it with them.� – robmjepson@gmail.com

Contact USU Police at 797-1939 for non-emergencies. Anonymous reporting line: 797-5000 EMERGENCY NUMBER: 911 r6461PMJDFSFTQPOEFEUPBUSFTQBTTJOHJODJEFOU at the Logan City cemetery. Police had found four individuals inside the cemetery after dark. Police issued a verbal warning to the individuals. A report was filed with USU Police. Wednesday, Aug. 24 r646QPMJDFNBOOFEBCPPUIBUUIF646 Connections fair. Thursday, Aug. 25 r6461PMJDFSFTQPOEFEUP7BMMFZ7JFX5PXFSPO a fire alarm. This alarm was caused by a resident curling their hair to close to a smoke detector in their room. The alarm was silenced and reset. r646QPMJDFTUPQQFEBWFIJDMFGPSFYQJSFESFHistration and found that the registration on the vehicle had been revoked. It was also discovered that the vehicle did not have insurance. The vehicle was impounded.

Compiled by Megan Allen

The first day of school has always been a day of excitement and bewilderment as new students file into classes. For many not familiar with the acronyms of Utah State University’s Logan campus, the first day of classes is spent with a student schedule in one hand and a campus map in the other. USU now makes it easier for students to find their classes and a whole lot more with the official USU mobile app. “We saw a need and looked around campus for help developing an official app,� said Trent Hunsaker, USU social media and marketing coordinator. “We were lucky to find great innovators on campus who could tackle such a project.� These innovators make up the team at USU’s Interactive Design for Instructional Applications and Simulations (IDIAS) Institute which was contracted to build the app for both iOS (iPhone) and Android smart phones. “We had worked with mobile apps specifically tailored for GPS data,� said Brett Shelton, project director of IDIAS, “and we were excited to take on a fully functioning app with many features.� The app’s features include a campus Google map, complete with building, office and parking information, as well as Aggie Shuttle locations, an Aggie Radio streaming player, USU news and sports stories from across campus and athletics, videos, a full calendar for the academic year and events and links to various helpful sites for students, faculty, staff and visitors. “I’m really happy with our work and the product,� said Shelton.

Celebrate USU’s Young Scientists

Nine of Utah State University’s younger faculty members are making news at the national level for groundbreaking research. Whether they are researching climate change, how to improve education or studying wireless networks used to cure neural injuries, this rising crop of young faculty has one thing in common: they are all recipients of the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award. NSF CAREER awards are given to outstanding junior faculty who demonstrate their research has the potential to have an impact in their fields. In particular, CAREER awards support the early career development of those who are most likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century. “These CAREER awards are among some of the most prestigious awards granted by the National Science Foundation,� said Raymond T. Coward, executive vice president and provost of USU. “As a research institution, USU is known for its seasoned researchers who are some of the most well-established, internationally-known experts in their fields.This group of NSF CAREER awardees will be the next generation of researchers to make groundbreaking discoveries.� At USU, nine young faculty have received CAREER awards since January 2010.

-Compiled from staff and media reports


Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Page 4

AggieLife

9XEL7XEXI9RMZIVWMX]ˆ0SKER9XELˆwww.aggietownsquare.com

Welcoming students back for a new school year BY RHETT WILKINSON features senior writer With the almost endless amount of students moving in for the first time or returning to school after a busy summer, the ASUSU executive council plans an entire week of activities to bring in the new schoolyear. Zach Larsen, the ASUSU programming vice president, is in charge of planning events throughout the year. “Our options are pretty limitless,� Larsen said. “It’s just a matter of getting support from other clubs and organizations and getting together.� Larsen and other ASUSU council members said they have indeed received such support, including feedback from returning students, and are pleased with what they have been able to coordinate for the Week of Welcome. The Las Vegas-themed week of events – which includes two concerts featuring Imagine Dragons

and Rocket Summer – also welcomes back comedian Derek Hughes and stays with tradition by hosting a bingo night and a movie, two events which Larsen said have been major hits in past years. “It’s difficult for me to say I am most excited about one show because the whole week is full of cool events,� said Larsen. Larsen said the council members involved in the planning process, including Activities director Kellen Hansen and Public Relations director Hannah Blackburn, were aware of the importance of attracting students to the events, including the incoming freshman. For this reason the officers helped distribute a survey in April through Facebook, the university’s website and by email to various school clubs and organizations asking returning students what they would like to see in this year’s Week of Welcome. Larsen said that nearly 200 returning students responded, influencing the council’s decision

to bring back the bingo night, dedicate some hours to dishing Aggie Ice Cream on the Taggart Student Center patio, and to welcome the return of a comedian like Hughes who, Larsen said, entertained USU students at an event a few years ago. “We wanted to really decide what events would be best,� Hansen said. “We’ve now had people to help us do that.� New strategies applied to Wednesday’s Day-on-the-Quad, an annual Week of Welcome event, have also provided an opportunity for more local businesses and school organizations to take part during the five hours of festivities, Larsen said. By restructuring the layout of the vendors, which will now feature a row of booths within the larger circumference of booths, has made it possible for 67 businesses and 137 clubs and organizations to have a presence at the event, compared to the 55 businesses and approximately 100 clubs and organizations

last year, Larsen said. Blackburn said the challenges of planning the week and the thrill of witnessing students’ reactions when they see what’s on tap for the coming week are all part of an exciting endeavor. “I’ve loved interacting with all the other officers, vendors and sponsors,� she said. “It’s really opened my eyes to programming. Working with the ASUSU officers has added so much to knowing what is involved in getting these events and to do it in support of (the student body).� Blackburn said the executive council’s teamwork, the assistance of faculty members and encouragement of the student body have all helped this year’s Week of Welcome to come together. “I can’t emphasize how much help I’ve gotten from everyone,� she said. “It’s not possible without a group effort. I can’t thank enough.�

Week of Welcome Events Monday, Aug 29 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Blood Battle – TSC Lounges 11 a.m. – Gone LDSSA’s Lunch for the Bunch – TSC Fountain Patio 8:30 - 10:30 p.m. – Imagine Dragons: Live in Concert – TSC Fountain Patio Tuesday, Aug 30 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Blood Battle – TSC Lounges 11 a.m. – Gone Walking Tacos – TSC Fountain Patio 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Special Olympics Basketball Game – TSC Fountain Patio 9 p.m. “ Thor� – Old Main Hill

Wednesday, Aug 31 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Blood Battle – TSC Lounges 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Day on the Quad – – rhett.wilkinson@aggiemail.usu. Quad edu 3 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Greek Recruitment Information – TSC Auditorium 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. RHA Barbecue – South Campus Lawn 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Comedian Derek Hughes – TSC Ballroom Thursday, Sept 1 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Blood Battle – TSC Lounges 11 a.m. – Gone Aggie Ice Cream – TSC Fountain Patio 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. High Stakes Bingo – TSC Ballroom Bring a can of food for SNAC and get an extra bingo card. Friday, Sept 2 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Blood Battle – TSC Lounges 12:30 p.m. - 1 pm. and 2:30 p.m. - 3 p.m. Greek Recruitment Information – TSC Auditorium 9 p.m. – Midnight ‘80s Dance with DJ Marcus Wing – Quad Saturday, Sept 3 10 a.m. The HURD presents USU vs. Auburn – TSC Lounges 8 p.m. – 11:30 p.m. The Rocket Summer: Live in Concert – Corner of 700 North (Aggie Bull-evard)

INCOMING FRESHMEN GATHER around the Block A during Connections Week. Many events are happening during the first week of school to welcome new and returning students back to campus. CARL R. WILSON photo

Service with a smile: Getting involved on campus BY GENEVIEVE DRAPER staff writer

With myriad clubs or activities to join as a new school year starts, the Val R. Christensen Service Center, located on the third floor of the Taggart Student Center, offers more than 20 different programs meeting a variety of needs and time commitments for those who want to add service to their schedule. “We have 22 different programs. We have something that will fit your interest. Come and ask and we can help you get started,� said Carlos Murillo, a junior majoring in global communications. Murillo is also a program director for the center. This year Sheldon Browning stepped into the role of community service coordinator, who advises the center’s leaders. He participated in the Service Center when he was an undergraduate. “The special thing about the Val R. Christensen Service Center is that there isn’t just one standout or signature program but that there are many programs all of which standout in their own way and that are unique in their own way to Utah State,� Browning said. Maddie Busteed is a junior majoring in international business and marketing, and is serving this year as Service vice president for the ASUSU executive council. Busteed said one of the unique things about USU’s Service Center is, though there is an adviser for the program, the programs are entirely student run. “Whatever a student’s dream is, we can make it happen,� Busteed said. Busteed began working with the service center and various programs as a freshman, becoming involved with committees, until finally serving as a director and now Service vice president. She said this was a great way to get involved with leadership. “I really treasure leadership, but I think a huge part of leadership is service. You can’t be a good leader without service,� Busteed said, “and realizing the needs of others by the chances I get serving.� Jordan Hunt, a junior majoring in liberal arts emphasizing

in business and organizational communication, started the Student Nutrition Access Center as a freshman. After being acquainted with other university food pantries, he worked with the Service Center to start SNAC. Hunt said, “One thing that I think is imperative to know about the Service Center and USU leadership in general: USU more than any other school I have ever seen focuses on student leaders. We need students to change the face of this campus.� The leadership opportunities are valuable, but Busteed

and Murillo said the opportunities to serve have positively impacted her time at USU. “Volunteering in the service center really transforms what would otherwise be an average college experience to an extraordinary and very meaningful college experience,� Browning said. Hunt said his university experience has been greatly impacted by his service.

See SERVICE, Page 8

8,):%06',6-78)27)2Service Center offers a variety of service programs for students. Depending on time commitments, the center can line any student up with the service opportunity best suited for him or her. KYLE PETT photo


AggieLife

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

Page 5

Bands, apple beer, and a musical experience The evening of Saturday, Aug. 27, I made the long journey to Providence, to hear one of my favorite local bands play at Pier 49 Pizza. Earlier that day I moved back up to Logan, driving my parents’ Toyota that doesn’t have air conditioning, so I was eager to get into an air-conditioned room, Rex hear some music and sip some apple beer. The band, Racecar Racecar! – which is a palindrome, by the way – was formed a few years ago by guitarist/vocalist Jett Fesler and drummer Alex Haslam. Haslam left the band to serve an LDS mission and, while he was gone, Brandon Lee joined to play keys and

provide vocals. Fesler and Lee have played numerous shows over the past two years, including a particularly memorable benefit concert last spring. summer bassist Brandon Rhythm This Casper joined the band and Haslam returned from his hiatus, filling out the band nicely. The band was set up in a tiny Colin space between some tables and booths in the restaurant, but they made the space work. Luckily they didn’t have to worry about crowding patrons. Their crowd, though, was unfortunately sparse. They began by playing a cover of George Harrison’s “Here Comes the Sun,� immediate-

Staff “Racecar GuyRacecar!� XXXX Grade: B+

Reviews

ly showing off Lee and Fesler’s ability to sing in harmony. They continued to do so throughout the night, covering everyone from Tom Petty to Simon and Garfunkle. It is no wonder that they can sing in harmony so well, as Fesler is a guitar performance major and Lee is pursuing a master’s degree in piano performance. Their

vocal abilities showed throughout the night, but not as much as their instrumental abilities. Lee often showcased his great skill on the piano, improvising at will and doing so wonderfully. I found that often the piano kind of

See RACECAR, Page 8

Un Packed Each week the Statesman will be profiling what students are carrying around in their bags. Be on the lookout! The maximum “safe� backpack weight is estimated to be between 10-15 percent of a person’s body weight. Smaller people risk more injury from carrying heavy backpacks.

JanSport and The North Face are two of the most popular brands for backpacks in the United States. Both brands are owned by VF Coorporation. There are 13 page and group results when you search the words “running with a backpack� on Facebook, but there are about 2,350 results on YouTube.

Before modern backpacks were invented, mountaineers would wear backpacks with wooden frames and leather straps.

There are such things as Solar Backpacks. These backpacks contain panels, which can produce up to four watts of power after proper sun exposure.

Louis Vuitton sells a men’s backpack for almost $2000. They also have two women’s backpacks that cost more than $1600 each.

– information gathered by Mariah Noble

Welcome back

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Page 6

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

CenterPiece

Tuesday

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Tobias Kroek’s eyes are slightly blood-� shot. Surrounded by mounds of pastries, the German man is quick with a smile as customers eye his fried cheese cake and razzleberry tarts. He has stayed up all night baking, and his small stand at the Cache Valley Gardner’s Market is abuzz with activity. Around him the environment is intoxicating. Families and farmers alike stroll through the square. The air is heavy with the smell of tamales, freshly baked artisan bread and the occasional whiff of bacon cooking. Ears of corn sit stacked by the hundreds, surrounded by tomatoes, green peppers, okra and freshly caught trout. As people mill around Pioneer Park in Logan, it’s clear that Utah’s oldest farmers’ market is in full swing. Decked out in blue denim overalls and carrying a wicker basket full of fresh vegetables, Debra Smith exemplifies the stereotypical farmer. As she sits down at a picnic bench to rest from her shopping, Jackie Christensen, her friend of 25 years, sits down next to her, a homemade taco in

1

hand. “It’s the best party in town,� said Smith, a veteran market goer. Both Smith and Christensen visit the market faith-� fully Saturday mornings when it opens at 9 a.m. This week their basket is filled with bunches of spinach, carrots, beets and basil. “It’s so wonderful. Everything is clean-� grown and fresh,� said Smith. “I love the atmosphere and the community aspect.� On the other side of the market is Maryann Montour with a pair of quick hands and a shining roll of copper. Her fingers braid together strands of the thin pieces of metal, twisting and contorting until a ring begins to form. Montour credits her start in jewelery making tal-� ent to a bad case of insomnia. Unable to sleep, she started crafting gemstones and copper. “I’m quite loyal to the market because they gave me my start,� said Montour, who now sells her jewelry around the state. “I have customers that come back week after week and year after year. “ In the seven years she’s been crafting

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jewelery, her hobby has turned into a full-� fledged business. Her jewelery is now sold in Bear Lake, Park City, Swalt Lake and Ogden. Though she loves traveling, she said she still calls Logan home. “This is where my heart is,� she said. “It’s fun to go to other places and meet new people and do new things in a differ-� ent place, but it’s so good to be home at our little market.� In the front of the park, 9 year-�old Maddy Telford lounges in a camping chair with a plate full of paper flowers. Unlike most of the booth renters at the market, a majority of Telford’s proceeds won’t go to her, but to the Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City. “She feels a special connection to that place because they saved her life,� said her sister Isabel. Last year she caught a case of common chicken pox. However, she was taken to the hospital when the illness turned into pneumonia and then into toxic shock syn-� drome. Eventually, she went into respira-� tory failure, where doctors had to give her

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CPR. Wanting to give back, Maddy came up with the idea of selling ceramic plates and paper flowers. “She has so many good ideas to help others,� said Telford’s mother, Becky. “It’s hard to keep up with your kids when they’re so good,� Beyond the cuisine, vegetables and crafts, a day at the Logan Farmer’s Market comes down to community. As Shonie Arave walks from booth to booth, the Hyrum native stops to catch her breath. Beside her are her 2 year-�old son, who dons a sun hat and a cup of apple juice, and 9 year-�old daughter – lemon scone in hand. “It’s really fun,� said Arave.� “It’s just social. You run into a lot of people you know.� The Cache Valley Gardner’s Market is open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., May through October. It is located at Pioneer Park (150 S. 200 East) in Lo-� gan. – allee.evensen@aggiemail.usu.edu

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AggieLife

Page 8

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

From Page 5

Racecar Racecar! has many talented group members, but some of those members steal the show

stole the show, drawing the attention away from Fesler’s vocals. Admittedly, this is not necessarily Lee’s fault, as there were some times that Fesler could have taken more control of the performance. They were not always unbalanced; the interplay between the two was quite wonderful on certain songs, showing that they had definitely rehearsed some songs more than others. Their cover of Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin’� showed some incredibly tasteful piano licks between lines of the song and some great vocals from Fesler at the end of the song. They did change the melody of the chorus just slightly, and though I’m not quite sure that I

liked their changes, I wholeheartedly approve of them changing things and not doing everything exactly like the original. One of my favorite parts of their performance was some improvisation done at the end of the cover of Elton John’s “Rocket Man.� After some great guitar and piano solos and some cool bass riffs, there was a bit of melodic imitation between the piano and guitar that was incredibly entertaining. I heard them play that song last spring, and although this time they didn’t have Lee with a crazy vocal solo at the end, this dialogue between the piano and guitar almost made up for it. One thing that bothered me with the per-

formance was that while Lee and Fesler were doing a wonderful job musically, Casper and Haslam seemed to be lagging behind. Casper did just fine with his bass lines but there wasn’t much exciting stuff coming from him. Haslam seemed to be putting out the same simple beat the whole night. Granted he did just get back from two years on a mission without drums, but that doesn’t change the fact that it got boring to hear the same beat for every song. Overall I truly enjoyed the show even though it seemed that the only people who came out to see them were me, my buddy Steve and a couple of older women.

Unfortunately, that’s how local shows turn out all too often. But don’t worry, folks. Racecar Racecar will be playing another concert with other local bands at Rock Against Diabetes on Sept. 10 in the Chase Fine Arts Center courtyard, with a minimum donation of $5. Racecar Racecar! will open at 11 a.m. and bands will play until 10 p.m. I would definitely go see this band again.

– Rex Colin Mitchell is a junior, majoring in cello performance from Vernon, Utah. If you want him to review your band’s concert, email him at rex.colin.mitchell@aggiemail.usu.edu

Dressing up the sundress W h a t girl doesn’t love a great sundress? They’re fun, flirty, comfortable and incredibly easy to Jimena Herrero dress either up or down. T h e y ’r e available in many styles, patterns and fabrics, making it easy for any body type to wear. When taking all this into consideration it’s easy to see why a great sundress is a staple in the summer wardrobe of many “fashionistas.� Sundresses are lightweight and delicate, and their airy quality makes

Trend Setter

them perfect for hot summer days but not so much for the frigid temperatures of fall and winter – a dilemma I’m sure we’ve all faced at one time or another. During the last few seasons the runways have been flirting with both 1940s and 1950s silhouettes, colors and details. This fall is no exception. The “tea dress,� as it was dubbed by many in the fashion industry, made an appearance at several shows including Miu Miu, Louis Vuitton and Azzaro. These vintage-inspired dresses have nipped waists, fun patterns and flirty skirts. They have a playful, yet sophisticated, aesthetic and look great on any body type. Think of it as a sundress with a twist. The best part? Wearing them throughout the

See PAIR, Page 9

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences invites you to participate in the school’s first A Light on the Hill ceremony August 29, 2011. The twilight reception is an opportunity to celebrate the start of the school year with Dean John C. Allen, department heads, faculty members, and other students in the college. Light refreshments will be provided. All students enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences

WHO:

WHERE: The Amphitheatre on Old Main Hill WHEN:

August 29, 2011 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

AS FALL APPROACHES, many think it is time to put away their flirty dresses for sweaters and scarves. But paired with the right accessories, a sundress can be transformed into a perfect fall outfit. Photo courtesy Thinkstock Photos

From Page 4

Service opportunities abound

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Logan InstaCare can treat you or a loved one when you need to see a physician quickly. Our expanded hours and weekends give you more opportunities to receive convenient, quality medical care from highly skilled physicians and healthcare providers.

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“Too often, I think people view college students as selfish leeches, almost. However, through my experiences I can say with confidence that myself and other students can make a lasting impression on the communities we belong to.� Murillo, who spent the first part of his life in Mexico, said that the service here is different. “In Mexico the only service you do is through the Catholic Church, if involved with that. You come here – all these people doing something to change the world. It is a really great way to get acquainted with the culture here.� Murillo said that his first encounters with picking up trash were not positive. “I said, ‘I’m not going to pick up trash for someone else’, but then I saw it differently. It’s your community, you have to take care of it. I pick up the trash, others see, and I’m leading by example.� There are more than 20 ongoing programs under the purview of the Service Center. Each requires different levels of commitment and involvement. Programs such as the Special Olympics or Best Buddies are among the most time consuming. However, Busteed said that participation in both of these programs are highlights of her year. For those who have less time or want to start out small there are plenty of opportunities. Busteed said everyone is welcome to come to the third floor to ask questions or even just hang out. She said there is always a service project going on to be involved in. The first service project of the year is the annual Blood Battle the first week of school in the TSC. For those wanting to ask questions, Busteed said the Service Center will have booths at Day-on-the-Quad Aug 31. There is also a Service Center Kickoff in the TSC Auditorium Sept 7 and 8. “The Service Center has a lot of potential to grow and better serve students, we only need students who have a vision – something that resides in every Aggie,� Hunt said. “By putting that vision to work they can make a real impact to the future of this University.� – genevieve.draper@aggiemail.usu.edu


AggieLife

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

Freshman settles in to college life Day in the

Life

Taylor Young, freshman, mechanical engineering

It’s 9:30 a.m. in Logan as the sun seeps through Taylor Young’s bedroom in an effort to yank him out of bed. Amid the new sense of spare time and freedom, it’s at least a blessing Earth’s natural elements have found a way to keep him upright during his first week as a college student. Young, an 18-year old Layton, Utah, native, pulls off his covers and heads directly to the shower – growing up in a military family has taught him nothing good comes unless you’re always on the move. He’s lived everywhere, from Georgia to England, and surprisingly he’s found much of his life gathers routine; he has his interests, his same personality and he’ll probably always start off the morning singing in the shower. This morning Taio Cruz’s “Dynamite� is his weapon of choice; and tomorrow, who knows? Young scarfs down a large bowl of Frosted Flakes and is out the door by 11 a.m., en route to the parking office. No more subdivision driveways to lean on – if you have a vehicle on this campus you’ll need a badge – almost like “Dragnet,� on wheels, but without the cool theme music. A good hour and $73 later, Young steps out of the build-

TAYLOR YOUNG HANGS OUT with his new roommates until early in the morning. Finding ways to be social is just one of the adjustments freshman must make when leaving home. STEVE SCHWARTZMAN photo

ing both impressed with the politeness of the lady at the counter and bewildered by the price he paid to put his vehicle into a white-painted box. At first he wondered if the lady was kidding – some sort of freshman prank to trick them into thinking parking really was that expensive. But alas, it truly demanded that pretty of a penny. After taking the long route back to his new abode in Merrill Hall, Young parks his car and makes the long walk across 400 North to his apartment. It’s now just past noon as he and his roommate Devin Patterson walk into the apartment, a little aghast at one of their comrades slurping down Ramen noodles in nothing but green boxer shorts. It turns out not all college life clichÊs are myths. They followed up with some nervous giggles, a quick lunch of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and it was time for the university

off to the Merrill Hall Lounge for “Mixed Drink Night.� Ellis, blender in tow, greets them with a laugh and begins setting Young up with some nonalcoholic frozen juice with the best of everything – strawberries, lemons, bananas, etc. They sit down to enjoy a hearty marathon of “Psych,� but, due to technical difficulties, are sadly confined to watching Channel 2 News. Within minutes his buddies Devin and Emerson Ugy shoot him a text from across the room: “You wanna go?� A quick nod and wink over to their corner, and they’re back en route to the apartment. It’s now 11 p.m. and everything else starts to go like a blur. Come home. Hang out. Set up some black lights. Throw on a little reggae music. Laugh. Hang out. Take down the lights – following some stern reprimanding from the RA. Hang out. Talk about the weather. Hang out. Keep hanging out. Wait for some friends to arrive. Now midnight has passed. Young jumps into the car with some friends. They take a detour to Taco Bell that turns into a 90-minute laughterinduced romp. They’re back at his place for a nightly routine of Halo 3 and some more hanging out to cap off the day. After a long journey of cereal, parking debacles, volleyball and numerous other adventures, he slides into his bedroom at 2:30 a.m. to complete his nighttime routine: take off jeans; go to bed. Day three of college life: complete.

“newbiesâ€? to do what they do best: hang out. Before long it’s already 1:30 p.m. and Andrew Ellis, the resident assistant, raps on the door, spreading the message that it’s time for a roaring game of pickup volleyball. And it was roaring, quite roaring. It was 4 ½ hourslong roaring. In all this time Young realizes three things: 1. Summers in Logan are about as beautiful as he’s ever seen. 2. Outdoor volleyball can deem itself quite addicting. 3. Judging by the consistent collision the ball makes with nearby cars, he may have dodged a bullet with such a far away parking pass. It’s 6 p.m. and only a few hours until an activity held by the RA. Young changes his volleyball-ridden clothes, throws on some “smell goods,â€? and thinks of something rather productive for himself and his roommates to do to pass the – steve.schwartzman@aggiT:10â€? time: they hang out. email.usu.edu And just like that they’re

Page 9 From Page 8

Pair dresses with accessories fall is easier than you might think. Because they’re a little more tailored than the average sundress, its easier to dress them up and wear them with layers – maximizing their wear time. Here are some ways to make your favorite sundress, or “tea dress,� wearable through the chilly autumn months.

1. Say goodbye to bare legs and add a fun pair of colored tights. Experiment with colors, textures and patterns to show your personal style. Pairing a lightweight dress with ribbed tights is a great way to stay warm and add visual interest to an outfit. When using patterns make sure you keep them small and simple. Pairing small pinstripes or a polka-dot pattern is a great alternative for a dress that has a prominent pattern.

2. Pair it with a cute cardigan. Keep in mind that if your dress has a pattern, you should keep the cardigan simple, and vice versa. Add a little interest with a vintage brooch or a plain skinny belt worn at the waist in a contrasting color.

3. A chunky sweater can also be a great alternative to a cardigan. It will create a more relaxed look. Pair it with some flats or even leggings. Add a long necklace to elongate your torso and avoid looking too bulky up top.

4. Extra chilly weather? Add a cropped jacket or a fitted blazer over your cardigan or sweater. Peplum jackets made a comeback this season and look great paired with a flirty dress. Look for these cute 1950s-inspired jackets in simple patterns or bold colors. Deep, gem-tone hues are back (teals, deep purples and royal blues). Keep the jacket simple and stick to one pattern or color. This will help keep the outfit looking uniform, regardless of how many layers you’re wearing.

5. Pairing a dress with boots is also a great way to stay warm. Avoid chunky heels and boots that are too heavy duty, as this will clash with the delicateness of the dress and make your legs look shorter. Instead try a sleek pair of knee-high boots with few buckles and details. Think simple.

Just because the weather is less than sunny doesn’t mean you have to say goodbye to your favorite dress. Get creative and add a few layers and fun accessories, such as scarves, hats and gloves. Not only will it extend the wearability of your dress, it will also keep you nice and toasty! – Jimena Herrero is a Liberal Arts Major minoring in Journalism. She attended ABM in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and majored in fashion design. Her column runs once a month. Comments or suggestions on how she can keep you trendy? E-mail her at jimena.h@aggiemail.usu.edu

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Page 10

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

SpecialFeatures

MLK Memorial: Stuck among the conceptual and the literal BY PHILIP KENNICOTT (c) 2011, The Washington Post

The new memorial to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. turns out to be a relatively modest affair. A stoplight on Independence Avenue SW announces the entrance, where a fan-shaped entry court leads to a 30-foot high portal of carved stone. The memorial faces inward, away from the Mall, with planted earthen berms and trees obscuring it from many angles. More than 180 new cherry trees have been added to this four-acre wedge of land between the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and the bridge that crosses the northern edge of the Tidal Basin, keeping the space green and assuring that the white necklace of blossoms that delights the world will be unbroken come spring. Except for a wall of green granite covered in quotations by King, and two main statue elements that represent a “Mountain of Despair� and a “Stone of Hope,� the memorial is a low, pleasant plaza that integrates quietly into the landscape of West Potomac Park.

Even the 30-foot tall statue of King, an early version of which prompted the Commission on Fine Arts to fret over its “confrontational� stance, imposing size and “Socialist Realist style,� is turned away from the main entrance. King, who was plenty confrontational in real life, now looks off to the West, toward where FDR sits in his equally controversial wheelchair. But there was no symbolism intended in that, according to executive architect Ed Jackson Jr. Like too many memorials, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is stuck uncomfortably between the conceptual and literal. The concept, originally developed by the San Francisco-based ROMA Design Group, focuses on the Mountain of Despair, two massive, roughly arch-shaped granite bookends, and the “Stone of Hope,� which contains a statue of King, carved by the Chinese sculptor Lei Yixin and shipped from Changsha, China. The “stone� is meant to look as if it has been pulled out of the arch of the “mountain,� and is turned slightly so that visitors first encounter a

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quotation by King, “Out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope,� before they encounter King himself. The stone of hope turns out to be derived from a rather violent allegory of political conflict and tribalism. The line is from King’s “I Have a Dream� speech, delivered in Washington on Aug. 28, 1963. It was apparently based on an image from the second book of Daniel, in which the prophet interprets one of King Nebuchadnezzar’s dreams. Nebuchadnezzar envisioned not a mountain, but a massive idol, or image, with a head of gold, arms of silver and thighs of brass. “As you looked, a stone was cut out by no human hand, and it struck the image on its feet of iron and clay, and broke them in pieces,� says Daniel, prophesying the downfall of the old order. King’s version makes no reference to smiting and politics, and it was certainly not the intention of the designers to suggest anything controversial. Despite occasional citations from his later, more challenging speeches, the memorial is focused on the anodyne, pre-1965 King, the man remembered as a saintly hero of civil rights, not an anti-war goad to the national conscience whose calls for social and economic justice would be considered rank socialism in today’s political climate. The hope-from-despair concept is realized literally, with a giant statue of King embedded in the Stone of Hope, which is grooved on both sides to suggest that it has been physically extracted from the Mountain of Despair. But it turns out to be a rather tricky thing to base archi-

%00-8;390(8%/) is a few hours with a jack hammer to improve the King memorial. It could be vastly improved simply by removing the statue. /Washington Post photo by Nikki Kahn.)

tectural design on rhetorical tropes. Especially King’s rhetoric. The master orator was remarkably inventive in his metaphors and eclectic in his sources. If you read his writing too closely, the metaphors begin to contradict and undermine each other. In the Dream speech, King spoke not only of a Mountain of Despair and Stone of Hope, but of a desolate valley of segregation, a solid rock of brotherhood, the majestic heights of “soul force,� and a lonely island of poverty in a vast ocean of material prosperity. Sometimes valleys are exalted, sometimes they are places where people “wallow in despair.� Even the heights, or high ground, isn’t always a positive image in King’s rhetoric. In one of his early speeches, in Montgomery, Ala., he spoke of being pushed from the “glittering sunlight of life’s July� into the “the piercing chill of an alpine November.� It was very much a mobile army of metaphors that King deployed. To the listener, they are pure poetry. But they were

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never meant to be pinned down in the way that creating a $120 million memorial based on one trope pins down an image. The image also created visual and design challenges that no one figured out how to solve. A mountain should be big, but a memorial near the Mall must be in scale to its surroundings - and given that the entire plaza rests on more than 340 pilings driven through marshy muck some 40-50 feet to bedrock, the mountain couldn’t get much larger even if the relevant authorities had approved something more colossal. Metaphorically, it seems as if the Stone of Hope ought to be smaller than the mountain from which it is hewn, but because it contains a statue of King, it must be big enough to be impressive. The result is a mishmash that looks a bit like King is attached to a giant door that has been pushed out of a rather meagre hillock. The seams joining the 41 blocks of granite that comprise the stone, and the 118 blocks that make up the two sides of the mountain give both sculptural elements a somewhat flimsy, cobbledtogether feel, as if they were Monday, Aug. 24, 2009 Page 14

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intended for a roadside attraction, not a monument on the nation’s most symbolically rich ground. You could see this coming for years, and it was clear during the approvals process that plenty of people on the oversight committees were feeling queasy about the design. There were worries about the size of the King statue, and the rather brusque, arms-folded stance in which he is memorialized. Efforts to tweak the design didn’t confront the central problem: The idea of representing King, the stone and the mountain literally. An imaginative landscape architect could have translated the mountain and stone concept into something more abstract. But once it was decided that there had to be a monumental, lifelike image of King, the concept and its literal execution were both doomed to failure. The memorial could be vastly improved simply by removing the statue. Or by following King’s original metaphor and hewing it down to something smaller and more abstract.

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TimeOut

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

Page 11

Brain Waves?

www.a-bay-usu.com

FunStuff

Argyle Sweater

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&VIEOMRKXLI1SPHÂ&#x2C6; kenneth.locke@aggiemail.usu.edu

The STATESSMAN Crossword! 0EWX(MXGL)JJSVXÂ&#x2C6;John Kroes

0SSWI4EVXWÂ&#x2C6;Dave Blazek

Check it out! All the clues, all the answers come from from this issue of The Statesman. Bring it in to TSC 105 or snap a photo with your phone and email to statesmanoffice@ aggiemail.usu.edu. Deadline Tuesday noon. Those with correct answers will be eligible for a drawing for a $10 restaurant gift certificate! Read & Play!

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FOR RELEASE AUGUST 29, 2011

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Cookie holders 5 Baseball feature 9 What gears do 13 Lake into which Ohioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cuyahoga River empties 14 Alabama march site 15 Austen novel 16 *Not animated, in filmmaking 18 Rotating cooking rod 19 Grassland 20 Plunked oneself down 21 Disco dance 23 *Like replays that reveal bad calls 27 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Affirmative!â&#x20AC;? 28 Travelerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide 29 Dental fillings 31 â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Dollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Houseâ&#x20AC;? playwright 34 __ noire: literally, â&#x20AC;&#x153;black beastâ&#x20AC;? 35 Enveloping glow 38 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I __ Prettyâ&#x20AC;?: â&#x20AC;&#x153;West Side Storyâ&#x20AC;? song 39 Dovesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homes 40 Do-it-yourselfersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; buys 41 __-Coburg, Bavaria 42 Like speaking 43 Wee parasites 44 Word with power or reactor 46 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Casablancaâ&#x20AC;? pianist 47 iPhone download 49 *One who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t function under stress 53 Mealtime lap item 55 â&#x20AC;&#x153;That feels great!â&#x20AC;? 56 Org. issuing many refunds 58 Garden of Edenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s __ of life 59 Where the ends of the starred answers are filed 63 Emblem of authenticity 64 Proverbial waste maker 65 Movie lioness

By Jennifer Nutt

66 Online business review site 67 Cut with acid 68 Medvedevâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;noâ&#x20AC;? DOWN 1 Come together 2 Astrological Ram 3 Opponent 4 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get it?â&#x20AC;? 5 Spat 6 Quarterback Manning 7 __, amas, amat ... 8 Ways to get under the street 9 Army meal 10 *Ineffective executive 11 Look happy 12 Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand 14 Rascal 17 Nile dam 22 Italian â&#x20AC;&#x153;aâ&#x20AC;? 24 Brunch staple 25 Neckwear pin 26 Santa Clara chip maker 30 Central Washington city 31 Uncertainties 32 Actress Arthur

8/29/11

Answers found elsewhere in this issue! Good Luck! Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

33 *Hunk or babeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attribute 34 â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s Russian president Yeltsin 36 Numbered hwy. 37 Barnyard brayer 39 Old buffalohunting tribe 43 Like a he-man 45 Kimono accessory 46 One of 50

8/29/11

47 Unable to sit still 48 City of Light, in a Porter song 50 Mars neighbor 51 Goofy 52 Wipe off the board 54 Brown seaweed 57 Whack 60 Cheerios grain 61 Trojansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sch. 62 Quagmire


Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Issue

Page 12

StatesmanBack Burner

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

SA Office moved

Monday

Aug. 29 Today is Monday, Aug. 29, 2011. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue of The Utah Statesman is published especially for Nate Wright, a junior majoring in mechanical and aerospace engineer-â&#x20AC;? ing from Pleasant Grove, Utah.

Almanac Today in History: In August 2005, the Gulf Coast of the southern United States was hit by one of the most powerful hurricanes on record. Hurricane Katrina slammed into Louisiana and Mississippi with winds exceeding 170 miles per hour and storm surges of up to 26 feet.

Weather

High: 92° Low: 55° Skies: Partly cloudy with a 20 percent chance of rain.

Big Blue Scholarship Fund Football Luncheon, SLC 12 p.m. A Light on the Hill Aug. 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the Amphitheater on Old Main Hill Imagine Dragons live in Concert TSC, Patio 8-10 p.m.

Tuesday

Aug. 30 Blood Battle Lounges on the 2nd floor of the TSC from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Special Olympics Basketball Game 12-1:30 p.m. on the TSC patio Free walking tacos 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the TSC Patio Thor on the big screen on Old Main Hill 8:30-10:30 p.m.

Wednesday

Aug. 31

Blood Battle Lounges on the 2nd floor of the TSC 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Day on the Quad 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Unveiling of the Undergraduate Research Spotlights wall 2:45 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Atrium of the Merrill-Cazier Library RHA Barbeque 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Derek Hughes Stand Up Comedian and Magician 7-10 p.m. in the TSC Ballroom

The Office of Study Abroad has moved! Please visit us in our new location 118 Military Science: First floor-enter in the door on the southside of the building just north of the TSC. Learn more about semester exchanges, short-term faculty-led programs, study in English, or build language skills. Study Abroad is affordable! Semester exchange programs are based on USU tuition costs.  Most scholarships and financial aid apply. Save the date! Study Abroad Fair Sept. 14 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the TSC Sunburst/International Lounge.  Contact us for more information: Office of Study Abroad Military Science 118; 435-797-0601; studyabroad@usu.edu; www.usu.edu/studyabroad

Walk or choose to loop the track. Walkers who create teams or sign up individually may do so at alz.org/utah. Runners are invited to participate in the 5K Run along side the Walk. The run fee is $20. To register as a runner you may go directly to the Web site at www.alz. org/utah click on Walk to End Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and go to the Logan walk. The sign up form is on our page. Or you may contact Jenn Weiss @ 435-754-0247 or jennw@ sunshineterrace.com

*P]MRK1G'S]WÂ&#x2C6;G&G McCoy

You Need to Know:

A Light on the Hill Ceremony Monday, Aug. 29 from 7:30 p.m. to 8:20 p.m. The College of Humanities and Social Sciences invites you to participate in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A Light on the Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ceremony Aug. 29, 2011. The twilight reception is an opportunity to celebrate the start of the school year. Light refreshments will be Stokes Nature Center provided. It will be held at invites ages 12+ to A the Amphitheater on Old Starry Night, held 7:45Main Hill. All students 11pm on Thursday, Sept. enrolled in the College of 1. Participants will learn Humanities and Social to recognize fallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major stars and constellations, get Sciences can attend. Cornerstone of Cache a feel for how stars move Valley Musical Culture: An through the night sky, Exhibit Monday, Aug 29 all view the moonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s craters, Day. A new exhibit organized and learn to use the stars as a compass - all with the by University Libraries at Utah State University takes a naked eye or binoculars. unique look at one of Cache Meet at the Logan Ranger Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical leaders who District parking lot for played a role in the cultural carpool to star-watching site. Registration required. development of Logan, For more information, call Frances Winton Champ. A 435-755-3239 or visit www. reception for the exhibit is Monday, Sept. 12, 4 p.m. at logannature.org. Merrill-Cazier Library. The exhibit and reception are free and open to everyone. Contact: Kathy.schockmel@ Walk to END Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Join this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s usu.eduBuilding Foyer. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t walk starting at USU track make it? Check out the website www.thebodyshop/ where you can register to participate in a 5K Run/

(IIT)RHÂ&#x2C6;tysoncole@aggiemail

Nature Center

Register for walk

More Calendar and FYI listings, Interactive Calendar and Comics at

UtahStatesman The

www.utahstatesman.com

We Deliver! 792-FOXS (435) 792-3697

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Page 20

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

SpecialFeatures

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Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Page 13

MondaySports 9XEL7XEXI9RMZIVWMX]Â&#x2C6;0SKER9XELÂ&#x2C6;www.utahstatesman.com

TouchBase AggieSchedules Volleyball THURSDAY, SEPT. 1 USU  vs.  Idaho  St.,  7  p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 USU  vs.  Syracuse,  7  p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 USU  vs.  Texas  State,  7  p.m.

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 USU  vs.  Utah,  4  p.m.  

SUNDAY, SEPT. 4 USU  vs.  Cal  State  Fullerton,  1  

Football SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 USU  at  Auburn,  10  a.m.

Cross Country SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 Utah  State  Open,  9  a.m.

Top 25 1  Oklahoma  (36)   2  Alabama  (17)   3  Oregon  (4)   4  LSU  (1)   5  Boise  State  (2)   6  Florida  State   7  Stanford   8  Texas  A&M   9  Oklahoma  State   10    Nebraska   11    Wisconsin   12    South  Carolina   13    Virginia  Tech   14    TCU   15    Arkansas   16    Notre  Dame   17    Michigan  State   18    Ohio  State   19    Georgia   20    Mississippi  State   21    Missouri   22    Florida   23    Auburn   24    West  Virginia   25    USC  

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1464 1439 1330 1286 1200 1168 1091 965 955 910 900 848 821 690 686 530 519 443 369 361 258 228 219 207 160

Wagner named preseason defensive player of the Year BY TAVIN STUCKI sports editor

LAV VEGAS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Utah State was picked to finish fifth in the Western Athletic Conference by both media and coaches preseason polls, released earlier this summer. Hawaii is the early favorite and picked to win the WAC, followed closely by Nevada in second and Fresno State in third. Louisiana Tech, in fourth, precedes Utah State, in fifth, who is followed by Idaho, in sixth. San Jose State, in seventh, and New Mexico State, in eighth, finish out the polls. Hawaii coach Greg McMackin said he does not believe a walk championship will be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;walk.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to compete for the WAC championship,â&#x20AC;? McMackin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think there are several teams that are going to be right in the thick of it.â&#x20AC;? With the departure of longtime favorite Boise State to the Mountain West Conference, many players and coaches feel the WAC championship is up for grabs, including Idaho head coach Rob Akey. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s saying it, some of them believe it,â&#x20AC;? Akey said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ones that believe it will have a chance.â&#x20AC;? Bryant Moniz from Hawaii was selected to be the WAC offensive player of the year for his senior season. Moniz led the Warriors to a 10-4 season last year and a share of the WAC championship.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve coached at every level and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen a guy study as hard as Bryant Moniz,â&#x20AC;? McMackin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at our offices all the time â&#x20AC;&#x201C; works hard, has got a family â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a great deal of respect for him.â&#x20AC;? Utah Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior linebacker Bobby Wagner was named the conference Defensive Player of the Year. Wagner led the WAC and tied for seventh in the FBS with 11.1 tackles per game and is a two-time all-WAC honoree. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a heck of a player,â&#x20AC;? said New Mexico State head coach DeWayne Walker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know when we get to that stage of the season (Wagner) is definitely a guy weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to See WAGNER, Page 14

Soccer off to best start ever Flanary leads USU with five goals on the season BY MEREDITH KINNEY sports senior writer

The USU womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer team has gone undefeated through the first four games to start the 2011 season and make history with a program best 4-0 start. Checked off on the Aggiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hit list are Weber State, Portland State, Colorado College and Northern Colorado.

Coachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show begins Tuesday

Utah State 1, Weber State 0

BY USU ATHLETICS

Utah State head coach Gary Andersenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s radio show will start on Tuesday, Aug. 30. The show, which will air mostly on Thursdays, runs from 6:05 to 6:45 p.m. on 610 AM KVNU and 610kvnu.com, as well as streamed on utahstateaggies.com. The Copper Mill Restaurant and Elements Restaurant will rotate hosting the show, starting with The Copper Mill. The show gives USU fans an opportunity to ask questions and interact with Coach Andersen and players. Host Al Lewis will recap the previous week and preview the upcoming game, taking questions from the audience and listeners. The Aggies are in preparation for their seasonopener on Saturday, Sept. 3 at No. 23/19 Auburn at 10 a.m. (MDT), which will be aired on ESPN2. USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preseason concludes with a scrimmage on Saturday, Aug. 27 at Noon as part of Utah State Aggie Football Family Fun Day, sponsored by Maceyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Foods. The event provides fans a chance to meet USU football players and coaches, participate in games and activities as well as purchase and pick-up season tickets. Activities sponsored by Maceyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Foods will begin on the South Concourse of Romney Stadium. Season tickets as well as two-game packages will be also available for purchase at the USU Football Family See COACH, Page 15

7)2-360-2)&%'/)6&3&&=;%+2)6poses for a photo at WAC Media Days this past summer. Wagner is part of the linebacker core that will anchor the Aggie defense. TAVIN STUCKI photo

7,%28)00*0%2%6=8%/)7%shot against Portland State a week ago. Flanary scored against the Vikings and leads the team in scoring. CARL R. WILSON photo

The Aggie womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer team opened their regular season on Friday, Aug. 19, with a 1-0 win over Weber State University at Rio Tinto Stadium in Salt Lake City. This is the third year the team has opened their season in the professional arena, each time against an in-state rival, and each time earning a win. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am really excited to come away with a win,â&#x20AC;? said USU head coach Heather Cairns. In the 33rd minute, senior forward Shantel Flanary scored the sole goal of the match. Keeping with tradition, Flanary has scored all three times at Rio Tinto, twice with the game-winning goal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It feels unreal, I guess,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t score the goals alone, my teammates obviously have to get assists from somewhere. It is always a team effort.â&#x20AC;? Because it is so early in the season, Cairns said the team is

Fast Stats Â&#x2C6;979FIKER season 2-1-1 Â&#x2C6;7IRMSVKSEPOIITIV 1SPPM1IVVMPPLEW EPPS[IHXLVIIKSEPW MRJMZIKEQIW still working to find their flow and rhythm in the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first couple of games it is really hard to get your attack clicking,â&#x20AC;? Cairns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think you saw that neither team had great chances in front of the goal.â&#x20AC;? After Flanaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal, Weber State pushed forward with a continued attack, but the Aggies held on for the win, 1-0. Utah State 2, Portland State 1 Playing at home at Chuck and Gloria Bell Field for the first time this season, Utah State came from behind to beat Portland State 2-1 on Sunday, Aug. 21. Portland State scored first in the 36th minute with a goal from sophomore Ariel Snyder. USU goalkeeper Molli Merrill deflected a save away from the net, but the 5-foot-5 forward out of Newberg, Oregon, headed the ball back in for the score to go up 1-0. The Aggies struck back in the 53rd minute when sophomore forward Mari Miyashiro See BEST, Page 14

Volleyball struggles in weekend tournament at SUU BY TYLER HUSKINSON assistant sports editor

The Utah State volleyball team had a tough opening to its 2011 season during the weekend at the Southern Utah Tournament, losing two of the three matches. After graduating four seniors, the defending Western Athletic Conference champions are still looking for an identity early in the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a little up and down,â&#x20AC;? USU head coach Grayson DuBose said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There were some things we did really well and, there were some things we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do very well. We kind of knew that going in. We lost a lot of experience from last year, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking to try and rebuild our identity here.â&#x20AC;? USU left Cedar City with 1-2 record after dropping matches to University of Pacific, host Southern Utah University and defeating Drake University.

Pacific 3, USU 0

Senior All-American outside hitter Liz McArthur led Utah State with nine kills while junior setter Kassi Hargrove, who started her first-ever match for the Aggies, finished with a career best 23 assists and 17 digs. In the first set, the Tigers jumped out a 5-1 lead and never looked back en route to a 25-13 victory. The Tigers hit .432 and held Utah State to a .129 hitting percentage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re offense is faster than anything Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen in womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volleyball, and we just hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t prepared for that,â&#x20AC;? DuBose said about Pacific. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can only simulate in practice what you are able to do. We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t able to simulate their speed and it got us a little uncomfortable.â&#x20AC;? Utah State cut the deficit to 20-10 on a kill from freshman outside hitter Rachel Orr assisted by Hargrove before

the offense sputtered and only managed three more points in the remainder of the set. The Tigers only held a three point advantage over the Aggies late in the second set, but USU did not get any closer and dropped the set, 25-18. The Aggies held a small lead in the third and final set before falling 25-17. USU 3, Drake 0

McArthur came up strong against the Bulldogs, recording her 13th career double-double with 13 kills and 11 assists. Junior opposite side hitter Shay Sorensen put the Aggies on the board first in the opening set with a kill, and the Aggies never gave up the lead. McArthur notched one of her 13 kills on a pass from Hargrove to give the Aggies the victory. Utah State fell behind early to Drake in the second set but rallied and out-

scored the Bulldogs 9-4 to regain the lead and cruised to a 25-16 blowout. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good team from a good conference (Missouri Valley),â&#x20AC;? DuBose said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They sent four teams to the NCAA (tournament) last year. RPI-wise that will help us out a little bit. They were good. I thought they were experienced and it was a good match for us to finally get one and kind of start to re-establish who we are.â&#x20AC;? Drake pushed the Aggies to the brink in the third set, but a timely block from Sorensen and an attack error from Bulldog junior outside hitter Bentley Mancini gave Utah State its first victory of the season. SUU 3, USU 2 The Aggies dropped a heart-breaking loss to the T-birds in their final day of action at the Southern Utah Tournament. The two teams traded See STRUGGLES, Page 15


StatesmanSports

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From Page 13

Aggiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; best-ever start has USU outscoring opponents 7-3

crossed a ball in from the left side which actually found the goal to tie the match at 1-1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just say I kicked it and it went into the net,â&#x20AC;? the 5-foot1 Hawaii native said with a smile. Flanary added another score just minutes later in the 56th. Defender Summer Tillotson sent a long ball in from the USU end of the pitch which bounced and found the 5-foot-3 forward to score the eventual game winner at 2-1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was like a 50-50 ball,â&#x20AC;? Flanary said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Me, the keeper and the other defender all just went up and somehow, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, I got above the two of them and just got a flick on it and luckily it went in.â&#x20AC;?

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Utah State 2, Colorado College 1 The Utah State soccer team started off their two game road trip with a 2-1 win over the Colorado College Tigers Friday afternoon. The win marks the second time in the past three years the Aggies have started off the season with a 3-0-0 record. USU held strong against a tough CC team throughout the entire 90 minutes, stopping 17 corner kicks and preventing 21 shots in the game.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

...I got above the two of them and just got a flick on it and luckily it went in.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; senior forward Shantell Flanary, USU Soccer

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We beat a really good team,â&#x20AC;? Cairns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are really impressive with their speed of play.â&#x20AC;? Utah State came out of halftime with an offensive mindset, scoring twice in three minutes. The first Aggie goal came in the 59th minute when sophomore Jennifer Flynn put the ball past the CC keeper Hanna Berglund into the right side of the net. Flynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal was the first of her collegiate career and was sparked by an assist from Flanary. Her assist was the 12th of her career, putting her three away from the all-time record at Utah State. Three minutes later in the

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62nd, Flanary netted a goal to put the Aggies up 2-0. The goal gives her three on the season, one in each game. The Tigers kept the pressure on in the second half, pushing into the final minutes when CCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s junior forward Brittney Lyman booted the ball past Merrill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They made us work,â&#x20AC;? Cairns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They made us work really, really hard.â&#x20AC;? Utah Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one goal lead prevailed as the time ran out, ending the game 2-1.

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Utah State 2, Northern Colorado 1 Utah State won its fourth straight game over the Northern Colorado Bears, 2-1, on Sunday. The victory secures the best start ever for Utah State soccer, winning each of their first four matches. Flanary came up big again

for the Aggies by netting both Utah State goals and scoring in her fourth consecutive game. The first goal came just four minutes into the match when Flanary booted a pass from Kendra Pemberton into the back of the net to go up 1-0. The next scoring opportunity for USU came an hour later when Flanary scored from 17 yards out to give the Aggies a two-goal lead. Despite promising chances in the second half, the Aggies were unable to capitalize. USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense held off the Bears until the 80th minute when junior midfielder JJ Wykstra scored the only goal for UNC. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; meredith.kinney@aggiemail. usu.edu Assistant news editor Megan Allen and sports editor Tavin Stucki contributed to this report.

From Page 13

Wagner to tackle WAC

have to account for. Obviously weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be watching him throughout the year. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very good football player.â&#x20AC;? WAC Commissioner Karl Benson put to rest all rumors of USU joining the MWC, calling the rumors â&#x20AC;&#x153;erroneous reporting.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever report you may have read or seen yesterday about something being imminent between the Mountain West and Utah State,â&#x20AC;? Benson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have no idea where it surfaced or how it surfaced.â&#x20AC;? Benson also addressed issues he is facing with keeping the WAC afloat as a competitive conference with the nearing departures of Hawaii, Fresno State and Nevada, as well as the deal he nearly worked out with BYU to join the conference for all sports except football. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will look forward to continuing the WACMountain West rivalry and on-the-field competition,â&#x20AC;? Benson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to get through this period,â&#x20AC;? Benson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m obviously disappointed that that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t materialize, but on the other hand, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here again with a plan and will

Fast Stats Â&#x2C6;0IH;%'ERHXMIH JSVWIZIRXLMR*&7 [MXLXEGOPIWTIV KEQI Â&#x2C6;8[SXMQI%PP;%' LSRSVII execute that plan that will allow the WAC and our member institutions to be clearly recognized nationally.â&#x20AC;? Nevada, Hawaii and Fresno will be spending 2011 as their last football season in the WAC. Nevada and Fresno will join the MWC in all sports for the 2012-13 season, while Hawaii will join the Mountain West for football only, and all other sports will compete in the Big West Conference, also beginning in the 2012-13 season. WAC play will begin on Thursday, Sept. 1, at 6 p.m. when Bowling Green travels to Moscow to take on the Vandals of the University of Idaho. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tavin.stucki@aggiemail.usu. edu

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Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

StatesmanSports

USU Football improves front line BY TAVIN STUCKI sports editor

The trenches. The beef. The big-uglies. Quarterback bodyguards or quarterback killers. Football coaches across the country will tell you a game is won or lost on the line. The 2011 season at Utah State University is no different. In this, the first of a three-part series previewing the Aggie football team, take a look at the men who make it all possible for the skill guys to do their job; the linemen. Offensive Line The Aggies return three starters on the offensive line: sophomore Tyler Larsen at center with seniors Funaki Assisi on the left and Philip Gapelu on the right at the guard positions. Larsen started his freshman year while both Assisi and Gapelu have two years of experience apiece. Offensive line coach TJ Woods said he will rely on the experience of those three to anchor the line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Obviously thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our strength right now on the front,â&#x20AC;? Woods said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got three guys whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got experience, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in the fire. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking forward to be able to lean on those guys.â&#x20AC;? The biggest question mark for the O-line will be at the two tackle positions. Oscar MolinaSanchez played half of the season in 2010 and has won the starting job at right tackle this year, recently beating out junior transfer Stetson Tenney. Tanner Richins and sophomore Eric Schultz continue to battle it out for the left side, a spot vacated by Spencer Johnson who graduated last year. Larsen said the line is doing much better than they were in the spring. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The tackles are catching

UTAH STATEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LINE SQUARES off at Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scrimmage. Both the offensive and defensive lines will be a key cog in deciding the Aggiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; success for the 2011 season. TODD JONES photo

up, so thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a really good sign,â&#x20AC;? Larsen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our communication is a lot better. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re picking up defenses that we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen before. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just all-in-all a lot smarter. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting more and more experienced out there.â&#x20AC;? But what is the key to a successful offensive line this year? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cohesiveness, playing as one, consistency,â&#x20AC;? Woods said,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our biggest goal right now is to try and improve being on the right assignment and being consistent. We have a lot of talent, we got a lot of guys who can do a lot of good things, but O-linemen got to do it every day, every play. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the bottom line.â&#x20AC;? Defensive line At the end of last season

head coach Gary Anderson announced a change in the defensive scheme from a 4-3 to a 3-4, which means USU will have one more linebacker on the field, but one less lineman. It is also an unfamiliar switch for defensive line coach Frank Maile, who said he was always used to a 4-3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we switched it was new for me,â&#x20AC;? Maile said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now

that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone through it with the spring and now through camp, I really love what it has to bring to the table â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the different dynamics that come out of it. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very exciting.â&#x20AC;? The 3-4 defense usually involves other players to put pressure on the quarterback in addition to the linemen and those blitz packages come in many different looks which can confuse opposing offenses. Junior defensive tackle Al Lapuaho said the new look gives USU a big advantage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dynamic,â&#x20AC;? said the transfer from Snow College. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have backers coming and blitzing, we have safeties and corners blitzing, the offense wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing.â&#x20AC;? Maile said the look brings new flavor to the Western Athletic Conference. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love it right now because no one really does it in our conference,â&#x20AC;? Maile said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something a little different.â&#x20AC;? As dynamic as the new defense will be with all the blitz options, one less lineman means the line needs beefier linemen, prompting USU to recruit several juco transfers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason why we brought them was because of who they were at their junior colleges,â&#x20AC;? Maile said. The D-line positions will be filled by Lapuaho at nose tackle, flanked by junior transfer Bojay Filimoeatu and senior Quinn Garner. Expect transfers Havea Lasike and Evan Huahulu to also make an impact for the Aggies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the most talent Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen on a defensive front in a long time,â&#x20AC;? Maile said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Together itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wrecking crew. But again, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to get them ready to be that wrecking crew when the time comes.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tavin.stucki@aggiemail.usu. edu

Page 15 From Page 13

USU struggles, inexperienced sets before the T-birds pulled out a 2-point victory in the fifth set to take the match. The Aggies narrowly took the first set from the T-birds, 25-23, but the Southern Utah rebounding on the next set edged out Utah State, 26-24. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you are a little inexperienced, things will matter. Little things will matter,â&#x20AC;? DuBose said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought Southern Utah was a little more aggressive than we were and I think that was the difference.â&#x20AC;? The Aggies nearly pulled out the fifth set and had a great opportunity with the score knotted up at 13 apiece, but sophomore middle blocker Nicole Gneiting-Theurer and McArthur committed back-toback errors to give the T-birds the victory. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ty.d.hus@aggiemail.usu.edu From Page 13

Andersen radio show returns

Fun Day on Saturday, Aug. 27, at the Romney Stadium Box Office, which is located on the South end of Romney Stadium. After its season-opener at Auburn on Saturday, Sept. 3, Utah Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home opener is on Saturday, Sept. 10 at 6 p.m. (MDT), taking on in-state foe Weber State, marking the first time that USU and WSU have squared off since 2001, and Utah State leads the all-time series, 11-1. The Aggie-Wildcat match-up will have special meaning for Andersen, who will be facing his mentor, Weber State head coach Ron McBride. Andersen played for McBride at Utah in 1985-86.


StatesmanSports

Page 16

Monday, Aug. 29,2011

New students pay attention, Aggie pride is in the air Can you feel it? I can. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to direct my thoughts Show Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something about to all of you here â&#x20AC;&#x201C; students me a the hot August air. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and teachers alike â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so something about freshplease read carefully. Scotsman men on the fountain Some of you have been steps. There are cars in at Utah State for a little the Stadium parking lot. while now and know The Bookstore is busy. whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up. Some of you Maybe you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fully are freshman who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. unpacked those boxes or Either way, Big Blue found your notepad yet. You probably needs YOU to become a better fan. just posted about your last hurrah of Maybe you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know anything summer on Facebook and Twitter. about Aggie football. Maybe you do. Well, I guess itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about that time. Either way, the Statesman is here to help. Let me introduce myself. My name is No USU student can be a real fan withTavin Stucki. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the sports editor at the out being informed and educated. Statesman and the football beat writer. From football and basketball, to handIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard more than a few people tell ball and rodeo, the Statesman has the me the sports page is the most read most complete sports coverage of any section in this paper, so if thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true, I newspaper in the world when it comes should have the captive audience of just to USU Athletics. If thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sport at about everyone on campus right now. USU, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of the Statesman sports

Tavin Stucki

page. You probably havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been to any Aggie baseball games. If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen the sign with the schedule on it, you probably donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know we have a wrestling team. You might not know USU has a lacrosse, rugby and hockey team. Well, you probably knew we have a hockey team. Or at least youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d better. To help you students know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up and not look like a freshman, we are here to give you the heads up on how these teams are doing. Have you ever wanted to see your name and picture in the paper? Remember what it was like in high school when you had all the reporters wanting to ask you about that 90-yard pass to win the game in the fourth quarter or the buzzer-beating trey in the state playoffs? This year weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to give you a chance to relive the past like

Uncle Rico. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re covering a lot more intramural sports than we have in the past, so stack your teams up and get ready to make a run at intramural champion. Read the Statesman sports page, and we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let you down. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m taking it upon myself to help you not be that guy who stands next to the water cooler and looks like a tool when he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Robert Wagner is great! Did you hear about that 79-yard pass against BYE last year?â&#x20AC;? Tavin Stucki is a sophomore majoring in print journalism. He is the sports editor for the Utah Statesman and writes USU football stories for ksl.com. He is an avid Aggie fan and has been since birth. Follow him on twitter at @tavinstucki for football updates.

California stuns Japan, claims Little League title SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; An American flag draped around his shoulders, Braydon Salzman couldn't contain his glee when he found California teammate Nick Pratto to give him a postgame hug. The boys from Huntington Beach are headed home with a Little League World Series championship. Pratto singled in the winning run with two outs and the bases loaded in the bottom of sixth inning, and Salzman pitched a complete-game three-hitter in a 2-1 victory Sunday over Hamamatsu City, Japan, and the tournament title. "USA! USA," yelled fans before Pratto's single. "I was just thinking. 'Oh God, Oh God,' Before I was getting in the box," the 12-year-old Pratto said. "But once I got into the box, I calmed myself by telling myself to just look for a good pitch." Pratto's clutch hit returned the World Series title to the United States with the type of victory even the big leaguers dream about. A U.S. team has now won six out of the last seven World Series, with Japan's win last year the exception. Pratto tossed his helmet into the air after rounding first before his teammates mobbed him in the infield. The teams

exchanged handshakes at the plate before California's giddy players posed at the mound with their new championship banner. "My team is physically smaller than most of the teams. We didn't think we would get to this stage," Japan manager Akihiro Suzuki, who fought back tears after the game, said through interpreter Kotaro Omori. "All of the players did such a wonderful job to get to this stage." With runners on first and second, an error by Japan shortstop Gaishi Iguchi on what could have been an inningending double play loaded the bases for California. After a force play at the plate, Pratto smacked a solid liner to center off reliever Kazuto Takakura that brought pinch-runner Eric Anderson home with the winning run. Pratto did his father, manager Jeff Pratto, proud. Nick Pratto said it was great to have his father as his coach, "but he kind of gets on my nerves sometimes." It was a fitting end to a tense game marked by excellent pitching and timely defense. Japan starter Shoto Totsuka struck out five over 4 1-3 innings, giving up a homer to right to California slugger Hagen Danner.

First pitch was delayed more than three hours after the outer bands of Hurricane Irene brought more rain than expected to the Williamsport area. "The result was bad, but they really tried their best," Suzuki said. "Today's weather was difficult for us to get used too. If the weather was like this in Japan, we wouldn't have played." The clouds finally started parting midway through the game, and sunshine draped the complex by the time the California players left the stadium to cheers by friends and family. Neither team could convert on several chances to break open the pitcher's duel earlier in the game. With runners on first and second in the top of the sixth, third baseman Dylan Palmer blocked the bag from sliding Japan runner Ken Igeta on a bunt play to help get California get out the inning. California put runners on first and second with two outs in the fifth, but Takakura got a f lyout to end the inning. Playing right field in the second, Takakura also made a running catch on fly down the line to save an extra-base hit with a runner on second.

NICK PRATTO, CENTER, CELEBRATES with teammates after driving in the winning run with a walk-off single off Hamamatsu City, Japan, pitcher Kazuto Takakura to win the Little League World Series Championship baseball game. AP Photo

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Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

Page 17

SpecialFeatures

New Newseum exhibit includes Sept. 11 artifacts BY JACQUELINE TRESCOTT (c) 2011, The Washington Post

Since Sept. 11, 2001, covering terrorism has been a priority for the news industry, while fighting terrorism has been a priority of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The Newseum has melded the two pursuits in a special exhibit called â&#x20AC;&#x153;War on Terror: The FBIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Focus.â&#x20AC;? The new display, which opens Sept. 2, fits neatly into an ongoing exhibition, â&#x20AC;&#x153;G-Men and Journalists: Top News Stories of the FBIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Century.â&#x20AC;? Fragments of the engines of United Flight 175 recall the power of the terroristsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; weapons. One engine part is 1,500 pounds, the other 800 pounds. Found just blocks from the World Trade Center towers and on loan from the FBI, the engine parts will be suspended from the

ceiling. Another item is Ruth McCourtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s red wallet, twisted and caked with mud. She was on Flight 175 taking her 4-year-old daughter, Juliana, to Disneyland. The FBI found the wallet in a Staten Island, N.Y., landfill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to show things in the state in which they were found,â&#x20AC;? said Carrie Christoffersen, the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curator of collections. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The purpose is to help demonstrate the range of conditions that these pieces have come through. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to make them look lovely again. The point is the horrible circumstances.â&#x20AC;? The FBI has lent the museum the rigged hiking boots of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;shoe bomber.â&#x20AC;? On a flight from Paris to Miami in December 2001, Richard Reid tried to light up the explosives hidden in his heavy black shoes. One of the

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Our Idiot Brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: An Easygoing Misfire â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Idiot Brotherâ&#x20AC;? turns out to be mis-titled. It should be called â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Brother We Treat Like an Idiot,â&#x20AC;? and that goes as much for the filmmakers as the dysfunctional family at the core of this easygoing misfire. Paul Rudd plays Ned Rochlin, a perpetually blissed-out biodynamic farmer who in the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first scene sells pot to a police officer. When he gets out of jail, he embarks on a serial-crash with his three sisters, upending their lives with his anarchic honesty and unbridled naivete. Peeking out from a curtain of shaggy hair and a beard, Rudd invests Ned with every ounce of the effusive, natural warmth that has become his trademark. And like so many movies in his career, he makes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Idiot Brotherâ&#x20AC;? much more tolerable than it deserves to be. Screenwriters Evgenia Peretz and David Schisgall play up Nedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innocence by making his sisters thoroughly unappealing: Emily Mortimer plays a dowdy, sad-sack hausfrau married

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Idiot Brotherâ&#x20AC;? C+

Reel

Reviews Wash. Post

to a pompous documentarian (played with withering contempt by Steve Coogan); Elizabeth Banks flails in a misguided brunet pageboy as a ruthless Vanity Fair reporter; and Zooey Deschanel lends spaced-out self-absorption to a lesbian tempted by a similarly navel-gazing male artist. Director Jesse Peretz happens to be the screenwriterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother, but surely heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no idiot. Still, one wonders whose idea it was that Deschanelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner - played by Rashida Jones - would take her sartorial style points from Urkel. Or whether the scene-stealing Kathryn Hahn, as Nedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s witchy hippie ex-girlfriend, had to be such a witch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Idiot Brotherâ&#x20AC;?

holds Ned up as a paragon of decency and trust, to the point where in one scene, he cheerfully asks a guy on the subway to hold a wad of cash - and the man does, gobsmacked. As Ned himself says, if you give people the benefit of the doubt, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll live up to it. But the filmmakers are so intent on demonizing everyone else in Nedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life that it suggests they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe their own tag line. There are times when â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Idiot Brotherâ&#x20AC;? possesses a loping, genial sweetness. But it lacks conviction, and it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hold a beeswax candle to such similarly themed films as â&#x20AC;&#x153;You Can Count on Meâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mommaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Man.â&#x20AC;? Rudd has created a genuinely engaging character in the Candide-like Ned, but â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Idiot Brotherâ&#x20AC;? gives him very little garden to cultivate. R. Contains sexual content including nudity, and for profanity throughout. 96 minutes. By Ann Hornaday (c) 2011, The Washington Post

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Be Afraid of the Darkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: Cellar! Beware!! Cliche coming!

Augmented by just enough CGI to bring its icky gremlins to life, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Be Afraid of the Darkâ&#x20AC;? feels retro in all the right ways; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bump-in-the-night tale that, if not for the occasional glimpse of a cellphone or reference to Adderall, could have been told decades ago.cActually, it was. Screenwriters Guillermo del Toro and Matthew Robbins adapted the script from a 1973 TV movie of the same name. The changes they made pull the tale further back, though, into the realm of fable - especially their decision to change the protagonist from an adult to a little girl: Sally (Bailee Madison, convincingly apprehensive and sullen) has been sent by her preoccupied mother to live with her father and his new girlfriend (Guy Pearce and Katie Holmes) in the grand old mansion theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re renovating. (Adults being mainly an obstacle in this sort of tale, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not inappropriate that Pearce and Holmes both offer thin performances.) Sally doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be there but canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t resist exploring. Soon she discovers a hidden basement - unsafe for little girls, an aging caretaker warns knowingly - whose rusty, bolted-up ash pit speaks to her. Scratchy, faint voices whisper to Sally, offering friendship. When her first encounter is cut short, we hear them whisper among themselves: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll come back. They always do . . .â&#x20AC;? Followers of del Toroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work will see reminders of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Panâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Labyrinthâ&#x20AC;? here - little girl, strange environs, enticing and perhaps magical creatures known only to her - but the storyteller is writing for another director, first-timer Troy Nixey, and keeps the action rooted in the real world. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll save the fantastic recesses of his personal mythology for his own films, though he does eventu-

ally work old folk tales into â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dark,â&#x20AC;? in thoroughly creepy ways best left for the viewer to discover. Nixey nails the look and vibe of the tale, starting with a chilling prologue in which the houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 19th-century inhabitants do horrible things to one another. In the presentday story, scares build steadily as Nixeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s camera creeps through heavy shadows that obscure the source of ratlike skittering noises. Identifying strongly with Sally, the movie is seduced by the monstersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; voices - when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re speaking to her, the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surroundsound mix makes them seem to be hiding all around us. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inevitable that she will set the things free and that her fascination will soon turn to dread. After milking the beastiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first few appearances for big shocks, Nixey shows us perhaps a bit too much of them; as the film moves into full-scale action mode, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slightly less satisfying than its creepy buildup was. (And, perhaps intentionally, it relies on a couple of shameless bits of illogic.) Even its imperfect moments, though, benefit from a literary and artistic richness most contemporary spook stories canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t muster. It would be a shame if side projects like this slowed del Toroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pace in making films of his own, like the deeply personal â&#x20AC;&#x153;Panâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Labyrinth,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cronos,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Backbone.â&#x20AC;? But the more movies he can put his stamp on, the richer horror cinema will be. . By John DeFore Special to The Washington Post DeFore is a freelance critic. R. Contains mildly gory violence and terror. 99 minutes.

TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sept. 11 anniversary: The five best shows to watch BY HANK STUEVER (c) 2011, The Washington Post

Hank Stuever recommends: â&#x20AC;&#x153;George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interviewâ&#x20AC;? (one hour) airs Sunday at 10 p.m. on National Geographic Channel. --â&#x20AC;&#x153;9/11: Day That Changed the Worldâ&#x20AC;? (two hours) airs Sept. 5 at 8 p.m. on Smithsonian Channel. ---

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nova: Engineering Ground Zeroâ&#x20AC;? (one hour) airs Sept. 7 at 9 p.m. on PBS. --â&#x20AC;&#x153;9/11: The Days Afterâ&#x20AC;? (two hours) airs Sept. 9 at 9 p.m. on History. --â&#x20AC;&#x153;Voices From Inside the Towersâ&#x20AC;? (two hours) airs Sept. 10 at 9 p.m. on History. Check local listings for time, channel

shoes is open to show how the explosives were inserted into the soles. A flight attendant smelled the match and grabbed the boot while the passengers restrained Reid with their belts. The belts are also on display. The journalism story isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forgotten in the exhibit. John Miller, the former ABC News reporter who was the last Western reporter to interview Osama bin Laden before the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, donated several items to â&#x20AC;&#x153;War on Terror.â&#x20AC;? The beige tunic, salwar kameez and pants he wore to the interview at the hideout in Afghanistan are displayed, along with a small camera. Two films

detail Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience. The new material includes two Wall Street lampposts, a sign that says â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;pushâ&#x20AC;? from a door at the World Trade Center, and rakes, shovels and buckets used to sort through the debris collected at the Fresh Kills landfill in Staten Island. Also displayed are several cellphones and pagers that were found. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They kept going off for days after,â&#x20AC;? Christoffersen said. Since it opened in April 2008, the Newseum has had a permanent exhibition on Sept. 11. It focuses on the news industry, journalists and the challenges of that day. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;9/11 Galleryâ&#x20AC;? includes 127 newspaper fronts from the next day and a 31-foot section of the broadcast antenna from the World Trade Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North Tower. Other exhibits include a limestone cornice piece from the Pentagon and part of the fuselage from United Flight 93, which went down near Shanksville, Pa.

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Views&Opinion

Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Page 18

9XEL7XEXI9RMZIVWMX]Â&#x2C6;0SKER9XELÂ&#x2C6;www.utahstatesman.com

OurView

AboutUs Editor in Chief

Water we fighting for?

Catherine Meidell

A

number of things changed on campus while we were away for the summer, but one thing seems to stand out more than others. Unfamiliar contraptions were built into the Taggart Student Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drinking fountains â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a strange invention that had us puzzled when we first discovered it. Looking more closely at it, we noticed the outline of a water bottle and a small spout where we assumed water was dispensed. We brought our water bottles to campus for the first time in months, simply to test the device. Though this water is the same water we once drank from the fountain, it tasted much sweeter. Thank you, water gods. It is now possible to fill water bottles up twice as fast, and we are doing it in style. Okay, so we know the real reason for these dispensers revolves around encouraging students to stop buying water bottles, which is a worthy cause. Of course, buying water can become expensive, and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that kind of cash lying around. It promotes ecofriendly behavior while keeping our wallets happy. The dispenser allows the entire water bottle to fill, while the water fountain only allows half the bottle to fill until the tilt of the bottle causes the water to flow back out of the top. There has been talk of taking this water bottle movement even further, and it toes the line. We are all in favor of giving students the option to decide whether or not saving the environment is on their priority list. Give students the option, and we believe they will more often than not make good decisions. Banning the sale of water bottles on campus completely, simply, does not make sense. Perhaps, we are being stubborn, but when our options are whittled down to one option, we feel rather confined. What will happen to the students who care less about preservation? When someone passes out on the sidewalk, we will know why. Dehydration. It comes down to this: donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell students what they can and cannot do. Prompt them to do the right thing. Make saving the earth convenient. This is why it was wise to install more efficient water dispensers that prompt students to carry water bottles. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not take it to the extreme. Thank you for the go-green enthusiasm, but at the same time, no thank you.

USU administration a step above the rest Welcome home Aggies. Logan has missed you. We are going to have a great year together. This summer I realized some great things about our institution. As part of my role, I have the opportunity to sit on the executive board of the Utah Student Association. This board is made up of the student body presidents from all the institutions of higher education across the state. As I listened to their issues, I have been grateful for the great executive team here at Utah State University, led by President Stan Albrecht. As I have represented the students on many different councils and committees, I have been amazed by their focus on student success that comes from each of our leaders. Many universities throughout the nation are putting a lot of focus on faculty research while undergraduates are stuck being taught by graduate students. However, here at USU the needs of the students drive everything that happens. Our administration really does have our best interests in mind. With the unique opportunity of possessing a great administration, student involvement is important. We cannot pass up the

ASUSU View

ERIK MIKKELSEN opportunity to shape our college experience into something great. Each year more and more students finish college with some sort of degree placing them in an increasingly competitive job market. In 2010 there were 3.3 million degrees awarded by public and private institutions. With these kinds of numbers coming out of colleges, and the number of jobs available dropping every year, a person needs more than just a completed college degree to keep up with the competition. The difference between the person who gets the job and the person who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t is now defined by how well one applicant has differentiated him or herself from the others. The time to start that differentiation is now. Those students who stand apart from the competition are students who took the initiative to not only get through college,

See RESUME, Page 19

News Editor

Rob Jepson

Assistant News Editor Megan Allen Features Editor Kellyn Neumann Assistant Features Editor Allee Evensen Sports Editor

Tavin Stucki

Assistant Sports Editor Tyler Huskinson Copy Editor D. Whitney Smith

ForumLetters Reduce number of feral cats To the editor: Feral and homeless cat populations need to be reduced out of concern for birds and other wildlife and out of a compassionate desire to reduce suffering. Trap-neuter-return (TNR) is a method of reducing the number of feral cats by neutering breeding colonies. TNR is not always appropriate, for example, where endangered species need to be protected from cat predation, but TNR is proving effective in many situations including on university campuses. On the USU campus TNR has reduced the numbers of cats near the Junction. The program was initiated in 2003-04 with the trap-

ping and neutering of about 22 cats by the USU Pre-Vet Club. From then until the present, the colony has been managed by volunteers organized by Aggie Cats. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m told there are currently four cats in the Junction Colony. Now, apparently USU plans to attempt to relocate those four Junction Colony cats. If this neutered colony is removed, cats that are not neutered are likely to become re-established in the area and feral cat numbers will again increase. In 2004 it was illegal to feed cats on USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus, but this could not be enforced and the cat population was increasing. The conditions that led to a cat population problem in 2004 are still present at the Junction. The area remains attractive to cats, and people still feel compelled to feed cats in the absence of a managed program.

Photo Editor Ani Mirzakhanyan

0IXXIVWXS XLIIHMXSVÂ&#x2C6; %TYFPMGJSVYQ It is both expensive and risky to relocate feral colonies. Moving the Junction cats will be costly and puts them in danger. Also, the Junction cats have provided a rodent-control service around the Junction. If the Junction cats are creating problems, the problems need to be clearly identified and potential solutions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including but not limited to relocation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; evaluated. To my knowledge, a basic decision-making process has not taken place. The state of Utah has passed legislation encouraging TNR in appropriate situations. USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relocation of a successful TNR colony should not take place without an investigation and opportunity for alternative solutions to be proposed. Molly Hysall

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hear some chatter For a large fraction of students at USU, the woes and triumphs of dating are always simmering in their minds. It seems as though our success as individuals partially revolves around our success in capturing the attention of members of the opposite sex. I assume this has a lot to do with why the column written by Richard Orcutt that ran in the Statesman last semester prompted the most discussion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it focused on this very subject: dating. Perhaps our readership will skyrocket if we switched up the game a bit and compiled a newspaper that resembles Teen Vogue and Entertainment Weekly. In fact I know Statesman content, whether it is in print or on the web, would be tweeted more often if â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wildâ&#x20AC;? Bill Sproatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest breakup was spattered across the top of the front page. If this is what you are interested in, tough luck. I advise you to download some newsworthy applications on your iPhone and start worrying a tad more

Taking the Soap Box

Catherine Meidell about the bigger picture. In case you were not aware, you are now paying a sum of 25 cents per credit hour in your student fees â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which total just over $400 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so the sustainability council can talk about ways in which USU can become more ecofriendly. Hopefully itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all talk. This fee may not seem like a big to-do and could most likely be found lurking in hidden corners of studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cars. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the point. Which organizations will ask students to increase their enrollment fees next? If the Sustainability council can do it, shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t everyone else? Are they more important, or did they simply just have the courage to ask? What are we willing to pay

for, and what makes those things more important? The truth is very few students ask themselves these questions. Maybe I need to face the facts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; students just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care. However, I refuse to believe this. I have met too many intelligent young people attending this institution. These people have opinions about university policies and regulations but would rather listen to themselves groan than groan in a public forum. I understand the therapy of talking to oneself, but that does not make it productive. If I could challenge every student to do one thing this year, aside from surviving group projects, it would be to become a proactive student. Find out what ASUSU executive council is talking about. Find out how they are spending your money. Without your feedback they will continue to make decisions based on what they believe you want this university to be, rather

Assistant Photo Editor Carl R. Wilson

Editorial Board Catherine Meidell Rob Jepson Kellyn Neumann Tavin Stucki D. Whitney Smith Steve Kent

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Â&#x2021; /HWWHUVVKRXOGEHOLPLWHG to 400 words. Â&#x2021; $OOOHWWHUVPD\EHVKRUW ened, edited or rejected for reasons of good taste, redundancy or volume of similar letters. Â&#x2021; /HWWHUVPXVWEHWRSLFRUL ented. They may not be directed toward individuals. Any letter directed to a specific individual may be edited or not printed. Â&#x2021; 1RDQRQ\PRXVOHW ters will be published. Writers must sign all letters and include a phone number or e-mail address as well as a student identification number (none of which is published). Letters will not be printed without this verification. Â&#x2021; /HWWHUVUHSUHVHQWLQJ groups â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or more than one individual â&#x20AC;&#x201D; must have a singular representative clearly stated, with all necessary identification information. Â&#x2021; :ULWHUVPXVWZDLW days before submitting successive letters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; no exceptions. Â&#x2021; /HWWHUVFDQEHKDQG delivered or mailed to The Statesman in the TSC, Room 105, or can be e-mailed to statesman@aggiemail.usu.edu, or click on www.utahstatesman.com for more letter guidelines and a box to submit letters.

CommentBoards

See MEDIA, Page 19

.SMRXLIGSRZIVWEXMSR$ YXELWXEXIWQERGSQ

Online poll What will you do with your $20 from the Outdoor Recration Program? Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

Use it for a date Go on a weekend adventure with a group of friends Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll forget about it

Visit us on the Web at www.utahstatesman.com to cast your vote.


Monday, Aug. 29, 2011

Views&Opinion

Pg. 19

From Page 18

Media: Use available tools

than what you, yourselves, want it to be. Get your jaw moving. Submit letters through the Statesman website, comment on the articles published about campus issues, download the ASUSU and Statesman iPhone apps and attend ASUSU executive council meetings. The Statesman will initiate weekly polls on its website and around campus, searching for your opinions. My hope is that you invest a few minutes each day informing yourself on the decisions that are being made around you, and in many instances, for you. Be part of that decision process. If you decide to remain uninvolved quit whining when things donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go your way. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about time you start caring, and I am positive

every Statesman editor has attempted to convey this message in one way or another. I can only hope a few studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wandering eyes fall on this page while searching for the crossword puzzle. With the uncertain economy, unspeakable amount of national debt, the upcoming U.S. presidential primaries, our loved ones fighting wars overseas and a state legislature that puts education on the back burner, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pivotal time to use our First Amendment rights. Americans fought for years to ultimately attain the freedom of speech, and what a waste it would be if we did not take advantage of it. Catherine Meidell is the editor in chief of The Utah Statesman. Comments can be sent to her at statesmaneditor@gmail.com.

From Page 18

Resume: Time for upgrade

dents never choose to take advantage of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s available. Inside ASUSU there are hundreds of ways to get involved and begin to get more from college. Each officer has a council that organizes all kinds of events; each college has a senator that focuses on the organizations in that individual college; and there is also a large number of clubs and organizations. By getting involved with these organizations, students begin to slowly move their resumĂŠ from a giant pile of similar resumĂŠs, to a very small pile of resumĂŠs of students who have chosen to take initiative and get more from college. Opportunities to get more from college continue with tapping into USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s network of professionals, getting involved with undergraduate research,

participating in campus recreation activities and so on. Even if a student does not have a leadership role, simply learning to communicate effectively with a variety of people can give an edge. As student officers we are here to serve you by doing our best to remove barriers that would keep you from getting more out of your college experience. This year we are going to do all we can to make that happen. Please let me know if there is anything you would like to see happen or see removed. We really do want your thoughts. Thank you, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go Aggies.â&#x20AC;? Erik Mikkelsen is the ASUSU student body president. The ASUSU View runs every Monday. Comments can be sent to statesmaneditor@ aggiemail.usu.edu.

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Page 20

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