Page 1


UESP Rated a Gold 529 Plan by Morningstar “Simplicity, combined with ingenuity, makes the Utah Educational Savings Plan among the best choices for college savers.”

Morningstar, Inc., October 2012

Open a UESP account and begin saving today. Saving for your loved one’s higher education is a good way to inspire their future. When you save with the Utah Educational Savings Plan, you help make that future possible.

• Free to open an account • No minimum or ongoing contribution requirements • Federal and Utah state tax advantages

A nonprofit 529 college savings program

800.418.2551 | uesp.org

Read the Program Description for more information and consider all investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses before investing. Call 800.418.2551 for a copy of the Program Description or visit uesp.org. Investments are not guaranteed by UESP, the Utah State Board of Regents, UHEAA, or any other state or federal agency. However, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) insurance is provided for the FDIC-insured savings account. Please read the Program Description to learn about the FDIC-insured savings account. Your investment could lose value. Non-Utah taxpayers and residents: You should determine whether the state in which you or your beneficiary pay taxes or live offers a 529 plan that provides state tax or other benefits not otherwise available to you by investing in UESP. You should consider such state tax treatment and benefits, if any, before investing in UESP.


Can this abacus help your child get even SMARTER? Your child’s working memory is like the RAM on your computer. Help your child discover the secrets of the Japanese abacus (Soroban) in a fun, hands-on learning environment and increase working memory, which will allow your child to think faster, more clearly and focus better in school and in life.

Locations: SIP Academy Classes taught in the Salt Lake County area. One class/week at convenient after-school hours For information, or to schedule a trial class: Call Emily at 801-652-1676 or email: emily@sipacademyusa.com

Early Treatment • Adult Treatment Braces • Retention • Jaw Surgery

Why Choose Us? • Dr. Broadwater is an orthodontic specialist.

• Dr. Broadwater is board-certified! • We get you in & out of braces during the estimated treatment time!

• We keep you informed of your treatment progress. • Dr. Broadwater always places the braces himself.

Paul M. Broadwater, D.D.S., M.S. www.holladayorthodontics.com

• We always put braces on the second molars. • We do not recycle braces...EVER! • We accept most major insurances!

801-278-7272 2080 East 4800 South in Holladay Monday-Thursday 8am - 5pm, Friday 7am - 1pm

Save $400 with UF ad


4 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013


The Corkboard submit funny quotes and cute photos at utahfamily.com

id Kyra, age 8 sa have “I’m sorry you om. If a headache, m GO, LE a re we u yo ge an ch d ul co you No your head out. .” more headache

As a child, my siblings and I lived in fear of the mysterious and sinister figure, Harmer Accident. (“…keep us safe from harm or accident.”)

“Mom, I need a fortcation. It’s like a staycation, but in my fort.” – Sarah, age 9.

Inspiring children to achieve since Challenger School offers uniquely rigorous and fun academics for preschool to eighth grade students. Our students learn to think for themselves and to value independence.

“But you said my imagination is important… so I imagined I ate the important vegg ies,” said Taylor, ag e 5.

“It’s okay mom, you don’t need to pay me for washing the car now!” exclaims my 12-yearold son. “Drenching you was payment enough for me!”

My daughter, Ann, age 8, handed me her Horse Dictionary and said “I can’t read this! There are swear words in here!”

After explaining color-blindness to my children, my son summed it up: “So, basically he sees everything like he’s in a TV show from the 50s, right?”

The results are unmatched at any price! Come see for yourself. Observe our classrooms any time—no appointment needed.

Farmington (801) 451-6565 1089 Shepard Creek Parkway

Sandy (801) 572-1910 10685 South 1000 East

Holladay (801) 278-4797 4555 South 2300 East

Lehi (801) 407-8777 3920 N. Traverse Mountain Blvd.

Salt Lake (801) 487-4402 1325 South Main Street

West Jordan (801) 565-1058 2247 West 8660 South

An independent private school offering preschool through eighth grade © 2013, Challenger Schools

ChallengerSchool.com

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 5


In This Issue: 24

After-School 16 After-School Sport and Enrichment Directory

24 Making Music Builds Brain Power in Kids

18 To Compete or Not Compete in Dance

12

28

Sections 5 The Corkboard

38 Family Health

8 In the Trenches

40 Childcare Options

9 Community Kidbits

44 Family Health

10 In Tune with FM100

46 The Family Pet

12 Fit Family

60 The Teen Scene

14 Family Travel

62 Places To Party

Education 28 Education Planner 30 Find the Perfect Tutor

36

A New Model for Cooperation for Parents with a Special Needs Child

Connections 48 No-Bored-Kids Calendar 51 Farmer’s Market Calendar

6 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

36

49 Teen Scene Calendar


Virtual school. Real engagement. Utah Connections Academy is a tuition-free, fully accredited online public school for grades K–12. And when students enroll, they connect—with exciting classes, enriching activities and enthusiastic, certified teachers. Plus the direct parental involvement and flexible schedule help support your family values. That’s why our students get wrapped up in learning like never before. To learn if it’s right for you, or to find an information session in your area, visit ConnectionsAcademy.com or call 800-382-6019.

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS “CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2” BILL HADER ANNA FARIS JAMES CAAN WILL FORTEIMAGERYANDYAND SAMBERG BENJAMIN BRATT NEIL MUSICPATRICK HARRIS TERRY CREWS KRISTEN SCHAAL ANIMATION BY SONY PICINSPIRED TURESBY THEIMBOOKAGEWORKS INC. BY MARK MOTHERSBAUGH EXECUTIVE “CLOUDY WITH AND PRODUCERS PHIL LORD CHRISTOPHER MILLER A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS” WRITTEN BY JUDI BARRETT ILLUSTRATED BY RON BARRETT PRODUCED STORY BY PAM MARSDEN KIRK BODYFELT BY PHIL LORD & CHRISTOPHER MILLER AND ERICA RIVINOJA SCREENPLAY DIRECTED BY ERICA RIVINOJA AND JOHN FRANCIS DALEY & JONATHAN GOLDSTEIN BY CODY CAMERON KRIS PEARN A SONY PICTURES ANIMATION FILM

3.75" X 9.75"

PARENTING 4C MAG

Provisionally accredited by the Northwest Accreditation Commission.

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 7


In the Trenches By Misse Betts, Lead Blogger

Zucchini Anyone? We built our first home in 1998. And if I put on rose-colored glasses, I don’t think the experience was all that bad. But what no glasses can erase from my memory was putting in the yard. It was a quarter acre of pure misery. We were young, it was our first home. No one told us that landscaping costs as much as a luxury sedan! And we drive old beaters! So after the sprinklers, sod, and cement curbing were in…. Our yard budget was gonzo. But that’s not all folks; your 26 pallets of Southern Utah Sod come fully loaded with GRUBS! Root sucking, brown spot making, grass killing grubs. Once the sod was down, we had no money or willpower left to plant flowerbeds. Since pricey perennials and budget busting bushes weren’t in our future, we converted our flowerbeds into our very own urban farm. The kids helped me make plant stakes; we dug holes and filled them with seeds together, and waited for the magic to happen. Apparently we are geniuses at growing hot peppers, cukins, and roma tomatoes. Seriouslywho needs 3 bushels of cayenne peppers? The kids were two and four at the time and the spiciest food they ate was ketchup. What is a cukin you ask? It’s when Dr. FrankenGarden plants your cucumber and pumpkin so close they get married and have a baby. Let me describe the offspring. It was small, orange, and round like a mini pumpkin on the outside but the inside was pure cucumber. “It’s alive!” “It’s alive!” Who knew that a dozen Roma tomato plants was about 11 too many? Halfway through summer we found restless natives living among the lush rainforest that started out as tomato plants. They were happy and they knew it. I’ll chalk that one up as a rookie mistake. Rookie mistake number two was planting more than one zucchini plant. By the middle of August we were doorbell ditching Volkswagensized zucchinis on front porches and making our escape running as fast as our wheelbarrow could go. I think you urban farmers out there will feel

my pain when I mention that after months of staring at and casting spells on my green pepper plants (I have NO luck with green peppers… Why can’t they grow like their cousin the cayenne?) I finally had several not-quite-readybut-almost-there peppers on my plant. Victory had bloomed and we were proud parents. Until… my neighbor’s son picked them all. Every. Last. One. They made perfect ammunition to throw at his older brother. His mother made a kind effort and bought me a bag of three peppers to replace them, not really understanding. I COULD HAVE GONE TO THE STORE AND BOUGHT PEPPERS, it was the process. I was so frustrated! And I had to remind myself- I CAN GO TO THE STORE AND BUY PEPPERS, the process wasn’t lost if after a sneak pepper attack on older brother killed all hope of growing my own. We still had fun, even if the green pepper plants were basically decoration, and all of our pumpkins were still green at Halloween and even if 99.9% of all the cayenne peppers were turned into compost. (The .01% was sampled by the oldest child who still has not fully recovered.) As much as I hated that darn yard, I loved our attempt at vegetable plants in the flowerbed garden. We’ve long since moved from our first home, but our neighbors never really forgot the bounties of kindness we left on their porches back in the day. What comes around goes around. We seem to find anonymous large squashes (we have no use for) gracing our front stoop. That’s when I put on my rose-colored glasses and refer to it as “Paying it Forward.” One good deed deserves another right? And so the vegi-go-round continues in our neighborhood harvest.

PUBLISHER

Todd Posselli

OPERATIONS MANAGER Andrea Moore

EDITOR

Kim Carlson

EDITORIAL INTERN Haylee Wilkes

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Joy Gough

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Launa Amann Kara Martinez Bachman Misse Betts Emily Capito, LCSW, MBA Rebecca Cressman Gayla Grace Aimee Cook O’Brien

Utah Family magazine is an independent publication committed to providing news, support and solutions to families across the Wasatch Front. The first copy of each issue of the magazine is free. For subsequent copies you must contact the publisher at the phone number or address below. Material contained in this publication is Copyright 2013 by Utah Family magazine. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. The views expressed in Utah Family magazine are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect those of the management.

PHONE # 801-942-6343

MAILING ADDRESS

369 E. 900 S. #321 Salt Lake City, UT 84111

EMAIL

mail@utahfamily.com

FACEBOOK

facebook.com/UtahFamily Photo and cover photo by Joy Gough, Joyful Moments Photography Thank you to Jordan School District for use of their bus.

8 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013


Community Kidbits

Enjoy Red Butte Garden for Free Labor Day weekend is the traditional last blast of summer. Enjoy it in colorful fashion! Thanks to the Salt Lake County voters and ZAP! (Zoo, Arts & Parks) funding, your whole family can enjoy the Red Butte Gardens for free on Monday, September 2 all day.

Get Your Geek on at the Salt Lake Comic Con

Cooler Temps, Great Food and Polka Await at Snowbird’s Oktoberfest 2013 Over the years, Snowbird’s Oktoberfest has become one of the best places to celebrate German food, music, dance and fun with over 60,000 visitors during the course of the celebration. There’s a little something for everyone in your family, and in the gorgeous setting of Snowbird (Hwy 210, Little Cottonwood Canyon)! Oktoberfest runs every Saturday and Sunday from noon6 p.m., August 17 through October 13.

Attend a Swanky Affair and While Raising Money for Kids with Cancer A limited number of tickets are now available for a very unique, black-tie optional fundraising gala supporting Camp Hobé, which serves over 200 children from the Intermountain West at the Elks’ Camp Wapiti in Tooele each year. Camp Hobé allows kids with cancer to have fun participating in activities, such as swimming, crafts, theater and camp fire events, all under the supervision of medical staff and trained volunteers. The Foothill Village Shopping Center will be the site of a “shopping” silent auction, a Roth culinary experience, live auction and special program on Saturday, September 28, from 6-9 p.m. Tickets are $50 per person, which will include food and beverages. One hundred percent of the proceeds will go to Camp Hobé. For tickets, please visit camphobekids.org/galaevent.html. For more information, please contact Becca Larsen, Development Director, at 801-8032356 or becca.larsen@camphobekids.org.

The Salt Lake Comic Con is being held at South Towne Expo Center, 9575 S. State St. in Sandy from September 5-7. Tickets range from $20-30 each. Families are welcome: two children ages 10 and under are free with each paid adult ticket. Salt Lake Comic Con is boasting the best in gaming, comics, movies, TV and pop culture right before your eyes. There will be much to see and do: cosplay contests, autographs (William Shatner will be there on Saturday) and the latest in books, posters, DVDs and, of course, comics, so we recommend you plan for at least a whole day to see it all.

Walk or run your way to the 6th annual “Live 2 Give” charity event. The “Live 2 Give” charity event will feature three different races this year. There will be both a competitive race and a fun run/walk for adults, as well as a Kids’ Color K with a color run. “This year’s event is going to be much bigger than in years past,” said Dede Fluette, Executive Director of Rocky Mountain Care Foundation. “There are many ways to participate and it’s a wonderful opportunity for the community to support those who need assistance with essential healthcare services.” This charity event takes place at Sugar House Park in Salt Lake City on September 14. Registration begins at 1 p.m. and the races will begin at 2 p.m. at the Sugar Beet Pavilion, located at the southeast corner of the park. Early registration is recommended for the special fee of only $25/adult, $10/ child or $75/family (parents with two or more dependent children living in the same household). T-shirts are included with preregistration. Dogs are encouraged to attend the event! Proceeds of this event will provide further funding for the Rocky Mountain Care Foundation and its programs. For more information about the Rocky Mountain Care Foundation, please visit www. rockymountaincarefoundation.org or look for them on Facebook.

Michael C. Tew DDS Specialist in Pediatric Dentistry

3855 W. 7800 S., Suite 200

(801) 282-1802

www.childrenslanding.com •• State-of-the-art State-of-the-art facility facility •• Complete Complete dental dental care care for for infants, infants,

children children and and adolescents adolescents •• Fun Fun and and friendly friendly staff staff •• Full Full sedation sedation options options

FREE

Cleaning and Fluoride (When you schedule your child for exam and x-rays)

or $50 Towards Treatment (New patients only)

FREE Exam for all children under 2 CALL ABOUT OUR NEW OFFICE IN

SARATOGA SPRINGS AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 9


Dialed in with FM100.3

From Fairy Tale to Fitness Before school starts again, let’s talk about

that decides to ride a bike and loves it! It will

books. Not school books, but the kind of

make your kids laugh and want to ride their

books you choose to read with your kids.

own bike someday. If you’re reading it aloud,

Children love story time. They crave that quiet

you’ll enjoy its off-beat humor too.

consistent cuddle we give them while reading

My Daddy is a Pretzel: Yoga for Parents and

aloud and turning page after page. But, when

Kids, by Baron Baptiste and illustrated by

you’re reading, you’re also teaching too.

Sophie Fatus. What if dad did yoga? This story

When my children were younger, I

is a wonderful way to introduce yoga while

looked for stories from around the world,

also relating it to jobs and a child’s real life.

full of imagination, humor, compassion and

You and your kids can learn nine yoga poses

adventure. I wanted them to dream about

to stretch your bodies and minds.

and understand their real and fantasy worlds. But, what if you specifically want to teach your young children how important it is to be active and healthy? Are there books for that? It’s a little ironic, but, yes. There are many children’s books that will plant the seeds of healthy activity and give kids an appreciation for their bodies. And, perhaps after reading and rereading these books and others, those seeds will blossom into healthy habits and attitudes throughout their childhood and adulthood. Here are a few of my favorite picks:

Toddlers to Kindergarten Dancing Feet! A board book by Lindsey Craig and illustrated by Marc Brown. This book for infants to preschoolers is full of dancing animals blended with funny sounding words. The older your toddler becomes, the more you can encourage him or her to stomp, thump, tip and creep just like the other dancing feet in the story. From Head to Toe, by Eric Carle. This bright and beautiful book for preschoolers uses colorful animals that teach children movement by inviting them to do as they do. Children will learn their body parts and how they help them bend, step and turn. Duck on a Bike, by Caldecott Honor winner, David Shannon. This is a funny story of a duck 10 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

Elementary and Older Oh the Things You Can Do That Are Good For You!: All about Staying Healthy ( from the Cat in the Hat’s Learning Library) by Tish Rabe and illustrated by Aristides Ruiz. The Cat in the Hat explains the basics of healthy living, from eating right and getting enough exercise to having a positive body image. The Busy Body Book: A Kid’s Guide to Fitness, by Lizzy Rockwell. This book never mentions the word “exercise,” but explains how activity, good nutrition and rest affect the inside of your body. Your kids will love the anatomy lesson and will celebrate the amazing human machine! We Are Girls Who Love To Run, by Brianna K. Grant and Nicholas A. Wright. This bilingual English-Spanish picture book encourages girls to love their bodies and enjoy running for health and fun. It impresses the value of self-confidence rather than allowing oneself to become obsessed with unrealistic Hollywood ideals of beauty. I think that’s a perfect message for young growing girls whether they run or not. Happy reading! If you have your own book suggestions you’d like to share, I’d love to hear from you! Feel free to email me at Rebecca@fm100.com.


Output On: July 12, 2013 1:26 PM

High-Resolution PDF - PRINT READY

2 013 H O M E S C H E D U L E UTAH CLASSIC 08.30 08.31

VS. UTAH STATE VS. FAIRFIELD VS. NORTHERN IOWA

09.17 09.24 09.29 10.04 10.05 10.24 10.27 11.07 11.10 11.22 11.24

VS. VS. VS. VS. VS. VS. VS. VS. VS. VS. VS.

7:00 P.M. 12:00 P.M. 7:00 P.M.

BYU 7:00 COLORADO 7:00 USC 1:00 WASHINGTON STATE 7:00 WASHINGTON 7:00 ARIZONA STATE 7:30 ARIZONA 2:00 CALIFORNIA 8:00 STANFORD 12:00 OREGON (Crimson Court) 6:00 OREGON STATE 12:00

P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 11


Fit Family By Kimberly Carlson

Be Healthy, Skip School Lunches As parents and children start getting back into the swing of things, simple things like getting up earlier or finding enough hours in the day to work, cook meals, clean house and read to your children at night become more taxing. I get it. I’m right there with you. My eldest starts middle school this fall (gulp), and my youngest is in fourth grade. You start finding ways to cut corners (every day is a hatday, right?) and your kids are sluggish the first few weeks of school until their circadian-school rhythms get back on track. One thing I highly recommend you cut out of your routine may surprise you: school lunches. I know it’s tempting to just fork over the money and call it good, but your short-term time saver could have long-term detrimental effects. Trust me. I know schools are doing the best they can given the circumstances under which they operate, and they are making strides to improve, but it may not be enough. Not yet.

Processed Foods = Less Concentration Dr. Keith Kantor serves on the Presidential Active Lifestyle Award Committee, is the author of What Matters, and holds a PhD in Nutritional Sciences. He cautions us that “kids who skip lunch or eat a processed hot lunch at school are setting themselves up for failure.” He goes on to explain that children who regularly eat a processed school lunch, eat empty calorie snacks, or skip lunch entirely, are affecting their ability to concentrate in school. “Even when children are presented with healthier alternatives in schools, time and time again they will choose the unhealthy option anyway” says Dr. Kantor. His book, What Matters emphasizes how to fix our health care crisis in America. His new book, The Green Box League of Nutritious Justice, slated to hit the shelves in September, focuses specifically on teaching children the importance of good nutrition – while having fun doing it. Dr. Kantor stresses the importance of not only teaching children about good nutrition, but creating positive, healthy habits for their lifetime.

Brown Bagging It Not only do I have more nutritional control over my children by having them bring a lunch

12 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

from home, but I’m also seeing how much they actually eat – rather than having them dump those canned green beans down the garbage can because let’s face it, no child eats the government-mandated veggie-like substance put in front of them next to their chicken nuggets (and don’t get me started on those)! The best back-to-school purchase I made last year was a bento box. My daughter thought she was the coolest kid in the lunchroom. Each little box was just waiting for her to fill it with her choice of fruit, veggies and a protein. Sometimes she went ‘exotic’ and put sushi in it, and sometimes she kept it simple with a sandwich. Either way, it became a

‘thing’ at our house. “What should we put in my lunch tomorrow, mom?” was a regularly posed question.

Teens: Too Late? My son, however, has already educated me on how it’s not cool to bring a sack lunch from home when you’re in middle school or high school. Many schools offer unhealthy vending machine temptations in addition to the traditional school lunch. It’s super easy to just fork over a couple of bucks and say “get something out of the machine today, okay?” If, however, you put the power of their lunches in their own hands, they might just go along. Plus,

Pointers for a Nutritious Lunch: Dr. Keith Kantor puts it simply: “What would you rather spend your money and time on, proper nutrition and prep time or doctors and medicine?” Here are his guidelines for a nutritious lunch for school: • Include: a lean protein, a healthy fiber, a serving of fruit and a serving of veggies. • Provide water rather than sugary soda or juices. • Don’t add a separate starch/carbohydrate. • Avoid processed foods. • Avoid additives, dyes, sugars and salt. For more ideas and nutritional information, visit his site, drkeithkantor.com.


you save money and time by having them pack their own lunches and teaching them good nutrition. Dr. Kantor recognizes this conundrum. “Teens are at a higher risk for gaining unwanted body fat and metabolic issues because they have more freedom and are exposed to unhealthy fast food options or sugary coffee shop drinks.” He urges parents to make life-long healthy habits, rather than short term diets or fads. “Teach your child proper nutrition and then practice it.”

Vending for the Future “There is no way I could break my son away from the ease and convenience of the vending machines at school,” says Margaret, mother of four teens and one tween in Murray. “It has become part of his daily routine, good or bad.” She hates to admit that, but has waved the white flag of defeat with her eldest. Fortunately for her, all hope is not lost. Jim and Mary Palmer, owners of Utah Healthy Vending in Park City, are trying to fill the current vending machine nutritional void. “We are trying to make healthy food more convenient than junk food” says Mary Palmer. “We vend food with natural ingredients that limit trans-fat, MSG, artificial colors and flavors.” They prefer to sell items such as dried fruit, Pirate’s Booty and organic milk. “Many schools are trying to make healthier choices, but it’s hard to refuse a soda machine when that company opted to purchase them a new running track with the purchase of a new five-year contract.” Palmer is hoping new legislation will help children get healthier, too. “Some schools initiate a lock-down policy where certain junk foods cannot be purchased during the lunch hour,” says Palmer. This only pushes many kids to skip lunch altogether.

Make lunches exciting! Here are some ideas: •

Make sure you keep one aspect of their lunch a secret (like the first apple of the season, or a homemade granola bar for dessert).

Consider slipping in a homemade note or drawing every now and then.

Purchase Lunchbox Buddies. These adorable cartoon cards are silly and fun with notes like “You’re a star in my eyes!” and “Hope your day is out of this world!”

Your kids will come to anticipate what’s in their lunchbox, while you’ll be nourishing their bodies and their hearts with little reminders that you are thinking of them – even when you’re not sitting next to them.

Changes in School Starting in July of next year, new federal regulations will require schools to only offer snacks that limit sugars, caffeine, transfats and excessive calories. Utah Healthy Vending choices already comply with those restrictions. Their vending machines will be in Wasatch High School in Park City. Thus far, the response from parents and students has been overwhelmingly positive. Palmer says “We want to promote wellness and health in the community.” They hope to reach more schools throughout the Wasatch front. It’s never too early – or too late – to emphasize healthy eating. Bringing a lunch to school is the norm around here, and this year’s bento box is ‘even cooler’ than last year’s. Even my middle-schooler has found a way to make it ‘okay’ to bring a lunch: he found a black and silver thermos he can fill with his favorite soups and hot meals (read: grown up meals).

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 13


Family Travels By Kimberly Carlson

Rocking the Red Rock, Moab Style! One of the perks about living in Utah is the ability to be in pretty much any type of outdoor environment you could possibly imagine within a few short hours. And if you have a family like mine, you like taking full advantage of all that Utah has to offer. Whether it’s hiking in the fall, skiing in the winter, fishing in the spring, or camping in the summer, Utah has it all – and we’ve done it! I’ve been to Moab many times over the past fifteen years; but never have I experienced Moab like we did this year! Thanks to the great folks at the Moab Adventure Center (MAC), my family and I had the trip of a lifetime and saw parts of Moab we’d never seen before.

Day 1: Hiking and Ice Cream! As Moab veterans, I have many pictures of the kids standing under Delicate Arch in Arches National Park. My daughter, Sarah, was only five days old on her first hike through the arches. So when Jamie Pearce, Manager at Moab Adventure Center, suggested we take a guided hike through the Fiery Furnace I knew my kids could handle it. It’s not the easiest of hikes for those with poor hips/ankles, low stamina and, well, some extra weight, but definitely worth it. There are places you have to squeeze through, places you have to leap over and places you need to shimmy and climb. We ate a hearty breakfast, loaded up on bottled water and slathered ourselves with sunscreen to prepare for the adventure. Cort, our excellent guide from MAC, made this hike entertaining and informative. He stopped every so often to discuss the local plants and their benefits; let the kids taste and feel some of the plants, and even tried to catch a lizard just for my son (or so he claimed – I think he was just a kid at heart, too). Our group was a comfortable 8 in size and we went at a

14 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

steady speed. While you can technically schedule a guided tour through the Fiery Furnace with a Ranger, I would highly recommend going through the MAC. I saw a group of 25 being led by one silent Ranger with the scragglers at the end struggling to keep up – while my kids were happily climbing and peppering Cort with dinosaur and lizard-related questions. I was impressed with his eye for “kid fun” versus “adult fun” on this hike: he would often send my kids (ages 11 and 9) through smaller paths (like the Lemon Squeezy) and have the adults meet up with them on the other (larger) route. My recommendations: go early, eat breakfast, enjoy the air conditioned ride to and from the park while you have it. By the time our hike was done it was a scorching 95 degrees before noon – time for ice cream! Right next to the MAC is the Moab Diner (read: air conditioned building with ice cream inside). My kids were definitely okay with avoiding the scorching hot car and happy to go enjoy ice cream in an old-fashioned diner. The staff is friendly and the décor is exactly what you’d expect from a diner: old booths, a fifties clock on the wall and a full menu of items such as burgers and fries; country fried steak and mashed potatoes and even fish and chips. The best thing on the menu, however, was the brownie sundae. I’m salivating just thinking

about it!

Day 2: Wild West Riding and Eating! Approximately 4 miles north and 14 miles east of downtown Moab is the Red Cliffs Lodge. Ranked #1 in Moab, this gorgeous resort is home to “about a bazillion horses” according to my daughter’s official count. If you’d like to see what the pioneers saw, this is the place to stay, especially if you’d prefer to see what the pioneers saw and not live the way they did. (There’s a whole new level of appreciation for things like air conditioning, beds and showers after a horseback ride in the summertime desert, let me tell you!) The Red Cliffs Lodge is nestled right next to the Colorado River and they have their own winery, restaurant, cabins, tennis courts, river rafting adventures, and yes, definitely horses. The wranglers out at the Red Cliffs Lodge aren’t just for show. They are true wranglers in every sense of the word: wrangler jeans, cowboy hats and a deep, intrinsic love of horses. One of our wranglers loved this place so much she moved here from Germany just to have a ‘home on the range.’ This was definitely my daughter’s day in heaven. She was hoping and praying she wouldn’t have to share her horse with her play-it-safe mom. She was in luck! “It’s always


After School one rider per horse, and we always match our riders’ personalities with our horses’ personalities,” explained Jill, our lead wrangler. My daughter was given a young, spirited horse named Slim Jim. My son was paired with SJ’s big brother, Daybreak, who was very curious about his surroundings. My boyfriend was given Clarence, a calm-spirited go-with-theflow horse. Me? I got the stubborn petulant teenager, Alex. “We love horses with spirit!” was the reply given when I asked how Alex ranked in horse-pitality. Hmmmmm. Jill told me how much she loves every minute of her job. “I love the smile on people’s faces after their first horse ride!” She went on to explain that every horse at the Red Cliffs Lodge is specially trained for this trip and they’re loved and spoiled for it. My allergies can attest to the truth in that statement: I’m quite allergic to horses and my allergies thanked whomever brushed my horse down before I rode him (nary a sniffle from me). Jill and three other wranglers took twelve of us on the trails that John Wayne himself rode with views of Castle Rock and a dip (for the lucky horses anyway) into Castle Creek. Jill pointed out all the places John Wayne and the Marlboro Man had traversed – with the gusto of a schoolgirl despite her age – and the younger wranglers piped up and pointed out where Johnny Depp would ride in his new movie, The Lone Ranger, amongst other famous actors like Tom Cruise and Will Smith. They even pointed out where the pioneers first went over the rocky cliffs to get into Moab on their pack mules. My level of appreciation for pioneers rose even more that day. Pretending to be a cowboy is hard work, you know. And being a cowboy for a day isn’t complete without a hearty steak for dinner. Fortunately we went to the Moab Grill for dinner and they did not disappoint! Succulent steaks served with a smile is what you can expect from them. The wait staff was friendly and accommodating too – when we asked them to change the channel on their TV, they obliged without question (a murder trial on CNN doesn’t bode well for children’s appetites). Their prices were reasonable and although the restaurant isn’t large there was no wait for our table.

Day 3: Slickrocks and Dino-Tracks It was my son’s turn for his day in heaven! My future paleontologist had been told (twice!) that there were petrified dinosaur tracks out in the desert and he couldn’t wait to see them. Once again the MAC gave us an excellent suggestion of going on one of their Hummer Rides. Zipping up 40-degree slick rocks – barely wide enough to fit our vehicle – our professional driver, DeVon, casually discussed the scenery as if he were doing nothing more than walking through the park. The Hummer is modified for maximum viewing (the very back seats are raised – and super bumpy) and it often felt more like a roller coaster ride than a car ride. If you have a severe fear of heights or are prone to motion sickness you should definitely ride shotgun with the driver. And close your eyes. And maybe pray. Just tell the others you’re graciously giving up the “primeseating” in the back. The views at the top are spectacular. We stopped at the vantage called On Top of the World to see a sweeping view of Moab’s red rocky hills and plateaus. We skimmed up and over sand, and perched on the edge of cliffs overlooking yet another view of the Colorado River. And yes, as promised, our guides stopped to show my son the petrified dinosaur tracks and explain their possible origins.

Day 4: All Day River Rafting In all my years going to Moab, we never once went river rafting down the Colorado River. In fact, in years past we would go just for the fun of camping and hiking and not much else. How foolish we were. This was our last day of adventure in Moab and I couldn’t believe how much fun we’d had thus far. If you can only afford one ‘extracurricular’ activity on your stay, I highly recommend the all-day river rafting with MAC. This adventure combines all the reasons people love the river: the swimming, the lazy drifting, with intermittent rafting through rapids and – of course – having fun. Carefully matched with others for skill/ age/ability, we were paired with another family to enjoy our trip down the river. Our

licensed guide, Mackay, declared our raft “the fun boat!” Much of the first hour of our trip was dedicated to getting all of us as wet as possible. Mackay let us jump off the nose of the raft, swim and float alongside the raft, and we even engaged in ‘splash-battles’ with other boats from the MAC. He also taught the kids rafting lingo (like the difference between a rapid and a riffle). There were other rafting companies along the river – youth groups and other families just like ours were partaking of the same river, but they were NOT getting the same experience. I noticed many of their boats were crammed full of people – almost twice as many as we had – and their version of ‘lunch’ seemed to be ham sandwiches at the shore. Remember the Red Cliffs Lodge I boasted about earlier? That was our lunch: a full BBQ buffet (included in the trip’s price) set up under cool, airy patios against a gorgeous backdrop of grass, red rocks, cabins and teepees. (Tip: save room for their cookies. Seriously. I don’t even like cookies and I had two of them.) After lunch we hopped back in our “fun boat” and declared war on our fellow travelers. We had a plan: steal their buckets and use them as weapons of mass watery warfare against all others! Our guide was careful to mix fun with safety and I never felt as though the “fun” got out of hand. If we had a man (mostly a child, okay, okay, mostly me) overboard, our guide was good to keep an eye on everyone. “I’ve never tipped a boat and I’ve never lost a passenger” reassured our guide – addressing mostly the moms on board. The only drawback to the all-day river rafting adventure? It came to an end. Next time our family goes to Moab not only will we be sure to call the Moab Adventure Center first, but we’ll also be booking the 2-day rafting tour! And the ropes course. And the hot air balloon rides. And, and, and… Good thing Moab is just a few hours away!

Moab Adventure Center 225 S. Main St. Moab, UT 84532 866-904-1163 www.moabadventurecenter.com

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 15


AFTER-SCHOOL DIRECTORY

Find all the listings with mapping, photos, videos and more using your mobile device. Armitage Martial Arts (119)

Bobby Lawrence Karate (124)

8736 S. 700 East in Sandy 801. 971.1562 armitagemartialarts.com

West Jordan and Riverton 801.567.9476 mykaratestudio.com

Armitage Martial Arts helps their students improve their self-respect, self-defense, conditioning, stretching, concentration and grades. For more information, or to try a private lesson, please visit their website.

With over 15 studios located throughout Utah, Bobby Lawrence Karate School teaches kids, teens and adults ages 4 and up valuable life skills that help all ages focus on their individual goals. Give one of their classes a try at a location near you!

Brighton Snow Sports School (122)

The Ballet Centre (121)

12601 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Rd. 801.532.4731 brightonresort.com

70 E. 4880 South in Murray 801.266.5066 wrightwayenterprises.com

The Ballet Centre in Murray teaches proper technique for the development of a dancer. They have their own theatre, and all costumes are provided for productions at no cost to the parents. There are four performances per year.

The Ballet Centre

Black Diamond Sports Centers (125) South Jordan and Park City 801.790.1800 blackdiamondgym.com

Black Diamond has been one of the nation’s top gymnastics and sport training centers for over ten years. Their staff specializes in appropriately challenging each and every one of their students in a safe, positive and success-oriented learning environment.

16 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

Brighton Snow Sports School has Daily Lessons and Multi-Week Programs to choose from. Their instructors are well trained in child development and student-centered teaching, which will create a fun learning environment to make your child’s experience a positive one.

Carolyn’s Sewing Academy (126) 4586 W. Dorilee Dr. in West Jordan 801.541.5701 childrencansew.com

CAROLYN’S

Carolyn’s Sewing Academy offers classes for children ages 6 and up. Class size is limited Sewing Academy to 4-5 student. All sewing machines and tools are provided in class, and there is no sewing necessary outside of class time. Costs include a pattern, but students are responsible for all their own fabric and notions.


CAROLYN’S

Sewing Academy Skills that will last a lifetime Now enrolling for Morning, Afternoon, Evening, and Saturday classes. Young seamstress - ages 5-6 Perfect for preschoolers and pre-k’s Children will learn basic hand sewing techniques and sewing terms. Threading needles working with pins, and using scissors

Kids and Teens: ages 7+

In this class students will learn the basics of sewing, as well as operate and navigate a sewing machine.

Adult classes:

In this class adults will learn the basics of sewing and how to operate and navigate a sewing machine.

Contact information:

(801)541-5701 cmiller4586@hotmail.com

www.childrencansew.com

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 17


After School By Aimee Cook O’Brien

To Compete or Not Compete in Dance So you think your child can dance. Well, at least they are showing an interest in dance. As a parent, the myriad of choices in the dance world can be very overwhelming. The pressure we face on making the right choices for our kids’ futures starts at a very young age these days. If they don’t get into the right school they won’t get into the right college. If they don’t get into the right dance studio they won’t have a chance of getting to Broadway…sound familiar?

Competitive vs. Noncompetitive There are many pros and cons to both options. What it really boils down to is interest, time, skill, commitment and money.

Skills Christy McQuaid, owner of Utah Dance Arts Center, a noncompetitive dance studio, believes that dance classes should focus on technique and fundamentals. It is well known in the dance world that ballet is the core of all types of dance. “If a student only practices several dance competition numbers, they will look great but it may be at the expense of the overall training of the dancer and while competition dance can be very motivating and promote teamwork, it also can have a flip side where dancers who are not as talented are excluded from the team,” McQuaid said. “Competition schools often focus on winning and hold in-school auditions where only the top few are used. A noncompetitive school’s motive is not to win a competition but teach dance to each child.”

Commitment: a Family Affair Allison Thornton, owner of The Dance Club, a competitive dance studio, agrees with the positives of noncompetitive dance but believes competitive dance offers much more. “Most dancers start out taking recreational dance classes once or twice a week. If after attending recreational classes parents can see that their child enjoys dancing or if the child expresses an interest then parents may consider taking the next step into competitive dance,” Thornton says. “When considering competitive dance for their child, parents should know that it’s not just a commitment for their dancer! The parent and, subsequently, the family have to be just as committed. In order to be competitive at any level, dancers need parents who are supportive of what they are doing and committed to helping them do what it takes in order to progress and achieve their goals. In considering whether or not to have their child participate on a competitive team, parents should research the options and consider whether or not they can be supportive within the balance of their specific family and financial needs.”

Time and Money Kelly Wanlass, mother of three young dancers, had her girls start small, now they are traveling to New York for competitions. “We started out at a small studio where my girls danced 1 hour a week, then were asked to join the competition team when they were five and seven. This studio only had two levels of teams

Tips for Parents According to Wanlass, here are key questions to ask when considering dance placement for your child:

• How many hours will my child dance each week? • How many competitions will they attend – and can we as a family support it? • Will the studio teach my child real dance technique, or just dance numbers to compete? • Are the teachers trained with professional experience? • Do the teachers love dance and will they help my child love dance? • What kind of growth opportunities are available as my child grows and improves? • What does each studio expect my child to be able to do at each level? • How organized is the studio? • Do the dancers know where to go and what is expected of them? • How many different styles of dance will they learn? 18 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

and there wasn’t much room for growth, so when my girls were 8 1/2 and 6, we moved to a much larger studio with five levels of teams and much higher expectations for its dancers – and as they began to take more hours of dance with more highly qualified teachers and more was expected of them, they began to improve dramatically and quickly moved up the levels.”

Final Consideration Make sure you match your child’s interest level to the commitment. If s/he is only marginally interested, start out small (one or two times per week in a noncompetitive studio). If s/he is eager and has been bugging you incessantly for several months, then competitive dance might be the right route. Only you know your child’s interest level and ability to stay focused. Also, studios have a huge price range – you can spend a little or a lot. Keep in mind the cost of costumes and tickets and possible travel as ‘extras’ above and beyond the studio charges. Finally, what can you as the parent realistically commit to? How much of your time, money, support can you realistically give? Consider carpools and volunteering your time to help when times are tough.


AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 19


Color Me Mine (129)

AFTER-SCHOOL DIRECTORY

Foothill and Draper 801.495.4849 colormemine.com

Everyone is an artist at Color Me Mine. They have over 400 ceramic pieces to choose from and over sixty colors to paint with! Everyone designs and paints their own pieces however they like and then picks them up a few days later, after the studio glazes and fires them.

Dan Whitley Music (343) 13602 S. 1300 East in Draper 801.918.7740 danwhitleymusic.com

Dan Whitley Music Studios offers music and singing classes, for beginning and intermediate: band, orchestra, jazz and chorus for preschoolers and up. Small class sizes and expert teachers make this a great after-school music studio for your child.

The Dance Company (131)

2120 E. 2100 South in Salt Lake City 801.486.4933 thedancecompanysaltlakecity.com The Dance Company is a professional studio offering superior technical training for dancers of all ages and levels in ballet, preballet, jazz, tap, hip hop, lyrical, and creative dance. They give tasteful performances with age-appropriate music, themes and modest costumes and uniforms.

Dance Concepts (132)

9492 S. Union Square in Sandy 801.566.2101 danceconceptsutah.com

The Finishing School (342) 4880 S. Highland Cir. in Sandy 801.277.9244 learntocookandsew.com

At the Finishing School we offer children and adult cooking and sewing classes, as well as birthday parties and events. We bring a new sense of fun to a dying art. Students thrive in this creative and positive environment as they learn these valuable skills.

Girl Scouts of Utah (135)

445 E. 4500 South in Salt Lake City 801.265.8472 gsutah.org All of the Girl Scouts of Utah programs follow the Girl Scout Leadership Experience Model, which emphasizes a girl-led, cooperative, and experiential learning environment. Every Girl Scout adventure is designed to nurture confidence, help make new friends and encourage personal growth.

I. J. and Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center (136) 2 N. Medical Dr. in Salt Lake City 801.581.0098 slcjcc.org

Teachers here help children become independent, self-confident and inquisitive learners, while aiding in their social-emotional, cognitive, language and physical development through academic and emotional self-discovery.

Imagination Place (137)

1155 E. 3300 South in Salt Lake City 801.463.9067 imaginationplace.com

Dance Concepts is a fun, family friendly dance studio in Sandy Utah offering classes in Ballet, Tap, Jazz, and Hip Hop. With class offerings for ages 2-18, you can have the whole family involved. All classes are taught by caring, qualified adults.

Any child any age can become a “musical all-star” with Imagination Place’s gold standard programs. Explore, create, giggle, and think! Programs are taught in an environment that celebrates the natural wonder your child possesses. The teachers are formally educated in music and/or early childhood development.

Darla’s Aerial Arts (130)

Kindermusick - Song of the Heart (139)

8496 S. Harrison St. in Sandy 801.427.0968 darladavis.com

Salt Lake City and West Jordan 801.953.0416 songheart.com

At Darla’s Aerial Arts they deliver quality: quality teachers, quality performance, quality equipment. Their program focuses on the aesthetics and beauty of the ethereal circus art of aerial silks for everyone wanting to just have a good time and get fit, climbing, swinging, flying, and stretching.

Research proves that music is the best activity for enhancing every area of your child’s development. Kindermusik classes immerse your child in a rich, developmentally appropriate environment with a multi-sensory approach to learning that improves the ability to think, reason, create and express.

eMotion Dance (133)

Lotus Blossom Martial Arts (141)

9119 S. Monroe Plaza Way in Sandy 801.566.6222 eMotiondance.com eMotion Dance strives to create a professional atmosphere in which children of all ages can learn and grow as dancers. Young dancers get to feel the joy of movement to music and the satisfaction of learning balance, coordination and rhythm to prepare them for ballet and jazz classes.

20 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

5508 Van Winkle Expressway in Murray 801.787.0838 lbsma.com

Under the direction of Master Marshall Parnell, certified 5th Dan Master in Taekwondo and 5th Dan Master in Haidong Gumdo, the Lotus Blossom Martial Arts’ curriculum is based solely on broad, yet traditional, Korean Martial Arts.


801

WEST JORDAN

567-9476

8949 s 2700 w (located in the REAMS shopping center)

801

RIVERTON

302-0804

12447 s Crossing Dr (Just north of the Riverton IN-and-OUT Burger))

voice j horns j piano guitar j violin j drums Preschoolers Program Available

(preschoolers must be accompanied by parent)

Four 60-minutes group lessons

Only $20

New student introductory offer. Mondays at 5 p.m. in September. Expires 9-30-13.

South Valley Location

(801) 918-7740 danwhitleymusic.com AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 21


The Music Studio (344)

AFTER-SCHOOL DIRECTORY

3245 W. 7800 S. #D in West Jordan 801.703.1475 themusicstudioutah.com The Music Studio offers music and art lessons for all ages and abilities. We offer private lessons and group classes for all types of instruments including vocal. Kindermusik classes are available for babies through preschool age. For more info, please visit our website.

SwimKids (149)

4679 S. 2225 East in Holladay 801.944.8811 swimkids.biz

SwimKids Where fun and safety meet

SwimKids offers unique water safety and survival swimming lessons using techniques developed over the last 28+ years. Although SwimKids’ focus is with children, they also offer lessons to students of all ages and skill levels - including special needs.

Salt Lake City Ballet (145)

Tanner Creative Dance (150)

1164 S. Main St. in Salt Lake City 801.664.4607 slcballet.com

7 Wasatch Front locations 801. 581.7374 tannerdance.utah.edu

Make friends and dance hard! The Salt Lake City Ballet specializes in authentic classical ballet training taught in the Russian Vaganova method by internationally recognized faculty. Weekly intensives open to all ages and abilities including toddler, youth, teen and adult.

Confident the use of wholesome, creative activity would allow children ages 1.5-18 to develop alert minds, healthy bodies, and strong character, Virginia Tanner established the Tanner Dance Program in 1937. Classes today offer a holistic approach, respecting each dancer’s individual abilities and needs.

Salt Lake Dance Center (146) 2668 E. 2000 South in Salt Lake City 801.467.5404 saltlakedance.com

WestWind Karate (345) Sandy, Kearns, Midvale 801.571.5425 westwindkarate.com

The Salt Lake Dance Center offers a wide variety of instruction for ages 3-17, with all levels of ability and desire. Whether you’re a serious dancer, or want to dance just for fun, this is the place for you!

More than just a place to take a karate class, WestWind Karate is a family-oriented school that reaches beyond physical and mental health. They also teach perseverance and integrity through comaraderie and friendship. You will learn something new in every positive, energy-filled class.

Singers Company (147)

The Winner School (151)

9201 S. 1300 East in Sandy 801.209.7171 sandydraper.singerscompany.com

6120 S. 2075 East in Salt Lake City 801.278.2500 tannerdance.utah.edu

At Singers Company we sing, we dance, and most of all - we have FUN! Singers Company is a non-competitive performing group for girls ages 3-11. Our goal is to empower young girls to perform and gain confidence through music and dance.

The Winner School is a nationally accredited, unique and excellent preschool and afterschool program for ages 2-13, dedicated to building self-esteem in your child. We are process oriented and believe your child will learn and retain more in a “hands-on” activity based program.

Studio 56 Dance Center (148)

YMCA Community Family Center (152)

700 E. 5600 South in Murray 801.261.3182 studio56dance.com

4223 S. Atherton Dr. in Taylorsville 877.690.9622 ymcasaltlake.org

Studio 56 Dance Center is designed to train dancers and performers in a positive structured environment. Their goal is to build self-esteem while creating talented dancers that express themselves and grow in a positive, challenging, and fun environment while dancing.

The YMCA of Northern Utah is a causedriven organization that is for youth development for healthy living and for social responsibility. Their mission is to provide communities with experiences that build strong kids, strong families and strong communities.

Suzanne’s Suzuki Violin Academy (347)

Zaniac (346)

Salt Lake City 801.401.0355 suzannesuzukiviolin.wordpress.com

1045 E. 2100 South in Salt Lake City 801.977.8580 zaniaclearning.com/sugarhouse

Learn to play the violin well in a fun, loving and stress-free environment. Children as young as 2 years old can begin to learn to play the violin the same way they are learning to walk and to speak… through Dr. Suzuki’s idea of the “Mother Tongue” method!

At Zaniac, kids discover math and technology – and just how much fun learning can be. Forget drills and repetition. Zaniac’s fun after-school enrichment programs engage kids in creative, conceptual problem solving that builds confidence and a real academic advantage.

22 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013


Life Arts House

Specialized Childhood Programs for infants through age 12 in the Nature of PLAY in Science and Art

Classes & Summer Camps

Tuesday 9:30-11:30 ($20)

Wednesday 1:30-4:30 ($25)

Dance, Music, Art, Drama (ages 2-3)

Field Explorers 3-4-5’s in-house Water, Rock, Sand Math

Tuesday 12:00-1:30 ($10)

Thursday 9:30-11:30 ($20)

Lunch Bunch Club and Story Book Time

Tuesday 1:30-4:30 ($25)

Dance, Music, Art Multi-generational

Thursday 12:00-1:30 ($10)

Field Explorer 4-7

Lunch Bunch Picnic & Play

Wednesday 9:30-11:30 ($15)

Thursday 1:30-4:30 ($25)

Dance, Music, Art, Drama 3-4-5’s

Field Explorer 6-2 Rock Climbing & Hounding

Wednesday 12:00-1:30 ($10)

Other Programs include

Lunch Bunch Club

Wednesday 1:30-4:30 ($25)

Field Explorers 6-8’s

Puppet Theatre Works Script To Screen On Location Development of “Toot Talk” an original Children’s Film Theatre

and Nature

Call Miss Pearl @ 801-502-8302 Email:pearl@lifeartscenter.com 7304 Jonathan Drive Cottonwood Heights, Utah, 84121

ViRgiNia TaNNeR CReaTiVe DaNCe 2013/2014 SCheDUle

Dance Classes for ages 11/2 - Adult

Fall 2013 | aug 26-Dec 14 Spring 2014 | Jan 6-May 3 Reserve Your Spot Now! Visit

tannerdance.utah.edu

Classes located at : University of Utah Bountiful • Brigham City Ogden • Park City Sandy • South Jordan

Today!

The University of Utah location also offers: Fine Arts Preschool Dancers with Disabilities Visual Arts • Hip Hop/Jazz • Ballet • Adults

Parties, Team Building, Auction Items, Family Fun, Gifts and More Draper Peaks Studio, Draper Foothill Village Studio, SLC 801.495.4849 801.581.1515 draper.colormemine.com saltlakecity.colormemine.com Visit our websites for all the information. Fun for ALL ages!!!

1390 Presidents Circle, Salt lake City, Utah | 801.581.7374 | www.tannerdance.utah.edu AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 23


After School By Kara Martinez Bachman

Making Music Builds Brain Power in Kids Many parents in the Wasatch Front naturally turn to sports as the first option when lining up after-school activities for their children. However, always putting the arts on the backburner may be a mistake, especially for children that are in the early years of preschool through elementary. Music instruction, in particular, is something that parents may want to explore a bit more. Even if a child is not musically inclined, many benefits are gained from a brief introduction to the fundamentals of either voice training or learning to play a simple musical instrument. Increasingly, researchers are finding that just a short period of instruction in music can have lasting positive effects that can change a child forever. Last year, researchers at Northwestern University conducted studies showing that those who were exposed to even a small amount of music education in early childhood showed significantly better responses to sound all the way through middle age. Even if those children did not continue to play the instrument afterwards and participated in no musical activity as adults, the benefits still remained as part of their overall brain function. In an article written by Katie Moisse for ABC News, Nina Kraus, director for the Auditory Neuroscience Lab at Northwestern, is quoted as saying: “We know from previous studies that if you have a robust response to sound, you’re generally a better learner…you’re better able to hear conversations in noisy places, your reading ability tends to be better and your auditory memory seems to benefit. Those skills are important.” In other words, the “take home” message from this study is that a small bit of music instruction in early childhood can lead to a better grasp of sound…and this appreciation for sound can make your child’s brain stronger into adulthood. These surprising results show that investing a little time in early music exposure is something that can

24 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

later pay great dividends. Cecilia Myhres, Director of the Myhres School of Music describes her results in teaching a three-year-old who was virtually non-verbal when he began lessons. Myhres said that after several semesters, he “was forming complete sentences and was able to communicate with his grandparents.” As a music instructor, Myhres is well aware that the work she does is not simply fun; it is serious business in making kids better thinkers as well as more capable of understanding and relating to other people. “Researchers have found that the effect of music on the brain improves cognitive development, verbal skills and emotional intelligence,” said Myhres. Even in Myhres’ South Mississippi—where most extracurricular activities center primarily on sports—most all young children will willingly grab onto music training and find it enjoyable and rewarding. There are other reasons for older children to consider musical training as well, even though the critical period of early childhood may have already passed. “Every day we see shy introvert young adults walk in and progress into confident, outgoing musicians. It’s a joy to watch the progress and how music does give them that vehicle for selfexpression,” said Myhres. Parents may wonder: “What if my child is not musically inclined?” Well, most researchers agree that any child can experience learning, as well as joy, from taking on a music program of any sort. “I believe that all children are musical and can achieve basic music competence,” said Myhres. “Just as young children have the innate ability to learn the language of their environment, they can also learn music…I would suggest to parents that say their child is not musically inclined: please do your own research. Try music and give them the benefit.” When you introduce your child to music, you not only create lasting memories, but you begin to build a skill set that they can proudly share with others. And if recent studies are

correct, those few months or years in a music studio may pay dividends in increased brain power for a lifetime. Kara Martinez Bachman is a freelance writer and editor of two editions of a parenting magazine. She enjoys making music with her kids, aged 10 and 13. She also loved visiting music stores with them; she always had to keep them away from the drums.


Olympus

Gymnastics

Now Taking New Enrollments! Call today for our FREE Trial class! Have your next Birthday Party at Olympus where you may utilize our 14,000 Sq. foot facility for games, inflatables, and gymnastics!

www.olympusgymnastics.org

9683 S. Sandy Parkway in Sandy • 801-566-3295 It ’s A Whole Other World Up Here

Options for Grades 1 - 7 + school pickups Now offering KinderClub for kindergartners Aerial Yoga, Silks Training, Cirque Training, Birthday Parties

Quality Teachers, Quality Training, Quality Equipment, Quality Performance

8496 S. Harrison St., Suite 111

801-427-0968 www.darladavis.com

2012 Utah Best of State Winner CLASSES & TEAMS Gymnastics • Tumbling Trampoline • Urban Gym Big Air • Rock Climbing

SPECIAL PROGRAMS Birthday Parties Open Gym • Camps Kids’ Night Out

EDUCATION Academic Preschool (ages 2-5) Kids Club - After-School Program

© 2011 USA Gymnastics. All Rights Reserved.

South Jordan’s Soda Row & Park City’s Redstone 801-790-1800 • www.blackdiamondgym.com AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 25


SwimKids Where fun and safety meet

PRIVATE SWIM LESSONS FOR AGES 6 MOS. & UP Teaches proper swimming techniques and water safety skills. Ongoing year-round enrollment. Warm indoor pool. Call (801) 944-8811 to schedule.

4679 South 2225 East

www.swimkids.biz Monday-Saturday 8-6:30 Kindermusik music and movement classes are designed to enhance your child’s development and instill a life-long love of music

Sign Up for a Fall Music Adventure!

Enroll Today for 2013-14 Two locations to serve you!

801-953-0416 www.songheart.com

Meet new bloggers at utahfamily.com for a wider slice of Utah Families.

Fall Session Begins September 9th!

Register NOW!

Bac k Mus to ic Tog ethe r®

Music Together®, Musical Bridge, Imagination Workshop, AntiGravity® Yoga, Chess, Band, Instrument Lessons, and More!

( 801 ) 463-9067 26 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

ImaginationPlace.com

Special needs kids welcome

Free Assessment

Lesson

15-min assessment. Reservation required. Based on availability.

$10 off

*

New Registration Fee For new customers only.

50% off

*

1st Parent-Tot Class Check out our Muv Studio classes! *Valid with coupon only. Coupon must be present. Not valid with any other offers. One coupon per family. Other restrictions apply.

Subscribe to our online newsletter at www.utahfamily.com for additional content & exclusive giveaways!


New Campus Visit us in Millcreek

Elizabeth Academy

We are all unique... Imagine the possibilities

CALL TO SCHEDULE A SCHOOL TOUR 154 E Myrtle Avenue - Murray, UT 84107

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR FALL 2013 Classes for ages 2-12 FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 801-281-4848 OR VISIT ELIZABETHACADEMY.COM

Blessed Sacrament School Academic Pre-Kindergarten Blessed Sacrament Catholic Elementary / Middle School, LLC Series #201

Academic Preparation for Kindergarten

Integrated & Structured Curriculum

Thematic Units

Language & Literacy, Mathematics, Science & Social Studies

Exposure to Spanish, Music, PE, Library, Computers

Whole Group, Small Group, Center Activities

801-572-5311

Engaging Activities & Creative Opportunities

www.blessedsacschool.org

Exploration, Problem Solving, Guided Discovery

2013

Enroll Today

3-year old Program - Grade 8

1745 East 9800 South, Sandy, 84092

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 27


EDUCATION PLANNER

Education Planner Find all the listings with mapping, photos, videos and more using your mobile device. Benjamin Franklin Academy (235)

Carden Memorial School (69)

Benjamin Franklin Academy is an assistance program to homeschoolers. They teach your student core curriculum: history, math, science and English (reading, writing, literature, etc.). They “assist parents in fulfilling their parental responsibility in the education of their children.”

You want the best for your child, and so does Carden Memorial School. They look for the best the world has to offer in literature, music, poetry, art, and of course, academics. They have a unique curriculum and small class sizes. To arrange a tour of their Junior Kindergarten-8th grade, call today.

Blessed Sacrament (188)

Challenger School (156)

Blessed Sacrament believes that creating caring relationships and a caring school community while teaching core character values across the curriculum is essential in fostering a healthy learning environment where all children can succeed spiritually, academically, and ethically.

Challenger School offers uniquely rigorous and fun academics for PreKindergarten through 8th grade students. They learn to think for themselves and value independence. The results are unmatched at any price. Visit them!

825 N. 300 West #200 in SLC 801.466.4326 bfhautah.blogspot.com

1745 E. 9800 South in Sandy 801.572.5311 blessedsacschool.org

Brainlinking (154)

2231 E. Creek Rd. in Sandy 801.467.6278 brainlinking.com

1452 E. 2700 South in SLC 801.486.4895 cardenmemorialschool.com

see website for locations 801.487.9984 challengerschool.com

Children’s Choice (117) 10750 S. 1300 East in Sandy 801.572.1880 childrenschoiceutah.com

Brainlinking has a unique program for unlocking frustrations with learning, removing barriers causing struggle or failure. It is not tutoring. It’s a fun, engaging life-changing approach for developing successful, confident learning!

You can rest easy knowing your child is receiving the best possible care in a setting where your child’s social, physical, emotional, and intellectual development will be the priority. We even provide a private full-day Kindergarten. Call to schedule a tour!

Buttons N Bows (155)

Children’s Corner (158)

Holladay and SLC 801.278.8223 bnbschools.com

They are a small, locally-owned company that has been dedicated to the education of young children for over 35 years; with a reputation for quality early childhood education rather than merely providing a daycare environment.

28 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

3534 S. Highland Dr. in SLC 801.486.6363 childrens-corner.net

With over 30 years of experience, Children’s Corner has a developmental approach which takes into account individual growth patterns, socialization, emotional development and cognitive learning programs. Their curriculum was designed for separate age groups.


Changing the Way Students Read! Dramatically Increasing Fluency & Comprehension! A program for all ages. In just four months you'll see the transformation from reluctance to readiness - from resistance to willingness. Improve 1-5 grade levels GUARANTEED! • READING: BrainLinking removes the barriers for struggling readers! When comprehension, fluency or eye-movement difficulty is the holdup, we will turn resistance into reading enjoyment.

BEYOND READING • MATH: BrainLinking solves math problems! When core knowledge, logic or memory is the holdup, we will turn frustration into fun with math!

Mention this ad for

$50.00 OFF the Learning Assessment. CALL TODAY!

• FOCUSING: BrainLinking makes concentration fun! Learning to focus happens easily with engaging balance board and kinetic activities.

“The improvements are tangible and measurable. I have personally witnessed some very impressive results, firsthand, with my own children, my friends’ children, and even with professional athletes. I am so convinced of its benefits that I am personally recommending and endorsing this educational breakthrough.” “Tremendously challenging, SUCCESSFUL, and believe it or not, FUN!”

John Stockton

Former UT Jazz Point Guard and avid Brainlinking fan

Sandy, UT • 801-I’M SMART or 801-467-6278 • www.BrainLinking.com AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 29


School (CCNS) (801) 604-6912 www.ccnsslc.com Community Cooperative Nursery School’s philosophy emphasizes developing “social readiness” and community building. CCNS provides developmentally appropriate, experience-based learning rather than formal academics. The school is owned by the parents. Each class has two co-oping parents, as well as a teacher, to increase adult/child ratios and offer parents a unique and richly rewarding opportunity to participate more fully in their child’s early development and education. Classes are available for two, three, and four year olds.

Back To School By Laura Amann

At The McGillis School, you will discover that we are more than just a place to learn; we are a community. McGillis students in grades one through eight have the opportunity to excel academically while learning the importance of productive group dynamics and social responsibility. Central to our core mission is providing learning experiences that empower children to become engaged and enthusiastic about their learning. The McGillis School is a secular school whose school philosophy is informed by Jewish values and culture. This philosophy creates context for all students to engage in understanding the meaning and significance of a tradition historically committed to intellectual growth and moral development. Our student body is a healthy patchwork of races, religions, and ethnic backgrounds. The diversity at McGillis provides an opportunity for children of all backgrounds to experience and embrace different cultures and lifestyles.

Lake City School District for children in grades kindergarten-8. The program embraces traditional academic subjects. The difference lies in the way the children learn. The Open Classroom Community, through a cooperative environment, will empower children to become responsible, lifelong learners. The Open Classroom is an innovative school that invites children, teachers and parents to collaborate as a community that inspires and celebrates the adventure of learning. Every person in the learning community–children, parents and teachers–has a role to play in creating and maintaining a meaningful, purposeful learning environment. It can be difficult to imagine how the OC’s principles work in action without visiting the school. The school welcomes visitors to come see the great dynamic that develops in this unique classroom environment and tour the school.

tional schooling should consider SEPS’s day school, tutoring program or special workshops as an alternative or supplement. Individuals with different learning styles will find success at SEPS. SEPS also offers programs for gifted children and ambitious adults who wish to accelerate their education. Services are offered for long-term educational and career goals or for short-term help. Programs are customized for each student.

K12, the leading curriculum provider for public online schools serving kindergarten through high school, and the Utah Online Academies give Utah students in grades K-8 an innovative public school choice. When you enroll in a Utah Online Academy, you get the flexible, individualized K12 curriculum, a rich combination of online lessons, printed

It doesn’t add up! for info www.water fordschool.org/openhouse Attend a free seminar on Processing Disorders presented by Karla Jay, M.S. Clinical Director of U CAN LEARN January 22nd in Sandy

Invest in Your Child’s Future

For more information or to sign up go to www.ucanlearn .net

Utah’s Premier Independent College-Preparatory School

Maybe it’s time to consider a tutor. Tutors frequently provide extra help in a particular subject area but they can also help high-achieving kids get extra enrichment. They can motivate kids, keep them on task SEPS Learning Center and teach organization. 604 Wilmington Avenue in SLC But467-2122 finding a great tutor, someone who (801) challenges your child and builds their abilities www.sepslc.com Openconfidence, House: and can be daunting.

Call to schedule a tour.

Issues to Consider

Summit Christian Academy Before hiring a tutor, speak to your child’s 4020 South 900 East teacher. Some parents assume that their (801) 613-1722 student doesn’t understand math while the www.scautah.org teacher sees it as an organizational or study Open House: Call to schedule a tour. skills situation.

1480 East 9400 South, Sandy, Utah 801.816.2203

to have their preschoolers reading before kindergarten; others want their middleschoolers tutored so they get into an honors class.DO YOU FEEL LIKE . . . • Homework is acompetition battlefield? right now is “The level of • Focusing is impossible? very high,” said Eileen Lambert, head of a Your child “But is missing tools? aren’t K-12• school. the learning early readers • Your child’s future is on the line? necessarily the brightest students by middle • YourKids’ child’slight learning pathgo is headed nowhere? school. bulbs on at different WEand CAN HELP!!! times, for some kids it’s not until sixth or

CALL FOR A FREE ASSESSMENT. Our service is provided in your home.

Finding a Tutor 801-699-1021

Have some clear goals to convey to potential Waterfordtutors. SchoolDo you want to see better 1480 East South grades or 9400 higher test scores? Less stress (801)anxiety? 572-1780Or does your child need and www.waterfordschool.org organizational help? Open House: Make sure 18, you8-11 have the right reasons for October a.m. hiring a tutor. Some parents feel pressured

can help. Word of mouth works also, try asking friends and other parents for their recommendations. “A good tutor should be able to build a good rapport with the student and make them comfortable,” says Lynn Bowen, a private tutor. “Sometimes word of mouth gets you that info. Sometimes trial and error.”

DO YOU FEEL LIKE PULLING YOUR HAIR OUT?

seventh grade. NotWE allINSTILL kids are for the AT BRAIN WORKS ALL ready THE IMPORTANT LEARNING SKILLS PERMANENTLY!! rigors of an honors class.”

Because the tutor relationship is personal www.brainworksmindmapping.com as well as professional, finding the right tutor can be tricky. Lambert recommends asking the child’s teacher for recommendations first. It may be another teacher in the school or Turning Learning Struggles into AbilitiesAbilities intoLearning Learning theyTurning mayLearning know Struggles of experienced tutors who

BRAIN BRAIN WORKS WORKS

Choosing a Tutor Make sure the tutor has experience in the subject and grade level that you need. Children with a diagnosed learning disability need a tutor who specializes in those issues. Once you have a few names, do a standard interview and ask some simple questions. Find out what experience and credentials they have, how they stay current with the latest educational methods and strategies

18 utahfamily.com FEBRUARY 2012

Feb12.indd 18

Six Wasatch Front locations.

See our ad on page 5 Now enrolling

Because You Know the Value of Education ChallengerSchool.com

3-8 year old children Do the words “math homework” for fall session strike fear in your child…or you? We can change that fear into better grades and higher self-confidence, and eliminate the frustration, tears, and fights over math homework.

30 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

are provided fre Murray Library,

Learn enjoy progra acade at the music phoni staff l encou skills. using decisi New Years Fam join uschildr in makin special guest. H 7-7:45classr p.m.

Yo-Yo Show: 1

Redeemer Lutheran School Thursday, February 23, 6 p.m. (801) 487-6283 1955 E. Stratford Avenue www.redeemer-slc.org Tour the Lower School campus Redeemer Lutheran School has been Montessori Community School providing a quality Christian education to 2416 E. 1700 South families in the Salt Lake area for over 40 (801) 355-1555 Preschool - Grade 5 Meet faculty, parents and students Bright Child+Working Hard=Falling Behind in School

page 22 | january 09 | utahfamily.com

Maybe your child has started to struggle in a certain subject; maybe he’s forgetting to turn assignments in; maybe he needs help prepping for a big test.

Locat 2857 3655 Reading Rocks Info:

Movie Monday about and for te S.1100 East, 3:3

U Can Learn Hall of Famer, D (801) 576-1488 worldwide with www.ucanlearn.net tricks. Dale rela and follows the The U Can Learn (Utah Center for Advanced Neuroscience, Learning Enhance-with a workshop are interested. N ment And Resource Networking, Inc.) team consists of a unique combination welcome. Bring Holladay Library of clinicians and dyslexia specialists with Amigos y Libro expertise in special education, speech pathology, psychology and learning dis- stories, songs a abilities. Professionals at the center treat español y ingl speech and language problems, reading Families. West problems, sound sensitivities, attention 7-7:45 p.m. Bamboo Peru deficits, processing problems, autism spectrum disorders, neuropsychological the opportunity problems and motor problems. The cen- songs played on ter also offers a full-day school special- native percussio Library, 1136 Pi izing in dyslexia remediation.

Find the PerfectWATERFORD SCHOOL ADMISSIONS OPEN HOUSE Tutor for Your Child K12 Utah Online Academies (866) 360-0166 www.k12.com/ut

Lear

Storytime Fun: music and fun. adult. Hunter L noon.

Discover how a better understanding of math can change your child’s attitude.Before you know it, your child could be crazy about math.

Pajama-Rama fun. You may w stuffed animal. F adult. Sandy Li

Mat

Locat Info: Mathn year-r highly for stu month week child’s overa forgin

Raptor Rapture Come meet som

McKe

Locat Info:

Childr atmos to a b thinkin McKe langu Spani eat a Game make the sa intera

Mon

Locat Info: Monte


February 1, 5:30 p.m. Utah Catholic Schools and how they tailor their lesson plans. Ask (801) 328-8641 what they enjoy most about tutoring and ask www.utahcatholicschools.org Open Houses: for references. Special open houses at Catholic schools across the Wasatch Front for Catholic A Tutoring Session Schools Week, Jan. 29-Feb. 5. Visit the Mostwebsite tutorsfor meet a public location, such moreininformation.

as a library or coffee shop, or in your home on a set schedule. Do not agree to a session Utah Lutheran Schools Community Child Development Center inSt. anJohn’s unknown location without a trusted 475 Herbert Avenue adult present. (801) 364-4874 Sit in on a few sessions and observe how Christ Lutheran School - 240 E. 5600 South the tutor and your child interact. “I make sure (801) 266-8714 that parents understand thatE.they’re always Grace Lutheran School - 1815 9800 South welcome,” Bowen. “I also give parents (801)said 572-3793 Redeemerafter Lutheran - 1955 E. Stratford feedback eachSchool session or keep them Ave (801) 487.6283 updated through email. The parents are a big Concordia Preparatory School - 12723 S Park Avet part of it and they need to know what’s going (801) 878-1515 on.” www.utahlutheranschools.org And make sure that the tutor and the Open Houses: teacherFebruary are in contact together. 11, 9-11and a.m.working and 6-8 p.m. “I communicate March 9, 9-11directly a.m. with the child’s teacher,” Bowen added. “Parents should Waterford School always make sure that the teacher knows that 1480 East 9400 South extra help.” the student is getting (801) And572-1780 don’t forget payment. Because of www.waterfordschool.org the one-on-one relationship, these topics Open House: can getLower tricky.School Discuss cost and payment Open House schedules upfront find out in advance February 23, and 6-8 p.m. about policies for missed appointments or additional fees for books or supplies. Keep in mind that a tutor isn’t a for doing hard work. Your student will still need to study and do his/ her own homework. No tutor should promise you a certain grade at the end of the session, but they should give your child the tools to become successful. That may mean an improvement in grades but it could also be increased independence, self-esteem and motivation.

Happy Happens LAKE SCHOOL for the AtSALT Miss Swendy’s! • Robust Music Program • Arts and Crafts

• Activity Room Performing arts • Outdoors Program

• Library • Puzzle Room

NO AUDITION / NO TUITION

Generations of families  continue to bringacademic their kids! Unparalleled and artistic training  Register now for the 2013-14 school year! Miss Swendy’s Day School

2722 West 6620 South in West Jordan www.saltlakespa.org Swendy Van Dorn, owner director • 801-566-9323

7

37

604 E. Wilmington Avenue FEBRUARY 2012 utahfamily.com 21

replacement Feb12.indd 21

Real estate

Growing Kids... Growing Family... Outgrown Your Space? Overseeing the buy/sale adventure from start to finish. Fabiola P. Busch REALTOR ®

cell: 801-680-9135 Office: 801-278-1111 fabiola.stonebrook@gmail.com

www.stonebrook.com

Discover the reason people call me Fabulous Fabiola.

1/24/2012 2:02:00 PM

BRIGHTfrom the start! GET THIS YEAR’S BEST BACK-TO-SCHOOL SUPPLY

Forget those new jeans and superhero lunchboxes. Confidence is the best school supply you can give your kids to set them up for school success. Start this year strong with Sylvan. Our proven approach blends amazing teachers with SylvanSync™ technology on the iPad® for a truly engaging learning experience.

Salt Lake City

Taylorsville

Sandy

50% off

Assessment Cannot be combined with other offers. Expires 10/31/13.

Riverton

801-466-1537 801-966-4780 801-233-1700 801-365-6500 Don’t wait until it’s too late. Start now.

SYLVANLEARNING.COM

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 31


EDUCATION PLANNER

Children’s Cottage (347)

Lit’l Scholars Preschool (167)

4615 S. Highland Dr. in Salt Lake City 801.272.0971

Salt Lake City and Taylorville 801.467.8545 litlscholars.com

Kids from 6 weeks to 12 years of age will enjoy coming to the Children’s Cottage! They provide transportation to and from school, meals and snacks, and even a separate environment for different age groups. Caring teachers help make this family-oriented facility a wonderful place for your children.

At Lit‘l Scholars, the children’s programs are designed to meet your child’s developmental needs. The center offers creative learning experiences with an academic emphasis on phonics, reading, math and printing. Children explore their world through art, science, social skills and cultural activities.

Concordia Learning Center (186)

Mathnasium (210)

12723 S. Park Ave. (2080 West) in Riverton 801.571.6769 clcutah.com

At CLC children will experience life and educational components through art, early math and science, movement and music, literacy and language. We are committed to providing your child with an environment that encourages independent, social and spiritual growth.

Dancing Moose Montessori (118) 4428 W. Links Dr. in West Valley City 801.968.0100 mydancingmoose.com

Emphasizing ethics of peace, order, and respect, Dancing Moose offers both choice and directed lessons in a structured environment that honors each child. Learning is important, but loving to learn is essential, especially in early childhood education.

Elizabeth Academy (160) 154 E. Myrtle Ave. in Murray 801.281.4848 elizabethacademy.com

Draper, Sugar House, Cottonwood Heights 801.572.MATH mathnasium.com Mathnasium is a learning center where students go year-round to boost their math skills. The centers are highly specialized, teaching only math to students in grades pre-K through 12. At Mathnasium students gain confidence and forge a positive attitude towards math.

McKee Language School (168) 1417 S. 1100 East in Salt Lake City 800.349.1846 mckeeschool.com

Our preschool uses the McKee Language system, a program for teaching children second languages in an atmosphere of play. Children are functionally fluent in Spanish in less than 500 hours. Children engage in hands-on, fun activities to keep their attention and actually use the language.

Monkey Mountain (248)

1526 Ute Blvd. at Kimball Junction 435.214.7451 monkeymountain.com

We help young people from 2 to 12 years of age develop the skills to be successful in life: initiative, concentration, critical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork, respect, responsibility, empathy and the desire to “give back.”

Of course Monkey Mountain is about running, jumping, climbing, sliding & playing. But it’s also about our wide variety of special, enrichment classes designed to provide age-specific, structured activities your kids will love! Check out Monkey Mountain’s preschool and childcare programs soon!

Hilltop Christian School (161)

Our Lady of Lourdes (170)

985 E. 10600 South in Sandy 801.974.5886 hilltopchristianschool.org

1065 E. 700 South in Salt Lake City 801.364.5624 lourdesschool.org

Hilltop Christian School is an assistance program to homeschoolers. They teach your student core curriculum: history, math, science and English (reading, writing, literature, etc.). They “assist parents in fulfilling their parental responsibility in the education of their children.”

They recognize the importance of teaching values of respect, responsibility, honesty, hard work and service to others. They are dedicated to providing an integral education, one that meets all the different facets of our students, in their individual learning.

I. J. and Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center (164)

Right Start Kids Academy (79)

2 N. Medical Dr. in Salt Lake City 801.581.0098 slcjcc.org

Our teachers help children become independent, self-confident and inquisitive learners, while aiding in their social-emotional, cognitive, language and physical development. Low child-to-teacher ratio with talented, credentialed instructors.

32 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

1955 E. Stratford Ave. in Salt Lake City 801.487.6283 school.rlcs-slc.org

Discover why the Right Start Kids Academy is such a great academic preschool! Our Educational Programs include Terrific Two’s, Preschool, Kindergarten Enrichment, and a Kids Klub. Give your child a jumpstart to their cognitive, social and physical development at Right Start Kids Academy.


EE L F R RIA T The multi-award winning online reading program!

Sugar House

Cottonwood Heights

Draper

1511 E. 2100 S. 385-242-7610

1844 Fort Union 801-679-1588

715 E. 12300 S. 801-572-MATH

Reading Eggs provides a comprehensive range of online reading lessons and ebooks that teach kids aged 3-13 the literacy skills needed for lifetime reading success. The reason why over 90% of parents using Reading Eggs report a noticeable improvement in their child’s reading skills is because the program makes learning phonics and basic reading skills fun. Your child can progress through the one-on-one lessons at their own pace and you can track their learning with regular progress reports and assessments. Take advantage of our special 5 week FREE trial today and see for yourself how your child’s reading improves by using Reading Eggs.

• 

•  •  •  •  • •



 

FREE 5 WEEK TRIAL* • 

Hurry, offer ends October 31, 2013. Register today at

www.readingeggs.com/see

•  • 

• •

 •   

•  • 

•  • 

*Free trial only available for new customers who sign up at the above address

• 

6120 S. 2075 E. Salt Lake City, UT 84121

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 33


St. John’s Community Child Development Center (246)

EDUCATION PLANNER

475 E. Herbert Ave. in Salt Lake City 801.364.4874 stjohnsccdc.org

The Tutoring Center (247) 7701 S. 700 East in Sandy 801.566.7701 tutoringcenter.com

The directors, teachers and staff want to do their part in “planting seeds of faith and knowledge.” They provide a clean, stable and secure environment to nurture spiritual, intellectual and emotional development; while cultivating physical, social and creative skills.

At The Tutoring Center your child will develop stronger academic skills in reading, math and writing. Your child will develop better concentration, focus and attention span. Your child will gain more confidence and motivation, and your child will develop stronger test taking and study skills.

S. L. School for the Performing Arts (214)

Utah Connections Academy (159)

The Salt Lake School for the Performing Arts promotes excellence in artistic expression, performing arts and academics to increase each student’s ability to compete professionally and to be successful in their future pursuits in institutions of higher learning.

Students in Utah now have the opportunity to thrive at Utah Connections Academy (UCA), a tuition-free public online school. The mission of the school is to maximize academic achievement for students in grades K–12 throughout the state who need an alternative to the traditional classroom.

2291 S. 2000 East in Salt Lake City 801.466.6700 saltlakespa.org

SEPS Learning Center (171)

604 Wilmington Ave. in Salt Lake City 801.467.2122 sepslc.com

online public school 800.382.6010 connectionsacademy.com

Waterford School (175) 1480 E. 9400 South in Sandy 801.816.2203 waterfordschool.org

Students at SEPS engage in handson creative learning activities every day with qualified, caring teachers. Contact us to inquire how we can improve your success in academic, cognitive, social, emotional, behavioral and employment areas.

An independent school providing a liberal arts, college preparatory education for students in Preschool through 12th grade. Waterford has an exceptional faculty, a rich curriculum, a nurturing community and a beautiful 40-acre campus. This is Waterford.

SIP Academy (314)

Weilenmann School of Discovery (240)

SIP Academy™ provides internationally acclaimed child development programs aimed at providing kids ages 6 through 12 with the skills required to excel intellectually. Their “mental abacus” programs enhance visual-spatial competency, concentration, math skills and learning ability.

Located in beautiful Summit Park, with bus service provided from Salt Lake City and Park City, Weilenmann School of Discovery offers students in grades K–8 opportunities for academic excellence, intellectual inquiry, artistic expression, creativity and discovery, and a strong connection to the natural world.

2150 S. 1300 East # 500 in Salt Lake City 801.652.1676 sipacademyusa.com

Summit Christian Academy (173) 4020 S. 900 East in Salt Lake City 801.613.1722 scautah.org

4199 Kilby Road in Summit Park 801.575.5411 wsdpc.org

The Winner School (151)

6120 S. 2075 East in Salt Lake City 801.278.2500 thewinnerschool.com

A fascinating little world of daily discoveries, endless diversity, and omni-directional development, Summit Christian Academy is a vibrant place where learning extends beyond the textbook to the art of keeping wonder alive.

The Winner School is a nationally accredited, unique and excellent preschool and afterschool program for ages 2-13, dedicated to building self-esteem in your child. They’re process oriented and believe your child will learn and retain more in a “hands-on” activity based program.

Sylvan Learning Center (292)

Zaniac (346)

2645 E. Parley’s Way in Salt Lake City 801.466.1537 sylvan-utah.com

1045 E. 2100 South in Salt Lake City 801.977.8580 zaniaclearning.com/sugarhouse

Sylvan Learning Center will give your child a truly personal learning experience. Their proprietary SylvanSync™ teaching system combines personal instruction with education technology. For more information, please give them a call.

At Zaniac, kids discover math and technology – and just how much fun learning can be. Forget drills and repetition. Zaniac’s fun afterschool enrichment programs engage kids in creative, conceptual problem solving that builds confidence and a real academic advantage.

34 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013


Wasatch Speech & Language Center a full-service clinic for children & adults of all ages with communication disorders.

stuttering  articulation  language  voice tongue thrust  stroke  swallowing  apraxia

Happy kids thriving in quality affordable care! Care for infants to age 12 After-school transportation

801-308-0400 2120 E. 3900 So. Suite #100

Drop-in child care 6 a.m. - midnight Monday-Saturday

www.stutteringinfo.com email: tgurrister@aol.com

Call ahead for details and to reserve a spot

3844 S. 1100 East in SLC

801-269-9526

ASHA CERTIFIED SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS

Use coupon code murray2013 for

FREE REGISTRATION for 2013 dance or preschool (new students only)

Slots available fall 2013!

Register for Winter/Spring Classes TODAY!

Nationally accredited. Hands-on learning. Dedicated staff. Preschool and Pre-K. Ages six weeks to six years. 344 East 300 South Salt Lake City, Utah 84111 • 801-537-5502 bmurphy@ywca.com • www.ywca.com

LOLIE ECCLES EARLY EDUCATION CENTER AT THE YWCA SALT LAKE CITY

Over 30 Years Experience

YWCA_UtahFamilyAd_AugSept2013_3.2.indd 1

salt lake city

6/12/2013 3:44:26 PM

We offer a structured preschool program for each age group as well as Kindergarten and a great after-school program

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 35


Special Needs By Michelle Murphy, Utah Parent Center

UMTSS: A New Model of Support for Families with a Special Needs Kid A Parent’s Perspective and Advice As a mother of 2 boys, ages 12 and 4, I know firsthand the importance of a quality education for children. Like most parents, I want my children to view school as a positive place where they can learn and feel successful. I know that school is more than just a place to go. It is an environment for learning in which we help to mold children to become successful adults. Sadly however, not everyone views school this way. For children

who struggle academically or behaviorally, school can be a place of challenge and, in some cases, even a place for failure. Fortunately, with new innovations such as the implementation of the Utah Multi-Tiered Systems of Supports (UMTSS) we are taking another step toward ensuring that we truly don’t leave any child behind when it comes to education. Join me as I tell you my story about how MTSS has helped me feel hopeful moving forward in education with my own child and others.

My Child My story starts over 12 years ago, when my oldest son was born. Having a child is one of the most amazing things you can do, but it is also one of the scariest. I knew right away that something was different with my child. Luckily, I was quickly able to connect with early intervention services. Their assessment found that my child needed immediate services to address some developmental delays. Although I was concerned about what was causing the delays, I was also happy that he was getting the help he needed. Over the next 3 years he received many services including: speech, physical therapy, occupation therapy and social skills assistance. I also had some private testing done which identified that he was very gifted, and likely had Asperger’s syndrome as well as anxiety disorder. By preschool, my son had made vast improvements, but still needed some help, especially in the social-emotional area. He was re-evaluated for special education services. They looked at both his behavioral and academic progress. I remember the eligibility meeting well, as it was a very bittersweet 36 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

moment. The academic data showed he was above-grade level in almost all areas. The intervention he received early on had helped and he no longer needed special education support. Behaviorally, however, he struggled and we thought he would need special education support moving into school. His test results did show some issues and delays with social-emotional skills, but they were not “bad enough” at the time to qualify for services. I understood that the team was following procedures and laws, but I couldn’t help feeling bitter and a little angry. It seemed they were telling me ‘There is a problem, but it is not yet bad enough for us to help.’ It felt very much like we were waiting for him to fail. I wanted his problems to be addressed early; and, like most parents, I was uncomfortable by the thought that he might not have the help he needed. The evaluation team was very kind and listened to my concerns. They promised to carefully monitor him and told me about 504 accommodations, should they be needed. I, however, still had a bad feeling that we might be setting him up to fail.

Other Children Around this same time I became a Parent Consultant at the Utah Parent Center. I started talking to other parents with special needs children. I was surprised to meet so many parents with children that weren’t doing so well in regular education, but didn’t qualify for special education. There were kids falling through the cracks; not having their needs met. I also saw – and experienced – a big divide in schools between regular education and special education. Special education was in charge of fixing all the kids that had issues. If they didn’t qualify for special education, then no one really knew what to do. I saw the heartache that parents like me experienced when it was their child falling through the cracks. It seemed like an impossible problem. What would – or could – we do to change this fragmented system?

IDEA Change was coming! In 2004 IDEA (the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) was reauthorized by congress. This reauthorization included something different: it introduced schools to a little used concept called Response to Intervention, or RTI. RTI’s concept is that we should help children at the lowest level possible, giving kids various levels of support based on need. It involves three different tiers of support and includes both general and special education teachers. The RTI concept was revolutionary


in helping schools understand that when a child is struggling, it is the job of both regular and special education to help. I personally saw a difference as I approached my child’s teachers about interventions and accommodations. They seemed more understanding and willing to help and even came up with some of the ideas! I’ve been to multiple trainings on RTI, and I recognize that while it’s a wonderful concept, it is not without its problems. Unfortunately, most districts were using RTI mostly for academics. There are many children, however, just like mine that would benefit from behavioral tiers of support as well. Utah didn’t really have the capacity to provide that support and so some schools were not able to successfully implement RTI. Still, I felt hopeful that we were moving in the right direction.

Today: UMTSS Fast forward to the present day: we have something even better coming! Utah was recently awarded a grant to use a new model called Utah Multi-Tiered Systems of Supports (UMTSS). With this grant comes the chance for 9 districts throughout the state to receive coaching, training and even some funding to help implement a UMTSS model. This is very exciting to me, as it addresses two of the big issues I saw as a parent with RTI. First, it includes both academic and behavioral support! Having these rolled into one model will help streamline things and just makes more sense. The second benefit is that schools and districts will be getting support and training. Change is always hard, but with this support, UMTSS has a much better chance of becoming a statewide model. UMTSS works by, first, providing universal screenings for all children. Students identified as needing support in either academics or behavior will then be given targeted interventions based on individual needs, and their response to previous interventions. Data is very important in this process, as it will help schools make data-based decisions rather than just guessing what a student needs. Any student who struggles regardless of his or her label or disability will be able to get help. This means that ALL children can benefit from UMTSS. General and special education can work together to put in place research-based interventions. Schools will continually be looking at student data to identify new students that need help as well

Grand Opening Discount: 25% Of the First Year for the First 10 Famil es To Enrol !

Grand Opening March 15 Grand Opening March 15 NOW OPEN IN SANDY Grand Opening Discount: 25% Off the First Year for the First 10 Families To Enroll! Grand Opening Discount: 25% Off the First Year for the First 10 Families To Enroll!

CALL US NOW CALL US NOW

TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT & TESTFREE CONSULTATION! TO SCHEDULE YOUR DIAGNOSTIC

CAL US NOW

801-566-7701 801-566-7701

ASSESSMENT & TEST CONSULTATION!

Empowering Children To Reach Their Potential

www.tutoringcenter.com Empowering Children To Reach Their Potential www.tutoringcenter.com

Reading Math Reading Writing Math Study Skills Writing Pre-Algebra Study Skills Algebra I Pre-Algebra Geometry Algebra I Algebra II Geometry

• Fun, Positive Environment • Month-to-Month Tuition Programs • Increased Attention Span • Individualized • Fun, Positive Environment • Month-to-Month Tuition Incentives and Rewards • • Increased Attention Span • Individualized Programs CONTRACTS! • NO • Incentives and Rewards • NO CONTRACTS!

vs. vs.

TO SCHEDULE YOUR FRE DIAGNOSTIC AS ES MENT & TEST CONSULTATION!

All ONE-to-ONE Instruction! All ONE-to-ONE Instruction! 7701 South 700 East - Sandy, Utah 84047 (next to Harmons) 7701 South East - Sandy, Utah 84047 (next to Harmons) James Taylor,700 Center Director (former Headmaster of Carden Memorial School) Algebra II

James Taylor, Center Director (former Headmaster of Carden Memorial School)

801-56 -7 01 • Fun, Posit ve Environment • Month-to-Month Tuit on Empowering Children To Reach Their Potential •Indiv dualized Programs • IncreasedAt ention Span w w.tutoringcenter.com •Incentives and Rewards Reading •NOCONTRACTS! Subscribe to our online newsletter at www.utahfamily.com for additional content & exclusive giveaways!

see page 61 AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 37


Family Health By Kimberly Carlson

Eye Exams: Which, When and Why I didn’t start wearing glasses until I was 21 years old. It took a good year’s worth of migraines as I drove home from work and comments like “why are you squinting at me?” before I figured it out. My mom relied on our annual visit to the pediatrician to tell her whether or not her children needed additional eye care. My children will come home from school once a year with release forms for me to sign allowing an eye screening on them to be conducted at school. Between the two, any and all problems my children might have with their eyes will be caught, right? Maybe. But maybe not.

At School “School eye exams aren’t really exams. They are just screenings. They are testing to see what the student’s acuity is. They are great, and pick up a lot of problems, but shouldn’t take the place of a real eye exam” explains Dr. Craig Smith, managing optometrist at John A. Moran Eye Center in Salt Lake City.

With your Pediatrician As part of a pediatric well-visit, a good pediatrician will check your child’s eyes. This is important – especially in newborns, while their eyes are still learning to focus. However, Dr. Smith also reminds us that a pediatrician’s exam isn’t complete on its own. “It’s great, because they will pick up problems, but they aren’t comprehensive.”

Proper Exams School screenings and eye check-ups with your pediatrician are beneficial and important, but by design they won’t catch everything. “Proper exams would pick up infantile glaucoma or retinoblastoma, although uncommon, a life-threatening cancer” that would likely get missed in a routine check-up or screening, says Dr. Smith. A comprehensive eye exam will check for visual acuity, depth perception and color vision as well as the health of the overall eye, including congenital disorders and cancers.

Frequency Obviously, any time you think your child has a problem, take them to an eye doctor. By the time they attend preschool or kindergarten, they should have had at least one comprehensive visit to the eye doctor

38 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

already. Dr. Smith also advocates annual eye exams for all school-age children until they are 18-19 years old. Then it should be every other year until they reach their 40s, when it should go back to annual visits.

Visible Signs of Vision Problems There are some very visible signs your child may have vision problems. First, if your infant cries until s/he is very close to the desired object or person s/he wants to see, there may be eye-issues. Secondly, if one eye seems to turn or look in a different direction than the other, there may be problems. Finally, if you see a white reflection in the pupil, it could be a life-threatening cancer. Children are children. They will never cease to amaze us in their ability to either hurt themselves or others. “Children find the most inventive ways to damage their eyes. You need to be on guard at all times!” says Dr. Smith. The way I see it, a routine eye exam should be on your back-to-school To-Do list for

The different kinds of eye doctors... Different kinds of doctors offer eye care, and the names can be confusing. Here are the basic ones to know:

• Ophthalmologists are medical doctors (have gone to medical school) who provide comprehensive eye care with medicine and surgery.

• Pediatric ophthalmologists have additional special training to treat children’s eye problems.

• Optometrists provide services that may be similar to ophthalmologists, but they don’t perform surgery. Some optometrists specialize in kids’ eye problems.

• Opticians fit and adjust eyeglasses.

everyone in your family!

Timeline... According to kidshealth.org, routine medical exams for children should include the following:

• Newborns should be checked for general eye health by a pediatrician or family physician in the hospital nursery.

• High-risk newborns (including premature infants), those with a family history of eye problems, and those with obvious eye irregularities should be examined by an eye doctor.

• In the first year of life, all infants should be routinely screened for eye health during checkups with their pediatrician or family doctor.

• Around age 3½, kids should undergo eye health screenings and visual acuity tests (or tests that measure sharpness of vision) with their pediatrician or family doctor.

• Around age 5, kids should have their vision and eye alignment evaluated by their doctors. Those who fail either test should be examined by their pediatrician or family doctor.

• After age 5, further routine screenings should be done at school or the doctor’s office, or after the appearance of symptoms such as squinting or frequent headaches. (Many times, a teacher will realize the child isn’t seeing well in class.)

• Kids who wear prescription glasses or contacts should have annual checkups by an eye doctor to screen for vision changes.


Read our digital edition on your laptop, tablet or mobile device. Visit our website! AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 39


Childcare Options By Kimberly Carlson

A Deeper Look Into Child Care and Those Who Care Editor’s note: This is a shorter version of an article looking into frustrations some parents are having over receiving child care assistance they qualify for. Visit utahfamily.com for the extended version. Meet Jane*. Jane is a recently divorced mom of four children under the age of 10. Her ex has decided to skip town – and his child support payments. So Jane needs to look for full time work to support herself and her children. Unfortunately, Jane hasn’t been in the job force for the last decade and things have changed. She is directed to the Department of Workforce Services (DWS) to look for a job. Her friends and family have recommended she see if she qualifies for

40 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

any state assistance as well, so she fills out all the necessary paperwork and finds out that she does indeed qualify for some assistance. Jane is told that she qualifies for food stamps, her children qualify for insurance through CHIP, Children’s Health Insurance Plans, (but none for herself), but she is denied any child care support because she doesn’t have a job. ‘Okay,’ she thinks. ‘I’ll come back when I have a job and reapply for child care support. I can do this.’ Jane finds a job. It’s not the best job in the world, but it is close enough to her new apartment that she can walk to and from her job every day. Which is good, because her car was repossessed due to nonpayment – it was either the car or the rent; she chose wisely. It is summer, and school doesn’t start for another few months. Jane needs full time daycare for her four children and starts the vetting process. She finds the daycare provider she likes and is told how much it will be to have her four children enrolled. ‘Yikes! That’s more than my first paycheck!’ she thinks. But what else is she going to do? She goes back to the state and re-fills out the paperwork necessary for child care assistance. Jane has to wait at

least 30 business days before she knows whether or not she qualifies – and for how much. In the meantime, she still has to provide care for her children while she works at her new job. Plus, the daycare center needs her to pay weekly. Jane is ‘lucky’: she has credit cards that help her float her payments for the first month while she waits to see if she qualifies for child care assistance. The good news: she learns that she qualifies for some assistance. The bad news is twofold: in her specific case, the assistance was not retroactive nor does it cover all of her expenses. In fact, it will only cover about half of her child care expenses. ‘Good thing I don’t have that car payment anymore,’ Jane thinks. ‘Child care is going to cost more than that anyway.’ Fast forward six months. Jane has been working at her new job diligently; showing up on time, working hard, and proving her worth. Her boss decides to reward her with a $0.25/hour raise. She then gets a notice in the mail that she needs to prove her income – again – to the state in order to continue receiving her child care assistance. She faxes in copies of her pay stub (thanks to her generous boss who lets her do this at work). Two weeks later? Her file is “closed” and her child care assistance stops coming. She panics. ‘What did I do wrong?’ She calls. She’s told by a caseworker that she didn’t hand in her paperwork in a timely fashion. She is told to send it all in again and she will have a new case file. “But I did hand all of that in when you asked for it” she argues. The caseworker tells her “those copies went to your food stamps renewal. We needed another copy for your child care assistance.” So, she takes an afternoon off of work to fill out all the paperwork all over again and wait the 30+ business days for her paperwork to process. In the meantime, she’s racking up dues at her childcare facility and trying to work overtime to offset those costs. She receives word that yes, indeed, she does qualify for coverage – but it’s even less now than it was before thanks to that $0.25/hour raise. Her raise has actually cost her money. And the cycle starts all over again. Jane isn’t alone. Carmen Alamos is a single mother of three children (ages 4, 6 and 7) in West Valley City. She’s needed daycare ever since her eldest child was a year old. Her case has been through the wringer and back several times. She’s had her case closed because, as she states, “the state doesn’t seem to have any accountability see page 42


Now Enrolling in Riverton 2-5 year olds Preschool and Childcare:

Preschool for 3 year-olds and Kinder College for 4 year-olds • Clean, safe facility • Professional, experienced and caring staff • Specialize in infants to age• Spanish 12 instruction • Art, music and movement

Now Enrolling! · Infant Nursery · Toddlers · 2 Year Olds · Preschool · Kindergarten Readiness

261 South 900 East 801-521-6419 • stpauls-slc.org

• Transportation to local schools Concordia Learning Center • Field trips and activities 12723 Park Ave. in Riverton 801-571-6769 • Private Kindergarten www.clcutah.com • Clean, safe facility • Professional, caring staff Sign Up Now For Our

Fit Family

Summer Program!

Free Summer Workshops!

10750 S. 1300 E.

Aerial Arts, Yoga, Dance & More! 801-572-1880 Register at fit.utahfamily.com

IN SANDY

Come to Park City & Explore

Infant to 12 Years Blessed SacramentAges School Academic Pre-Kindergarten

the Great Indoors! At Utah’s Giant Indoor Playground

Whe Adven re tu Begin re s!

Blessed Sacrament Catholic Elementary / Middle School, LLC Series #201

Academic Preparation for Kindergarten

Integrated & Structured Curriculum

Thematic Units

Language & Literacy, Mathematics, Science & Social Studies

Break Exposure School to Spanish, Music,Camps PE, Library, Computers

Drop Off Childcare Whole Group, Small Group, Center Activities

801-572-5311

Engaging Activities & Creative Opportunities

www.blessedsacschool.org

A State-Licensed Hourly Childcare Facility

1526 Ute Blvd., Park City, Utah  Exploration, Problem Solving, Guided (435) 214-7451 MonkeyMountain.com

Discovery

E

E PRESCH AT

T OF S BES T

Open 7 Days/Week

L

12 & 2013 20

Drop In Play • Parties

Enroll Today . VOT

D OO 3-year old Program - Grade 8

1745 East 9800 South, Sandy, 84092

SIGN UP FOR OUR SUMMER FUN ‘N SUN CAMP TODAY! AUG/SEPT JUNE/JULY2013 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM UTAHFAMILY.COM 41 25


A Deeper Look

facilities’ funds for the children she watches

to check on their ongoing cases and see what

cont. from pg. 40

and feeds, and she hates watching the

may be missing/needed from their file. That’s

parents struggle to maintain their assistance.

great for individuals that have access to the

Her very diligent efforts have attracted

internet – but far more difficult for others

attention – and help.

like Alamos. “If I’m lucky enough to get off of

for their staff. I can talk to one caseworker about my case who decides one thing, and

Utah Private Child Care Association

work before the library closes, get all three

then the next caseworker will claim the

Executive Director Johnny Anderson is deeply

of my young children rounded up and on the

first decision was wrong and completely

entrenched in this situation. The owner of

bus in time, I might get access to the internet

change it.” Once, Alamos’ case was closed

seven child care facilities himself, he is aware

through the library’s computers. And only if

because the caseworker calculated her

of the nuances of the DWS. “The Department

I can keep my children quiet and occupied

income improperly. She took time off work

of Workforce Services has a lot of really good

long enough to check it.” She considers the

to go in and find out how to fix the situation.

people working for them – but they also

internet, like TV, to be a luxury. Often she

A different caseworker decided the first

have a LOT of cases.” Anderson and Tilley

can’t even afford to keep her phone active.

caseworker was inaccurate, and adjusted

have been business colleagues for the past

Jane, however, uses myCase regularly and

her assistance level. A few months later?

27 years, and have worked together on the

appreciates the chat capabilities.

Yet another caseworker decided the last

Utah Private Child Care Association for the

caseworker was wrong, and her case was

past 15 years meeting with the DWS, the Utah

Communications at the DWS is very

closed again. Alamos says she never talks to

Office of Child Care and the Care About Child

concerned about cases like Jane’s and

the same caseworker twice, and they don’t

Care division, amongst many others. While

Carmen’s. “We do our best to resolve

seem to have any cohesive training. “It’s just

he acknowledges the system isn’t foolproof,

issues as they arise.” He wants the public

not fair that they can make a mistake, but I

it has made many improvements over the

to know that the DWS has made many

get penalized for it.”

years. “My advice to parents is to be vigilant,

positive changes lately. They also have a

keep copies of everything and never assume

new Executive Director, John Pierpont, who

typical, they aren’t entirely isolated incidents.

that just because the paperwork has been

is “assessing each department line by line”

Many childcare facilities are also frustrated.

submitted that it’s ‘done.’ Check online and

looking for ways to improve their services,

Deborah Tilley, owner of Tilley Time Child

keep track of your case through ‘myCase.’”

as well as visiting child care locations and

Care, has made it her personal crusade to

Kristen Floyd, Director of Utah Office of

Unfortunately, while these may not be

Joseph Demma, Director of

attending town hall meetings.

speak on behalf of day care facilities and

Child Care, agrees. “We have made many

the families they service. “As a fully licensed

online resources available to parents such

caseload, with hundreds of thousands of

provider of nearly 36 years and witnessing

as online chat and myCase access to follow

clients, with a decreasing budget.” Demma

far too many parents lose their child care,

their application process….which [also] allows

also stated that “We take the responsibility

housing and even jobs due to the current

them to check on the status of a parent’s

of assigning [designated] taxpayer money

system, I felt someone had to step up front

child care case and assist the parent with the

seriously and thoughtfully.” He explained

and insist on changes.” She likes to say that

eligibility process, [as well as] a provider help

how their internal performance review team

“Tilley Time Child Care really ‘cares about

line and a provider website.”

reported their accuracy levels were at a high

child care’!” She simply can’t sit idly by and watch the government revoke the child care

myCase, which Anderson and Floyd are referring to, is an online portal for individuals

Demma points out, “We have an increasing

of 94% - up from 83% a few years ago. While many improvements have been made, there are many more that parents and child care providers are hoping for. If

If you need child care assistance...

you find yourself in need of these services,

If you feel as though you may qualify for – or are in need of – government assistance for child care please visit jobs.utah.gov/customereducation/services/childcare/index.html or give them a call at 801.526.0950 within the Salt Lake Area, or 866.435.7414 if you’re outside the Salt Lake Area. Their call center hours are from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and they have many online tools to see if you qualify – and what you may qualify for. And always:

a few things you can do to help ensure you

• Do as much research as possible on your options

temporary financial help of the state.” Jane

• Keep copies of everything • Check your case often either through myCase, on the phone, or via regular mail

or think you may qualify for them, there are get the best possible outcome. Please see our sidebar for advice and step-by-step details. For now, Jane does her very best to stay positive. “At least this service exists. I don’t know what I would do if I didn’t have the hopes to increase her education and wean herself off state assistance as soon as she can. Alamos, like Tilley, attends town hall

• Don’t assume anything – confirm receipt of all necessary documents

meetings and helps wherever, whenever she

• Write everything down: who you talked to, what they said, when you called

can to make the system more communicative

• Communicate well with your child care provider and your case worker • Be honest and upfront If you feel as though your needs are not being met through your caseworker, Joseph Demma encourages you to call the Executive Director’s office.

and viable. For a more in-depth article, with interviews, advice for parents, and an update on Jane and her four kids, please go to utahfamily.com. *Not her real name. Jane was fearful of overall retribution for speaking out publicly.

42 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013


C

hil

r a dc

e

Very State-of-the-Art Facility with Spacious Learning Environments, Play Areas and TopNotch Safety Features

T y im e li l

Specialized Programs for Every Age Group Including Infants Preschool, Kingergarten and School-age

e

T

Sign Language, Spanish, Music, Science, Food Experiences, Arts & Crafts all included in our preschool program

Professional Planned Curriculum with Activities Used in or Approved by N.A.E.Y.C., Head Start and 4-H Programs

Specialized Programs Include Summer Camp, Parents’ Night Out, School Transportation School-Age Field Trips, Dance, and More

We Are Utah’s Only 24-Hour Facility Tilley Time Child Care has been in business since 1986 and is one of the largest centers in the State of Utah

4579 S. 1175 West in Taylorsville

801-265-2489 • www.tilleytimechildcare.com

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 43


Family Finance By Kimberly Carlson

Late to the College Money Game Isn’t Game Over As my not-so-small children head out the door for their first day of school with new backpacks – filled with new school necessities – I can’t help but add up the costs in my head: new shirts, new pants, new shoes, new binders, new calculators, etc. Even “new to me” items were tallied up alongside the costs of lunches and field trips and books. This year, something new has been added to this “list of new” – the biggest sticker price of all – and something I am not ready for: college. As far as I can tell, there are two college camps for parents: the We’ve Already Started a Savings Plan camp that seems to start in vitro, and the We Have Years Before We Have To Worry camp where the parents either can’t (or don’t) start saving for their children’s college fund and one day realize that their son can look you straight in the eye without standing on the couch first (and where did that voice come from?). Guess which camp I belong to?

It’s Never Too Late No matter how close college looms in the not-so-distant future, it’s never too late to start saving. “Start saving now in a 529 college savings account. It is never too late. Small amounts can be contributed to the Utah Educational Savings Plan and may be eligible for a Utah state income tax credit which helps maximize the investment,” says Lynne Ward, executive director of the Utah Educational Savings Plan. But what if your teen is a junior or senior in high school already? What then? I’m no rocket scientist (hence the lack of college fund for my children), but I know I won’t be able to put in enough money in a year or two to cover four or more years of college for my son.

Attack Plan Rachel Cruze, daughter of Dave Ramsey and author of The Graduate’s Survival Guide, says all students can go to college and graduate debtfree no matter how much money you have right now. She recommends parents and teens sit down together and make a realistic plan. “Find out how much money both you and your child have slated for college. See how much time you both have to save, and how much money you think you can set aside before

44 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

college begins.” If that amount is zero (or feels like it anyway), don’t be disheartened! There are several options out there:

Scholarships and Grants Scholarships, grants and some types of financial aid are available to all if you’re willing to put in a bit of time and effort to find and apply for them. FAFSAs are difficult and dreary, but they are a good life lesson as well. “Any amount is worth applying for. Even if it’s just $200. That’s $200 more than you had the week before!” Cruze advises. Make sure your student reads the fine print, too. “Some grants you actually have to pay back if you fail a class or drop out of school,” said Ramsey.

Stay in State Cruze also advises your teen start out in a community college or in-state college. The sticker price will be significantly lower, and if the community college works well with the local university, all of their credits will transfer. “No one will care which college you started out at. In fact, many won’t care which one you’ve graduated from. They just want to see that you’ve graduated,” says Cruze.

Work Study There are many colleges that have part-time work study programs and Residential Advisor positions to supplement your student’s (non) income status. In her supplemental DVD, Cruze highlights how those students who worked their way through college not only graduated

Simple Suggestions Seniors: find out when you can hand in your FAFSA application online. Start applying for RA and work study programs. Juniors: this is your year to apply to scholarships and grants! Make this year count – find one per week to apply to until summertime – then amp it up to one per day. Sophomores: try to find a part-time job or volunteer where there are scholarship

debt-free, but tended to have higher grades than non-working students. They had a better work ethic when they graduated, too. “I always encourage students to work their butts off for 4 years now so they have 40 years of their life to do what they want to do.”

No Student Loans “There is no case in which a parent should co-sign for a student loan.” Cruze recognizes that our current instant-gratification culture is a breeding ground for credit card debt and it’s very tempting to just sign on the dotted line and voila! School is paid for… until you graduate, or drop out. Then what? Even if you start a 529 plan while your teen is a senior in high school, contributions can still be made by the parents, grandparents, even the student while s/he attends college! In fact, Utah taxpayers may still receive the Utah state income tax credit on contributions for the life of the account so long as the beneficiary was younger than 19 when it was created. And parents can always change the beneficiary after their child graduates from college – giving younger siblings (or even you!) access to leftover funds. It’s never too late to invest in your child’s future.

opportunities – and a very nice letter of recommendation. Freshmen: save, save, save! You still have time to set aside money in a savvy way. Help contributing with a 529 plan, start saving that babysitting money; talk about what is a need versus a want. Younger: learn just how far your dollar will stretch. Ask how much it costs to run your family’s household and see if the job you want in the future will cover the costs.


“Discover the Power of Your Own Potential”

Invest in Your Child’s Future Now Enrolling Kindergarten and Preschool Students for 2012-13 EXCEPTIONAL FACULTY SMALL CLASS SIZES

TUITION-FREE PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL INQUIRY-BASED INSTRUCTION UTILIZING NATURE AND THE OUTDOORS, TECHNOLOGIES, MEDIA, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

SAFE AND NURTURING COMMUNITY RESEARCH-BASED EARLY READING PROGRAM 1480 East 9400 South, Sandy, Utah 801.816.2203 www.waterfordschool.org

4199 Kilby Road, Park City, Utah 435.575.5411 wsdpc.org

Daily bus service from Park City and SLC

AUG/SEPT JULY2013 2012 UTAHFAMILY.COM utahfamily.com 45 19


The Family Pet By Kimberly Carlson

Urban Farming Yes, you’re in the right section. This IS about the family pet… sort of. You see, when my mom was a little girl, her father gave her a bunny. She loved that bunny. She named him and fed him and played with him after school. Until one fateful day….fluffy became food; rabbit stew to be exact. This was fine; until my grandfather informed my mother exactly who she was eating. With the emergence of urban farming and an intrinsic desire to teach our children where their food comes from, more and more Utahns are expanding on their backyard gardens to having chicken coops, goats, beehives and more. This is great for our ecology and – in theory – our family’s economy, but is it beneficial or harmful to our children who see these animals as pets and not food?

“the practice of cultivating, processing, and distributing food in or around a village, town, or city.” Specifically, it means harvesting food in your own backyard – be it from a garden or an animal.

Who? Many Utahns have been exploring this concept. Aimee C., mother of three in Sandy, said “Honestly I thought it would be a fun experience for our family. We have a garden every summer and some fruit trees but wanted to take it up a notch and have our own farm fresh eggs as well.” Christina B., mother of three in N. Salt Lake said “My husband always wanted to grow up on a farm, so this is our way of giving our children a ‘taste of farm life’ by having goats and chickens.”

Where? What? As defined by Wikipedia, urban farming is

Urban farming is just that: urban. Small backyards mean small spaces and smaller

Starting Your Own Urban Farm Here is a list of helpful websites of local companies and resources to get you on your way to your own urban farm. Urban Initiative Program (UIP) urbanfarming.slco.org Start here! The UIP was created by Salt Lake County. They have a handbook with guidelines and rules about urban farming. It will teach you everything you need to know about laws and proper care for your urban farm. B.U.G. Farms - backyardurbangardens.com This local Salt Lake and online community provides you with all the knowledge you need to get started on your own urban farm. From newsletters, to communitysupported agricultural tips, anecdotes and recipes, they have everything the urban farmer would ever want to know!

Just Add Chickens – justaddchickens.com Located in Salt Lake City, Joe is happy to answer anyone’s questions about chickens, coops, costs and care. Plus, his

46 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

chicken coops are attractive and childfriendly (just like Joe!). Jones Bee – jonesbee.com They are more than just a beekeeper’s supply store. They have an online community bulletin board, sell local honey, soap, lotions and more, and provide a free service to other local beekeepers: you can post or purchase slightly used equipment on their site. Drake Family Farms drakefamilyfarms.com Originally from West Jordan, the Drake family has all things goats! You can purchase their animals, or goat byproducts. Rockin E Country Stores rockinecountrystores.com Rockin E has been in Woods Cross since 2003. They are dedicated to providing the best products and knowledge for all things pet-, livestock-, workwear-, lawnand garden-related.

animals. Christina B.’s backyard is barely large enough to house their chicken coop and space for their goats. “But it’s worth it to see the kids learning a sense of responsibility and care,” she says. Most families have put their coops or beehives or pens as far away from the house as possible.

Why? Aimee C. summed it up nicely: both families were motivated by giving their children “a taste of what it is like to grow and harvest foods they can eat right off the vine or from the coop to the pan.” And, for both families, their children have grown quite attached to the animals they are tending.

Payoff? Everyone I asked said the same thing: it was not very cost effective to have chickens, pigs, beehives or goats, etc. They spent quite a bit of cost and time in upkeep. But the payoff? “The eggs laid by our hens taste nothing like those in the store. We get brown and blue eggs and the yolks are a bright orange and full of flavor,” exclaims Aimee C. see page 61


Ready… Set… StRut! Last year’s strut was so much fun… let’s do it again! Saturday, September 21, 2013 Liberty Park, 600 E 900 S, Salt Lake City Registration: 9 a.m.

Join Best Friends Animal Society for the famous Salt Lake City dog walk that saves the lives of homeless pets. After the strut, we’ll have a festival in your honor — featuring food, games, entertainment and more.

Strut your Mutt and help Save them all

tM

Visit strutyourmutt.org Presented by Best Friends Animal Society. Special thanks to our sponsors:

Hey Neighbor, can I borrow a cup of catnip? Come meet our cutest new neighbors!

Best Friends Pet Adoption Center in Sugar House ®

2005 South 1100 East Salt Lake City, Utah 84106 bestfriends.org/utah

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 47


No-Bored-Kids Calendar August 14 Wednesday Off To School Storytime Celebration: A special preschool storytime for kids who will be graduating to preschool and kindergarten and welcome new and continuing friends for another year. Stories, songs and other fun surprises. Ages 3-5. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 10 a.m.; Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 11 a.m.; Sweet Library, 455 F St., 11 a.m. Playtime Fun: Bring your kids to play with toys, games and do a coloring activity while you sit back and take it easy. Ages 1-5. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Music And Movement: Be prepared to be active in this fun and simple program. Suitable for ages 1 and up. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Herriman Library, 5380 W. Herriman Main St., 10:3011 a.m. Drop-In Preschool Storytime: Stories, music, activities and crafts. Ages 3-5. Ruth Vine Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., 10:30-11 a.m. Little Spelunkers Storytime: Stories, games, crafts and more all related to the theme Dig Into Reading. Ages 0-4. Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 10:30-11:30 a.m. Utah Stix Jugglers: Family entertainment with freestyle juggling moves and juggling demonstrations. Whitmore Library, 2197 E. Ft. Union Blvd., 10:30-11:30 a.m. Fireman’s Squirt: The Murray Fire Department will spray their hoses on the crowd at the Murray Park Softball Field. Wear your swim suit. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 11-11:30 a.m. Natural History Museum Event: Join the Natural history Museum of Utah in very exciting adventures with archeology, geology and paleontology. Drop in between 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way.

Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., 6-8:30 p.m. La Hora Del Cuento: Spanish/English fun with stories, songs and more. Vengamos por diversiones en español y inglés con cuentos, canciones y mas. Calvin S. Smith Library, 810 E. 3300 South, 7-7:40 p.m. Rhythms At Riverside: Enjoy great local music and beautiful summer evenings outside the library. Jazz Brulee. DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 7:30 p.m.

Sensory School Age Fun: Special needs program for older children and teens. Siblings welcome. Parental attendance required. Ages 6-18. Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 2-3 p.m.

Night With Utah Symphony And Opera: Share the emotion and expressiveness of classical music with a free performance by the Utah Symphony and Opera. Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main St., 8-10 p.m.

Big Diggers Activity Club: Stories, games and crafts for kids grades K-6th. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 2-3 p.m.

15 Thursday

Your Library, Dig It!: Fun and games celebrating the summer library program. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 2-3 p.m. We Dig Dinosaurs: Fun time with dinorrific games and activities. Draper Library, 1136 E. Pioneer Rd., 3-4 p.m. Family Movie Night: Free. Ruth Vine 48 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

Off To School Storytime Celebration: A special preschool storytime for kids who will be graduating to preschool and kindergarten and welcome new and continuing friends for another year. Stories, songs and other fun surprises. Ages 3-5. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 10 a.m. Also at Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 11 a.m. Kids Club: A great opportunity for your child to learn in a fun, interactive

setting. The South Towne Center teamed up with National Geographic Kids to create activities and games that focus on discovery through play. Details at mallkidsclub.com/southtownecenter. South Towne Center Mall, 10450 S. State St., 10 a.m. Playtime Fun: Bring your kids to play with toys, games and do a coloring activity while you sit back and take it easy. Ages 1-5. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:30-11:30 a.m. I Dig Reading Magic Show: A stuffed bunny becomes a real live bunny, just as in the story of The Velveteen Rabbit. A visit from the only spider who can SPELL, Charlotte from Charlotte’s Web is quite a surprise. The Secret Garden comes to life to music while gorgeous flowers constantly bloom and disappear. Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 2-3 p.m. Twilight Concert Series: Twilight market opens at 5 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. $5 purchased at twilightconcertseries.com or at gates. Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, 5 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park: Bring your family for some fun performances at the amphitheater this summer. Ticket info at murray.utah.gov or 801264-2614. Oklahoma! Presented by

special arrangement with Rodgers and Hammerstein. Tickets $8/adult, $6/child and senior. Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 8 p.m.

16 Friday Shakespeare Festival For Kids: For kids and adults with short attention spans. Using Shakespeare’s words, they trim, clarify and explain his stories in a way that will entertain everyone. Plays include The Tempest, Much Ado About Nothing, Breakfast with Shakespeare and The Green Show, which is free. Tickets start at $7 at uctheatre.org. The Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State St. Folklore Fun For Kids: Musicians and dancers from around the world will demonstrate their dances in full costume. South Jordan Library, 10673 S. Redwood Rd., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Off To School Storytime Celebration: A special preschool storytime for kids who will be graduating to preschool and kindergarten and welcome new and continuing friends for another year. Stories, songs and other fun surprises. Ages 3-5. Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 11 a.m. Folklore Fun For Kids: Musicians and dancers from around the world will


1-mile run. $5/child, $7/adult, members free. Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Scientist In The Spotlight: What is it really like to be a scientist? Meet local researchers and explore current science through hands-on activities and demonstration. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-4 p.m.

Donuts With Dad Storytime: Bring Dad or Grandpa to the library for stories, songs, activities and donuts. Ages 0-7. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 10:30-11 a.m.

Folklore Fun For Kids: Musicians and dancers from around the world will demonstrate their dances in full costume. Herriman Library, 5380 W. Herriman Main St., 2:30-3:30 p.m. Advanced Spelunkers: Stories, games, crafts and more all related to the theme Dig Into Reading. Ages 8-11. Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 3-4 p.m. Mini Drive-In Movie: Let your child’s imagination run wild as they decorate a car in preparation for a drive-in movie. Short animated adaptations of children’s books will be shown and popcorn provided. Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 4-5 p.m. Millcreek Venture Out!: Live music, great food, an amazing farmers’ market, arts and crafts, outdoor recreation activities plus an outdoor movie under the stars. Events start at 5 p.m. with the movie beginning at dusk. Schedule at MillcreekVentureOut. org. Watch Cars, rated G. Big Cottonwood Park, 4300 S. 1300 East, 5 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park: Bring your family for some fun performances at the amphitheater this summer. Ticket info at murray.utah.gov or 801264-2614. Oklahoma! Presented by special arrangement with Rodgers and Hammerstein. Tickets $8/adult, $6/child and senior. Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 8 p.m. Star Party: See the wonders of the universe through telescopes provided by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/calendar.asp. Dusk to 11 p.m. Harmon’s Taylorsville, 5400 South Redwood Rd., 9 p.m.

17 Saturday Shakespeare Festival For Kids: For kids and adults with short attention spans. Using Shakespeare’s words, they trim, clarify and explain his stories in a way that will entertain everyone. Plays include The Tempest, Much Ado About Nothing, Breakfast with Shakespeare and The Green Show, which is free. Tickets start at $7 at uctheatre.org. The Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State St. Pro Motocross Championship: Featuring the best motocross racers in the world as they race on a newly-built, national-caliber motocross track. Tickets $40, $20/ages 6-11 at millermotorsportspark.com. Miller Motorsports Park, 2901 N. Sheep Lane, 9 a.m. Pig N Pork Day: Have a hog-wild day as you enjoy food, games, crafts and activities designed around our little oinkers. Plus there is The Squealer kids’

Read To The Dogs: Read to a gentle and well-trained intermountain therapy animals R.E.A.D. dog. Draper Library, 1136 E. Pioneer Rd., 10:30 a.m.-noon. Third Saturdays: Free activities for families. Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Dr., 1-4 p.m. Cozy Cat Afternoon: Kids practice reading to a fuzzy friend in a nonthreatening environment. Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 1-3 p.m. Movie Matinee: Enjoy a family friendly movie. Watch Jurassic Park, rated PG-13. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 2-4 p.m. Utah’s Animals: Get up close and personal with Utah’s animals. An introduction to Utah’s animals is also a perfect introduction to the biological and ecological concepts they represent. Included in admission. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-3 p.m. Party In The Garden Park: Celebrate the grand opening of the Education Center with an evening of live music, delicious food and activities for every member of the family. Free. Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District, 8275 S. 1300 West, 4-9 p.m.

T

demonstrate their dances in full costume. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 1-3 p.m.

H

E

A HE

A RT

S ND

OUL

OF THE COMMUNI TY

ONT H FR

meet a

r e m r a F

C

AT WAS

Fridays

Thanksgiving Point 3003 N. Thankgiving Lehi, Utah July-September, 10am-2pm Millcreek Market & MOVIE June-August, 5pm-10pm For locations, visit: www.millcreekoutdoors.org

SATURDAYS Gardner Village

1100 W. 7800 S. West Jordan, UT June-October, 9am-2pm *Breakfast served 8am-12pm

SUNDAYS

Wasatch

Wheeler Farm

6351 S. 900 E. Murray, UT June-October, 9am-2pm *Breakfast served 8am-12pm

Grammy’s Fruit & Produce - Willard, UT

Store 5823 S. State St. Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-5:30pm 801.718.5622 wasatchfrontfarmersmarket.org

Music On The Island, Pink Mountain Duo: Free concert with paid admission to the park. Info at 801-721-9569. Antelope Island State Park, 4528 W. 1700 South, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park: Bring your family for some fun performances at the amphitheater this summer. Ticket info at murray.utah.gov or 801264-2614. Oklahoma! Presented by special arrangement with Rodgers and Hammerstein. Tickets $8/adult, $6/child and senior. Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 8 p.m. Summer Stargazers: Join local astronomers for an informative presentation followed by a ride to the top of Hidden Peak via Snowbird’s Aerial Tram. From there, you will enjoy an unobstructed view of the evening skies through high-powered telescopes. $18 adults, $12 children 12 & under. Snowbird, Highway 210, Little Cottonwood Canyon, 8:15 p.m. Star Party: See the wonders of the universe through telescopes provided by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/calendar.asp. Dusk to 11 p.m. Stansbury Park Observatory Complex, State Road 138, 9 p.m.

19 Monday

Discover distant planets. Bring your own little earthlings.

110 S. 400 W. SLC • 385-468-STAR clarkplanetarium.org

Family Movie Night: Free. Watch Journey 2, The Mysterious Island, rated PG. AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 49


No-Bored-Kids Calendar Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 6-8 p.m.

Bedtime Math Ages 6-9: Math activities to get kids thinking. Each child receives a take-home kit, so registration is required. Ages 6-9. Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 6:30-7:30 p.m.

210 E. 400 South, 7 p.m.

Utah Stix Jugglers: Family entertainment with freestyle juggling moves and juggling demonstrations. South Jordan Library, 10673 S. Redwood Rd., 7-8 p.m.

21 Wednesday

Great Reads For Girls: Wonderful books to read and discuss. Girls 8-12 with caring adult. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 7-8 p.m.

Movin’ And Groovin’: Dance, move and rock out with Miss Carolyn. Especially for young kids. Ages 3-9. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:30-11 a.m.

Space Adventure Puppet Show: Blast off with a fearless astronaut for an unknown and distant planet inhabited by aliens, space worms and monsters. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 7-8 p.m.

Let’s Make Music: Sing, dance, laugh, play rhythm instruments and have fun. Ages 0-4. Registration required by calling 801-944-7579 or at the children’s desk. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 10:3011:15 a.m.

I Dig Reading Magic Show: A stuffed bunny becomes a real live bunny, just as in the story of The Velveteen Rabbit. A visit from the only spider who can SPELL, Charlotte from Charlotte’s Web is quite a surprise. The Secret Garden comes to life to music while gorgeous flowers constantly bloom and disappear. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 7-8 p.m.

Take A Movie Journey: Journey to another land with the Muppet’s Wizard of Oz. Columbus Library, 2530 S. 500 East, 5-7 p.m.

Monday Nights At The Library: Bring the whole family for shows, movies, crafts and more. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 7-8 p.m.

22 Thursday

World Stage Summer Concert Series: Free concert series. Featuring Asante African Performing Arts. Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 8 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park: Bring your family for some fun performances at the amphitheater this summer. Ticket info at murray.utah.gov or 801264-2614. Oklahoma! Presented by special arrangement with Rodgers and Hammerstein. Tickets $8/adult, $6/child and senior. Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 8 p.m.

20 Tuesday Movin’ And Groovin’: Dance, move and rock out with Miss Carolyn. Especially for young kids. Ages 3-9. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:30-11 a.m. Let’s Make Music: Sing, dance, laugh, play rhythm instruments and have fun. Ages 0-4. Registration required by calling 801-944-7579 or at the children’s desk. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 10:3011:15 a.m. Drop-In Craft: Make a pierced sun catcher. Ruth Vine Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., 2-7 p.m. Millcreek Chess Club: Chess for all ages. Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 3-5 p.m. Utah Film Center Movie Screenings: The world of film comes to local audiences through free community screenings with the best documentary, independent and dramatic cinema year-round. Film info at utahfilmcenter.org. Watch Beyond Right and Wrong, Stories of Justice and Forgiveness, not rated. SLC Main Library, 50 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

American Girl Club: Join in discussing all things American Girl. Bring a friend, your doll and have fun. Barnes and Noble West Jordan, 7157 Plaza Center Dr., 7 p.m.

Movin’ And Groovin’: Dance, move and rock out with Miss Carolyn. Especially for young kids. Ages 3-9. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:30-11 a.m. Chickadee Society: Designed for the emergent reader. Includes science-themed stories, hands-on activities, movement activities and gallery exploration. Included in museum admission. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 11 a.m. Mad Science For Kids: Elementary age kids learn through fun, hands-on science experiments. Hunter Library, 4740 W. 4100 South, 3-4 p.m. Twilight Concert Series: Twilight market opens at 5 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. $5 purchased at twilightconcertseries.com or at gates. Kid Cudi. Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, 5 p.m. Amigos Y Libros: Spanish/English fun with stories, songs and more. Vengamos por diversiones en español y inglés con cuentos, canciones y mas. West Jordan Library, 1825 W. 8030 South, 7-8 p.m. American Girl Club: Join in discussing all things American Girl. Bring a friend, your doll and have fun. Barnes and Noble South Towne Marketplace, 10180 S. State St., 7 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park: Bring your family for some fun performances at the amphitheater this summer. Ticket info at murray.utah.gov or 801264-2614. Oklahoma! Presented by special arrangement with Rodgers and Hammerstein. Tickets $8/adult, $6/child and senior. Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 8 p.m.

23 Friday Shakespeare Festival For Kids: For

kids and adults with short attention spans. Using Shakespeare’s words, they trim, clarify and explain his stories in a way that will entertain everyone. Plays include The Tempest, Much Ado About Nothing, Breakfast with Shakespeare and The Green Show, which is free. Tickets start at $7 at uctheatre.org. The Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State St. Family Storytime: Stories to bring the whole family together. Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 2 p.m. Science In Your Kitchen: Amazing scientific reactions are happening every day in your own kitchen that you don’t even notice. Learn about states of matter and watch some fun experiments. Finish with a take-home experiment of the sidewalk chalk you created together. Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 3-4 p.m. End Of Summer Bash: A health and safety fair including police and fire displays, K-9 demonstrations, health and safety vendor booths, food booths, free games and hot dogs (while supplies last), live music, zumba and a movie at dark. Heritage Park, 10800 S. Redwood Rd., 6 p.m.

Conservation In Concert: Enjoy free concerts located in the heart of Sugar House. Grab a basket, a blanket and the kids. Schedule at utahopenlands.org/ index_files/Page663.htm. Folk Hogan. Hidden Hollow Natural Area, 2150 S. 1100 East, 6:30 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park: Bring your family for some fun performances at the amphitheater this summer. Ticket info at murray.utah.gov or 801264-2614. Oklahoma! Presented by special arrangement with Rodgers and Hammerstein. Tickets $8/adult, $6/child and senior. Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 8 p.m.

24 Saturday Shakespeare Festival For Kids: For kids and adults with short attention spans. Using Shakespeare’s words, they trim, clarify and explain his stories in a way that will entertain everyone. Plays include The Tempest, Much Ado About Nothing, Breakfast with Shakespeare and The Green Show, which is free. Tickets start at $7 at uctheatre.org. The Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State St.

a.m.-4 p.m.

When I Grow Up Kids’ Job Fair: When I grow up, I want to be...a fireman. No...a ballerina. No...a paleontologist. Meet the people with these careers at the fun kids’ job fair. Plus see big trucks, participate in fun activities and enjoy performances. Dream big about your future. Viridian Event Center, 1825 W. 8030 South, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Bug Brigade: Millipedes, cockroaches and tarantulas might seem creepy, but spend some time with these creatures and you’ll see just how incredible they are. Learn all about bugs’ anatomy, behavior and impact on the environment. All ages. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-4 p.m. Reading You Can Dig It Magic Show: Sharpen up your digging tools and get ready for a magical adventure into all things Dig-able. Free magic tricks for the children. Ruth Vine Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., 2-6 p.m. Cowboy Poetry Series: A fun-filled experience featuring poet Stan Tixier. Info at 801-649-5742. Park entrance fees apply. Antelope Island State Park, 4528 W. 1700 South, 4-5 p.m. Summer Stargazers: Join local astronomers for an informative presentation followed by a ride to the top of Hidden Peak via Snowbird’s Aerial Tram. From there, you will enjoy an unobstructed view of the evening skies through high-powered telescopes. $18 adults, $12 children 12 & under. Snowbird, Highway 210, Little Cottonwood Canyon, 8 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park: Bring your family for some fun performances at the amphitheater this summer. Ticket info at murray.utah.gov or 801264-2614. Oklahoma! Presented by special arrangement with Rodgers and Hammerstein. Tickets $8/adult, $6/child and senior. Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 8 p.m. Golden Sun And Polytype: Local group whose approach to musical creation lends itself well to listener response in both the recorded realm and live performances. Tickets $10 at sandyarts.com. Sandy Amphitheater, 1245 E. 9400 South, 8 p.m.

26 Monday

Sun Party: Explore the closest star with special telescopes that allow for safe viewing of the sun. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/ calendar.asp. Winchester Park, 6400 S. 1100 West, 9-11 a.m.

Family Art Night: A free, fun and educational evening for family members of all ages to experience art. Tour the gallery, talk to artists about current exhibits and do a hands-on art activity you can take home. Light refreshments will be served. Bountiful Davis Arts Center, 745 S. Main St., 7-8:30 p.m.

Fielding Garr Birthday Celebration: Celebrate Fielding Garr’s 219 birthday with guided tours of the ranch, pioneer games, a lecture on Fielding Garr and wood processing demonstrations. Not all activities run throughout the day. Info and schedule at 801-649-5742. Antelope Island State Park, 4528 W. 1700 South, 10

I Dig Reading Magic Show: A stuffed bunny becomes a real live bunny, just as in the story of The Velveteen Rabbit. A visit from the only spider who can SPELL, Charlotte from Charlotte’s Web is quite a surprise. The Secret Garden comes to life to music while gorgeous flowers constantly bloom and disappear. Magna Library, 2675


Farmers’ Markets By Maryann Alston

If your goal is to offer your family more fresh fruits, produce, and perhaps organic meats and cheeses, visit one of the many farmers’ markets in our area. Take the children along! Many markets offer children’s activities, entertainment, and chances are, if you let your kids pick out their own fruits and veggies, they’ll actually eat them. Many farmers’ markets along the Wasatch Front are open rain or shine, and host a number of local farmers, food artisans, artists, prepared food vendors, and musicians. Come out and see what Utah has to offer, visit a farmers’ market!

Tuesdays

Tuesday Harvest Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, SLC Now-Oct. 22, 4 p.m.-dusk slcfarmersmarket.org The Downtown Farmers’ Market now offers a mid-week option for buying fresh produce and other food in addition to some great arts and services. West Jordan Farmers’ Market Jordan School District, 7875 S. Redwood Rd., West Jordan Now-Sept., 5 p.m.-dusk

Wednesdays

Park City Farmers’ Market Canyons Resort, 4000 Canyons Resort Dr., Park City Now-Oct., noon-6 p.m. parkcityfarmersmarket.com Visit the Cabriolet parking lot for fresh produce, fresh baked bread, music and arts and crafts from local vendors. The Cabriolet lift will be open to take guests into the Resort Village.

Thursdays

University of Utah Farmers’ Market University Tanner Plaza, 201 S. 1460 East, Salt Lake City Aug., 22-Oct., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. facebook.com, search for University of Utah Farmers Market Local produce and food with the starving college student in mind, but

everyone is welcome. Special events and entertainment make this market healthy and fun.

Fridays

Murray Park Farmers’ Market 296 E. Murray Park Ave., Murray Aug.-Oct., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Offering an assortment of organic food, vegetables and fruits. Sugar House Farmers’ Market Sugar House Park, 2100 S. 1400 East, Salt Lake City Now-Oct. 11, 4-8 p.m. sugarhousefarmersmarket.com Kids receive the Junior Farmers Passport they can bring to each vendor to get stamped and learn about the local foods offered then turn in to receive a goody bag. Market emphasizes local farmers and ranchers while also providing arts and crafts, packaged foods and prepared food for eating on site, plus special activities for kids. Thanksgiving Point Farmers’ Market 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi Now-Sept. 27, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. wasatchfrontfarmersmarket.org Featuring the KidsMarket the last Friday of every month for kids 15 and under to sell their handmade and/or homegrown goods during regular market hours. Millcreek Market and Movie Various Parks in Millcreek Area, SLC Now-Aug. 30, 5-8 p.m. millcreekventureout.org

Held in conjunction with Millcreek Venture Out! and Millcreek Movies in the Park at various parks throughout the Millcreek Area. Enjoy entertainment, fresh produce, arts and crafts, outdoor recreation activities, plus an outdoor movie beginning at dusk.

Saturdays

Downtown Farmers’ Market Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, SLC Now-Oct., 8 a.m.-2 p.m. slcfarmersmarket.org A summer tradition for Salt Lake City residents and visitors, this market has over 250 vendors including artisans, farmers, vendors and crafts, plus prepared food vendors and live entertainment. Gardener Village Farmers’ Market 1100 W. 7800 South, West Jordan Now-Oct. 26, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. wasatchfrontfarmersmarket.org Now in its second year, this market hosts over 90 vendors and plenty of food, fun and atmosphere. With a special WitchFest market in October from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Murray Park Farmers’ Market 296 E. Murray Park Ave., Murray Aug.-Oct., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. If you missed Friday’s market, you can still get fresh produce and other offerings set in this beautiful park. South Jordan Towne Center Farmers’ Market 1600 W. Towne Center Dr., South Jordan

Aug.-Oct., 8 a.m.-2 p.m. southjordanfarmersmarket.com Shop from Utah growers and enjoy different activities every week including chalk art competition, wacky watermelon fun, chili cook off, face painting and more.

Sundays

Park Silly Sunday Market Historic Main St., Park City Now-Sept. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. parksillysundaymarket.com An eco-friendly, open-air market and street festival featuring unique and eclectic, local and regional arts and crafts, entertainment, gourmet food, produce and more. People’s Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, Salt Lake City Now-Oct., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. slcpeoplesmarket.org Featuring local produce and prepared foods, artisan products and entertainment. Each week features a different, fun event including kids’ craft day, book day, health and safety day and more. The market will also match food stamp benefits redeemed at the market (up to $10). Wheeler Farm Farmers’ Market 6351 S. 900 East, Murray Now-Oct., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. wasatchfrontfarmersmarket.org It’s not uncommon for a rooster or two to wander by while visiting this market since it takes place on a real demonstration farm that includes cows, horses, sheep, goats, chickens and much more.

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 51


No-Bored-Kids Calendar S. 8950 West, 7-8 p.m.

Pointe at 53rd, 5249 S. State St., 4 p.m.

Timpanogos Storyteller Performance: Celebrate summer with national storytellers as part of the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival. Renowned storytellers will thrill and entertain people of all ages. Viridian Event Center, 1825 W. 8030 South, 7-9 p.m.

The Rose Exposed: The 6 resident performing arts companies of the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center (the Rose) come together to offer performances, workshops, classes and more. Enjoy a variety show sampling all 6 of the resident companies for $15. Tickets available at roseXposed.org. Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 7 p.m.

Monday Nights At The Library: Bring the whole family for shows, movies, crafts and more. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 7-8 p.m. World Stage Summer Concert Series: Free concert series. Featuring Smiling Souls. Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 8 p.m.

27 Tuesday Terrific Tuesday: Enjoy an evening of exciting family fun activities including arts and crafts, guest speakers, movies, games, demonstrations and more. Free. Details at galecenter.org. Gale Center, 10300 S. Beckstead Ln., 6 p.m. Pajama Time: Stories, songs and fun for kids of all ages with a participating adult. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 7-7:30 p.m. Utah Film Center Movie Screenings: The world of film comes to local audiences through free community screenings with the best documentary, independent and dramatic cinema year-round. Film info at utahfilmcenter.org. Watch Anita, not rated. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 7 p.m. I Dig Reading Magic Show: A stuffed bunny becomes a real live bunny, just as in the story of The Velveteen Rabbit. A visit from the only spider who can SPELL, Charlotte from Charlotte’s Web is quite a surprise. The Secret Garden comes to life to music while gorgeous flowers constantly bloom and disappear. Hunter Library, 4740 W. 4100 South, 7-8 p.m.

28 Wednesday Space Adventure Puppet Show: Blast off with a fearless astronaut for an unknown and distant planet inhabited by aliens, space worms and monsters. Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Rhythms At Riverside: Enjoy great local music and beautiful summer evenings outside the library. Hindenburg Pilot. DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 7:30 p.m.

29 Thursday Twilight Concert Series: Twilight market opens at 5 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. $5 purchased at twilightconcertseries.com or at gates. Empire of the Sun. Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, 5 p.m.

30 Friday American Girl Club: Join in discussing all things American Girl. Bring a friend, your doll and have fun. Barnes and Noble The 52 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

Star Party: See the wonders of the universe through telescopes provided by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/calendar.asp. Dusk to 11 p.m. Stansbury Park Observatory Complex, State Road 138, 9 p.m.

31 Saturday The Rose Exposed: The 6 resident performing arts companies of the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center (the Rose) come together to offer performances, workshops, classes and more. Free classes, activities and performances suitable for all ages will be presented. Free, but tickets required and available at roseXposed.org along with activity schedule. Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Older Than The Stars, Geology Of Antelope Island: Spend some time in the visitor center, then venture out into the park to see many geologic features firsthand. Park entrance fees apply. Info at 810-721-9569. Antelope Island State Park, 4528 W. 1700 South, 10 a.m.-noon. Movie Matinee: Enjoy a family friendly movie. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 2-4 p.m. Star Party: See the wonders of the universe through telescopes provided by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/calendar.asp. Dusk to 11 p.m. Stansbury Park Observatory Complex, State Road 138, 9 p.m.

September 1 Sunday Salt Lake City Jazz Festival: A jampacked day of nonstop, fabulous music. Info at slcjazzfestival.org. Ticket price TBD. Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main St., 2 p.m.

com. Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, 5-8:30 p.m.

Murray Arts In The Park: Bring your family for some fun performances at the amphitheater this summer. Ticket info at murray.utah.gov or 801-264-2614. Murray Acoustic Music Festival. Produced by IAMA. Charley Simmons, Buckle Busters, Cold Creek. Tickets $5/GA. Murray Park Amphitheater, 495 E. 5300 South, 6 p.m.

3 Tuesday Toddler Time: Stories, fingerplays, songs and a playtime. Ages 6 mos.-2 yrs. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Drop-In Storytime: Stories, songs and fun. Ages 2-6. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 11-11:30 a.m. Library Explorers: Explore a new topic each month through books and fun handson activities. Ages 5-7. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 4:15-5 p.m. Pokemon/Bakugan Club: Play Pokemon, Bakugan, Legos, whatever. Bring your own game pieces. 8 yrs. and older, please. Under 12 yrs. old must be with a caring adult. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 7-8 p.m.

4 Wednesday Toddler Time: Stories, fingerplays, songs and a playtime. Ages 6 mos.-2 yrs. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Drop-In Storytime: Stories, songs and fun. Ages 2-6. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 11-11:30 a.m. Yarn Club: Fun for all experience levels and ages. Bring your own supplies. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 4-6 p.m. 75 Year Celebration Movie: Celebrate South Salt Lake’s 75th anniversary with a James Bond movie. Columbus Library, 2530 S. 500 East, 5-7 p.m. Game Night At The Library: Play board games, card games and more. Open to all ages, though children must be accompanied by an adult. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Pajama Storytime: Stories, songs and fun with or without your jammies. Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 7-7:45 p.m.

5 Thursday

2 Monday

Toddler Time: Stories, fingerplays, songs and a playtime. Ages 6 mos.-2 yrs. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:15-10:45 a.m.

Red Butte Garden Free Admission: Free admission thanks to the ZAP fund. Red Butte Garden and Arboretum, 300 Wakara Way, 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m.

After School Club: A program for school aged children. For elementary-age children. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 4-5 p.m.

Labor Day Luau: Say aloha to summer with great food, leis, tiki torches and live entertainment. Tickets $18/adult, $13/child ages 3-11, 10% off for members. Day-of $21/adult, $16/child at thanksgivingpoint.

Twilight Concert Series: Twilight market opens at 5 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. $5 purchased at twilightconcertseries.com or at gates. MGMT. Pioneer Park, 300 S. 300 West, 5 p.m.

6 Friday

Scientist In The Spotlight: What is it really like to be a scientist? Meet local researchers and explore current science through hands-on activities and demonstration. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-4 p.m. Rockin’ The Decades With The Salamanders: Featuring amazing musicians, vocalists, costume changes and choreography. Tickets start at $10 at sandyarts.com. Sandy Amphitheater, 1245 E. 9400 South, 8 p.m.

7 Saturday READ Dogs: Read to therapy dogs. Ruth Vine Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Dog Day Afternoons: Children practice reading with therapy animals in a positive, non-threatening, fun environment. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 1-2:30 p.m. Also at Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 1-2:30 p.m. International Vulture Awareness Day: Bring the kids to the aviary today to learn all about vultures through activities, shows, story times and more. Info at tracyaviary. org. Regular admission applies. Tracy Aviary, 589 E. 1300 South, 1-4 p.m. Utah’s Animals: Get up close and personal with Utah’s animals. An introduction to Utah’s animals is also a perfect introduction to the biological and ecological concepts they represent. Included in admission. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-3 p.m. Crafternoons: A monthly social and crafting event for children. New craft projects taught each month and all supplies provided. Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., 2 p.m. Anderson-Foothill Chess Club: Do you want to learn how to play chess? Do you already play and wish you had more people to play with? All ages. AndersonFoothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 4-5 p.m. Music On The Island, Red Desert Ramblers: Red Desert Ramblers, a swinging local band with national recognition, that plays bluegrass, classic country and swing music. Free with paid park admission. In the Visitor Center Amphitheater. Bring camp chairs or blankets as seating is limited. Info at 801721-9569. Antelope Island State Park, 4528 W. 1700 South, 7-8 p.m. Summer Stargazers: Join local astronomers for an informative presentation followed by a ride to the top of Hidden Peak via Snowbird’s Aerial Tram. From there, you will enjoy an unobstructed view of the evening skies through high-powered telescopes. $18 adults, $12 children 12 & under. Snowbird, Highway 210, Little Cottonwood Canyon, 7:45 p.m. The Souvenirs And The Hollering Pines:


Do you need

More time with family and

financial peace of mind?

The

S

d an

y

ar

T

Gu S

ild

PreSenTS

Tony Award winner for Best Broadway Musical!

WAH OPPORTUNITY NO cold-calling NO friends and family list NO team-building (unless you want to) NO parties NO product-purchases

AUGUST 9 -17 8pm SANDY AMPHITHEATER

For Tickets

801-568-ARTS www.sandyarts.com Vertical orientation

empoweredmommas.com (dads welcomed too!)

Horizontal orientation

Follow us on Facebook

October 4-6

Kingsbury Hall KingTix.com | (801) 581-7100 $15 Student Tickets available at Kingsbury Hall box office AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 53


No-Bored-Kids Calendar Two local groups, one country, the other Americana. Tickets $10 at sandyarts.com. Sandy Amphitheater, 1245 E. 9400 South, 8 p.m.

9 Monday Home-School Club: This club is for kids ages 5-12 who are being home-schooled. Call 801-264-2587 to register. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 1-2 p.m. Reading Rocks: Book club for boys and girls grades 4-6. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 4-5 p.m. Family Night Storytime: Enjoy stories, games, songs, crafts and other related activities. Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 6-7 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park Family Night Series: Enjoy free family-friendly entertainment the 2nd Monday of each month this summer. Murray Heritage Center, 10 E. 6150 South, 7 p.m. Charley Jenkins: A top 12 finalist on NBC’s hit show, Nashville Star. Using a mixture of songs from his three albums and personal twist on new and old hits, Charley and his band put on one heck of a show. Tickets start at $10 at sandyarts. com. Sandy Amphitheater, 1245 E. 9400 South, 8 p.m.

10 Tuesday Reading Rocks: Book club for boys and girls grades 4-6. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 4-5 p.m. No Girls Allowed: Snakes, snails and underwear tales. Worms, squirms and other fun stuff just for boys ages 7-11. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 4:10-4:55 p.m. Great Reads For Girls: Wonderful books to read and discuss. Girls 8-12 with caring adult. Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 7-8 p.m. Science Movie Night: Free movie screenings followed by lively discussion with science experts. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 7-9 p.m. Bilingual Family Night: Songs and stories for the whole family in English and in Spanish. Canciones y cuentos para toda la familia, en inglés y español. Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 7-8 p.m. Along The Wasatch: A series featuring the natural history and environment of the Wasatch. From fish to falcons, bees to bats, rocks to ringtails, each program delves into a different aspect of the wonderful place we call home. Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 7-7:45 p.m.

Reading Rocks: Book club for boys and girls grades 4-6. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 4-5 p.m.

musical instruments, dances, songs and fantastic books. Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., 11 a.m.

12 Thursday

Second Saturday Crafts: Craft-time fun. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 2-3 p.m.

Toddler Time: Stories, fingerplays, songs and a playtime. Ages 6 mos.-2 yrs. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Chickadee Society: Designed for the emergent reader. Includes science themed stories, hands-on activities, movement activities and gallery exploration. Included in museum admission. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 11 a.m. Book Dudes: An after-school program for boys ages 7-11. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 4-5 p.m.

13 Friday Book Dudes: Adventures, activities and action-packed fun geared for guys ages 6-12. A new theme each month based on books boys love. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 3-3:45 p.m. Star Party: See the wonders of the universe through telescopes provided by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/calendar.asp. Dusk to 11 p.m. Harmon’s Cougar, 4872 W. 6200 South, 9 p.m.

14 Saturday Utah Grand Prix: The thundering stock cars of NASCAR headline the premiere automobile road racing weekend, with drivers who are accustomed to turning left only trying to cope with one of America’s finest road racing tracks. Tickets $25/ Sat., $10/Sun., free/12 and under. Info at millermotorsportspark.com. Miller Motorsports Park, 2901 N. Sheep Lane. Safety Safari: Various organizations will be on the grounds to give your family tips on how to stay safe and healthy all year round. There will be games, prizes and more. Regular admission applies. Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Ring Around The Rose: Repertory Dance Theatre’s wiggle-friendly series of performances for children and families that explores the magical world of the arts, including dance, theatre, music and storytelling. $5/3 and up, 2 and under, free. Dance, draw and discover the arts with the Repertory Dance Theatre dancers and friends. Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 11 a.m.

Toddler Time: Stories, fingerplays, songs and a playtime. Ages 6 mos.-2 yrs. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:15-10:45 a.m.

Culture Crafts: Kids ages 6-12 are invited to learn about a country, its culture, facts, fables, and folklore, and make a fun craft. Registration required by calling 801-5948623. Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 11 a.m.-noon.

Drop-In Storytime: Stories, songs and fun. Ages 2-6. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 11-11:30 a.m.

Music And Movement: A lively and noisy hour aimed at toddlers, preschoolers and their caregivers to explore a variety of

11 Wednesday

54 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

Bug Brigade: Millipedes, cockroaches and tarantulas might seem creepy, but spend some time with these creatures and you’ll see just how incredible they are. Learn all about bugs’ anatomy, behavior and impact on the environment. All ages. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-4 p.m. Family Art Saturday: Children of all ages and their adult companions explore exhibitions and participate together in collaborative hands-on art making activities led by a trained educator. Free. Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 2-4 p.m. Star Party At Antelope Island: Join members of the Ogden Astronomical Society in White Rock Bay. Flashlights must have a red filter over them. Weather permitting. Park entrance fees apply. Info at 801-721-9569. Antelope Island State Park, 4528 W. 1700 South, 6:30-11 p.m. Summer Stargazers: Join local astronomers for an informative presentation followed by a ride to the top of Hidden Peak via Snowbird’s Aerial Tram. From there, you will enjoy an unobstructed view of the evening skies through high-powered telescopes. $18/ adults, $12/children 12 & under. Snowbird, Highway 210, Little Cottonwood Canyon, 7:30 p.m. Star Party: See the wonders of the universe through telescopes provided by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/calendar.asp. Dusk to 11 p.m. Stansbury Park Observatory Complex, State Road 138, 8:30 p.m.

15 Sunday Utah Grand Prix: The thundering stock cars of NASCAR headline the premiere automobile road racing weekend, with drivers who are accustomed to turning left only trying to cope with one of America’s finest road racing tracks. Tickets $25/ Sat., $10/Sun., free/12 and under. Info at millermotorsportspark.com. Miller Motorsports Park, 2901 N. Sheep Lane. Carmelite Fair: Support the monastery in this annual fair. Events include a 5K run/walk, various ethnic foods along with burgers and hot dogs, live entertainment, rides, games, crafts, live auction and prize giveaways including a 2013 Kia Soul. Info at carmelslc.org. Carmelite Monastery, 5714 Holladay Blvd., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

16 Monday Fun Day Make And Take Craft: School’s out for...the day, so come to the library to make an awesome craft. Ages 3-11. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West,

3-8 p.m.

Family Movie Night: Free. Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 6-8 p.m. Also at Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 6-8:15 p.m.

17 Tuesday Toddler Time: Stories, fingerplays, songs and a playtime. Ages 6 mos.-2 yrs. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Baby, Toddler And Me: Story, songs, fingerplays and a short playtime for your baby up to 2 yrs. Parent or caregiver must accompany children. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 10:30-11 a.m. Drop-In Storytime: Stories, songs and fun. Ages 2-6. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 11-11:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime: For children ages 3-6 yrs. with a caregiver. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 1:30-2 p.m. Drop-In Craft: Make swirly stones. Ruth Vine Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., 2-7 p.m. Millcreek Chess Club: Chess for all ages. Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 3-5 p.m. Great Reads For Girls: Wonderful books to read and discuss. Girls 8-12 with caring adult. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 7-8 p.m.

18 Wednesday Toddler Time: Stories, fingerplays, songs and a playtime. Ages 6 mos.-2 yrs. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Baby, Toddler And Me: Story, songs, fingerplays and a short playtime for your baby up to 2 yrs. Parent or caregiver must accompany children. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 10:30-11 a.m. Drop-In Storytime: Stories, songs and fun. Ages 2-6. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 11-11:30 a.m. Kidz Club: A different focus each time. This month is Superhero Training Academy. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 4-5 p.m. Book Dudes: Adventures, activities and action-packed fun geared for guys ages 6-12. A new theme each month based on books boys love. Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 4-5 p.m. Game On: Play video games, board games, card games and more. Grades K-6. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 4-5 p.m. Great Reads For Girls: Wonderful books to read and discuss. Girls 8-12 with caring adult. Draper Library, 1136 E. Pioneer Rd., 7-8 p.m. Also at Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 7-8 p.m. American Girl Club: Join in discussing all things American Girl. Bring a friend, your doll and have fun. Barnes and Noble West


Sick Days Were Made to be Taken. Season passes on sale August 23rd

Untitled-1 1

8/6/13 2:18 PM

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 55


No-Bored-Kids Calendar Jordan, 7157 Plaza Center Dr., 7 p.m.

19 Thursday Kids Club: A great opportunity for your child to learn in a fun, interactive setting. The South Towne Center teamed up with National Geographic Kids to create activities and games that focus on discovery through play. Details at mallkidsclub.com/southtownecenter. South Towne Center Mall, 10450 S. State St., 10 a.m. Baby, Toddler And Me: Story, songs, fingerplays and a short playtime for your baby up to 2 yrs. Parent or caregiver must accompany children. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 10:30-11 a.m. Preschool Storytime: For children ages 3-6 yrs. with a caregiver. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 1:30-2 p.m. No Girls Allowed: Snakes, snails and underwear tales. Worms, squirms and other fun stuff just for boys ages 7-11. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 4-5 p.m. Great Reads For Girls: Wonderful books to read and discuss. Girls 8-12 with caring adult. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 7-8:15 p.m. Great Reads For Girls: Wonderful books to read and discuss. Ages 7-11 with a caring adult. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 7-8:30 p.m.

20 Friday Scientist In The Spotlight: What is it really like to be a scientist? Meet local researchers and explore current science through hands-on activities and demonstration. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-4 p.m.

21 Saturday Strut Your Mutt: Enjoy a tail-wagging day with your dog, while raising funds to help save the lives of shelter pets in Utah. This is a leisurely fundraising dog walk followed by a doggie-themed festival that includes pet contests, photos, treats for your dogs, fun activities, refreshments and more. Registration $30/individual, $35/day-of or $50/couples, $60/day-of, $20/12 and under, $25/day-of or free without a t-shirt at strutyourmutt.org. Liberty Park, 1100 S. 600 East, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Sun Party: Explore the closest star with special telescopes that allow for safe viewing of the sun. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/ calendar.asp. Winchester Park, 6400 S. 1100 West, 9 a.m.-noon. Meet Your Best Friend At The Zoo: Cats and dogs from local adoption agencies will be at the zoo in the American Express Event Pavilion, waiting to meet their new families. Admission to the adoption event is free, Zoo admission is not included. Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 56 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

Read To The Dogs: Read to a gentle and well-trained intermountain therapy animals R.E.A.D. dog. Draper Library, 1136 E. Pioneer Rd., 10:30 a.m.-noon.

fun. Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 7-8 p.m.

What’s Up In Riverton?: Meet your local Riverton businesses and Riverton city staff. Businesses are invited to share info about themselves and give out free stuff. Refreshments, games, car show and more, all free. Riverton City Hall Park, 12830 S. 1700 West, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

The Princess And The Pea Puppet Show: Based on Hans Christian Andersen’s famous tale of a princess and a pea. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:30-11:15 a.m.

25 Wednesday

Third Saturdays: Free activities for families. Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Dr., 1-4 p.m.

Baby, Toddler And Me: Story, songs, fingerplays and a short playtime for your baby up to 2 yrs. Parent or caregiver must accompany children. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 10:30-11 a.m.

Cozy Cat Afternoon: Kids practice reading to a fuzzy friend in a nonthreatening environment. Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 1-3 p.m.

Kids Create: Create and construct beyond your wildest imagination. Grades K-6. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 4-5 p.m.

Utah’s Animals: Get up close and personal with Utah’s animals. An introduction to Utah’s animals is also a perfect introduction to the biological and ecological concepts they represent. Included in admission. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-3 p.m.

Great Reads For Girls: Wonderful books to read and discuss. Girls 8-12 with caring adult. Whitmore Library, 2197 E. Ft. Union Blvd., 7-8 p.m.

Anderson-Foothill Chess Club: Do you want to learn how to play chess? Do you already play and wish you had more people to play with? All ages. AndersonFoothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 4-5 p.m.

23 Monday Fun Flicks: It’s movie night. Draper Library, 1136 E. Pioneer Rd., 7-8:30 p.m. Family Art Night: A free, fun and educational evening for family members of all ages to experience art. Tour the gallery, talk to artists about current exhibits and do a hands-on art activity you can take home. Light refreshments will be served. Bountiful Davis Arts Center, 745 S. Main St., 7-8:30 p.m.

24 Tuesday The Princess And The Pea Puppet Show: Based on Hans Christian Andersen’s famous tale of a princess and a pea. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Baby, Toddler And Me: Story, songs, fingerplays and a short playtime for your baby up to 2 yrs. Parent or caregiver must accompany children. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 10:30-11 a.m. Preschool Storytime: For children ages 3-6 yrs. with a caregiver. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 1:30-2 p.m. Terrific Tuesday: Enjoy an evening of exciting family fun activities including arts and crafts, guest speakers, movies, games, demonstrations and more. Free. Details at galecenter.org. Gale Center, 10300 S. Beckstead Ln., 6 p.m. Great Reads For Girls: Girls ages 7-12 with a caring adult are invited for lively discussions, activities, friendships and

26 Thursday Toddler Time: Stories, fingerplays, songs and a playtime. Ages 6 mos.-2 yrs. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Baby, Toddler And Me: Story, songs, fingerplays and a short playtime for your baby up to 2 yrs. Parent or caregiver must accompany children. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 10:30-11 a.m. The Princess And The Pea Puppet Show: Based on Hans Christian Andersen’s famous tale of a princess and a pea. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 11-11:45 a.m. Chickadee Society: Designed for the emergent reader. Includes science themed stories, hands-on activities, movement activities and gallery exploration. Included in museum admission. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 11 a.m. Preschool Storytime: For children ages 3-6 yrs. with a caregiver. Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 1:30-2 p.m. Day Of The Dead Workshop: Learn about the many traditions of the Day of the Dead and make your own altar. Perfect for families and people of all ages. Free but space is limited so registration is required by Sep 19 at wvc-ut.gov/DocumentCenter/ View/6867. Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 6-8:30 p.m. American Girl Club: Join in discussing all things American Girl. Bring a friend, your doll and have fun. Barnes and Noble South Towne Marketplace, 10180 S. State St., 7 p.m.

27 Friday Family Storytime: Stories to bring the whole family together. Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 2 p.m. No Girls Allowed: Snakes, snails and underwear tales. Worms, squirms and

other fun stuff just for boys ages 7-11. Draper Library, 1136 E. Pioneer Rd., 4-5 p.m. American Girl Club: Join in discussing all things American Girl. Bring a friend, your doll and have fun. Barnes and Noble The Pointe at 53rd, 5249 S. State St., 4 p.m. Star Party: See the wonders of the universe through telescopes provided by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/calendar.asp. Dusk to 11 p.m. Stansbury Park Observatory Complex, State Road 138, 8:30 p.m.

28 Saturday Annual Sundance Harvest Market: Featuring musical entertainment, amazing food, and a myriad of artistic hand-crafted items. The brilliant fall foliage amid the splendor of Mt. Timpanogos provides a beautiful backdrop for this event. Free. Sundance Resort, 8841 N. Alpine Loop Rd., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wasatch Reptile Expo: Whether you’re interested in adding a member to your household or just want to see the creatures, this reptile expo will bring some of the top breeders in the US along with reptiles and amphibians from around the world. Tickets $8/person, free/ages 4 and under. Info at wasatchreptileexpo.com. Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Bug Brigade: Millipedes, cockroaches and tarantulas might seem creepy, but spend some time with these creatures and you’ll see just how incredible they are. Learn all about bugs’ anatomy, behavior and impact on the environment. All ages. Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 2-4 p.m. Kate DiCamillo Book Signing: Newbery Medalist author of many beloved books for young readers including The Tale of Despereaux and Because of WinnDixie will read from and sign her newest book Flora & Ulysses, The Illuminated Adventures. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 4 p.m. Star Party: See the wonders of the universe through telescopes provided by the Salt Lake Astronomical Society. Weather permitting. Please check the Salt Lake Astronomical Society’s website before going at slas.us/calendar.asp. Dusk to 11 p.m. Stansbury Park Observatory Complex, State Road 138, 8:30 p.m.

29 Sunday Wasatch Reptile Expo: Whether you’re interested in adding a member to your household or just want to see these amazing creatures, this reptile expo will bring some of the top breeders in the US along with reptiles and amphibians from around the world. Tickets $8/ person, free/ages 4 and under. Info at wasatchreptileexpo.com. Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, 10 a.m.-4


p.m.

6 mos.-3 yrs. Free. Granite Community Center, 2500 S. State, 10-11:30 a.m.

Ongoing

Two-Buck Tuesdays: Receive $2 admission for each guest at each venue including Museum of Ancient Life, Farm Country, and Thanksgiving Point Gardens with the Children’s Discovery Garden. Make a craft for $2 and get some goodies for $2. Info at thanksgivingpoint.org. Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Runs through Aug.

Mondays Music In Motion: Have fun with nursery rhymes. Ages 18 mos.-3 yrs. Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. Ready, Set, Move: Move to the beat in this program full of music and movement for ages 3-5 with a parent or caregiver. Draper Library, 1136 E. Pioneer Rd., 10:30-10:55 a.m. Runs through Aug. Dig The Beat: Music and movement storytime for babies and families. West Jordan Library, 1825 W. 8030 South, 10:30-11 a.m. Runs through Aug 12. Book Baby: Storytime for the youngest crowd. Except Sep 2. Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 11 a.m. Also at DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 11 a.m. Storytime With Phyllis: Stories and songs with beloved volunteer storyteller. Except Aug 19. Treehouse Children’s Museum, 347 22nd St., 11 a.m. Runs through Aug. Baby & Me: This storytime is for infants up to 18 mos. of age, with one caring adult per child. Except Sep 2. Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., 3:30 p.m. Monday Night Garden Adventures: Garden Adventure nights are outdoor events filled with learning opportunities and great activities for the whole family. $10/adults, $6/child (3-12), $9/seniors. Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, 5-8 p.m. Monday Night Family Night: See and touch some of the coolest reptiles on the planet. Watch an animal feeding at 7 p.m. $5/age 13 and up, $3/seniors 65+ and ages 3-12, free/2 and under. Scales & Tails, 3584 S. 1950 West #13, 5-8 p.m. Family Game Night: Enjoy an evening with your family and friends with board, card and party games. Great for all ages. Fongo Bongo Games, 1751 W. 12600 South, 6-9 p.m. Mondays In The Park: Free concerts of folk and ethnic music and dance in front of the Chase Home Museum in the middle of Liberty Park. Schedule at heritage.utah. gov/arts-and-museums/events-mondaysin-the-park. Chase Home Museum, 900 S. 700 East, 7 p.m. Runs through Aug 19. Monday Nights At The Library: Bring the whole family for shows, movies, crafts and more. Except Sep 2. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 7-8 p.m. Runs Sep 1-30.

Tuesdays Family Storytime: Enjoy fun stories and a craft. All ages invited. Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., 10 a.m. Runs through Aug. Mommy And Me Play Group: Fun activities, games and snacks for ages

Baby And Me Storytime: Rhymes, books, music and fun. Newborn to 24 mos. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 10:1510:45 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30. Book Baby: Storytime for the youngest crowd. Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 10:15 a.m. Drop-In Storytime: Stories, songs and fun. Open to all children. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. Also at West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 1:15-1:45 p.m. Runs Sep 1-30. Stop In For Stories: Fun stories and a craft for children 2-7. No registration required. Except Sep 3-6. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 10:30-11 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30. Preschool Storytime: Stories and merriment for preschoolers. AndersonFoothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 11 a.m.; Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 11 a.m.; SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 4 p.m. Pottery Barn Book Club: Weekly storytime for all ages. Members receive an official Book Club Card and will receive a special gift after attending five storytimes. Pottery Barn Kids, 602 E. 500 South, 11-11:30 a.m. Tuesday Storytime: A fun storytime for children. Barnes and Noble Sugar House, 1104 E. 2100 South, 11 a.m. Tales For Tots: A fun storytime for children typically followed by a craft activity related to the story that guests may take home. Regular admission rates apply, members are free. Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, 11 a.m.-noon. Runs through Aug. Wiggle Worms: An interactive program of stories, songs and action rhymes for infants up to 2 1/2 yrs. of age. No registration required. Except Sep 3-4. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Runs Sep 1-30. Preschool Fitness: It’s a reverse storytime. Lots of action with a story break. Adults, come ready to take part with your kids. Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 2-2:45 p.m. Runs through Aug. Music At Main: Free public concerts for all ages. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 7-9 p.m. Runs through Aug.

Wednesdays Book Baby: Storytime for the youngest crowd. Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 10 a.m.; Sweet Library, 455 F St., 10 a.m.; SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 11 a.m.; Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 4 p.m.

Preschool Storytime: Stories and merriment for preschoolers. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 10 a.m.; Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 11 a.m.; Sweet Library, 455 F St., 11 a.m.

Library, 210 E. 400 South, 10 a.m. Also at Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 11 a.m. Preschool Storytime: For children ages 3-6 yrs. with a caregiver. Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., 10 a.m.

Baby & Me: This storytime is for infants up to 18 mos. of age, with one caring adult per child. Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., 10 a.m.

Mommy And Me Play Group: Fun activities, games and snacks for ages 6 mos.-3 yrs. Free. Granite Community Center, 2500 S. State, 10-11:30 a.m.

Drop-In Storytime: Stories, songs and fun. Open to all children. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. Also at West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 11:15-11:45 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30.

Book Baby: Storytime for the youngest crowd. Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 10:15 a.m. Also at SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 11 a.m.

Stop In For Stories: Fun stories and a craft for children 2-7. No registration required. Except Sep 3-6. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 10:30-11 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30.

Stop In For Stories: Fun stories and a craft for children 2-7. No registration required. Except Sep 3-6. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 10:30-11 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30.

Drop-In Preschool Storytime: Stories, music, activities and crafts. Ages 3-5. Except Sep 4. Ruth Vine Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., 10:30-11 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30.

Toddler Time: Stories, songs and fun for all. Ages 0-2. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. Dig The Beat: Music and movement storytime for babies and families. West Jordan Library, 1825 W. 8030 South, 10:30-11 a.m. Runs through Aug 15.

Wonderful Wednesday Storytime: A fun storytime for children. Ages 4-5. Except Sep 4. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 11-11:40 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30.

Little Diggers Storytime: A fun, drop-in storytime geared for ages 5 and under but everyone is welcome. Whitmore Library, 2197 E. Ft. Union Blvd., 10:30-11 a.m. Runs through Aug.

Wonderful Wednesday Storytime: A fun storytime for children. Barnes and Noble South Towne Marketplace, 10180 S. State St., 11 a.m.

Toddler Time: For children ages 18 mos.3 yrs. with a caregiver. Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., 11 a.m.

Creative Kids: Children will explore their inner artist through creative work with a variety of materials, including paint, clay, and glue. Ages 2-5. Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 11 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Little Scientist: Children are encouraged to ask questions about nature and to seek answers through collecting things, counting and measuring, making observations, and experimenting. Ages 2-5. Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 11 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Tales For Tots: A fun storytime for children typically followed by a craft activity related to the story that guests may take home. Regular admission rates apply, members are free. Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, 11 a.m.-noon. Runs through Aug.

Storytime At King’s English: Listen to stories, meet new friends and have fun. The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 11 a.m.

Wiggle Worms: An interactive program of stories, songs and action rhymes for infants up to 2 1/2 yrs. of age. No registration required. Except Sep 3-4. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Runs Sep 1-30.

Family Nature Program: Enjoy free family-friendly entertainment at Silver Lake in Big Cottonwood Canyon. Nature puppet show at the Nature Center. Big Cottonwood Canyon, , 11-11:20 a.m. Runs through Aug.

Wild Wednesdays: Every Wednesday, learn about a different animal. Ogden Nature Center, 966 W. 12th St., 3:45 p.m. Runs through Aug.

Drop-In Storytime: Stories, songs and fun. Ages 2-6. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 11-11:30 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30.

Wednesday Crafts: For kids of all ages and their families. Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 4 p.m. Also at SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 4 p.m.

Herriman Chess Club: All ages and abilities welcome. Children under 10 need to be with an adult. Herriman Library, 5380 W. Herriman Main St., 4-6 p.m.

Grand Valley Bank Community Concert Series: Bring the family for a picnic and dancing. Free. Except July 24. Deer Valley Resort, 2250 Deer Valley Dr. South, 6-8 p.m. Runs through Aug. Concerts By The Creek: Outdoor concerts with great local musicians. Except July 24. Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 7 p.m. Runs through Aug 14.

Thursdays Preschool Storytime: Stories and merriment for preschoolers. SLC Main

Alphabet Soup: This popular program focuses on a different letter of the alphabet each week with a recipe for family literacy that includes stories and songs, theater, art, science, history, vocabulary development and more. $3/child and $1/ adult after 6 p.m. Treehouse Children’s Museum, 347 22nd St., 6-8 p.m. Newpark Concert Series: Free concerts every Thursday. Info at newparktowncenter.com. Newpark Amphitheater, 1476 Newpark Blvd., 6-8 p.m. Runs through Aug

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 57


No-Bored-Kids Calendar Family Bilingual Storytime/Hora Del Cuento Bilingue: Stories, songs and games in Spanish and English. Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 7 p.m. Jammy Time: Evening drop-in story time for kids ages 2-7 and their families. No registration required. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 7-7:30 p.m. Runs Sep 1-30, except Sep 5.

free/2 and under. Scales & Tails, 3584 S. 1950 West #13, 10 a.m.

Saturday Storytime: Fun weekly stories and activities. Barnes and Noble West Jordan, 7157 Plaza Center Dr., 11 a.m.; Barnes and Noble Ft. Union, 7119 S. 1300 East, 11 a.m.; Barnes and Noble Sugar House, 1104 E. 2100 South, 11 a.m.

Fridays

Studio 444: Little ones, older children and parents create masterpieces of art together using a wide variety of media in this half-hour workshop. Recommended for ages 4 and older. Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Stop In For Stories: Fun stories and a craft for children 2-7. No registration required. Murray Library, 166 E. 5300 South, 10:30-11 a.m. Runs Sep 1-30, except Sep 3-6.

Free Crafts For Kids: Children can make fun and free crafts. Every week a different theme. Visit Lakeshorelearning.com for additional info. Lakeshore Learning, 5480 S. 900 East, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Preschool Storytime: Stories and merriment for preschoolers. Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 11 a.m.

Storytime At King’s English: Listen to stories, meet new friends and have fun. The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 11 a.m.

Sounds Of Summer: Outdoor concert. Fun for the whole family. Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 7:30 p.m. Runs through Aug 15.

Amazing Me: Children will participate in a variety of health, safety and self-esteem building activities. Ages 3-7. Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 11 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. Storytime At King’s English: Listen to stories, meet new friends and have fun. The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 11 a.m. Family Nature Program: Enjoy free family-friendly entertainment at Silver Lake in Big Cottonwood Canyon. Nature storytime. Top of Big Cottonwood Canyon, 11-11:30 a.m. Runs through Aug. Friday Storytime: Stories, music, games and more. Barnes and Noble The Pointe at 53rd, 5249 S. State St., 1 p.m. Murray Arts In The Park Children’s Matinees: Bring the kids for some free entertainment in Pavilion #5. Schedule at murray.utah.gov. Murray Park, 202 E. Murray Park Ave., 2 p.m. Runs through Aug 8. Science Matters: Families explore evidence, conduct experiments and draw conclusions with different scientific themes. Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 2:30 and 5 p.m. Friday Afternoon Movies: Enjoy a different children’s film each Friday. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 3 p.m. Studio 444: Little ones, older children and parents create masterpieces of art together using a wide variety of media in this half-hour workshop. Recommended for ages 4 and older. Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 4 p.m. Kids Gaming: Kids under 12 can come play Wii. Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 4-5 p.m.

Saturdays Saturday Safari: See and touch some of the coolest reptiles on the planet. $5/age 13 and up, $3/seniors 65+ and ages 3-12, 58 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

Science Saturday: Investigate the world around you with a different science program or experiment each week. Elementary ages. Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 11 a.m.-noon. Runs through Aug 17. Highlights Of The Collection: The tour of the best of the museum lasts about 30 mins. Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Dr., 1:30 p.m. Cuentame Cuentos: Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 2 p.m. Science Matters: Families explore evidence, conduct experiments and draw conclusions with different scientific themes. Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 2, 4 and 6 p.m. The Canyons Summer Concert Series: Free live music every Saturday evening. Schedule at canyonsresort.com. Canyons Resort, 4000 Canyons Resort Dr., 6 p.m. Runs through Aug. Cool Air Concert Series: Free outdoor concerts for the whole family. Coolers are permitted, dogs are not. Snowbird, Highway 210, Little Cottonwood Canyon, 6-8 p.m. Runs through Aug 10. Homestead Saturday Night Concerts: Enjoy free concerts every Saturday. Picnic dinners, including classic summer favorites, are available for pre-order. Concert schedule at gohebervalley.com/ homestead-saturday-concert. Homestead Resort, 700 Homestead Dr., Midway, 7 p.m. Runs through Aug.

Sundays Flying Ace All-Star Freestyle Show: Olympians and national team athletes put on a 30 min. freestyle aerial show for spectators every Saturday during the summer. $10/adults, $5/youth and seniors, free/2 and under. Utah Olympic Park, 3419 Olympic Parkway, 1 p.m. Runs through

Sep 1.

Highlights Of The Collection: The tour of the best of the museum lasts about 30 mins. Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Dr., 1:30 p.m. Weekend Wiggletime: Action-packed, movement-oriented stories. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 3 p.m.

Other Ongoing Utah Festival Opera And Musical Theatre: A five-week festival consisting of over 100 events including four productions of grand opera, operetta, light opera and seldom-seen Broadway-style musical theatre, orchestral and vocal concerts and more. Event schedule at ufoc.org. Utah Festival Opera and Musical Theatre, 59 S. 100 West. Runs through Aug 10. Guided Interpretive Activities: Every weekend through the summer, park interpreters will be expounding on the wonders of this amazing place through enlightening hands-on activities. Driving tours meet at the visitor center (times vary), Beach Discovery is from noon-2 p.m. at Bridger Bay, and Island Discovery is from 1-3 p.m. at Buffalo Point. Park entrance fees apply. Info at 801-721-9569. Antelope Island State Park, 4528 W. 1700 South. Runs through Aug. Pumpkin Days And Haybale Maze: A not-so-scary Halloween activity including a family-friendly hay bale maze, pick a pumpkin out of the patch and take a wagon ride through Wheeler Woods. Fee $7/ages 2-12, $9/13 and up. Under 2 free hay maze and wagon ride, per paying adult, pumpkin $5. Hours at wheelerfarm. com. Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East. Runs through Oct 31. Legally Blonde: Based on both the novel by Amanda Brown and the 2001 smashhit film. Tickets at midvaletheatre.com. Midvale Main St. Theatre, 7711 S. Main St.. Runs Aug 15-31. Tarzan: Edgar Rice Burroughs’ vibrant jungle boy swings into full action in this recently honed telling of an orphan boy raised by a nurturing family of apes, then surprised by love from a stranger who looks like him. Tickets $28, $16/ages 5-11, under 5 not permitted. hct.org. Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Dr. Runs Aug 9-Sep 28. Alice In Wonderland Jr.: Join Alice’s madcap adventures in Wonderland as she chases the White Rabbit, races the Dodo Bird, gets tied up with the Tweedles, raps with a bubble-blowing Caterpillar, and beats the Queen of Hearts at her own game. Tickets $10 at empresstheatre.com. Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South. Runs Aug 16-Sep 7. As You Like It: One of the great comedy plays by Shakespeare. Rosalind, the daughter of a banished duke, falls in love with Orlando, the disinherited son of one of the duke’s friends. When she is banished from the court by her uncle, Rosalind takes on the appearance of a boy calling herself Ganymede. This program will involve

local high school seniors working one on one with a professional to learn the many aspects of theatre production. Tickets $10 at empresstheatre.com. Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South. Runs Sep 20-28. Dracula Vs The Wolfman: When 2 newlyweds get lost in the Transylvania forest, the groom gets bitten and seeks shelter at the nearest castle. The caretaker, Dr. Acula, falls in love with the recent bride and vows to turn her against her true love to be with him. Little does he know, his rival has become a werewolf and has the power and ability to destroy the evil vampire. Tickets $8-$16 at theobt.org. Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main. Runs Sep 27-Nov 2. Tuacahn Festival: Shows include Mulan, Mary Poppins, Thoroughly Modern Millie, Starlight Express plus performances by Odyssey Dance Theatre, The Fab Four, Jim Brickman, HEART, Hotel California and more. Info at tuacahn.org. Tuacahn Amphitheatre, 1100 Tuacahn Dr. Runs through Dec 28. Tractor Drawn Wagon Rides: See the farm, historic buildings, and hidden trails of Wheeler Woods. Rides leave every half hour, weather permitting. $2/person ages 2 and up. Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., except Sun. Shark Week: Learn about the creatures at the top of the aquatic food chain. Events, activities, contests and prizes throughout the week. Living Planet Aquarium, 725 E. 10600 South, 10 a.m. Runs Aug 4-10. Annual Breastfeeding Cafe: A series of workshops, classes, conversations and information regarding breastfeeding. Schedule of events and the mini cafes at breastfeedingcafe.wordpress.com. Open 10 a.m.-close, Sun. 1-close. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 10 a.m. Runs Aug 8-19. Pelican Encounter: Stand side by side with a keeper and feed a flock of magnificent pelicans for just $3. Limited to 10 people per feeding. Tracy Aviary, 589 E. 1300 South, 10:15 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. Amazon Adventure: A delightful, intimate experience with some of the Amazon Basin’s most adventurous and engaging flyers. $3/person. Limited to 8 people/feeding. Encounter times run approximately 15 mins. Schedule at tracyaviary.org. Tracy Aviary, 589 E. 1300 South, 10:45 a.m. Step On Stage: An exciting drop-in theater workshop featuring hands-on interactive experiences in the performing arts. Included in regular admission price. Except Sun. and Aug 19. Treehouse Children’s Museum, 347 22nd St., 1and 3 p.m. Runs through Aug. Stingray Feeding: Feed the stingrays! $6/ person, members receive 10% off. Limit 10 tickets per day, must be 5 or older to participate. Regular admission applies. Except Thurs. Living Planet Aquarium, 725 E. 10600 South, 2 p.m. Runs through Sep 8.


Teen Scene Calendar

august 14 Wednesday

related crafts, contests and how-to ideas. Hunter Library, 4740 W. 4100 South, 4-5 p.m.

29 Thursday

Teen Anime Club: Preview new anime episodes, share your artwork and discuss manga and anime with other teens. Whitmore Library, 2197 E. Ft. Union Blvd., 6:45-8:30 p.m.

Gamer’s Club: Play Yu-Gi-Oh or Magic: The Gathering with other Gamers. Each month will have a different theme for the Tournament. Participate in the theme of the month and receive a free prize! Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 3-5 p.m.

15 Thursday

30 Friday

Cassette Tape Wallet Craft: Make a new wallet out of an old cassette tape. Teens. Herriman Library, 5380 W. Herriman Main St., 2-3 p.m.

Teen Movie Friday: Watch a free movie. Watch Jack the Giant Slayer, rated PG-13. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 3-5 p.m.

Zumba For Teens: Part dance, part exercise. Get a nice cool drink at the end and win a prize. Ages 10-16. Sandy Library, 10100 Petunia Way, 2:303:30 p.m. Teen Movie Night: Fun movies for teens. Watch Warm Bodies, rated PG-13. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 6-8:45 p.m.

16 Friday Mini Buttons, Magnets And Gaming: Make mini buttons to wear, magnets for your locker and play Wii games. Teens. Ages 11-18. Draper Library, 1136 E. Pioneer Rd., 2:30-4 p.m. Bubble Wrap Bags: Make a hip new bag out of bubble wrap. Teens. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 3-5 p.m. Teen Advisory Board Meeting: Join the teen advisory board and help to plan programs for teens, write for the teen newsletter, meet new friends, and get volunteer hours. Millcreek Library, 2250 Evergreen Ave., 5-5:45 p.m.

17 Saturday Yu-Gi-Oh Tournament: Come and play Yu-Gi-Oh for fun and card trading. Hunter Library, 4740 W. 4100 South, 2-5:30 p.m. ToshoCON Anime Convention: Enjoy panel discussions, a cosplay contest, viewing room, crafts, manga swap, vendor marketplace and a dance to top off the night. Teens. Viridian Event Center, 1825 W. 8030 South, 2-10 p.m. Teen Movie Matinee: Teens watch their favorite movies on the library big screen. Watch Warm Bodies, rated PG-13. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 3-5:30 p.m.

20 Tuesday Chess At Main: Drop in to learn basic moves and advanced strategies while making new friends. Teens and adults. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 3-5 p.m. Teen Book Club: Book discussion, treats and games. Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 7-8 p.m.

27 Tuesday Teen Anime Club: Preview new anime episodes, share your artwork and discuss manga and anime with other teens. West Jordan Library, 1825 W. 8030 South, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

28 Wednesday Hunter Anime Club: Join in fun anime/manga

September 6 Friday Teen Movie Friday: Watch a free movie. Watch The Hobbit, rated PG-13. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 3-5 p.m.

9 Monday Kearns Anime Club: Learn, watch, discuss and enjoy anime and manga. Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 3-4:30 p.m.

20 Friday Doctor Who Party Lock-In: Celebrate the Doctor turning 50 with games, food and make your own sonic screwdriver pen. Dress as your favorite character for a costume contest and win cool prizes. Teens. Registration and signed permission slip required. Herriman Library, 5380 W. Herriman Main St., 6:30-9 p.m.

21 Saturday Yu-Gi-Oh Tournament: Come and play Yu-Gi-Oh for fun and card trading. Hunter Library, 4740 W. 4100 South, 2-5:30 p.m. Teen Movie Night: Fun movies for teens. Watch 42, rated PG-13. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 3-5:15 p.m. Teen Anime Club: Preview new anime episodes, share your artwork and discuss manga and anime with other teens. Teens and tweens. Riverton Library, 12877 S. 1830 West, 3-3:45 p.m.

23 Monday Kearns Anime Club: Learn, watch, discuss and enjoy anime and manga. Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 3-4:30 p.m.

25 Wednesday

10 Tuesday

Hunter Anime Club: Join in fun anime/manga related crafts, contests and how-to ideas. Hunter Library, 4740 W. 4100 South, 4-5 p.m.

Teen Craft Night: Make a fun craft. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 6-7:30 p.m.

26 Thursday

11 Wednesday Teen Anime Club: Preview new anime episodes, share your artwork and discuss manga and anime with other teens. Whitmore Library, 2197 E. Ft. Union Blvd., 6:45-8:30 p.m.

12 Thursday Teen Anime Club: Preview new anime episodes, share your artwork and discuss manga and anime with other teens. Herriman Library, 5380 W. Herriman Main St., 7-8:30 p.m.

14 Saturday Yu-Gi-Oh Tournament: Come and play Yu-Gi-Oh for fun and card trading. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 2:30-5:30 p.m.

17 Tuesday Chess At Main: Drop in to learn basic moves and advanced strategies while making new friends. Teens and adults. SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 3-5 p.m. Teen Gaming Night: All teens are invited for a fun night of gaming. Treats provided. Ages 11-17. Magna Library, 2675 S. 8950 West, 6-7:30 p.m. Teen Book Club: Book discussion, treats and games. Holladay Library, 2150 Murray Holladay Rd., 7-8 p.m.

Gamer’s Club: Play Yu-Gi-Oh or Magic: The Gathering with other Gamers. Each month will have a different theme for the Tournament. Participate in the theme of the month and receive a free prize! Kearns Library, 5350 S. 4220 West, 3-5 p.m.

27 Friday Bottle Cap Rings: Make your own bottle cap ring. Teens. West Valley Library, 2880 W. 3650 South, 3-5 p.m.

28 Saturday Tyler Anime Club: Fun activities and Japanese culture. Ages 12-17. Ruth Vine Tyler Library, 8041 S. Wood St., 3-4:30 p.m.

ongoing Tuesdays Teen Space: Activities include intramural sports, arts, music, cooking, mentoring and much more. Free. Ages 12-17. Sorenson Multicultural and Unity Fitness Center, 855 W. California Ave., 5-7 p.m.

Thursdays

19 Thursday

Teen Summer Reading Program: Eat snacks, explore anime, create movies, duct tape fashion and more. Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., 2 p.m. Runs through Aug 15.

Teen Movie Night: Fun movies for teens. Watch Jackie Robinson Biopic 42, rated PG-13. Bingham Creek Library, 4834 W. 9000 South, 6-8 p.m.

Teen Space: Activities include intramural sports, arts, music, cooking, mentoring and much more. Free. Ages 12-17. Sorenson Multicultural and Unity

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 59


Teen Scene By Haylee Wilkes

Is Your Teen the Victim of Cyberbullying? Virtual social networking has been ruthlessly lashing out on the youth of today, turning digital indifference into real life emotional scars. In a time where cyberspace seems to be the new frontier, parents and teens need to find a way to adapt in a beneficial way. In other words, how can we emphasize using internet for the good rather than enabling the bad? For those that are unaware of the situation at hand, bullying has gone to a whole new level. Select Facebook statuses, twitter feeds and Instagram photos are dedicated to psychologically destroying the confidence of our future generations.

How it Begins During my senior year, an anonymous twitter page began bashing student after student. The comments were honestly appalling. One particular victim, a cheerleader who had been called fat because of all the McDonalds she had been caught eating during lunch, uncovered the virtually-masked bandits in the hall. This led to an entire crowd of student bystanders provoking the two girls, whose heated words turned into a physical and emotional boxing ring. A few shoves quickly attracted teachers, which attracted administration, which ended the fight that hadn’t seemed to have peaked.

Ingredients for Disaster The only reason this event got so heated was because of the sheer numbers: the hundreds of students who followed this twitter account, the hundreds of students that joined in with hateful words back to the incognito girl, the hundreds of students surrounding them with words and shoves as they fought, and the hundreds of students that were yelling “fight, fight, fight!” the entire time. Provocation, anonymity and an unattached reality were the key ingredients. Emily Capito, a certified Life Coach who most often works with teens, points out that, “teens are just unaware of how fast their words can spread; and the ability to remain anonymous simply fuels that fire of impulsive retaliations.” Matthew Woolley, a licensed Psychologist in Utah, says that this “intense humiliation is

60 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

disruptive to identity development. Ultimately, the bullying hinders the kid’s ability to develop a positive self-outlook. This process, however, can be reversed if the situations can be handled in a positive way.” Prevention So how do we stop this sort of bullying? Woolley goes on to say, “There really is no way out of bullying, in fact bullying is a typical and almost an essential part of adolescent development. But, as a whole, we can definitely find better ways to handle and diffuse the situations.”

Teens’ Reactions First of all, it’s time to end hasty retaliations. We teens need to begin attaching our words with reality and quit letting our emotions rule our keyboards. Capito advises, “Don’t even engage. Nip the situation in the bud instead of overreacting. Bullies love overreactions, in fact, it fuels their fire.” We must return to using dependable peers as outlets. A trustworthy foundation is necessary. Teens’ closest peers and family members should be where impulsive feelings are vented out and diffused, rather than published for everyone and their dogs to see. “Kids that are the greatest subject to bullying are the ones that don’t have this foundation at home,” says Capito, “The kids need to feel like someone has their back.” This is done by creating a good circle of friends and a strong connection with the adults that are around, especially parents.

Parents’ Reactions Woolley discloses, “The number one response I get from my clients when I ask them why they didn’t consult an adult is, ‘I thought they might overreact.’” We all secretly want to tell our parents, but the classic ‘mama bear’ reaction that would explode from my

mother’s fury is almost just as humiliating, if not more so. Capito says the first step for parents is simply “don’t overreact.” The situation needs a level-headed, clear-thinking adult to give advice. Not only would being calm prevent a potential detrimental experience, it would amplify reasons for kids to trust and come back when such bullying would occur again. “We need kids’ first responses to be confiding in a parent or trustworthy adult.” states Woolley.

Positive Counteractions Retaliation is never the right answer when a bully strikes, but maybe a positive counteraction could change hurt kids to renewed kids. After the fighting incident broke out at my high school, a brave student created a much different twitter account. This twitter account would complement an array of students in exchange for a “shoutout.” This twitter account got extremely popular, and all my friends would talk about how flattered they were after reading their complement. It didn’t start any fights, didn’t hurt anyone’s feelings, and used the internet in a positive way that united the student body. Teens are trained to believe that the internet is evil; I suggest we change this perception. Let’s start thinking that the digital part of everyone’s life can be positive. These social networking tools can be used in a way that gets individual voices heard, showcase talents, and broadens understanding of the world’s way of thinking. Help your teen explore a virtual world that expands knowledge, heightens creativity, and prepares for a cyberspace-based future. 19-year-old Haylee Wilkes is a journalism student at Dixie College.


UMTSS, cont. from pg 37 the effect of current interventions. Some parents are wondering “How will this affect special education?” The good news is that special education will still be there for the kids who need it. Parents and educators will still be able to request an evaluation for special education at any time during the UMTSS process. Under UMTSS it may even be possible for a child to be receiving IEP services and receive some tiered supports in the general education setting. The bottom line is that UMTSS will benefit ALL children. I believe this process will greatly improve

communication between all educators and create a feeling that it is everyone’s job to help educate a child.

Your Child If you have a child you think might be falling through the cracks, UMTSS can help. As mentioned previously, UMTSS is fairly new and so districts throughout Utah will be at different stages of implementation. The first thing to do is to talk to the right people, such as the school psychologist or social worker. Sit down with them and discuss the

Urban Farming, cont. from pg 46 Pets or Food? Best of all, the children see these animals as pets – loving them and caring for them daily – so much so, in fact, Aimee C.’s family can’t bear to actually eat their chickens. “Too sad and strange for us,” she said. Christina B.’s family feels differently, however. “We know our boys get attached to the chickens, but they need to understand the circle of life. They watch us kill and pluck the chickens.” She paused before adding, “Come to think of it, I think they see the goats as pets and the chickens as food.” While they eat both the eggs and the chickens, they use the goats for their milk and cheese.

For You? If your family has considered taking the leap into urban farming, there are a few things to consider first. How attached will your children get? Are you comfortable with serving fluffy

as food? If not, perhaps a beehive is the way to go. There are many local places like Abeez Honey in Spanish Fork that will help you get started. How much time is your family willing to put into it? While you can have just one or two goats or pigs, you have to have a whole flock of chickens. And let me tell you: they smell if you don’t take proper care of them. And urban farming means close neighbors – with noses of their own! If you rely on your children to keep the animals clean and happy, make sure they’re actually doing so. What will your children learn? Will they appreciate their organic, locally-raised food more? Or will the travesty of it all be too much for them? Children are resilient, but not unfeeling. When my son was old enough to understand the concept of animals-to-plate, he became an avid vegetarian. My daughter feels bad for the tomatoes she picks – there’s no way we could actually eat a pet bunny!

challenges your child is facing. Together you can talk through different options and look at what additional data or information might be needed. From there, you would develop a plan of action including some interventions for the school to try. Then, the school should monitor progress and keep you informed on your child’s progress. If one intervention does not work, schools and parents should work together to add in new interventions and supports, until the child begins to make progress. If your school is not yet familiar with UMTSS, try asking for some RTI interventions. Although this is an older solution, this process will help your child at the lowest level, and hopefully address issues before they become even bigger until UMTSS is fully implemented. Looking forward, I feel hopeful as a parent. Of course I know it won’t be perfect, but I am excited to see progress. I hope fewer parents will feel their children are falling through the cracks as I once did. Hopefully more and more parents will notice the changing role of teachers and appreciate that they are there for all children. My hope is that UMTSS will be a helpful model for years to come. For more information on UMTSS please visit www.utahparentcenter.org or call the Utah Parent Center at 801-272-1051 to speak to a consultant. Michelle Murphey is a mother of 2 and Parent Consultant at the Utah Parent Center

AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 61


Places To Party By Andrea Moore

A Fun Party From Start To Finish The Finishing School Teaches the Art of Sewing and Cooking

I grew up in rural Iowa, the middle of two sisters and two brothers. My mom worked long hours but she still managed to provide us with very valuable lessons in cooking, cleaning (much to our displeasure) and many other life skills. It was because of her lessons that I know how to cook more than just mac ‘n cheese and can sew a button and fix a hem, among other useful things. Maybe it’s living in a city with so many conveniences, but it seems these skills are not nearly as important as they used to be. Sue Hess Fenton, owner and founder of The Finishing School, may agree with me. Some 30 years ago she dreamed of teaching some of her daughters’ friends how to sew. She “recognized that sewing and cooking are becoming a lost art and [I] wanted to share [my] knowledge with as many children and adults as [I] could.” She took this dream and turned it into what is now: The Finishing School, where hundreds of youth – as well as adults – have received instruction in cooking and other life skills. “The Finishing School continues the tradition of offering highly skilled teacher-specialists in each area of interest,” says Fenton. They offer yearround youth classes, hour-long children’s classes in sewing and cooking/life skills after school on weekdays and on Saturday mornings, and a 10-week-long summer session. “All classes are for boys and girls as well as adults,” explains Fenton. In addition to these great classes, Fenton offers the following three 62 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

wonderful, traditional birthday party packages for ages 4 and up:

Chef for a Day Pizza Party Party guests get gussied up in real chefs’ aprons and white hats they decorate themselves. After learning the basics of pizza making, they each make their own original mini pizzas for lunch. Games with a kitchen and food theme continue the fun.

Dress-Up Tea Party Party guests come dressed in their most elegant dresses and are then provided with the accessories, tea hats, gloves and costume jewelry. They then enjoy a simple etiquette lesson followed by tea service which includes finer sandwiches, veggies and a yummy drink served on fine china, special tea cups and linens. Guests make a cute craft and decorate a cookie to bring home.

Cupcake Decorating Party Party guests will be transformed into pastry chefs as they first decorate their own chef hat, then enjoy a hands-on lesson on how to decorate their own cupcakes using different decorating techniques with pastry bags. Guests take their cupcakes home in a fun cupcake box. All parties include: invitations, decorations, traditional games, ice cream, gift opening, and gift for the guest of honor, with cake and goodie bags available for an extra charge. Parties run 1.5 hours and are held afterhours. See website for details. I am so glad my mom took the time to teach me these life skills – yes, even the cleaning skills – and I intend to pass what I know onto my daughter AND son. It’s also good there is someone who can supplement my lessons in a fun environment, as there is plenty that I do not know. The Finishing School 4880 S. Highland Circle Holladay, UT 84117 801-277-9244 learntocookandsew.com


Party Services

1519 South 700 West Salt Lake City, UT 84104 (801)977-9000 www.jumparoundutah.com

$50

Book your next birthday party with us and enjoy the entire 7,000 square foot facility for a TRUE private party.

with this ad.

Offer valid for any party date if booked by September 30, 2013

Ultimate Video Game Party exPerience™

We roll up to your doorstep with our Mobile Video Game Theaters which feature Ultimate Game Chairs, XBOX, Playstation and Wii. We create a fun, interactive environment for up to 16 players to play at the same time in a self powered, climate controlled, state of the art theatre.

FREE

Party Package Pucker Powder, Tattoos, and Wristbands

Perfect for: Birthdays ~ Schools corporate & Fund raising Events

When you mention this ad

801-619-0724

To book the Gamin Ride log on to

www.gaminride.com AUG/SEPT 2013 UTAHFAMILY.COM 63


Studio of Classical Ballet Arts Dixie Stallings Clegg Artistic Director BFA Ballet, U of U Utah Civic Ballet L.A. Stage & TV

Classical Ballet Pre-Ballet Jazz Tap Hip Hop Creative Dance Mom & Tot Adult Classes

We Grow Dancers! 801-486-4933 2121 East 2100 South www.TheDanceCompanySalt Lake City.com 64 UTAHFAMILY.COM AUG/SEPT 2013

Utah Family Magazine AugSept 2013 issue  

AugSept13 issue of Utah Family Magazine

Utah Family Magazine AugSept 2013 issue  

AugSept13 issue of Utah Family Magazine

Advertisement