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MARCHADOR QUARTERLY The Official Publication of the USMMA, Mangalarga Marchador Association for North America

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THE USMMA MISSION The vision of USMMA is to provide leadership for establishing and promoting the Mangalarga Marchador horse breed in North America, encouraging the pursuit of excellence in bloodlines, and the welfare of its human and equine participants. The USMMA is the recognized affiliate of the Brazilian Mangalarga Marchador Association, the ABCCMM.

Our mission is to: • Inspire and encourage interest in the Mangalarga Marchador breed. • Provide a registration body to insure the purity of the breed. • Publish a breed standard consistent with the Brazilian standard of the ABCCMM. • Encourage participation and cooperation among breeders, owners, trainers and other equine professionals in support of the Mangalarga Marchador and the USMMA goals. • Affiliate and coordinate with other organizations and associations in support of the vision and mission of the USMMA.

Join us to learn more about the Marchador breed! Join us to promote the Marchador breed! Join us to register your horse! Join us to connect with other Marchador owners! To become a member: http://www.namarchador.org/membership/ member/ Questions: The USMMA Board Members and Committee Chairs are here to answer them. Contact us through our website http://www.namarchador.org/contact-us/ or directly to the President at paboz24@gmail.com.

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Table of Contents 4 USMMA News 5 Letter from USMMA President Je Bosley

Submissions to the Marchador

7 Update on Equitana Open Air from USMMA Secretary and Clinic Chair Alessandra Deerinck

Quarterly send directly to Tresa Smith, PhD, MM owner and breeder at montanamarchador@gmail.com

Member News 11 Connie Claire wins $250 Show Subsidy for Mounted Archery

USMMA Board Members

12 New Member & Marchador Owner Beth Carlson

Jeff Bosley, President paboz24@gmail.com

13 A tribute to Howard Bonis (1944- 2017) First Marchador in Maine

Tia Nelson, DVM, Vice President, drnelson@valleyvethelena.com Alessandra Deerinck, Secretary hhsensing@icloud.com Lynn Kelley, Treasurer lynnkelley@me.com Lisa Estrada, lisaestrada412@gmail.com Aline Greene, magiadabrisa@icloud.com Jake Martinez, jacobmmartinez@aol.com Cathy Pierce, cpierce@stx.rr.com

Features 17 SPOTLIGHT on ENDURANCE Articles by Alessandra Deerinck 17-23 and Aline Greene 24-25 26 Ask Tia! Melonoma vaccine Question from Eliza Frazer Q & A our resident vet and MM breeder Submit your questions to Tia here.

Forms and Directories 29 2017 Membership Drive and Membership form 30 Farm and Business Directory

Technical Boards Megan Fallwell, Registrar, meganmcclarney@gmail.com

31 From the editor

Colin Fallwell and Lynn Kelley, website Tia Nelson DVM 3


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USMMA NEWS Letter from USMMA President Jeff Bosley Greetings to all members! I hope that you have renewed your membership for 2017 by now. If you have, you may remember part of my member welcome letter that lists my goals for the year. “We had a rebuilding year in 2016 and are ready for 2017 to serve you. I am planning the following for 2017: 1 Reinstate our USMMA newsletter as a professional quarterly journal publication. 2 Hold a USMMA clinic and horse show. 3 Host regional events or get-togethers in 4 -5 regions. 4 Help facilitate ABCCMM activities such as ABCCMM inspection visits and other joint activities. 5 Hold elections for the new Board for 2018.� In support of my goals, we have several events coming up in April and May that we are hoping you can celebrate and get behind as we work to promote the Mangalarga Marchador.. Of course you have already heard from Alessandra about the USMMA Annual Clinic and Equitana event in October. These other events are a little sooner, and we welcome your participation and enthusiasm. April/May ABCCMM Inspection As you may know, there is now an ABCCMM Inspector, Dr. George Vilar, who is in Florida many times during the year. The cost and logistics for doing the Brazilian inspection and registration has just gotten easier! Any ABCCMM member can request an ABCCMM inspection at any time. ABCCMM inspection is not required for USMMA registration. It is for breeders and owners who want to maintain dual registration for their Marchador horse - both the ABCCMM and the USMMA. However, in an effort to save even more money for our members that do, the USMMA will attempt to communicate all ABCCMM inspections. If joining an already scheduled inspection helps you, then you can coordinate with the other 5


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members involved to make the arrangements for George to visit your farm and horses. Summerwind Marchadors has requested an ABCCMM foal inspection and it is scheduled for April 29th-April 30th weekend. If you have Marchador foals or horses that need to be inspected, please contact Lynn Kelley lynnkelley@me.com and Dr. George can fly from Phoenix airport to your farm following that inspection before returning to Florida. May 26-28 Mane Event in Scottsdale Westworld https:// scottsdale.maneeventexpo.com This is a well-run event in Canada and in 2017, they are putting on their first event in the U.S. We were represented in Canada at one Mane Event and think it is a good opportunity to reach a bigger audience and all horse people! We are planning to have a USMMA booth. Any USMMA member business are welcome to display materials at the booth for a $50 contribution. No sales materials are allowed; only information at a non-profit booth. Efforts to organize this 3 day weekend event are being started now. We may have an opportunity to speak their about the breed. Riders are sought for participation in the clinics if you want to sign up. Please contact me, paboz24@gmail.com if you are interested in volunteering to man the booth, or want to show your Marchador horses (additional fees apply for boarding) or have other ideas. We will also post these events and news on the website and in our next quarterly Journal in April. Additional Marchador and Gaited Horse Events are listed on our website. Remember that there is a SHOW SUBSIDY FUND available to all members. If you have a local event, or horse show where you are taking your horse, please apply for a grant from the USMMA to help defray the costs. Regards, Jeffrey Bosley USMMA President http://www.namarchador.org 6


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USMMA NEWS Equitana Open Air October 2017 — by Alessandra Deerinck Dear Mangalarga Marchador owners, Horses are a big part of our life, and our breed has so many great traits that make horsemanship into a great passion, not just a gentle hobby. It has been a year full of activity for the BOD under the guidance of our President Jeff Bosley, and we have accomplished a lot of things aimed to benefit the membership and their horses, and to bring the Mangalarga Marchador breed to the attention of the American public. I would like to let everyone know about the 2017 USMMA event, in hope that you may decide to join us. I have been assigned the task of organizing our yearly event. In my search I have found a very rare opportunity to bring our horses in front of one of the largest audiences in the equestrian world, but in order to make the best out of what I was able to create as the venue for our event, I need to know how many of you are interested. We have the chance to hold our annual USMMA event at EQUITANA USA, a world-class equestrian trade show that is coming for the first time to the United States. This is an opportunity comparable to being present at Breyerfest last year, with the major difference that every USMMA member is invited to participate and enjoy the opportunity to be part of something important with their horses. I have been working to write the program of a clinic/show that will see us in the arena at Galway Downs in Temecula CA, during the three days of the Open Air event. This is one of the four different venues that EQUITANA USA will feature during 2017 and 2018.

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The USMMA is planning on having a booth where members that are interested, and will contribute to the expenses, will be able to display their material, and to be present, if they would like to volunteer to be part of the group that will run the booth. Everyone bringing horses will have to cover the expenses for their stalls. A draft of the program is attached below, any idea will be considered and everyone is welcome to be part of this great event. I will be calling each one of you to talk about your thoughts and see if you can join us at Equitana USA with your horses. These links illustrate the event: http://www.equitanausa.com/prospectus/ www.equitanausa.com/price-book-full Please get back to me and let me know what you think about this great opportunity to let the American public see what a great breed we are bringing to our country. I look forward to reading your responses and to be a part of something great with all of you. Sincerely, Alessandra Deerinck USMMA Secretary 760 715 1554

PROPOSAL FOR USMMA 2017 EVENT AT OPEN AIR – EQUITANA, Galway Downs Temecula CA What we may have: • • • •

1 BOOTH 1 hour time in the ring for the three days of the event (clinic) Trails around the Temecula Wine Country (Cavalgada) Stalls for our horses (horse owner will have to pay for stall fees on the days of the event).

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Possible presentations: Day 1 History of the breed, with emphasis on its versatility and how the gaits were developed and changed in time. Day 2 Mechanics of the gaits in the Mangalarga Marchador Day 3 Inspection demonstration. Day 1, 2 and 3 A guided trail ride around the wine country, trails and length of the ride will be planned before the event, considering the possibility to visit different wineries and have lunch or dinner there.

More Events - on the Website! USMMA Events, Member Events and FOSH Events are listed on the website. http://www.namarchador.org/shows-and-events/ events-calendar/ Let us know about events in your area. Milda Minter, pasofinotrainer@gmail.com (336)225-0214 wrote to invite all USMMA members to an open gaited breed show in Yadkinville, NC on July 15-16 sanctioned by FOSH. Please contact her to participate!

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MEMBER NEWS Connie Claire awarded Show Subsidy Congratulations to Connie Claire, the first applicant and recipient of the USMMA Show Subsidy Award in 2017. Connie and her husband Doren will travel to Texas (from Florida) to compete in an international mounted archery event with their Marchador gelding DaVinci do Summerwind, better known as LEO! Connie and Doren hold mounted archery clinics at their farm in Florida, named Archer’s Point. Connie and Doren drove themselves and their horses from Florida to Texas to compete in the International Mounted Archery Competition held there on March 9-12, 2017 09th - Practice day 10th - Masahee & Mamluk 11th - Ranking Korean & Triple Qabaq 12th - Polish Style & Awards Board member Cathy Pierce who lives in Texas drove up to cheer them on! In 2016 USMMA awarded 3 separate requests for $250 each . The 3 grants funded were the only requests received . The application form on our website has been updated to a fillable form. Also please email Laurie Klassen, the Award Administrator to notify her if you are submitting an application. It's just a backup to make sure no applications are missed. For more information on the Show Subsidy Award Program or to submit an application, please follow this link: http://www.namarchador.org/membership/awards-programs/ For more information on Marchador events, please follow this link: http://www.namarchador.org/shows-and-events/events-calendar/

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MEMBER NEWS Meet new Marchador owner Beth Carlson By Beth Carlson At the ripe 'ol age of sixty-three, I have been searching for my "forever" horse for over three years now. I wasn't set on a particular breed but had my strict criteria. I am now excited to say I just bought my first Mangalarga Marchador. As a stranger to the breed I can't tell you what a positive and wonderful experience it has been for me because of the three women that helped educate me and find what I was looking for. Those women were Lynn Kelley, Laura Patterson Rosa and the breeder of my horse, Aline Greene. In addition, I was fortunate to have the chance to ride Cyndy Falvey's MM here in Maine. I have participated in the horse industry for forty-five years in various ways along with purchasing many horses of different breeds from all over the country in those years and I must say this was the most pleasant horse buying experience I have had to date and it was because of these wonderful MM people that helped me along the way. The sincerity and honesty of all involved just shined through. Aline has been so accommodating and has gone out of her way to help me. I look forward to your newsletter and learning more about the breed as I grow and learn with my new horse, "Bendito". Editor’s note: Bendito do Legacy is a 3 year old Marchador gelding now being started by Beth’s trainer in Maine. Bendito is the son of Traituba Zumbido and Nikita do Campo Real, both imported from Brazil and with Aline Greene at her SC farm, Saint Horse Marchadores.

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MEMBER NEWS A Tribute to Howard Bonis (1944-2017) By Lynn Kelley

Howard Bonis, the first Marchador owner in Maine recently passed away late January, 2017 When Howard could no longer take care of his beloved horse, a great home was found with Cyndy Falvey, only a few minutes away on the Maine coastline. Cyndy is a long-time horse owner and has another older Thoroughbred on her property. Cyndy also took Chama’s companion, the goat (named Goaty)! The two animals are inseparable and when Cyndy trail rides, often the goat comes along! As a tribute to Howard, Cyndy has given a generous donation to the USMMA in Howard’s memory. Thank you Cyndy! You can read some of Howard’s obituary here and gain a sense of what kind of person he was! I met Howard when he contacted me to purchase a Summerwind Future Foal. Already in his late 60’s, he guaranteed me that he would be a great home with no problems training horses from a young age. He proceeded to tell me many, if not all, of the stories about the horses in his life, including a Morgan stallion that he loved for many years. He had acreage in Maine so he set out to build a horse barn and hay storage on the property. He put a paddock up on the crest of a hill with plenty of trees for shade and shelter. All for his future horse. Howard was convinced that his Marchador would be enjoyed by the whole family including his grandchildren. He also wanted to use the horse as a therapy horse with autistic children. Before his foal was born, an older, trained Marchador became available that I thought might be a good fit for Howard and perhaps better than waiting for a foal to grow up. Howard agreed. Chama was off to Maine! Chama was loved by the family. He was well-cared for by Howard who got to relive all of the warmth and enjoyment about grooming, feeding, and riding again. After 13


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Howard’s death, his family wrote and told me how much they thought having Chama prolonged Howard’s life. I drove to meet Howard and his wife Susan after a Kelley family wedding in New Hampshire. It was a memory I will always treasure. Little did I know then, that it would be soon after, he would need to give up his Marchador. After Chama moved on to Cyndy, we were fortunate enough to meet her. Cyndy often comes out west in the winters so we met during Barrett-Jackson week. A horse couldn’t be more lucky to have these two owners in Maine! Obituary Howard L. Bonis Jr., Howard L. Bonis Jr., 72, of Arrowsic, died Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. Howard died peacefully with his wife by his side and surrounded by his children. Howard was born on March 5, 1944, in Norwalk, Conn., to Howard L. Bonis Sr. and Mary Castango Bonis. He grew up in Norwalk, Conn. He was a member of the first graduating class of Brien McMahon High School in 1962. After high school, Howard attended Norwalk Community College, before enlisting in the United States Marine Corps. His bravery during the Vietnam War earned him a Purple Heart and Bronze Star With Valor. While in Vietnam, he served as a fire team leader with the Company F, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines. He was medically retired from the United States Marine Corps. Howard married Susan Walker Bonis on Sept. 9, 1967. Howard met Navy Corpsman Susan Walker at St. Albans Naval Hospital on Long Island, N.Y., while he was recovering from injuries sustained on the battlefield. He went on to graduate from American International College with a degree in political science, and later earned his master's degree in special education from Salem State University. The most rewarding years of his professional career were spent as an educator in both public and private schools. 14


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A celebration of his life will take place in Maine in the summer of 2017. He will be privately interred at Arlington National Cemetery. We ask you to celebrate Howard by having a root beer float, eating an éclair, or dancing with someone you love.

Chama Lustre do Lucero - the well-traveled Marchador First Marchador in Maine. Chama was born and bred at Haras Lucero, TN, the breeding farm of Bill and Sandy Kambic, long-time members of the USMMA.   He is the son of Desafio de Miami x Apple Pie de Miami, both bred by the Guerra family of Florida, the first importers of Marchador horses to the U.S. At a young age, he was sold and shipped to California to Jake Martinez and Theresa Longo at Rancho de los Cielos.   They were relatively new breeders and wanted to have some Marchadors to sell as they started their breeding program.   Chama moved from there to Oregon, where he was trained and competed successfully in mounted archery at Cascade Mounted Archery with Holm and Susan Neumann.   Being a horse “anyone could ride”, Chama moved south again to AZ to Sandy Hull.  When Chama didn’t work for her, Sandy moved on to another Marchador and Chama left here bound for Maine!   His forever home with 2 wonderful owners - Howard Bonis and now Cyndy Falvey!

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SPOTLIGHT ON ENDURANCE - 2 Marchador Mares Alegria de los Cielos and Aria de los Cielos — by Alessandra Deerinck I know for a fact that in their country of origin Mangalargan Marchador (MM) mares are mostly not used as performance horses. Many of them just get barely broke to ride, to pass the breed inspection, their mane is cut to the roots, and they spend the majority of their life as broodmares. In Italy, where I was born, we have a way to say that goes like: “Paese che vai, usanza che trovi!” Translated in English it would sound like ”Wherever you are, adopt the local costumes”. So in the US mares keep their beautiful mane and get a chance at being performance horses. This can also be the case because in the U.S.A. the Mangalarga Marchador breed is still represented by less than 300 individuals, and devoting even just some of the mares only to breeding would take out a large portion of the horses available to ride. Training and riding a mare in competitions was not a choice I made just because of the limited number of horses available, or personal preference, it was mostly a fact determined by what I was asked to do professionally. I do not have a personal preference for mares, geldings or stallions, and when I work with them I keep in consideration and appreciate the typical traits of each one but, strange enough, during the last few years I have mainly ridden mares. Many riders do not like mares because of their personality and how it can affect the practice of the equestrian disciplines. I rode and trained Allegria de Los Cielos for her first limited distance ride in 45 days. My degree in Veterinary Medicine and my past experiences assisted me in succeeding in the task, but I would not recommend trying to do what I did to anyone. I actually had a taste of why mares can be difficult to rely on with Allegria de Los Cielos, at another one of our endurance rides. I was leading her around camp, and she would get so emotional that would rear, if we went past other horses. The ride manager asked me if I brought “another one of my stallions”, and I answered her with a smile, just saying that this time it was 17


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just a “hot chick�. Unfortunately, during that particular ride I had to pull Allegria out of the competition, because her emotions were not allowing her to pulse down. Her heart rate would easily came down below the acceptable 60 beats per minute limit because she was fit, but her heart would spike up any time a horse was in her sight. She was in heat and the hormonal influence, and her lead mare personality played against us this time. Training horses for endurance has many different challenges and having a time constraint is never advisable. Endurance training does not have a formula valid for all horses, and it takes many years to evolve to the point where horses can go 100 miles. The MM is pretty new to this country and definitely new to the AERC competitions. Most MM horses have competed in Limited Distance and the data is still very limited to make valid statistics. I really enjoy both kinds of Marcha (Allegria is a Picada horse, Aria is Batida) and the way the horses can efficiently and comfortably cover the ground. When the horse is sound and fit we can gage the speed and what gait to use according to the trail. I build a horse’s endurance with consistent daily training, on good terrain at a steady slow speed, in the intermediate gait of each horse, but also, always apply dressage to develop the horse in all of its gaits, from walk to canter and in between. Each gait requires a different level of energy expense and produces a different result, changing gait or speed takes a considerable toll on the metabolism of a horse, which is something I try to avoid as much as I can. The trails in California are not like a manicured flat arena, or the middle eastern sandy desert, and usually we have changes in up or downhill, and terrain, everything that requires to be aware and never expect to apply a fixed protocol. Generally, I keep the same steady gait and speed in competition, and slow down alternating intermediate gait and walking when changes in altitude require more energy expense. Most of all, I listen to my horse and how he or she feels about what we are doing together.

In training I also put my efforts in the health of the whole horse, with careful and complete nutrition, and a very accurate care of the hoof. All of my horses are barefoot, their hooves are cared for daily and I trim them weekly, just to the size that normal 18


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wear and tear would maintain. I do that to establish a routine that avoids a lot of the stress that the anatomical structures of horses undergo in training. I prefer this approach to the maintenance of the horse’s hoof for various reasons, going from liking the awareness that being able to feel the ground brings to a horse, to its ability to perform better, especially if I help with removable boots. This kind of hoof protections shelter the horses from hurting on difficult ground, but can be taken off to let them rest their whole body after the performance is done, and allow for the hoof physiological, natural growth, wear and tear. The Mangalarga Marchador breed has naturally strong hooves, because of where it was developed, which makes for a great endurance horse. The training facility where I was boarding had a quarter mile circular galloping track, and groomed trails that allowed Allegria to reach a good fitness level by being able to work on every aspect of it. Also, the relationship built by working with Human Horse Sensing, allowed us to confidently ride the endurance course even with limited trail experience. Most importantly, I had to make sure that the training that Allegria was going to receive was not going to hurt her. She underwent a lot of changes in a very short time, beginning with being stabled in a stall instead of the pasture, then to having her diet modified to fulfill the new needs for her new activity. The very balanced mind of the MM breed helped her in coping with the new neighbors, and all the changes. Because she came from the pasture, her muscles, bones and joints were not fit to be exercised and especially under the weight of a rider. Fortunately my degree, one more time, assisted me in this task, and keeping a close eye on her limbs gave me an indication of how she was doing with the training. During the training on the track and on the small hills on the property I monitored her heart rate and recovery, but without using a heart monitor. With a new horse I prefer to just watch closely her behavior and vital signs, rather than relying on technology, so I get to really know the horse I am working with. A heart monitor signals will not tell me soon enough if the horse is uncomfortable, while assessing the heart rate after carefully watching how the horse behaves gives us a more complete information. Later, when a horse is trained and we know how he behaves in a race, having a heart monitor can be a big advantage. 19


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Allegria’s heart rate and ability to recover improved fast, and so did her ability to stay in gait for long periods of time. To build endurance , sometime I use interval training, which allows less wear and tear on the horse and its hooves, than covering long distances in training. Then, once every two weeks I take the horse on a long and slow ride, possibly in company of another horse. To offset Allegria’s inexperience I practiced some dressage and even took her to a clinic given by Juan Manuel Munoz Diaz, an Olympic dressage rider from Spain. During the clinic I had the chance to see how we could have faced a stressful situation together. I was not supposed to take her to this event, but the horse that was chosen to participate had an accident and Theresa and Jacob decided to still go to the clinic and bring Allegria to fill the spot. We were not really ready for such an important task, but Allegria acted like it was no big deal, even the covered arena and the audience did not upset her, and one more time I had the confirmation of her wonderful lead mare personality. I still did not know about her ability to camp, but after this experience I was more confident that she was going to be just fine. The Manzanita ride base camp offered corrals to house the horses, but they were very small and attached. Allegria was between two other horses and in the evening I had one more time the chance to observe her lead mare personality at work. When we fed the horses she became very territorial and chased the others away from her food and water making them stand on the opposite side of their corrals, until she was done eating, then she became again the sweet mare I knew. The night passed without any problems and at dusk I saddled her up while the riders of the 50 mile ride were leaving camp. Allegria let me get everything ready and we went to the start where the other 81 horses were lining up. One more time she acted like a pro, and I felt like we were one entity, being able to choose the speed and gait, pass or let others pass us. It took us a little more than four hours to cover the distance, that had portions of steep uphills on single track trail intermixed with downhill slopes, and easier trail. Allegria is without doubt one of my favorite horses ever. Her best gait is the Picada, she is a really exceptional mare, and her “stallion like” behavior was just caused by her young age, and inexperience. She has overcome her juvenile behavior and has matured into a great horse. In fact, last year I had the honor to 20


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ride her in the 2016 Tournament of Roses Parade, with the AERC riders, after spending a year through several different venues, like winning the title of Mangalarga Marchador Champion mare 2015 in Las Vegas, participating in four Parades (Swallow Day in San Juan Capistrano, Fourth of July in Temecula, Western Days in Valley Center, La Jolla Christmas Parade) , a Cowboy Challenge, a dressage clinic and dressage show, one Cowboy Dressage event, the Fiesta of the Spanish Horse and AERC rides (we placed 5 in the 2016 Bar H). Not very many horses have done something like that in a year, most of all, the variety of what she was able to achieve is really impressive, and it reflects the genetics values of the Mangalarga Marchador breed, a breed that I have come to love for many reasons. The first time is unforgettable, and this is true about everything we have a passion for. Even after riding, training and competing with horses for almost 40 years the feeling I had when I met Rio and all the other Mangalarga Marchador horses at Rancho de Los Cielos was something very special. The Mangalarga Marchador has been bred to fit with human beings in any possible way, from the gait to the mind. I will always remember the very first moment when I worked with Allegria’s full brother, seven year old stallion Rio de Los Cielos. We were standing still, looking at each other in the eyes, waiting on who was going to move first. I was hesitating, because I did not know Rio at all. As soon as I won my hesitation he moved with me, even following when I decided to leap in the air. When I went from working on the ground to riding Rio was very light, he moved effortlessly at each gait. He seemed always to be willing to do what I wanted and was capable of dealing with all sorts of terrains. Even in deep grass, where the ground was not visible, Rio proceeded like in a perfectly leveled arena. I always felt like I was with a friend. The Mangalarga Marchadores are very special for various reasons, and this is true also for the ones that have behavioral problems. This is the case for 1861 Marengo de Tosana, aka Lady, a grey mare imported from Brazil. Jacob Martinez and Theresa Longo told me that Lady did not trust human beings, probably because of something she experienced. At times, she showed to be really terrified of being near a person. Fear based 21


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behavior is very difficult to overcome because is part of a survival mechanism, and is unconscious. So helping a horse truly overcome its fear could be a very hard task. I do this kind of work with “off the track” racehorses, and when I had to work with Lady my experience came in handy. Luckily, with her I did not have to struggle against a Thoroughbred’s inborn and exaggerated “flight instinct”. Lady was afraid, but genetically equipped to get along with human beings, and it took me only two sessions of working without constraints to be able to ride her. Later Lady was pregnant with Aria de Los Cielos, the foal that I acquired and is now four years old, and my “dream horse” that came to reality on May 1st 2012. For a few month in 2016 I had both Allegria and Aria in training, and I can say that I could appreciate the consistent quality of these mares from Rancho de Los Cielos. The breed’s strength, their great mind, and comfortable gait make for great endurance horses, but also for horses good any other discipline. The fact that both mares are also related and come from the same breeder is not accidental and is a real proof of their quality. I put Aria under saddle at the end on February 2016, and passed her ABCCMM inspection by Kate Barcelos on her fourth birthday. By the end of the summer we did a NATRC ride, and in October her first LD ride where we placed fifth. On December 29th 2016 at the Death Valley Encounter LD Aria became the first Mangalarga Marchador to win an AERC ride in the USA. At the same time we were also showing in schooling dressage shows and earning over 63% of the points in her first four events. In February 2017 we placed third in another 25 mile ride. Aria has been with me since birth, and I have carefully managed every aspect of her upbringing, training and competition. We are taking a journey across the equestrian disciplines, barefooted, supported by our relationship built with Human Horse Sensing. I developed this method of horsemanship after working with horses for more than forty years, racing as a jockey, jumping, doing endurance, riding dressage and working without tack on the ground and in the saddle. The barefoot philosophy came along with learning how important the senses are, in the human to horse relationship, but in situations in which the ground becomes too harsh to ride I use Renegade boots, and love the 22


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way these boots truly respect the mechanics of the horse’s movement.

About the Author: Alessandra Deerinck, HH Sensing. Human Horse Sensing highlights the roots of equine behavior, their social relationships and how to communicate efficiently from human to horse. In all of our interactions we choose the most appropriate sense for reaching the horse, in contexts and with subjects that he understands without the need of being taught through conditioning. Whether we just met or we are old time friends, we can immediately connect with a horse and take in consideration every aspect of the relationship including feelings, that are normally left out and considered a weakness from our part. Regardless of genetics and physical ability, only a horse that likes what he does can be a real champion, the others can manage to do the job quite well thanks to the equine extreme natural trainability, and tolerance. This is the very reason why knowing how they feel about our relationship is important to me. When a horse freely recognizes a human being as a leader, things that could be challenging are instead possible. HH Sensing offers training, problem horse retraining, colt starting, and horsemanship instruction for any level or discipline. It is a method of horsemanship that focuses on managing the relationship while it is happening, rather than giving riders things to do, to train or occupy their time with horses.Our approach, based on classical dressage, behavioral studies and liberty training is dedicated to enhance your horse’s potential keeping his wellbeing and yours in mind. Aside from horse training, we provide you and your horse with the solid horsemanship needed to be successful in any equestrian discipline. With HH Sensing, human and horse work in team, with or without tack, through how they perceive the situations. It works whether just starting or repurposing a horse, at any time of his life. We teach human and horse how to establish an active and dynamic dialogue that will assist them in any situation. Your 23


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horse can execute without being submissive, and you can become a leader of leaders. We are located in San Marcos, California, but work online and hold clinics worldwide upon request. Email hhsensing@icloud.com Visit www.HHSensing.com Call us at +1 760 715 1554

Features SPOTLIGHT ON ENDURANCE — Aline and Brisa Greene, Saint Horse Marchadores Aline’s methods for getting ready to ride: To start a horse from scratchI ride for 30 min daily for 2 weeks, then 1 hr every other day, another 2 weeks I ride for about 3 times a week, one day very laid back, the other day, my whole course, and one day sprint training! We practice at a walk, in gait and at a canter and gallop. All speeds are needed during the race. I have been creative around my area flats to prepare for hilly courses or just including repetition over small hills ( that's all I have ) for my horse's physical prep. My horses like to go , so I let them chose the pace but I lead the way! Limited distance rides are 25-35 miles which is what we do. But endurance rides can be 50 to 100 miles. The ride distance and course is set by the ride manager. There are vet checks at the beginning, middle and end of the race. At any point, if the horse is lame, not hydrated or does not pulse down, then the horse and rider are pulled from the race. The rider may also pull their horse from the race using their discretion. We have done well! I'm proud to say that I have taken 6 of them to rides , 4 mares and 2 Stallions! They are: 24


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Marchador Quarterly

April 2017

Esthetique do Premier - mare Erva-Doce de Tesoro - mare Graça do Lucero - mare Terra do Saint Horse - stallion Traituba Zumbido - stallion Nikita do Campo Real - mare (Megan Fallwell is the owner

I have been Top Ten and Top five three times in a row and Brisa has been First Junior three times! FOSH Gaited Distance Article - Junior Rider Spotlight AERC junior riders are riders under the age of 16. Brisa is only 10 years old this year and has already ridden hundreds miles in training, with 4 Limited Distance endurance rides under her belt. She has come a long way, baby! Brisa is a very special Junior Endurance Rider riding a Mangalarga Marchador in competition that her mom, Aline, gave up for her daughter. Erva-Doce de Tesouro is Aline’s favorite horse, a sweet, Mangalarga Marchador mare who Aline knew would take care of her daughter. And so, Aline Greene looks on with pride to see her loved ones also competing in a sport she is passionate about. Since that beginning, Brisa has changed horses and now rides Graca do Lucero, another Marchador mare. Distance riding is great for young riders. The time in the saddle makes them better riders and they also learn how to care for their horses better, paying attention to hydration, speed, recovery and overall preparation and fitness. Brisa has earned three AERC achievement awards - 1st place, Junior Rider. The first was at the Brixton Bridge ride where her sponsor was Dan Hallman. But most of the time, her riding partner is her mom Aline. Brisa says she likes distance riding because it’s competitive and you get to ride your horse through the woods!

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Editor’s note - In addition to Alessandra and Aline, several other Marchador horses and Marchador owners compete in Endurance races around the country and in Canada. There seems to be a fit, as the Marchadors are starting to finish well — top tens, top fives and even 2 wins. Congratulations!

Features Ask Tia!

Question:

Q: Grey horses are prone to melanomas, and while the good news is that they usually are not the malignant cancers we fear when we think of melanomas in people, they can grow and interfere with tack, eating, digestion, or split and get infected by flies. Some publications report that there is a vaccine which can reduce or even eliminate the growth. What is your opinion of the vaccine? Answer: MELANOMA VACCINE Your veterinarian takes a sample of the melanoma from your horse and it is sent to a company that makes a vaccine specific to the melanoma that your horse has. The vaccination involves a series of 4-biweekly injections along with a 6-month booster. This is similar to what we did years ago when we'd cut out a piece of a melanoma on a horse and "transplant" it to a different area on that horse; sometimes it worked to stimulate an immune response, sometimes it didn't. The new vaccine that's being marketed uses your horse's melanoma and then enhances it with patented (at this time) processes which make it more like to stimulate an immune response. Interestingly, this vaccine is only available AFTER your horse has melanoma, it does NOT prevent melanoma in an individual.

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Another approach that is gaining traction is gene therapy and involves injecting DNA segments that code for human interleukins—molecules that promote an inflammatory response —directly into equine melanomas. This stimulates an inflammatory response in the melanoma(s) and causes them to regress. A lot of research is being done with equine melanoma at this time. In horses except in uncommon situations, melanoma is considered to be a benign process that only causes trouble if the melanoma(s) are located in an area that causes trouble, for example, under the tail inhibiting a horse's ability to defecate. Unless the melanoma is causing problems or is at risk of trauma, the current recommendation is to leave them alone. I expect to see a change in that philosophy in the coming years.

About the Author: Tia Nelson, DVM has served on the USMMA Technical Board as our resident veterinarian for many years. A life-time member, currently, she is also on the Board of Directors as an officer, Vice President. Tia graduated from CSU College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and has managed her own practice in Helena, MT for over 15 years. She and husband, Derek breed Mangalarga Marchador horses on their ranch in MT under the breeding name Vista da Serra.

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Forms and Directories USMMA 2017 Membership - CLOSES 4/30/2017 Our Membership Drive is underway for 2017! Become a member by visiting this page — http://www.namarchador.org/ membership/member/ or by printing the form on the next page and mailing it in. Cathy Pierce is our Membership Chairperson. If you wish to join us in helping to build and promote the Mangalarga Marchador breed here in North America, please sign up to renew your annual membership. We have lowered dues to make it affordable for everyone to participate. We are lucky to have so many volunteers, like the USMMA Board that keep the association moving forward. And also our 13 Lifetime Members ($1,000). We are able to do more because of all of them! Your membership dues cover the website costs, the costs of holding board meetings, USMMA phone calls, legal fees and a few member benefits like printing brochures, 1-2 advertising campaigns and promotion efforts and the member show subsidy. The registry fees cover the costs for the registry office, paper, mailing and DNA tests with UC Davis. Member websites are linked to the USMMA database, and you can also create classified ads at no charge! Members receive discounts on all registration transactions. We had a rebuilding year in 2016 and are ready for 2017 to serve you. Our goals for 2017: 1 Reinstate our USMMA newsletter as a professional quarterly journal publication. 2 Hold a USMMA clinic and horse show. 3 Host regional events or get-togethers in 4 -5 regions. 4 Help facilitate ABCCMM activities such as ABCCMM inspection visits and other joint activities. 5 Hold elections for the new Board for 2018. 29


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USMMA 2017 Membership Application Please mail this form with your check to: Check made out to USMMA Lynn Kelley, USMMA Treasurer, 10487 E Rising Sun Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85262 Alternatively, you can also pay online using paypal.
 Email payment address: lynnkelley@me.com or via our website http://www.namarchador.org INDIVIDUAL ANNUAL DUES $50.00 FAMILY ANNUAL DUES

$75.00

LIFETIME DUES

$1,000.00

Member Name(s) ________________________________ Farm/Ranch Name: _______________________________ Street: __________________________________________ City, State, Zip ___________________________________

Email: _________________________________________ Home Phone: ___________________________________ Cell Phone: _____________________________________ Website Name: ___________________________________

Additional donation for ADVERTISING FUND $ ________ Additional donation for SHOW AWARDS FUND $ _______ Dues and contributions to the USMMA are not tax-deductible.

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From the Editor: Tresa Smith Enjoy your Spring edition of the USMMA Journal. We hope to publish quarterly, January, April, July and October. One of the things we hope to do with this publication is to feature the diversification of how the Marchador is used with real life examples. This Spring we are featuring Endurance Riding. Five years ago in the USMMA Spring Journal, we featured an article on Brazilian champion endurance rider Pedro Werneck . He has been an endurance competitor for 25 years , is a member of the Brazilian PAN American team and races in Brazil and internationally. Wherever he competes the horse of this choice is the Mangalarga Marchador. This Spring, I thought it interesting to report closer to home and feature two U.S.M.M. A. endurance riders, Aline Olviera Greene and Alessandra Deernick. Hope you enjoy hearing from them. Please feel free to share with us stories of how you use your Marchadors by emailing me at: montanamarchador@gmail.com SubmissionDeadlines: SUMMER-June 30: FALL: September 30 and WINTER: December 31. As we are just starting to roll out the USMMA Journal as a quarterly publication, we are seeking input as to what are readers want. Towards this end, we are asking the question: DO YOU WANT TO HAVE PAID ADVERTISING IN THE JOURNALS.? Please share your thoughts on this by emailing me. montanamarchador@gmail.com Happy Trails, Tresa

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Marchador Quarterly, Issue 2, 2017  
Marchador Quarterly, Issue 2, 2017  

Published for North American Mangalarga Marchador members. Please enjoy and contribute!

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