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anguard V If it matters to you, it matters to us.

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH ALABAMA

THE

MONDAY APRIL 16, 2018 VOL 1719 ISS 19

w w w.t he vangu ardus a.com

Pride Prom to return to USA

Dr. Jim Aucoin to retire

Softball team plays double header

USA Spectrum plans to give college students a second chance at prom on April 21.

The Department of Communication prepares to bid farewell to its chair.

USA wins one, loses one against ULM.

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Summer Safety Tips Junior Quarterback Dallas Davis Lead the Jags to victory agiainst Mississippi State University. Photo courtesy of USAJaguars.com

Spring game BY: CHARLES HARRISON | SPORTS EDITOR

University of South Alabama Chief of Police Zeke Aull has several summer safety tips to share with students. Photo by Shannon Lundgren BY: SHANNON LUNDGREN | EDITOR IN CHIEF

University of South Alabama Police Department Chief Zeke Aull shared some summer safety tips as students start to slide into summer. Aull suggested students prepare

for any upcoming road trips by making sure they have a small tool kit in their car, as well some extra oil. USAPD plans to host their annual Check My Ride event closer towards the end of the semester and will announce the date for the event soon. Check My Ride is an

event where USAPD officers help students make sure their cars are road-worthy. Traveling students can still rely on the LiveSafe app even if they are not in the Mobile area. Aull Continued on page 2

The University of South Alabama football team concluded spring training with the iHeartRadio Red versus Blue Spring Game on April 14. Two days before the game, however, the Jaguar football program received a shock when fifth-year senior quarterback Dallas Davis announced his intentions to leave the team. Last season, Davis split starts with fellow Junior Cole Garvin, and was the Jags’ most efficient passer with a 57.1 completion percentage and eight touchdowns in nine appearances. Continued on page 8


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Vanguard Summer safety tips, continued THE

Continued from page 1

University of South Alabama Alpha Hall South Room 336 Mobile, Ala., 36688 Tel: 460-7966 I Fax: 380-2850 Advertising: 460-7966 thevanguardeditor@gmail.com STAFF Editor in Chief Managing Editor Asst. Managing Editor Copy Editor Opinion Editor Sports Editor Web Editor Electronic File Mgr. Reporters

Shannon Lundgren Marissa Mason Richard Narramore Amber-Lynn Boothe Rachel Goodman Charles Harrison Krisha Amin Tricia West Hannah Blackburn Kenyan Carter Christian Hinkel Elaine Russ Natasha Spradlin Rachel Sullivan Photographers Briana Cunningham Cartoonist Clay Lolley

recounted a tale of a student who broke down on the side of the interstate and used LiveSafe to contact USAPD, who helped the student locate assistance. Students who have cars but live overseas or plan to fly back home are welcome to leave their cars for the summer in the Gamma lot, according to Aull. Previously, students who planned to leave their vehicles at USA while they returned home could leave their cars parked on Stadium Drive, but this year, USAPD selected Gamma lot to keep a closer eye on the vehicles. “The officers are in and out of

Advisors Advising Heather Leigh Stanley James Aucoin Advisor Emeritus John Sellers

Mission The Vanguard, the student-run newspaper of the University of South Alabama, serves its readership by reporting the news involving the campus community and surrounding areas. The Vanguard strives to be impartial in its reporting and believes firmly in its First Amendment rights.

Send letters and guest columns to: thevanguardeditor@gmail.com Letters and guest columns must be received by 7 p.m. on the Wednesday prior to the Monday publication. Submissions should be typed and must include the writer’s name, year, school, JagMail and telephone number. All submissions become the property of The Vanguard. The Vanguard reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for length and clarity. The Vanguard has a commitment to accuracy and clarity and will print any corrections or clarifications. To report a mistake, e-mail thevanguardeditor@gmail. com. The Vanguard is published Mondays during the academic year, except for exam periods and vacations, and is published twice each summer. The Vanguard is supported in part by an allocation from student activity fees and operates in the Office of Student Media. Issues are available at most University buildings and select offcampus locations. Freelance writers and photographers will receive payment upon successful publication.

To request additional issues at a stand near you, email: vanguarddistribution@gmail.com

according to Aull. “If it seems to good to be true, it probably is,” Aull said. When not working, students should avoid illegal substances, according to Aull. Synthetic marijuana, more commonly known as Spice, has been known cause an allergic reaction and could result in death, according to Aull. As for drinking alcohol, Aull encouraged students who are over 21 to drink responsibly. Students who are not old enough to legally drink should avoid alcohol, according to Aull. The public can contact USAPD at (251) 460-6312 with any questions

USA Crime Report

Advertising Advertising Manager Preston Smith Graphic Designer Jennette Bago

Gamma lot all the time,” Aull said. Students who plan to take a road trip should be sure to check the reviews of any hotels they stay at and be aware of their surroundings. It can be worth paying slightly more money to make sure a hotel has a good reputation, according to Aull. Hotels aren’t the only thing students should research. He said students planning to take summer jobs should be sure to research their potential employers to make sure they are legitimate, according to Aull. Students should be wary of jobs that require an initial financial investment because that could indicate an opportunity is a scam,

04/05/2018 Theft of Property Third Degree Gamma Parking Lot A purse was stolen from a vehicle while parked on campus.

Possession of Alcohol, Intoxication Intramural Fields A victim was transported to the hospital for a medical emergency.

04/06/2018 Assault Third Degree Softball Field Known person, with intent to cause physical injury to another, used his hands to strike two individuals causing minor physical injury to one party.

04/09/2018 Recovered Drug Paraphernalia USA Medical Center Assorted drugs and drug paraphernalia were found by the complainant and turned over to police. Recovered items included: empty syringes, syringes containing yellow substance, Gabapentin, Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen, metal spoons and lighters.

04/07/2018 Domestic Violence - Third Degree Delta 6 The crime of Domestic Violence Third Degree was reported from the Delta 6. 04/08/2018 Duty Upon Striking an Unoccupied Vehicle Communications Building A student reported that an unknown vehicle stuck their vehicle while parked on campus. 04/08/2018

04/09/2018 Theft of Lost Property Humanities Building A female student reported that her cell phone was missing during her class at the Humanities Building on the University of South Alabama main campus. 04/09/2018 Domestic Violence, Third Degree. Criminal Mischief, Third Degree, Reckless Endangerment USA Children’s & Women’s Hospi-

tal A woman and her infant daughter were assaulted by their boyfriend/ father.

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Avoiding Noise Induced Hearing Loss not worn. Students who have jobs in landscaping, construction, or bartending can also be exposed to harmful sound levels. Hunting, mowing the lawn, using leaf blowers and operating other types of loud machinery without proper hearing protection can be harmful. Additionally, anyone who listens to their personal listening devices too loudly is at risk. Think back to the last concert or loud event you attended. How did your ears feel afterwards? Ringing in the ears (tinnitus), a sensation of fullness, and a seemingly muffled feeling can be symptoms of a temporary threshold shift. A temporary threshold shift is a temporary loss of hearing and can result from exposure to loud noise for an extended period of time. Even though these symptoms are temporary, repeated temporary damage can add up to a permanent problem, putting you at risk for Everyone has been told to turn developing Noise Induced Hearing their music down at some point or Loss. another. At times it feels like the 2. How loud is too loud? equivalent of “You’ll shoot your eye The extent of damage to the out, kid!” auditory system from noise exMost of us know that being posure depends on several facexposed to loud sound for an extors: the decibel level of the noise tended period of time can damage our hearing, but the details may not (loudness), how close you are to be apparent. How loud is too loud? the noise source (distance), and How long is too long? Isn’t hearing the duration of noise exposure (time). The louder the noise level, loss just something my grandparthe greater risk of damage to your ents have? Being equipped with the answers hearing. Research shows that sounds greater than 85 decibels can to these questions will empower you to make informed choices and become hazardous to one’s hearing health and can cause a significant prioritize your hearing health. decrease in hearing over time. For 1. Who is at risk? distance, the closer you are to the Almost everyone, regardless of noise source, the louder the sound age, is at risk for Noise Induced is that reaches your ear. It is imHearing Loss. College students, in portant to distance yourself from particular, engage in activities that loud speakers, bands, fireworks, can be harmful to their hearing etc., to decrease the risk of hearing health. damage. The longer the duration These activities include attendof exposure to loud sounds, the ing sporting events or concerts on greater the risk of hearing loss. As campus without adequate hearing the loudness of sounds increase, protection. Members of the Jaguar the duration of exposure should Marching Band can be exposed decrease rapidly. to damaging sound levels during It is recommended to limit expohours of practice and performance sure to sounds at 85 decibels to 8 if adequate hearing protection is BY: LEAH HORN, WILL BARON, ANNIE SUGGS AND JESI PRUETT | CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

USA Audiology graduate students share tips on avoiding Noise Induced Hearing Loss

hours. Individuals who are exposed to sounds that are above 85 decibels should limit their exposure to below 8 hours. Now that you have a little background on what can cause noise induced hearing loss, what sounds are you encountering that could be damaging your hearing? 3. How to Listen Safely: None of the aforementioned statistics mean that you can’t enjoy going to see your favorite band it simply means you might need to adjust your listening habits. Several studies have measured the maximum volume output of iPhones at 115 dB, louder than a lawn mower. Most sources recommend keeping your volume at 60 percent or less, but don’t forget about the relationship between time and volume. If you are listening at levels higher than 60 percent, limit the amount of time you are listening and give your ears “breaks” of quiet. Noise cancelling headphones reduce the amount background noise that competes with your music, meaning you won’t have to turn your volume up as high to drown out the sounds around you. When you know in advance you will be in a loud environment like a football game or concert, wear hearing protection. The classic yellow 3M plugs are available in bulk on Amazon and are effective for a variety of environments. These do take practice to insert correctly and the protection they provide is based on the quality of the fit. For casual musicians and frequent concert-goers, there are special plugs that provide protection without causing the music to sound muffled or distorted called “high fidelity” plugs. These can be found easily through online retailers like Amazon. For professional musicians, music majors, and band members, custom hearing protection can be a valuable investment. While more expensive, these devices are more comfortable over long periods of

time because they are made to fit the individual’s unique ear shape. For these, you would need to visit an audiologist so that they can made custom impressions of your ears. Finally, an easy and free way to be more aware of your noise exposure is to measure the level of noise you are around. There are several free sound level meter apps available, though their accuracy depends a great deal on the calibration of your phone’s microphone. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Sound Level Meter app can measure noise. It’s free and contains a wealth of information in addition to being a fairly accurate way to measure noise levels. 4. What to do if you think you have a hearing loss: You will need to see an audiologist to have your hearing tested accurately. Audiologists are the health care professionals who specialize in hearing and balance disorders. We have an ear, nose, throat physician and multiple audiologists at the Speech and Hearing Center on USA’s campus. The center is open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. After scheduling your hearing test, make sure that you aren’t exposed to loud noise for at least 14 hours prior to the appointment. Exposure to noises above 85 decibels within this time frame can negatively affect your results. The testing conducted will include a baseline audiogram that makes it easier to track changes in your hearing over time. If a hearing loss is identified, the audiologist can work with you to provide amplification and communication strategies to help you cope in difficult listening situations. Lastly, you should make sure to protect your residual hearing and prevent any further loss by using the hearing protective devices listed above.


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Gentle Giants: Understanding the banana spider

Dr. John McCredie said that banana spiders are interesting and gentle animals, but asks that they do not be disturbed. Photo courtesy of Fabien Michel BY: ELAINE RUSS | REPORTER

Any native of Mobile has encountered one- the giant, yellow monster that is the banana spider. With their large bodies and long webs, they are impossible not to notice, and even harder to avoid. But, according to Dr. John McCreadie, a general entomology professor at the University of South Alabama and curator of the USA Arthropod Depository, the banana spider is gentle and should not cause concern. The banana spider, or Naphila cavipes, is a fascinating creature, McCreadie said. “Their ideal habitat is any open or broken vegetation where they can spin their webs,” McCreadie said. “It is native to the Americas, from Canada to Southern Argentina. Their diet is anything that gets stuck in their webs and is small enough to kill.” The larger spiders are females. “The males are tiny, and I mean tiny,” McCreadie said. “The big ones are the size of a pea. They hang around the nest looking for love. I have seen females about five inches in diameter with their legs spread out, and I’ve seen webs that stretch to about thirty feet.”

The cause for the size difference is evolutionary, McCreadie said. “One theory behind the size difference is that a larger female body is more advantageous to generating offspring,” McCreadie said. “The bigger the size, the more eggs and thus the chance of getting her genes into the next generation. Another reason is that spiders are predators and a smaller male would not alarm a female in her web.” Most importantly to humans, the spider cannot cause any harm to them, McCreadie said. “They are very gentle and will only bite if cornered,” McCreadie said. “They have venom, so that makes them poisonous. However, so do honey bees and fire ants. The question is, ‘how toxic is the venom?’ If they bite, it may hurt, it may not. But, it won’t ruin your weekend.” The banana spider, despite its intimidating size, will not bite unless threatened, McCreadie said. “How often have you heard of a banana spider bite, as opposed to a bee sting?” McCreadie said. “If you go up to their web and poke them gently, they will run away. The aggression they show is to their prey, or their dinner.” Banana spiders are also benefi-

cial to the ecosystem, McCreadie said.

“The question is, ‘how toxic is the venom?’ If they bite, it may hurt, it may not. But, it won’t ruin your weekend.” -Dr. John McCreadie

“They are predators and as such act as a control mechanism on the populations of other terrestrial vertebrates,” McCreadie said. Additionally, they are an asset to

South America, according to McCreadie. “Some native people use their webs as fishing nets,” McCreadie said. “Their silk might have medical values as well.” McCreadie suggested that anyone that encounters a banana spider should observe them and leave them be. “Watch it; they are really quite interesting,” McCreadie said. “But, beyond that, please do not disturb them. Do not be afraid of them. Just like us they are trying to make a living and stay one step ahead of the tax man.”


LIFE

5 USA Spectrum to host Pride Prom der identity or sexual orientation,” Baylor said. “In high school, I didn’t feel comUniversity of South Alabama’s fortable going to prom due to how LGBTQ and allies group, USA my peers thought I would dress Spectrum, is planning to host Pride according to the way they viewed Prom on Saturday April 21, 2018 my sexuality and gender expresfrom 7 - 11 p.m. in the Student sion,” USA freshman Jordan CampCenter Terrace Room. Pride Prom bell said. “Pride Prom is a second is an event where members of the chance for me to feel comfortable community can come together, in the skin I was born in and in the dance and celebrate their sexual clothes I choose to wear.” orientation and gender identity. The dress code is anything the atThis year’s theme is Slay For The tendee feels comfortable in, accordGawds, alluding to space and the ing to Baylor. cosmos as well as glamor and fash“We encourage everyone to stick ion, according to Spectrum Vice to our theme of space and the galPresident Meaghann Baylor. axy, but how you choose to express “Our goal for Pride Prom is that is up to you!” Baylor said. “I ultimately for everyone to have a personally will be dressed to the good time, but especially those who nines, however, if you want to come didn’t have a great prom experiin casual attire, it’s 100 percent up ence due to issues with their gento you!”

Single tickets are $3 with a USA student ID and $5 without a student ID, while couple’s tickets are five dollars, according to Baylor. All

“My advice to the working student would be to just learn to relax,” Mahlghon stated. “Learn to relax and not feel guilty about it, and learn to schedule time to just do nothing. It will change your life, I swear.” Mahlghon mentioned that she will relax by watching a set number of Netflix episodes (and not letting herself binge watch) or even just by planning time to play in her phone. Jennifer Kantor, USA science major and Starbucks employee said she plans relaxation time to avoid burnout. “My day is really timed out, every hour is filled with something. I try to give myself an hour just to relax every day or else I’ll crash and be useless,” Kantor said. Kantor insisted that it is important to have balance in all aspects of your life. Plan to take the week of finals off, and budget for it if you have to. “I save all of my vacation hours to take finals week off,” Kantor said. “Before I got vacation at my job, I would just save my tips all year to

take the week off. Do it for your mental health. Finals are stressful enough without working eight hours a day. It’s hard to relate to other students because our stresses aren’t exactly the same. Sure we take the same tests, but they might get five days to study for it while I will get five hours to cram everything into my mind.” Kantor also said maintaining her social life has helped her cope with the stress. “Don’t just budget money to focus on school, budget money and reserve time to spend with your friends,” Kantor said. “Just an hour for lunch every week can keep you motivated and also gives you someone to talk to when life starts to get really tough.” USA Business Major and Starbucks Shift Supervisor Hannah McDuffie gave a final piece of advice to students, and perhaps the most important for some hardworking student-employees to remember. “College can be difficult, even for someone who only goes to class

BY: MARISSA MASON | MANAGING EDITOR

“Pride Prom is a second chance for me to feel comfortable in the skin I was born in and in the clothes I choose to wear.” - Jordan Campbell

transactions are cash-only, according to Baylor. Baylor said that many of the club

members plan to attend as single attendees and participants should not feel pressured to have a date. It’s a good chance to meet both members of USA Spectrum as well as non-members, according to Baylor. “I really hope that we have a good turn out,” Baylor said. “We have been looking forward to this event all year and are planning for so many fun activities. I don’t want anyone to miss out because I truly believe this will be our best event yet.” The event is set to have pizza, cake, refreshments, music, a few drag performers and some small contests, according to Baylor. “The best advice I can give is to have fun, don’t limit yourself,” said Baylor. “Get out and get to know us and we will return the favor.”

Advice for working students BY: TRICIA WEST | ELECTRONIC FILE

MANAGER

For some students at the University of South Alabama, a normal day consists of five hours of class, an eight hour work day and then additional studying when they get off the clock. If that sounds like you, you’re not alone in the struggle. According to CBS News, a 2011 U.S. Census report determined that 71 percent of the nation’s 19.7 million college undergraduates were actively employed. Reise Mahlghon is a USA undergraduate and full time Wal-Mart employee. Her family immigrated from Germany with little money and thus her parents can not lend her financial help with her education. Mahlgon said she works to get an early start on her student loans. “Most days it just feels like I’m grinding from dawn to dusk,” Mahlghon said. “When I’m not working, I feel guilty for relaxing. I never really catch a break.”

and studies and does nothing else,” McDuffie said. “Just remember not to be so hard on yourself.” “Learn from your bad grades and mistakes,” McDuffie said.“Be proud of your grades if it was honestly the best you could do with that you were given.” With college depression rates being so high, according to a study by Neumann University, suicide is the second-leading cause of death among 20 to 24-year-olds, it is important to remember that suicide rates amongst young adults are highest in students who work more that 30 hours a week. Students who work more than thirty hours a week are also more likely to drop out compared to those who work 15 or fewer. Appointment for managing school, work and relationship stress are available through USA Counseling and Testing Services by calling 251-460-7051.


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Department of communication chair retiring

Dr. James Aucoin has been employed at the University of South Alabama for 24 years. Photo by Sara Boone BY: RICHARD NARRAMORE | ASST. MANAGING EDITOR

After 35 years of studying and practicing journalism, department of communication chair Dr. James “Jim” Aucoin plans to retire after this semester. Aucoin’s road to department chair is a winding one. Aucoin was born into a working class family hailing from Missouri. His father, a World War II Bronze Star veteran, managed a dry cleaners and his mother ironed clothes and baby sat for money. As the only boy of six children, Aucoin was told from an early age he would attend college. “I was told you’re going to go to college, you’re going to go to college, you’re going to go to college, because at that point in the 1960’s, college was seen as a way to better yourself and improve your life beyond what your parents had,” Aucoin said. Aucoin went on to the University of Missouri-Kansas City and majored in English, something he considers a depressive reaction from the loss of his father in his freshman year. It was the summer before his senior year of college that Aucoin considered pursuing journalism. “I was sitting on the balcony of my apartment reading Nation magazine,” Aucoin said. “I thought to myself ‘I could probably do this’ - publish articles. So I started thinking about becoming a journalist. I met a friend who was going to college with me who also wanted

to be a journalist and we hung out and talked about how we want to do that.” Young, in love and engaged to his first wife, Aucoin had pondered the future he could provide his fiance with only an English degree in hand. “By the time I was in my senior year it was pretty clear there was not many jobs for literary critics unless you had a master’s and or a Ph. D.,” Aucoin said. Nevertheless, Aucoin pushed ahead to get his Master of English, as a means of sticking around while his wife finished college. Aucoin never received his Master of English due to time constraints and foreign language requirements. After his finace finished, the two decided to move. “What we were planning to do, because we wanted to move, when she finished I was going to go to graduate school in journalism and get a master’s in journalism,” Aucoin said. “I applied to the University of Colorado and the University of Missouri because Missouri was a good school, but Colorado was a more interesting place to go. She really wanted Colorado.” So the two moved two moved to Colorado and Aucoin completed his master of journalism. He then landed a job at the Lincoln Nebraska Journal in Lincoln, Nebraska. Eventually, Aucoin and his wife had moved back to Missouri so she could take care of her grandparents and a year and half later they divorced. It was one year later Aucoin met Peggy “Peg” Hansen while covering a story about a new clinic in the area. Aucoin fell in love again. When Hansen left Missouri to go Denver, Colorado to become a nurse practitioner, Aucoin followed. “I decided to follow her there,” Aucoin said. “So I quit the job at the newspaper and couldn’t find a job in Columbia because Columbia has a lot more journalist than there are jobs.”

Since he couldn’t find work, Aucoin decided to continue his education and get his doctorate in journalism. In 1990, while in the middle of his doctorate, Hansen and Aucoin married and then moved to Mobile. Hansen was reluctant to move to Alabama at first, but Aucoin was able to convince her after pointing out Mobile’s warm climate and proximity to the beach. Fast forward 12 years and Aucoin became chair of the department of communication at the behest of his fellow employees.

“I am just one of many chairs that do a good job on this campus,” -Dr. JameAucoin Over the course of his time as chair, Aucoin developed student media at USA into the pogram it is today. He created Due South and helped secure funds to establish

97.1 The Prowl, a student ran radio. “I am just one of many chairs that do a good job on this campus,” Aucoin said. Aucoin said he plans to continue to dabble in journalism and continue to write after he retires. Aucoin will leave behind a legacy of supporting student media and promoting journalism by creating the Peggy Hansen and Jim Aucoin Journalism Scholarship. Aucoin founded the scholarship with money he inherited after his wife’s death. “This has been my life for the past 24 years,” Aucoin said. “This department has been and the students who have been here have been a big part of my life for 24 years. I really wanted to do something that would continue to help students get an education and encourage students to get an education in journalism. I think it’s important.”


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Pets of USA: Slasher

Pets of USA is aimed to showcase a little bit of cuteness and happiness around USA. Note that pets are not allowed to live in USA housing without special permissions. All pets featured must be legally owned. To submit pictures for Pets of USA, email TheVanguardEditor@gmail.com with the pet’s name, owner’s name and photos of the pet.

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Slasher often likes to sing along to his favorite metal bands. Photo courtesy of Shannon Lundgren

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251-343-6800 • MirabelleMobile.com Slasher isn’t winking at you; he really is one-eyed. Photo courtesy of Shannon Lundgren

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SPORTS

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Spring Game, continued Continued from page 1

Davis was unavailable to comment on his reason for leaving the team, however in an interview with WJGH News Davis said he fully intends to transfer and play for another institution this fall. As a fifth-year who has already graduated from USA, Davis has the ability to transfer to another school and play as a graduate transfer. Davis’s decision leaves junior Cole Garvin, junior Evan Orth and freshman Cephus Johnson all jockeying for the starting job. Johnson got the call for the spring game leading the Jaguar’s first string offense onto the field. “It’s a big step, but me and my teammates worked real hard to get here,” Johnson said about getting the start. “It was fun, we went out there and competed.” The freshman set to work putting together an early touchdown drive, capped off with a 44-yard touchdown pass caught by junior wide receiver Jamarius Way. Johnson finished out his time on the field with a fourth quarter touchdown pass to freshman wide receiver Kawaan Baker. Johnson was 9-12 for 126 yards and two touchdowns making him the Jaguar’s most productive passer in the game. Garvin split the first string snaps with Johnson during the game. Garvin is the only potential Jaguar starter who has started a regular season game at the collegiate level. Garvin played in eight games last season for the Jags, he had a 52.6 completion percentage posting 1,490 passing yards and seven touchdowns.

In the spring game, Garvin struggled completing only three of his eight passes for only 98 yards and one touchdown. 68 of Garvin’s 98 passing yards came when he hit a short pass to Baker with 11:22 to go in the first half. Baker then broke several tackles and dashed down the field for the score in the longest play of the game. Orth lead the second string offense for most of the game, connecting on eight of his 13 passes for 72 yards. “I thought the decision making was good,” head coach Steve Campbell said of the quarterback play. “There were some explosive plays, Cephus hit the deep ball early that got us going and he hit another on that last drive, he threw the ball well down the field. I thought Cole did some good things, and Evan had some cards stacked against him with the second offense going against the one defense but he handled things well to not put his group in a bad situation. I was pleased with the quarterback play, but I need to watch the film to see where we are at.” One of the biggest changes in the Jaguar offense this season is the implementation of the tripleoption running style. The Jaguar running game was explosive in the Spring Game with 22 carries for 135 yards and a touchdown. The Jaguar offensive line is a point of concern for the upcoming season. The Jags came into the spring game with only nine healthy bodies spread across five offensive line positions. “I think those guys have adjusted well,” Campbell said about the offensive line. “I am really proud of the offensive line because we finished the spring with nine

“I am really proud of the offensive line because we finished the spring with nine healthy bodies. Those guys fought their behinds off all spring.” - Steve Campbell

healthy bodies. Those guys fought their behinds off all spring. Today I had three guards play four positions, they weren’t getting a whole lot of rest but they got a lot of reps; they’ve been doing that all spring. I’m really pleased with the way that the offensive line is progressing, we have a long way to go but I like the way those guys are working and pulling together facing adversity. Those nine guys didn’t tap out when the could’ve at any point in time. Normally you are hopefully three deep on the offensive line, we weren’t even two deep.” The first string defense excelled in the game shutting out the second string offense and posting a dominant performance, after adjusting to a new system. The Red versus Blue game now concludes the 2018 Spring Training period who will resume practice this upcoming fall. The Jags will kick of the 2018

season on Sept. 1 at Ladd Peebles Stadium against the Louisiana Tech Bulldogs. To stay up to date on Jaguar football checkout the Vanguard Facebook page @TheVangaurdUSA or go to the Vanguard Website www.TheVanguardUSA.com.

Redshirt freshman Kawaan Baker earned the longest gain of the day during the Spring Game. Photo courtesy of USAJaguars.com


SPORTS

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USA men’s baseball wins doubleheader BY: CHRISTIAN HINKEL | REPORTER

The University of South Alabama men’s baseball team won both games of their doubleheader against the University of Georgia Southern on Friday, April 14. In the first game of the doubleheader, the Jaguars jumped out to a quick 7-3 lead by the end of the fourth inning. The Jags lead increased to 9-3 in the sixth inning with home runs from junior outfielder Travis Swaggerty, and senior infielder Will Luft. The Eagles fought back and cut the Jags’ lead in half, but after three outs in the top of the ninth inning the Jags walked away with the 9-6 win.

Senior pitcher Tyler Carr started for the Jags in the first game of the doubleheader and has a record of 6-2 on the season as a starter with this victory. Swaggerty filled up the stat sheet with a stellar performance. For the game, Swaggerty had two runs, two hits, four RBIs, and two home runs. Luft and senior infielder Paul Russo also had notable performances. Luft scored two runs to go alongside two RBI’s, and Russo also scored twice and added an RBI to his stat line as well. The Jaguars advanced to 19-13 on the season and 8-4 in Sun Belt Conference play with this victory before moving on to the second half of Friday’s

doubleheader. Freshman pitcher JoJo Booker started the second game against the Eagles. The Jags dominated the Eagles in the second game by a score of 8-1. This victory gave Booker an overall record of 2-1 on the season as a starter. The Jaguars didn’t find themselves on the scoreboard until the bottom of the third inning when Russo ran in on a Swaggerty base hit, but that didn’t hurt the Jags due to their solid play on defense. The Jags only allowed one run all game long. Once the Jags took their lead in the bottom of the third inning it was never relinquished. Russo and sophomore infielder

Hunter Stokes both had two runs on the night. Swaggerty once again had a fine performance with one run, but three RBIs. Junior infielder Brendan Donovan also was key to the Jaguars’ success as he scored one run and posted two RBI’s. With both of these victories on Friday, the Jaguars are now 20-13 on the season. The Jaguars extend their win streak to three games and also boast an impressive 9-4 record in conference play. The Jags are scheduled to play again Wednesday, April 18 on the road against The University of New Orleans, and scheduled to have their next conference series on the road against Texas State starting on April 20.

USA softball splits doubleheader BY: HANNAH BLACKBURN | REPORTER

The Jaguar softball team (2121, 6-10 SBC) split their conference doubleheader Friday night at Jaguar Field against the University of Louisiana-Monroe (22-16, 9-8 SBC), winning the first game 6-1 and falling in the last matchup 131. In the first game, freshman infielder Hannah Smith had one run, two hits and three runs batted in during her three at-bats. Sophomore infielder Katelyn Gruich had one and two hits in three at-bats. Senior outfielder Haleigh Lowe had one run and one hit in three at-bats and senior infielder Kristian Foster had one run and one hit in three at-bats. A solo home run from Smith in the second inning and a triple from MC Nichols, her first triple of the season, which scored Gruich and put the Jaguars on the board. Sophomore infielder Brittani Reid’s double in the third scored Lowe from second base. In the fifth inning, freshman catcher Kamdyn Kvistad’s double scored Foster from second base, and Smith’s single allowed sopho-

more infielder Brittani Reid and pinch runner Taylor Stevens to score the final two runs of the first meeting. Senior pitcher Devin Brown held the Warhawks to just one earned run in the matchup. Brown had 10 strikeouts in the game with four of those catching the batter looking. In the final game, the Jaguars’ offense was unable to outlast the ULM defense as the Jags’ lone run came in the bottom of the first inning from a sacrifice fly ball to right field, allowing senior infielder Kaliegh Todd to score from third base. The Warhawks scored six runs in the top of the second inning, capitalizing on a one-run lead. Lowe was the only Jaguar to record multiple hits in this game as she went 2-for-4 at the plate. Todd had one run and one hit and foster had one hit in her three at-bats. Despite falling in the second game, head coach Becky Clark is proud of how her team played, and is confident in their ability to bounce back. “Devin [Brown] had a little bit of a slow start in game one today,

but she picked it up at the end and was a lot more efficient,” Clark said. “She hit her spots a little better and picked up her velocity. We got some timely hits as well. In game two, we had opportunities to put some runs on the board and didn’t do what we needed to do. We had some tough things happen to us

earlier in the game and let it get away from us. Lowe was the only Jaguar to record multiple hits in this game. We gave up too many free passes. At the end of the day that’s what hurt us in game two.” To find out more about the USA softball program and other USA athletics, visit USAJaguars.com.

Outfielder Haleigh Lowe was the only Jaguar to record multiple hits in the second game. Photo courtesy of USAJaguars.com


OPINION

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Covering political topics in the classroom BY: NATASHA SPRADLIN | REPORTER

U.S. citizens in the 21st century seem to navigate political polarization by diving headfirst into heated debates online or refusing to participate in political discussion altogether. It’s a no-win scenario. We find ourselves unfollowing friends and family on social media and ignoring the elephant in the room on holidays. We’re all stressed, we’re all frustrated and we’re all worried about the future of our country. Yet, we can’t seem to hash out our differences and come together to move forward. In a study conducted by Pew Research, 14 percent of Republicans said they have a lot of friends in the opposing party. Nine percent of Democrats said the same thing.

“I would much rather them do it in a college environment than wait until they get into their jobs.” -Genevieve Dardeau How do we overcome the false narrative that claims a deep, irreparable divide exists in the United States when we avoid or belittle people who disagree with us? We need to know how to distinguish facts from opinions. We need to be able to ask questions, acknowledge biases in ourselves and others, examine information/ evidence and draw conclusions. We need to accept when we’re wrong and make changes where necessary. Which raises the question, are universities doing enough to ensure students leave higher education with these critical thinking skills? Senior instructor in the University of South Alabama’s department of communication, Genevieve Dardeau, engaged students in controversial issues and current events such as gun control and im-

migration during a public speaking lecture on persuasion this month. Dardeau said she allows politics in the classroom because she wants to set the example for students. Many students are nervous when they enter public speaking. They question whether they can explore topics related to religion, sex and politics. So what makes Dardeau’s approach different? “If you’re not exposed to it then how do you develop the discourse?” Dardeau said. “How do you set up an argument that is based on facts? What is a fact? How do you evaluate that? How do you defend it?” According to Dardeau, professors should strive to truly educate, not indoctrinate students. “I would much rather them do it in a college environment than wait until they get into their jobs,” Dardeau said. USA student Kristina Evans thanked Dardeau after the lecture. Evans admires Dardeau for taking charge of the classroom and encouraging students to participate in difficult conversations. “When she mentioned gun control she told us she was a gun owner,” Evans said. “Well, sure she’s a gun owner, and she may be a recreational hunter, but that doesn’t mean she’s for or against guns. She’s just saying she’s used guns, and she uses them now. It wasn’t like ‘this is what I believe so you should too.’ She allowed you to have your own dimension in the conversation.” Evans is supportive of discussing politics in the classroom. However, she feels it should be done mildly and in a healthy manner. USA student Jason KirstenMatrone agreed and believed that as a country, we are too afraid to talk about controversial issues. That needs to change. “I think it’s especially appropriate in public speaking because all opinions are out on the floor,” Matrone said. “So to have someone who is modeling that helps build a student’s confidence to stand up in

front of everybody and speak. She (Dardeau) didn’t hold back anything which is why it was so good.” Universities have a responsibility to prepare students for the real world, and the real world includes

political discourse. If professors continue to shy away from controversial subjects, students will never learn how to navigate them. Are these the kind of leaders we want to send into our communities?

A study conducted by Pew Research found that 14 percent of republicans have friends in the opposing party and that democrats have 9 percent in the opposing party.

YOUR OPINION ) : S T N COU We know you have opinions. Share your thoughts with The Vanguard at thevanguardeditor@gmail.com


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April 16 2018  
April 16 2018  
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