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THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND INAUGURATES ITS SEVENTH PRESIDENT LEFT: Faculty members and student leaders garbed in traditional black robes wait for inauguration proc ee dings to b egin. BELOW: President Baum, Governor Chafee and Professor R. Rockaf ellow enjoy a w itty comment by Dr. Blackwe ll , President of Furman College. TOP : Mrs. John M. Sapinsley, Chairman of the Board of Tru stees of State Colleges co ngratulates President Baum after placing the enchained medallion of hi s office about his neck. CENTER

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Though many yearbook staffs consider a dedication in the introduction of the book as deadweight, the 1969 Grist proudly dedicates this yearbook to Dr. John F. Quinn , retiring Vice-President of Student Affairs. The University Manual states, " The VicePresident for Student Affairs will be responsible for the direction of all student personnel activities of a non-academic nature. He will coordinate the activities of the following officers: the Director of Athletics .. . the Medical Director ... the Coordinator of Advisement and Counseling .. . the Dean of Students . . . the Director of Student Activities and the Memorial Union ... the Director of Housing . . the Director of Student Aid . . . the International Student Advisor . . the University Chaplains . Through these services Dr. Quinn has earned the respect of all who know him. This dedication is our way of expressing gratitude and appreciation to Dr. Quinn for the time and talents he has rendered to us here at the University of Rhode Island .

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Dr. Quinn discusses student government with Senator Julie Lepper.

A SPECIAL DEDICATION: Dr. John F. Quinn Retiring Vice President of Student Affairs After 22 Years of Service To the University of Rhode Island

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VICC PRESIDENT FOR SfUOÂŁ-NT AFFAIRS "'T THE U~IV,R'SITY OF R~ODE. ISLAND

PE HAS SEI!V'!_O nit: LIAI'_~E_I~9T_Y

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THE GRIST In a broad sense, everything revolves-the earth, the seasons, the life cycle ; and by functional definition , every revolution has a central point. Revolution on university campuses may circulate around the inanely repetitious, the intellectually perceptive, or the shatteringly destructive. There is a revolution in progress at our University. Its machinery has been rotating for about five years. Its dimensions have been small and its achievements modest, but its focal point, increasingly identifiable, has been the earnest effort on the part of many students, faculty, and administration to achieve a larger sense of responsible community. This focal point is being attained, and while some aspects of the revolution have been disconcerting , and some abrasive, none has threatened the essential thrust of the University's progress. Substantial revolutionary steps have been achieved this year. More will develop in the years ahead, if we continue to build on the platform of responsible community. John F. Quinn Vice President for Student Affairs

Editor-In-Chief: Edward L. Frisella Managing Editor: Peter Robinson Photography Editor: Joe Norris Ass't. Managing Editor: Salim Valimahomed Secretary : Nancy Oster Business Manager: Janet Lee


Student Life .... 24

Personalities .. . 68

Academics .. .. 42


Organizations .. . . 232

Seniors . ... 324

Residences .. . . 78 23


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REGISTRATION: Convention of the Confused Every year September brings what has to be the convention of the confused--otherwise known as registration . Here as nowhere else, a student can face the " Establishment" in lines and signs and computer goofs. Sl ips to get in--cards to fill out--cards for sleeping--cards for eating--cards for cars-" Deposit at Station # 4, proceed to . Name- Co ll ege- Cu rriculum-024-40-7960. Your life story told in a serial nu mber. Encouraging? Inspiring? Hardly. When you reach the fina l station you can buy a calendar for 25c and get a b lotter free. Somehow it doesn 't quite b lot out the haunting feeling that the whole experience is all a nightmare, a reoccuring one at that.

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BELOW LEFT : Reg istr ation lines seem neverending to impatient students. ABOVE LEFT : Keaney Gymnasium holds more perpetual lines inside. BELOW : Freshman co-e d fl ee ts reaction to Registration 1968.

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RODMAN: Confusion and Aggravation For those of indomitable spirit and patience Rodman is the epic test. Students wishing to drop and add courses congregate here. Endless lines, confusion , disgruntled people , red tape, drop cards , add cards, section cards all make the process of changing courses unique. The experience of waiting in line for an hour only to find the section closed shouldn 't be denied to anyone. The system at Rodman Hall is URI at its worst: mechanized, dehumanized and impersonal. Thankfully it doesn't represent the usual way of life here.


FAR LEFT : More confusion can be found in Drop and Add Lines. FAR LOWER LEFT: Students wait in line to pay term bill. NEAR LEFT: Bewildered co~ed may find a needed course closed out. NEAR LEFT BELOW : Mr.

V. Petrarca, Head of Bursar, aids during this frustrating period .BELOW: Sgt. Garron ad~ vises a fresh on ROTC courses.

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BELOW : stu dents campus A c ri tic book.

Memoria l Un ion ba ll room fills with who want to contribute by joining organizations. BELOW FAR RIGHT : browses through 1968 Grist Year-

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CLUB 72: A Contribution of Self An enthusiastic freshman class encountered the many URI organizations on Club 72 Day. Boasting " something for everyone ," Club 72 is designed to introduce and encourage student participation in extra curricular activities. Among the many organizations represented were the All Nations Club, Grist Yearbook , Memorial Union, Arts Council , and for the sports minded the Sailing and Horseman 's C lubs. Club 72 is more than just a super recruiting station. It gives students an opportunity to meet the people behind the organizations and perhaps of even greater significance , it demonstrates the vital ingredient in any worthwhile experience: contribution of self.

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FROSH BARBECUE: The Beginning Of A long Friendship After a day of welcoming speeches and farewells , the barbeque on the " quad " provided the Freshmen with a well deserved change of pace. Members of the Dining Services, decked out in cowboy hats and neckerchiefs and armed with fried chicken , corn on the cob and apple pie , extended their brand of URI hospitality to the Class of 72. Amid shyness and laughter the barriers fell and easy compatibility replaced them . Soon the freshmen were discovering the essence of student life : camaraderie.

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FAR LEFT : William Taylor, Head of Dining Services, pauses to enjoy a moment of tranquility then back to work. TOP RIGHT : Smiles, corn-on-the-cob, and cokes are served at fresh barbecue. ABOVE: The

"q uad " is a perfect place to si t and enjoy the company of new friends.

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ABOVE: The singing group " Friend and Lover" entertain URI students. ABOVE RIGHT: Basketball court provides a friendly atmosphere for casual gathering and dancing .

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NIGHTLIFE: Entertainment Gives Boost to Student Spirits

In spite of the now famous Exodus from Kingston come Friday, ample and varied entertainment can be found at URI. Dances on the tennis courts give college men and co-eds a chance to relax from the rigors of higher education, while stage product ions such as FRIEND AND LOVER provide variety and depth to URI 's extra-curri c ular events.

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CONVOCATIONS 68: An Expression of Peaceful Revolution Dr. Werner A. Baum , URI 's new president, addressed students and faculty as the academic year officially began at the opening convocation. Jeffrey Wright, Student Senate President, also addressed the gathering. Holding aloft a beer can, a symbol of the University 's " social condi tions ," Mr. Wright explained that these conditions could not be separated from the classroom. The sp iri t of this year's convocation was change ; a revolutionary and radical chang e achieved by honest and sincere cooperation between students and faculty.

Every sea t in Keaney Gym is fill ed wi th parents, students and faculty members.

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A Time To Learn Each one of you- that is, each one of you that is worth his salt-is strugg ling w ith certain questions. You are asking yo urselves and perhaps your friends: What is life? What is success? What is happiness? What is good? And in the dark of the ni ght you are ask in g yo urself : What am I? What do I want ? Where am I goi ng? Th ose questions you must ask , somehow, sometime; and the answers you find for them w ill determine largely what yo u will become and what you will find. Primarily, yo u have come to college to learn the answers to these questions, and your life depends on the answers. Each one of you wil l have to reach his own conclusions, since no one can reach them for you. Two thousand years ago, Pilate asked: " What is truth? " Mi ll ions have repeated the question , thousands have striven to answer it-and it remains the enigma of the world. You, too, must strive to answer it. You probably will never succeed, but in striving you will attain somethi ng li ke education; you wil l learn something like wisdom. Out of the confusion , the con tradictions, the eter nal mysteries, you will evolve a philosophy of life-and to evolve that philosophy is your primary purpose in coming to college.

Percy Marks " Advice to Freshmen "

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We should not forget that our tradition is one of protest and revolt, and it is stultifying to celebrate the rebels of the past ... while we silence the rebels of the present. Henry Steele Commager: Freedom, Loyalty, Dissent.

ACADEMICS


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UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

KINGSTON, RHODE ISlAND 02881

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR

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Does the phrase " peacefu l revo lution'' apply to URI ? I believe it does. During my six months here, I have noted a clear trend towards greater student involvement in campus life. I find students to be highly interested in campus life. I find students to be high ly interested in enhancing the academic climate, in broadening extracurricu lar opportunities , in improving both the reality and the image of the University. Our students and faculty generally have demonstrated a willing ness to work toward change for the genera l good in the sp irit of reason which should prevail in a university. There are student representatives on every university committee which directly affects student life, quietly working toward a better community. There are faculty committees at work inv!)stigating and evaluating programs and curricula. Lines of communication among faculty, students , and administration are growing stronger because individuals and groups are willing to strive for mutual understanding. There is a spirit of change for the better on this campus, and it is to the credit of the students that-be it " revolution " or " evolution"-it is peaceful and effective.

Werner A. Baum Pres ident & Prof. of Physics

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Dean Fredrick Amling Col lege of Business Administration

Dean Heber W. Youngken Jr. College of Pharmacy

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Dean James W. Cobble College of Agriculture

Dean Beverly D. Cusack Co llege of Home Eco nomics

Dean Martha 0 . Sayles Coll ege of Nursi ng

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I have in the past introduced myself to new students as the "yellow peril " from Korea. But the " white peril 's" warm response to the "ye llow peril " was truly a mem o rable one. They listened through my ear-irritating accent and were receptive to my new views and sometimes unpopular ideas. They did not believe that an " evil Chinese spirit" has visited to disturb the peace and serenity of the remote and small North Eastern town of Kingston. I have great hope for the young generation of this campus. In them I find the promise of new dawn. It would have been difficult to exchange academic questions and new experiences if they were to identify me merely as a Chinese cook or laundryman. I was most flattered to hear a comment from a student that I was the best kind of "yellow peril" she has ever encountered. Chong S. Kim Asst . Prof. of History

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This university is in the unique position, because of its size, of being able to reverse the trend toward mass, depersonalized education. As President Baum said at his inauguration, this should be a "student oriented" unive rsi ty. It is almost axiomat ic that the quality of education declines as the size of classes grows. One way of reversing the trend toward impersonal education is to reduce the size of classes, espec ial ly in the required courses. Another way is for departments to offer a lternatives to the introductory courses they now require, so students will have a cho ice. Fina lly, faculty members must communicate the e nthus iasm th ey feel for the ir subj ects. How e lse will students get excited about th e ir education?

Edward H. Pauley Instru cto r in Philosophy

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The fact that the provocative word " revolution " is central to a student-selected theme for the 1969 Grist shows a marked change between the 1969 URI student and his predecesors. And " marked change" is as valid a definition of "revolut ion" as " the overthrow of an establ ished system." Has there been an overthrow of the estab li shed syste m at URI ? Of co urse not. Has there been a marked change in URI this year? Yes. Th is yea r I saw a new examination of the established patterns and values of the University, a new look at the rights and responsib il ities of the individual -by students, faculty members, adm in istrative officers. I saw an amazingly new population of adm in istrative officers this year, each one bringing to an old post a new identity in terms of his definition and eva lu ation of his role. I saw the sprouti ng of a mustachioed and insurgent male student population seeking the identificatio n of college men, not co ll ege boys. I saw a tota l faculty movement toward a revivification of the curr icu lum , indiv idu al facu lty movements toward turning the affairs of the c lassroom into a dialogue instead of a pontification. As this piece is being written it may be too early to declare that this year has reached jubilee proportions in positive change, but it has had a specia lness about it that I hadn 't ex perience before-a specialness that portends peaceful revolution .

Lorraine D. Ryan Instructor in English 56


There has been a marked chang e in student orientation in the past several years . The challenge to the faculty formerly was to stimulate , if not to provoke, the student to think rather than to learn almost by rote, which habit he acquired before entering the University. Another problem was to limit the intrusion of extra curricular activities upon the time required for his studies. Today the student is more mature and more sophisticated caused perhaps, by the impact of fundame ntal changes of all k ind s in our contemporary society which have thrust greater responsibilities upon him. He seems to regard the university as principally serving the practical function of getting the requisite education and degree as the key to economic development with scarcely any of the sentimental attachment to the university of his parents. While he is not cynical , he has fewer illusions of life than his predecessors. He is dimly aware of the uncomfortable and imperfect world in which he will live with its congestion , pollution and many daily irritations. Perhaps the greatest lasting contribution the faculty can make would be to convince him that while life is serious, it is not grim , that our institutions have been proved to be fundamentally workable and worthwhile and that a cultivated sense of humor can more often effectively alleviate problems than a Masters degree.

David G. Geffner Prof. of Business Law

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Th e students here are mostly inarticulate, uncreative and dull. The only " controversial issues" which concern 99% of the URI st udent body are such shockers as who can drink the most beer, or cut the most classes , or belch the loudest, or pass a course with the least amount of studying . .. etc. . etc. Th e URI student is not a true representation of the typical American college student. The fact of the matter is that the URI student, in his parochial isolation and overprotected environment, is a most atypical breed , indeed. The peculiar mentality of the URI student allows these " leaders of tomorrow" to stand meekly by as their humble and conse rvative institution fades into oblivion. Apathy is the trade mark of campus life and individualism and protest are virtually unknown. Each person 's behavior must be sanctioned by his or her respective " house." The level of maturity and involvement has been most recently demonstrated in Panty Raid '68. The brilliant young men and women of URI , after having their intellectual orgasm for the year, quickly retreat . in order to plan new fun and games. Indeed , at URI there is safety in numbers . R. K. Pyle Grad. Asst. Politi cal Science

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The U.R.I. catalogue currently states " Out-ofstate students add tuition $800.00." Approximately one fifth of the undergraduates pay this fee , as do almost two hundred foreign students. My suggestions for peaceful revolution at U.R.I. include the abolishment of this " non-resident punishment " and the enrol lment of the best qualified students from aiT over the world . Achievement of these goals will not only increase the caliber of students, faculty , and administrators, but will place this institution among the first of the intelligent state universities. Arvo L. Puukari Visiting Prof. of Marketing Managem ent

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From the perspective of 16 years on the faculty I do see a peaceful revolution occurring among the students of the University. For they are different today from what they were ten years ago. When I say "they" I do not mean, of course, the whole student body or even a majority of them. I refer to that sma ll vocal minority, who howeve r, exert a d isp ro port ionate influ ence and tend to give to ne and shape to the entire group. Today' s students see m to me to be a good deal more q uestioning, a good deal more cr it ic al of th e establ ish ed order , whether in the university, the community , the nation , or the world . Their critical outlook arises not ou t of mull ish opposition to what is, regardless of its merit, but out of an aroused concern over the justice of many of our social , economic and political arrangements. Most admirable, in fact, about the new student militancy is its motivation-the heightened sensitivity to man 's plight and the desire to do something about it. Yet while such commitment is good, I am im pelled to chide some in this generationgently, I hope-for the ir occas ional lapses into intolerance, rude and crude behavior, nihilistic and anti -rational attitudes. But I am glad that these have not generally been the characteristics of those who really care on our campus. Peaceful revolution , if it is to reach its goals, requires, I believe, those great virtues of decency and respect for the rights and opinions of others, and that uncommon commodity , common sense. Still , however dedicated the smal l minority of activists may be in the pursuit of peaceful change , their task wil l remain an enormously difficult one until they can fire and move the apathetic, all too unfortunately the large majority of us in the University community, all too often indifferent travelers on what ought to be an intellectual journey of high adventure and exciting involvement.

David D. Warren Prof. of Pol. Science and Chairman

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Peaceful revolution is intrinsic to the processes of education and scholarship. The advancement of knowledge requires continuing re-examination and testing of established premises. Education and scholarship atrophy rapidly if this re-evaluation is not aggressively pursued . Changes suggested by this process of re-evaluation are effected by insuring that oppos ing viewpoints are given free expression and all arguments are heard. Channels of communication must be open and minds must be open so that the ultimate impetus for change in the University community is the force of id eas. There is no place in the University for coercive action. Reasoned and disciplined argume nt is the tool of peaceful revolution , and conflicts , whether of a social nature or of ideas, are reso lv ed by the rational judgment of th e parties concerned . " Peaceful Revolution " is a major purpose of scholarship and an essential factor in civilized soci ety . William W. Leete Assoc . Prof. of Art

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There is nothing so permanent as change. Yet change is, more often than not, feared , dreaded , and disruptive, be it positive change or negative change. Because we are what we are, humans, we tend to be reluctant to reshape ourselves to meet the changes of the times, we tend not to be eager for the new and even slow to respond to human need. Thus, in order to effect chang e, a revolution is often needed. For all concerned social change is a learning process. We need a society that can look at itself with honesty and an open mind , one th at is able to create new solutions to age old as well as new problems , and one that is capable of putting into effect the solutions created. URI is producing change-agents-changeagents who will be the instigators of Revolutions -Effective revolutions-Peaceful Revolutions. Constance M. Palmer Asst. Prof. of Nursing


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" It is an old saying , " a little knowlege is a dangerous thing ." Recently , we have discovered that a lot can be worse: worse because too often it leads to the demigration of meanings which, by their very nature, cannot be transmitted as information. It is no accident that students lead the retreat to meaning. Whether or not the retreat is violent depends very much on the callow men who feign substance by parading power and offer us " edu cation " as a substitute for culture." William R. Campbell lnstr. in Pol. Sci.

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We live in a provocative world. It is an exciti ng , dynam ic era of history. The improbable of today may become the possible of tomorrow . Down through the ages man has pondered over What Is and What Ought To Be. Students fu ll of energy, enthusiasm and zest for living must seek through their idealism to change those evils and inequities of What Is to What Ought To Be. Th e hopes for a world of peace , pl enty, and brotherhood have always been the basic aim of education in our society. Understanding of th e complex, seemingly insoluble problems of society is the aim of a student. By careful gathering of pertinent facts, followed by analysis of various alternative solutions, one can arrive at a defi nite decision. Neither students nor faculty can these days absolve himself by playing the spectator. One must preserve the privilege of dissent as we ll as the responsibi lity of resolving differences. One must either stand up and be counted or you stand a good chance of be ing counted out. Make your views known through active involvement in soc ia l, civic, and political organizations. We need a peaceful revoluti on against illiteracy, disease, prejudi ce, hung er, and poverty-then the found ations for perm anent peace for all mankind wi ll occ ur. Human misery caused by hunger, disease and ignorance will then disappear from the face of the earth. Marvin Pitterman Prof. of Economics

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To Henry Thoreau civil disobedience was the " definition of a peaceful revolution ." His was the most civil of all disobedience; a refusal to comply with a particular law or policy in a non-vio lent , non-obstructive manner. His action hardly warrants justification today. At the other extreme lies vio lent, obstructive disobedience attempts are made to physically destroy long-estab lished institutions. The danger involved is that such activists will bring down a greater repression and backlash as the price of their immediate demands, sought through violence. In the middle ground lies non-violent, but obstructive disobedience. No one can doubt the strength from the results obtained from this sort of protest. It is important for all of us to take a stand on the issues of the day and decide ourselves how we would go about living by our convictions. William J. House lnstr. in Economics


" PEACE" is the great cry of the day. It is what we all long for deeply. Peace is not merely an absence of strife , bittern ess , conflict and confinement but something positive, something that gives us happiness and fulfillment. It is an inner reality , and not merely exte rnal order. The reign of PEACE means true communion among men; that I break out of my little shell and enter the world of another ; that I love him as a person , despite his faults ; that I see him as an individual, and not as "o ne of those peop le. " It means being open, seeing his point of view, regardless of how different from my own. It does not mean agreeing with everyth ing, or even to lerating everything. I may have to take a firm stand against dangerous tendencies: Fight the error, but love the one who errs, says Augustine. To rea lly love a person is to fight-<>r at least be on guard against-the dangers in him , dangers which invariab ly are also enemies of true peace. All this is not easy. It requires a REVOLUTION , a fight against my tendencies towards narrowness and selfishness. Thus it is that the PEACEFU L REVOL UTION , which will truly unite all men, must begin at home : I must begin with myself, before I can reach out to others. Stephen D. Schwarz Asst . Prof. of Philosophy

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As peaceful revolution progresses , professors again will become students; students their own professors. First casualties to fall : lecture system, departmental empires, textbooks, grades, credits, and attendance records' ta~ers. In our Einsteinian universe, what once was positive is lucky to survive as probability. Objective data are meaningful only if mentally correlated . Universities will emphasize conceptual thinking , giving -up cookbooks of conventionally conclusioned recipes. Stimulation will come from broad reading combined with tutorials, seminars, papers. Less contact hours will be compensated for by meaningfully structured dialogue, while preserving present student-faculty ratios to relief of budget makers. Nobel laureates, video taped will release professors from platform duty. Computerized libraries, producing instant bibliographies , electronic print-outs , wil l replace second-hand factstuffing . Universities, released from government contracted prefocused research will think universally.

Edward C. Higbee Prof. of Geography

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I think the most valuable discovery for me as a student at the University of Rhode Island has been an awareness of its professors and their attributes (or lack of them) . I recall that as a freshman my chief academic concern at the beginning of each semester was the hour a course might be given: wou ld I be lu cky and get a ten o'clock class or would I get stuck with an eig ht? As a sophomore I matured only slightly. My primary concern in my second year seemed to be with course titles. If a course sounded good in the catalogue I could only assume it would prove equally exciting in the classroom. My naivete was overwhelming. It wasn't until my last two years here that I began to realize the value of any course was directly proportional to the sensitivity of the man who was teaching it. To seek out valuable teachers and to get to know them, academically and socially, both in and out of the classroom should be one of the fundamental desires of any student who has any hopes of growing intel lectually. Brian E. Gorman Class of 69

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One cannot change a campus atmosphere overnight. This atmosphere , whether it be apathetic or enthusiastic, is interwoven into every part and person on campus . No one can force a student to cheer his team to victory . No one can force a professor to make his course interesting. No one can force everyone to remain on campus on weekends. No one can force student rights. Des ire is needed in every case . If the University wants to change and progress, it must evolve a new degree of interest -interest from the majority of students , fac ulty and administration. I feel that URI is changing for the better. But no loud protests or bloody riots w ill achieve an end uring change . They can only retard its growth. It is only when everyone feels inside that he cares about the University, that this campus will improve. Meg Gamble Class of 72

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Universities throughout the nation are concerning themselves with riots and rebellions. However, more important than the involvement of the student mass is the involvement of the individual student. Each incoming freshman has, at one time, looked forward to college with mi xed emotions and expectations. Whether or not these anticipations are fulfilled each student gained inval uable knowledge and experience in matriculation at the university. College is a fresh , new life, one that has never before been known. Many additional responsibilities have been handed over and must be coped with, using them to their fullest and wisest advantage. Each freshman undergoes an internal revolution, it may be a revolt against parental authority, the stigma of being exclusively identified with a certa in clique, or always being in the background. Through varied campus activities every student is given the opportunity to acquire personal satisfaction by doing his " own thing ." Thus, each student has participated in a revolution, his own peaceful , personal revolution. Randi Conley Class of 72 70


There are two ways to get a point across. One is peacefully , the other vio lently. Looking at them objectively, violent revolution is a means of forceably imposing one's will on another. Peaceful revo lution is a means of letting people know exactly how one feels , without being destructive. Violent revolution says to a person , "This is the way we are going to do it." Peaceful revol ution says, " Why don 't we try to do it this way? " It is natural for one to repel something forced upon him . It is just as natural for one to give something a chance if it is presented as an altern ative , rather than as the on ly way .

Virginia Schutter! Class of 69 URI freshman care this year. They care about their education, the rules and regulat ions that govern them , their living conditions, wee kends on campus ; they care about everything . This big change in attitude has blossomed this year due to an informative summer orientation program and an enthusiastic new staff : new deans, Housing Directors and coordinators and hall directors. Freshmen cared enough about an unwanted and unnecessary regulation to demonstrate against it. Led by Browning Hall, 250 tie-less students visited Butterfi eld Dining Hall one evening . As a result , students no long er are required to wear ties at evening meals. Deans make frequent visits to the resident halls. They are greeted by enthusiastic crowds of students who ask pointed questions and demand satisfactory answers. This year's freshman attitudes will play a large ro le in shaping the feelings of subsequent freshman classes. A new enthusiasm has been infused into the Class of 72.

David Boule Class of 69

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UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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The weeknight meeting place for many University of Rhode Island students is the Library. Within its cubical lined walls , one can find a quiet refuge for study as well as areas for typing, archives, and a computer section. It is the profusion of empty bookshelves, however, for which the Library is well known .


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The times of that superstition which attributed revolutions to the ill will of a few agitators have long passed away. Everyone knows nowadays that whenever there is a revolutionary convulsion , there must be some social want in the background , which is prevented , by outworn institutions, from satisfying itself. Friedrich Engels: 1851 .

RESIDENCES


\

You don't h a ve to b e Negr o

80


Dormitory Life Is Social Involvement The dorm , a surrogate home away from home, remains the focal point of campus life. Collected within its walls, an aggregate of individuals engage in activities such as water fights , panty raids, and dorm meetings. Occasionally there is time for studying - although not in the expected places.

81


"In Loco Parentis" Should a college stand in the position of a parent imposing regulations on the life of students outside the classroom? "In Loco Parentis" is dying hard, but it is dying. The current trend is toward greater assumption of responsibility by students. A special committee to study social regulations met during the year with the goal of developing mutual trust and respect for reasonable rules and regulations. In a detailed report this committee of students, faculty and administrators recommends that 21-year-old students be permitted to possess and use alcohol on a trial basis for up to one year in residences, fraternities and sororities. Along with more freedom would go strong disciplinary action for violation of the regulation . The system has been tried with some success on other campuses. A major recommendation of the committee was accepted by the President with modifications. It allows visiting hours by persons of the opposite sex in student rooms on weekends at stated hours under certain conditions.

82


83


84


BUTTERFIELD HALL President-C. Cutting Vice-President-R. Bayzo n Secretary-B. Faber Treasurer-M. Merner

1. D. Tweed ly 2. C. Culling 3. W. Foley 4. R. Daiell 5. J. Wi lson 6. L. Dem ilco 7. B. Balvina n 8. M. Gallagher 9. H. Smilh 10. D. Carlson 11 . C. Correia 12. A. Cotta 13. J. Dunni gan 14. D. Rocc i 15. B. Faber 16. V. Cerlll i 17. K. Sayles 18. B. Nesmilh 19. F. Spi ne ll i 20 . J. Tral s 21 . G. Joseph 22 . P. Kleniewsk i

85

23. B. Sullivan 24. D. Heffernan 25. B. Savage 26. B. Bishop 27. W. Ko belski 28. P. Rol lins 29. A. Brown 30. E. McWill iams 31 . F. Lorey 32. P. Malnamee 33. B. Neal 34 . F. Lonti 35. S. Enderby 36. D. Artz 37 . M. Paskoski 38. V. Marselg lia 39. T. Goff 40 . B. Guimond 41 . J . Szalkowski 42. P. Wi lson 43. P. Si lva


HOPKINS HALL President-J . Manchester Vice-President-G . Ingram Treas urer-W. Menri Secretary- C. Ciluglio

1. R. Gannon 2. S. Wood 3. J . Rosenberg 4. 5. 6. 7. B.

86

H. Levine R. Flock A. Stern W. Henry J. Manchester

9. 10. 11. 12.

13. 14. 15. 16.

M. Ainb inder S. Dowlatshahi C. Deluglio D. Dennis A. Draper D. Stetson S. Rothberg R. Boeglin


ELLERY HALL President-J. Visneuski Vice-President-C. Colarulli Secretary-F. Streethart Treasurer-G. Haley

1. G. Natale 2. M. Rouslin 3. W. Benesch 4. F. Ganen 5. B. Kimball 6. R. Walace 7. D. Seigel 8. R. Schwalbe 9. E. Jones 10. R. Larder 11 . B . Sawch uk 12. J. Vesnewski 13. D. Midgley 14. R. Strickhast 15 . P. Heron 16. D. Mahoney 17. L. Pracaccini


BRESSLER HALL President- B. Schenck Treasurer-N. Somberg Secretary-S. Erni

1. J. Marchant 2. Fung-Eng 3. E. Andrews 4. P. Deslauriers

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

A. Kwolek C. Kress G. Sorozan J. Montgomery C. Smith J. Kerr H. Mears J. Robinson

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

E. Bahns A. Berger J. Jackson N. Samberg R. Fava T. Conway A. Rounds R. Bousquet G. Burgess 22. D. Dennis 23. E. 01 ive r

88


89


ADAMS HALL R Dah mer Presiden~~. Blanda Vice-Preside R Fell ows Treaso rer-D. Ho lmes

Secre~~~.

. Soctal Chatr

Athletic

Bland a B. Jacob

D i rector~

J. Carc tert J. Petrarca

1. J . Breguet 2. R. Dahner 3. P. Trickett 4. D. Burl ingame 5. W. Gaige 6. D. Barclay 7. J. Eckha rt 8. G. Michaud 9 _ J. Comeau 10. c. Hess 11 . A. Cheung 12. S. Pomeroy . 13. G. PerdikakiS 14. R. Levitt 15. J. Portnoy 16. J. Terre~ova 17_ D . Gre nrer 18 R. Fowler 19. J. Du ckworth 20: P. Del li Carprnr 21 . R. Brandle

22. J . Dor 23. c. Quinn 24. R. Keegan . 25. M. Schleewels 26. M . We lichy 27. J. Sm ith 28. S. Goren 29. A. Corwin 30. J. Johnson 31 . B. Clarke 32 _ G. Sorenson 33. S. Di Lustra 34 . K. Milngan 35. T. DeCICCO 36. J. Mahoney 37. B. Ross 38 D. Brown 39: B. Daniels 40. c. Holm 41 . R. Swanson 42 . J. Lavoy


BROWNING HALL Pres ident-R. Ye noli Vi ce-P res id ent-C. De/bon is Secreta ry-G. Kulzer Treas urer- H. Mun so n 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. B. 9. 10. 11. 12.

J. Cicci S. Levinson R. Bri lion J. Ruggiero G. Sverker H. Munson C. Delbonis R. Moore J. Mc l aughlin R. Abrams M. Connol ly J. McCarty

13. D. Lord 14. M. Cantor

15. B. LaPierre 16. B. Spicer 17. J. Ka hn 18. J . Cami re 19. J . Shelly 20. J . Smith 21. G. Escobar 22. D. Maynard 23. B. Berry 23. B. Sherry

24. A. Gomez 25. R. Pollini

26. B. Hanna 27. P. Karanfilian

91

28. R. Baier 29. D. Vinchkoski

30. S. Larson 31. J. Skaradowski 32 . J. Kel ly 33. G. Va n Epps 34. B. Chace 35. D. Marshall 36. B. Norton 37. G. Kulzer 38. M. Blazar 39. P. Wi lkins 40. T. Hill 41. M. Maroon 42. J. Polselli 43. J. Zimmerman 44. E. Gavin 45. T. Teolis 46. R. Dulac 47. L. Monari 48. E. Szymanski 49. G. Tomkiewicz 50. R. Holden

51. K. Stevens 52. J. Dammen 53. D. David 54. S. Hackett 55. D. Calwell 56. A. Lavallee 57. M. Dufresne 58. D. Lopes 59. L. Abbott 60 . M. Hagebrouck 61. T. Lukasiewicz 62. E. Keene 63. J. Kocon 64. J. Donnelly 65. D. Me Pherson 66. K. Neary 67. K. Tala 68. D. Schollin 69. J. Holmes 70. G. Camara 71. "Otto"


BURNSIDE HALL Chairman-A. Alfano Vice-Chairman-N. Seggel Treasurer-A. Webster Secretary-W. Gaulin Social Chairman~ . Allen Intramural Chairman-W. Oziemblewski

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 .

R. Alfa no

J. Wo ll ish J . Mariscal M. Gnoleau P. Simonds S. Holt C. Furtado W. Emmett J . Plante N. Wh iston K. Dwyer

R. Hewitt A. Pires S. Powers H. Bossett D. Sepe D. Schack R. Webster W. Strohl 20. D. Dennis 21 . J . Doe 22. R. Payson 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

23. 24 . 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33.

0. Mc Elroy

J . Poul io t D. Payton R. Wil ner S. Ro berts P. Cousineau G. Foster N. Seggel D. Hen nessey R. Bodi nton R. Case ions

92


MERROW HALL President-A. Lepore Vice-President-N . Oster Sec retary-N . Pride Treasurer-C. Imond i Social Chairman--J . Votalato

1. D. Francis 2. M. Woodward 3. J. Rig ney 4. L. Lorenz 5. D. Johnson 6. D. Belcher 7. A Hinger B. C. Zilly 9. A Lepore 10. K. Pattillo 11. T. Duffy 12. M . .Hathaway 13. C. lrace 14. M. Jabour 15. C. Campo 16. C. Rheaume 17. G. Dutra 18. L. Rielly 19. J. Votolato 20. N. Mil ler 21 . M. Ke l ly 22. C. Imondi 23. J. Tashman 24. D. Shepard 25. B. Winsor 26. L. Tanguik 27. G. Lowry 28. J. Manion

95

29. 30. 31. 32.

K. Turano N. Nordqu ist B. Scheuh ing M. McSoley

33. J. Currier 34. S. Zwirb lis 35. D. Macaulay 36. K. Melone 37. D. Winograd 38. A. Ch in 39. S. Kent 40. A. Chase 41 . B. Potter 42. P. Clarkin 43. T. Bear 44. J. Bogrow 45. B. Matteucci 46. M. Me Dade 47. M. Whitn ey 48. A. Ramsey 49. J. Audet 50. S. Manfred 51 . L. Barry 52. D. Te l la 53. B. Whitlum 54. B. Bagdasarian 55. N. Pride 56. L. lacofano


ROOSEVELT HALL President- B. Gates Vice-President- B. Filer Secretary- R. Anderson Treasurer- G. Notarpippo

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

M. Daggett D. Sparli ng L. Terrinavo J. Richatelli B. O'Brien B. Gates C. Lupinacci S. Mandel l P. Goodsill J. Swinford B. Feyler J. Agnello N. Heagle A. Tousignant F. Collyer R. Anderso n S. Banning

18. 19. 20. 21 . 22. 23. 24 . 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30 . 31 . 32 . 33. 34 .

E. Greene G. Dzialo S. Jackson M. Simpson S. Tepper C. Burbank J. Lancot L. Wi llner C. Evans P. Haskell B. Bennett S. Bennett S. O'Connell M. Haczynski S. Mundy K. Grady M. Mai nville

96


97


路. 1. L. Gomer 2. K. Morrison 3. R. Rushby 4. M. Lofche 5. S. Staeger 6. C. Tom ka 7. B. Burke 8. L. Th omas 9. J. Menzies 10. D. Thomason 11 . M. Hilton 12. J. Salvucci 13. M. Stofega 14 . B. Oring 15. R. Rusuzla 16 . C. McCulloch 17. I. Minkkinen 18. C. Lubeck 19. C. Ryszkiewicz 20. S. Lindequist 21 . D. Morrison 22. L. Hadfield 23. B. King 24. B. Cohen 25. N. Guritzky 26. R. Weiner 27. S. Cataldo 28. D. Frei lich 29. N. Welchman 30. D. Den nis 31 . B. Burque 32. D. Jutras 33. S. Orchel 34. A. Paolino 35. G. Hildenbrand 36. M. Tow 37. D. Dem oranvi lle 38. K. LaMarg e 39. L. Catanio 40 . G. Oh 41 . M. Lewis 42 . B. Hughes 43. D. Gauthier 44. K. Greene 45. K. Jones 46 . J. Bellavance 47. M . McDonald 48. P. Manchester 49. J. Steere 50. D. Kalberer 51 . L. Jankowski 52. J. Troll 53. T. Kazimer 54. C. Wasylean 55. J. Helsel 56. D. Unda 57. A. Shadford 58. L. Kalter 59. C. Baron 60. N. Imondi 61 . J. Brown 62. E. Bu cacci 63. J. Santos 64. C. Martley 65. L. Sherlock 66 . M. Toth 67. P. Carlson 68. N. Campbell 69. A. Burn s 70. C. Sepcsick 71. B. Ferrant i 72. C. Paolucci

BARLOW HALL President-G. Monahan Vice-President--S. Averdisan Treasurer-J . Horton Secretary-D. Phillips Social Chairman-C. Veneziano


TUCKER HALL Presid ent- L. Najarian Vice-President- P. Hardman Secretary--J . Grinnell Treasurer--S . Lambert

1. V. Therou x 2. K. Carbone 3. S. Walsh 4. P. May 5. B. DaRosa 6. C. Rainey 7. L. Najarian B. P. Berg 9. M. George 10. C. Ciexynsky 11. K. Kraemer 12. J . Ying l ing 13. J. Woods 14. T. LaVal lee 15. N. DiPadva 16. E. Silberman 17. D. Lee


100


Presid ent--J. Rea rdon Vice-President-S. Fl ynn Treasu rer-S. McCraw Secretary-A. Stang Social Ch airman-C. Mulvey

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10. 1L 12.

13.

WELDIN HALL

14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21 . 22. 23. 24.

101

L. Tanquay C. Polanski J. Owen M. Sullivan M. Hallock S. Martin L. Hogan L. Seneca l C. D'Amico M . Gamble K. Jenkinson J . Molzon J . Smi th E. Columbine D. Bl ai r M . Pezzi B. Mclaugh lin E. Histon E. l all amme J. Jones P. Betts P. Buck ley P. Penine D. Johnston

25. N. Sealon 26. E. Rinfrette 27. P. Porter 28. G. Brennan 29. P. Webster 30. S. Bernstein 31. L. Viselli 32 . R. Stang 33. R. Snegg 34 . F. Taft 35. S. Mclaughlin 36. S. Bu tts 37. S. Hallock 38. C. Williams 39. J. Dow 40 . L. Schofield 41. K. Crescenzo 42. J. Klausen 43. M. Langhammer 44. D. Costa 45. S. McCraw 46. J. Reardon 47. R. Pasiak 48. N. Nilsson


1. J . Gropper 2. S. Ric ci

3. J. Winslow

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

M. Shakleton P. Mesmanian L. Portnoy R. Berger C. Menegas S. Platl R. Kazanjian 11. P. Hunt 12. N. Genest

ALDRICH HALL President--J. Kuzdeba Vice-President-C. Jones Treasurer-E. Brown Secretary-K. Paroline

102


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9.

DORR HALL President- E. Portnoy Vice-President-S. Morel lo Secretary---J. Payne Treasurer-C. Fouty

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

16. 17.

M. Ouzbury P. Smith S. Baxter J . Roy L. Kilgri ss N. Ross J. Wentz S. DeWolfe E. OiGiovani J. Robinson M. Th eroux M. Parmenter J. DeFonzo B. Brown J. Weinstein M . Leonberger L. Stern

18. A. Goldstein 19. J. Kosch 20. S. Mustalesk i 21. L. Wirth 22. C. Blanchard 23. S. Kullburg 24. P. Booth 25. J. Kuzdiba 26. J. Brown 27. K. Jones 28. 0 . Dennis 29. M. Wexter 30. C. Maynard 31. M. Nahod 32. B. Palmisiciano 33 . K. Paroline


1. M. Gervasimi 2. B. Briden 3. B. Digue 4. C . Pagalorini 5. B. Krzyzek 6. K. Garvey 7. B. Correia 8. C. Welch 9. K. Nazemetz 10. J. Bur1on 11 . R. Correia 12. C. Scialla

PECK HALL President-N. LaCroix Vice-President-M . Cahill Treasurer-C. Berger Secretary-B. Corriea Social Chairman-D. Roberts

104

13. P. Schnell 14. M. Ma1arese 15. F. Asse lin 16. L. Hinckley 17. N. Cardill o 18. M. Martin 19. A. Foster 20. D. Walenczyk 21 . D. Melcher 22. S. Sascia 23. D. Kerkirk 24. M. Cah ill


1. 2. 3. 4.

D. Neumann S. Martineau

HUTCHINSON

A. Menard

J. Kwiatkowski 5. S . Vangiere 6. J . Oram 7. M. Cullen 8. S . Cavanaugh 9. P. Breen 10. J. Halligan 11 . M. Roman 12. S . Matarese 13. J. Hiscox 14 . N. Eddy 15. E. Genderson 16. L. Armstrong 17. A. Koenig 18. M. Gerardi 19. J . McArdle

HALL President-N. Eddy Vice-President--S. Cavanaugh Secretary-A. Koenig Treasurer-R. Nicynski Social Chairman-J. Hiscox

105


Left : "Those Were T he Days" is the theme of Kappa Alpha T heta's Rush Party .

106


A Greek Speaks When I decided to join a sorority, it was because I found a group of girls that I felt comfortable with , could easily talk to and enjoyed being with . Instead of having three or four good friends, I would have more than sixty. I look at it this way: I came to college to pursue an education, and at the same time to learn to live with people and to learn to be on my own , without my parents there all the time . I felt I needed to be able to accept a greater amount of responsibility than I had previously. Living in a sorority has done all of this for me. I am getting my education, but at the same time , I am learning to live with people and accept them for what they are. I do not think that I could have done this in a dormitory, just concerning myself with two or three good friends. Living in a sorority has also helped me to become a more responsible person. I had to learn to be more considerate of more people and to do a larger part in the maintenance of a house than I did in a dormitory. We all do in a sorority. Without this type of cooperative effort, we would fall part. Being in a sorority has helped to fulfill my college days and has helped me to enjoy the fullest three years of my life. Every day offers something new and different, and I share these new and different experiences with people whom I feel especially close to.

PATRICIA GIAMMARCO Alpha Delta Pi

107


108


109


k< ,--


DELTA ZETA Pres ident-L. Raft Ru sh Chairman (VP)-0. Kesse l Pledge Trainer (VP)-E. Mullen Recording Secretary-C. Sandor Corresponding Secretary-C. Stadnicki Treasurer--S. Reynolds Social Chairman-J. Robbins House Manager-A. Pinto Steward-G . Corbett

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21 . 22. 23. 24. 25 .

M. McDonald S. Groet J. Lepp er S. Whitely B. Papitto S. Nichola C. Stadnicki G. Corbett M. Con t i D. Aug er T. Lepper L. Paz ienza M. Ca rn ey G. Nuhn H. Wilson S. O' Connor S. Reynolds F. Eizik D. Pepin L. Forsberg N. Raab J. Jodri L. Weak ley L. Rignanese M. Hashaway

111

26. S. Stott 27. J. Robinson M. Marce llo G. Haas L. Mu llen D. Capaldo S. Hackett J. Myatt 34. B. Har ris 35. L. Mang les 36. C. Sandor 37. E. Barrett 38. C. Fitzge rald 39. J. Fre chette 40. D. Rampino 41 . J. Merlu zzo 42 . A. Ceme ron 43. J. He nnessey 44. I. Amman 45. M. Masterson 46. G. Di Christofaro 47. N. Lawto n 48. C. Norton 49. L. Raft

28 . 29. 30. 31. 32: 33.


ALPHA DELTA PI President-D. McQueeney Vice-President-J. Trewhella Recording Secretary-M. Mattera Corresponding Secretary-D. Rooke Treasurer-M. Hiller Rush Chairman-L. Feldman

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

J. Knaus D. McQueeney M. Large B. Lawson P. McGuerin J. Joyce M. Morrone L. Macari D. Kenny S. Pecht P. Ennis P. Brady L. Migneault J. Vaughn J. Estes J . Medeiros S. Selden L. Belnap D. Castro M. Hallas L. Aitke n

22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31 . 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41 .

R. Senecal A. St. Lawrence J. Dionne S. Kane L. Feldman J. Dionne W. Weinman P. lannessa M. Venditti L. Anderson D. Sanford S. Mi liar G. Shutter P. McDowell D. Parilla S. Aldworth L. Migneault S. Campbell C. GoHman P. Giammarco 112


ALPHA CHI OMEGA President-G. Viall 1st Vice-President-N. Salter 2nd Vice-President- M. Hutchinson 3rd Vice-President-A. Silva Rush Chairm an-G. Daly Social Chairman-A. Goodman Treasurer-L . Shedden

1. C. Holm 2. J. Montaquila 3. N. Salter 4. P. Bartigian 5. P. Lukas 6. C. Bensted 7. M. Perry B. B. Ham 9 . J . Kane 10. G. Via ll 11 . G . Dal y 12. D. Kushnir 13. A. Marlelli 14. C. Innes

15. C. Klein 16. E. Gordon 17. L. Montgo mery 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27.

C. Colantonio L. Shedden J. Harrower J. Montaquila D. Pilkington K. Plall R. Cook C. Innes J. Carpenter M. Plu ta


116


SIGMA DELTA TAU President-P. Curci 1st Vice-President-C. Novick 2nd Vice-President-B. Sandier Treasurer-L. Blackburn Recording Secretary-E. Levine

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

117

L. Berube S. Ehrlich S. Feldman L. Cimarusti S. Wolff M. Ellman F. Weiss J . Kahn T. Thomas ian A. Baltman V. Salcone D. Albert

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21 .

S. Ricci

J . Famiglietti

J. Dilorenzo J. Kirsner J. Pannone M. Harris S. Madeiras D. Templeton L. Besachio 22 . F. Katzman 23. P. Curci 24. A. Little Sister


118


SIGMA KAPPA Pres ident- C. Hooper 1st Vi ce-Pres id ent- A. Di Lu cch io 2nd Vi ce-President-M. Harri s Treasurer-L. Saun ders Correspondin g Sec retary-M . Durante Rush Chairm an-W. Tu c ker

1. J. Simmons

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. B. 9. t 0. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

M. Durante C. Hoope r H. Saunders D. Phi l lips K. Kleist K. Nelson D. Saccoccio D. Gens K. Gresio A. Charney G. Murphy M. Sh oemaker J. Burs ley D. Dav is D. Smi th J. Cha r lesworth W. Tucker P. Capalbo P. Lawrence A. Jordan

119

22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36 . 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42.

D. Nea le A. Wal l C . Ko per C ~ Carson K. McGaughy I. Ash ford M. Tow P. Norton C . Najar ian A Dilucch io D. Holden N. Bush D. Costigan S. St. Pi erre M. Eagan E. Lyo ns S. Jackson C. Johnson S. Shyab R. Zuckerman J. Kowkowski


DELTA DELTA DELTA President-C. Gosiminski Pledge Trainer-A. Trevaskis Treasurer-M . Mellone Recording Secretary-P. Sherb lom Corresponding Secretary- D. Jenkinson Chaplain-C. Sheldon

1. P. Oriecki 2. L. Houston

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. B. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

15. 16. 17. 18.

P. Murphy J . Kauffman M . Gi rouard A Mazzie S. Forrest J. Charters M. Dalton P. Moran J . Cadulli C. Strung D. Iacono L. Janssen B. Payne S. Procopio J. Altamuro A. Orner

19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35.

C. Calci D. Davi dson S. Mehalko J. Lancellotti D. MacDonald D. Jenkinson C. Gosciminski J. Considine L. Har ris E. Belelho A. Cahoon G. Robey C. Sheldon A. Trevaskis J . Lee D. Wilkie T. Guglielmi

120


12 1


Swiderski President;;-;;~L . Kitch in 1st Vice-Pre~~t-V. Westeren d Vi ce-Presld Ulmschneider 2n Treasurer-S . V Boivollo . Secretary. Corresponding

LAMBDA DELTA PHI 1.

~- ~~~~;~~e

;:s:

Beaujean 4 S. Spero 5 : M. Taylor 1

~: g ~~~~ zyczyn 8 F. Stone 9: KL. 10 . .

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11 . D. Jones 12 S. Hersey 13: P. lacono ne 14. 15.

1

~- ~~~~:rski . Westeve n

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122

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123


CHI OMEGA President-S. Pelley Vice-President-N. James Secretary-S. Greenwell Treasurer-K. Riley Social Chairman J. Leimert, C. Lentz Activities Chairman A. Escalette

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14.

15. 16. 17. 18.

P. O' Neil L. Lyons K. Mcl aughlin J. Lynch B. Horman L. Nec lan K. Kelly S. Nye J. Johnson M. Tabor S. Grady S. Greenwell A. Escaletle J. Labossiere S. Schauflee L. Sm ith S. Pelley J. Ziegelmayer

19. P. Donilon 20 . J. Leimert

21 . 22 . 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31 . 32. 33. 34. 35. 36.

C. Woodbury J . Dunn J. Deignan J. Manley M. Fitzpatrick A. Broderick N. James L. Daum P. Traynor L. Wexlee D. Crockett L. Hartmann K. Jennings J. Headley B. Gil kes S. Morey


KAPPA ALPHA THETA President---J. Tessier 1st Vice-President-C. Brown 2nd Vice-President-C . Narciso Treasurer---J. Ousterhout Corresponding Secretary-C. Lindell Recording Secretary---J. Badessa

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

J. Caracuzzo B. Everett J. Badessa S. Daniels J. Pietraszek C. Struczyk C. Lindell M. Hanf K. Flynn K. Blankenship L. Kagan L. Gerrick L. Fairlie M. Healy

15. M. Kirby 16. B. Swanson 17. K. Degnan 18. C. Narcisco 19. S. Klein 20. L. Cooney 21. B. Welch 22. C. Brazina 23. P. Grant 24. J . Ousterhout 25. S. Grilli 26. P. Carter 27. J. Tessier


ALPHA XI DELTA President-M. Malouf Vice-President-P. Piepszna Recording Secretary-L. Gillette Corresponding Secretary--S. Lell i Treas urer-A. Sherry

.' ~ I

1. C. Comery 2. M. Benson 3. A. Moradian 4. M. Rowley 5. C. Chaves 6. G. Crudup 7. M. Malouf 8. J. Murphy 9. C. Greco 10. L. Coupe 11 . L. Howarth 12. R. DiCenso 13. J . Harvey 14. J . Nerone 15. L. DiChristopharo 16 . C. Buonocore 17. C. Chaicu 18. L. Campbell 19. A. Fitzsimmons 20. S. Lelli 21 . C. Cronkite 22. Mrs. Wilkinson 23. L. Gillet 24. J. Ke l ly 25. J. Saylor 26. S. McNamara

126


CHI PHI President-D. Bettencourt Vice-President-D . Arabian Secretary-A. Coppola Treasurer-H . Ei ckhoff Soc ial Chairman-L. M. Smith

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. B. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15.

W. Hofmann D. Bettencourt J . Etter W. Cichelli M. DelPrete P. Carangelo J. Troiano T. Slick T. Scarpanci ni S. Warwick R. Blanchard B. Campelia D. Reynolds D. Su lliva n R. Manganero

16. 17. 1B. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 2B. 29.

D. Good H. Ei choff R. DeS isla J . Smith R. Malafronte R. Dubois R. Racca D. Arab ian R. Mandevilli F. Dill R. Clark J . McCaughey R. Tolley S. Bartlett

128


129


PHI KAPPA PSI

1. N. Burkhardt 2. M. Pfrommer 3. B. Seip le 4. N. Ruotolo 5. J. Jarecki 6. D. Dennett 7. T. Hilliard B. B. Kane 9. R. Rydberg 10. G. Bockstael 11. J. Riley 12. D. Lister 13. D. Pearson 14. B. Matteson 15. L. Smith 16. S. Knee 17. T . Piekot ' 1B. B. Breidinger 19. D. Chase 20. K. Muehlburg 21. G. Yeadon 22. F. McVey 23. D. Wood 24. J. Lyons 25. K. Fecteau 26. S. Hackett 27. S. Pr i nee 2B. C. Cobb

President--J. Braitch Vice-President--S. McCochran Recording Secretary-N. Burkhardt Corresponding Secretary-L. Gerner Treasurer-K. Muehlberg Social Chairman-C. Cobb

130


1. A. Shoemaker 2. T. Ambrose 3. C. Kong 4. T. Constant 5. R. Plante 6. R. Papertsian 7. D. Stoudt 8. D. Binns 9. v . Mello 10. F. Ruhle 11 . L. Marini 12. R. Blomstedt 13. J . Braitsch 14. E. Drechsler 15. B. Spooner 16. C. Frost 17. A. Honour 18. J . Tremblay 19. S. McCochrane 20. B. Breidinger 21 . J. lnt lehouse 22. W. Piekut 23. R. Knee


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PHI SIGMA KAPPA President-A. Ide Vice-President-M . Ranftle Secretary-A. Ramsey Treasurer-H. Golenski

1. 2. 3. 4.

B. Gorman A. Ramsay K. Grillo B. Zartar ian 5. K. Simmons 6. A. Masterson 7. A. Osowski 8. A. Knight 9. A. Puniello 10. F. O'Brien 11 . G. Bargamian 12. W. Upham 13. H. Gorenski 14. A. Zar tarian 15. M. Gerzevitz 16. J. Broccoli 17. P. Bulger 18. F. Pampel 19. G. Bennett 20. T. Pickering 21. S. Benjamin 22. F. May 23. E. Lambert

24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40 . 41. 42.

B. Merritt M . Battista

J . Higgins

G. Capalbo J . Ogrodnik C. Stevens M. Med ici A. Ide N. Grossmann J. Henehan J . Nappi J . Rotter A. Hedison J . lzzi A. Dubord E. Melenkivitz K. Carlson J . D'Ambrosia M. Ranftle 43. L. Andreano 44. D. Del Nero 45. E. Donegan

133


LAMBDA CHI ALPHA President-M . Aaronson Vice-President-A . Geary Sec retary-A . Lemay Treasurer-T. Sherman Steward-A. McDermott Social Chairman-W. G. Morrison

0 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. B. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Mrs. Miller H. Samson J. Montecalvo J. Provencher J. Medeiros S. Kotler S. Polak R. Lemay A. Mathieu P. Alves G. Ande rson T. Kippot A. Richardson S. Bartosiah L. Rotner W. Petrosk i

17. 18. 19. 20. 21 . 22 . 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31.

M. Young S. Crawford W. Staffopolous A. Geary M. Frost E. Corn ell W. Casey E. Sm ith R. Hansen J . McNiff A. Hale M. Aaronso n J . Rodinski N. Hill K. Wi lhe lm

134


135


PHI GAMMA DELTA President-J . Mills Corresponding Secretary-A. Fredette Recording Secretary-J. Amaral Treasurer-A . Parrillo Hi storian-C. Alganese

136


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

J . Young G. Humpkin J . Hayes B. Stillman D. Norris C. Tabor G. Denarido B. Achloger T. Ellis A. Winter D. Adams R. Kingsley J . Amaral S. Collis J . Russel G. Slavin R. Fielder B. Dee

19. 20. 21 . 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31 . 32. 33. 34. 35. 36.

M. Sullivan

R. Ofsti J . Lawless B. Ferdette F. Farris H. Maturi J . Kerby A. Tortolano T. Riley D. Dennis G. Evans Mrs. Noble H. Maturi D. Berretto D. Konchar K. Poe E. Vierra F. Chapman

37. 38. 39. 40. 41 . 42 . 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51 . 52.

E. Brazil M. Standish S. Cor san J . Cross J . Magee H. Tutell P. Rapeley R. Lowe B. Balderson F. Brown R. Capello P. Bulloc k M. Cavarllo M. lnfantol ino M. Leh er B. Perrilo

137


TAU KAPPA EPSILON President-E. Pitera Vice-President-W. Phinney Treasurer-S. Klitgord Secretary-D. Abdinoor

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. B. 9.

10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

R. Harrison N. Scalera M . Amarel M. McGreary A. Melidossian J . Early W. Wetzel R. Nathan W. Ph inney J . Spring D. Robinson T. Crosby R. Convery A Fiore E. Campion D. Murphy D. Abdinoor T. Fay R. White T. Wheeler


•••

1. M. Morgan 2. F. Oliver 3. G. Normand 4. M. Gautreaux 5. R. Jordan 6. D. DeStefano 7. K. Smith 8. B. Schoelle 9. B. Philbin 10. J . George 11 . P. Welch 12. W. Osborne 13. R. Lang 14. A. Silverman 15. H. Haverga l 16. R. Fitch 17. R. Caffrey

18. 19. 20. 21 . 22. 23. 24 . 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31 . 32. 33. 34 .

J. Krawick G. Scown R. Christenson B. Webster A. Ormiston R. Walsh R. Perri J. Wright L. Pierce A. Robinson T. Wright T. Weyant J. Knapp R. Fu saro D. Bennett G. Askevoid W. Knox

35. 36 . 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48 . 49. 50 .

B. Thompson J. Salinger W. Greene W. Histen G. Caffrey R. Potvin N. Scheeler D. Leach R. Weigert K. Carlson R. Marqu is R. Haynes F. McDuff K. Powell R. Larki n S. Cro nin

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SIGMA CHI President-W. Osborne Vice-President-M . Rabasca Treasurer-A. Chaffery House Manager- K. Smith Steward-D. Jordan Secretary-A. Christi anson Social Chairman-A. Ormiston


ALPHA EPSILON PI President-H. Fine Lieutenant Master-C. Frank Treasurer---J. Sommers Socia l Chairman-L. Alschelor Steward-A. Zell 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

R. Fleischer T. Uarella G. Green R. Brownell W. Teres 0 . Zimmerman P. Rabin R. Haf1 H. Fine S. Wein1raub

11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

H. Rackmil E. Simon R. Rich1er C. Frank S. Sherman R. Zu11y W. Me1kiff J . Sommers S. Drucker

140

20. 21. 22 . 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

D. Zell J. Henry H. Kessel M. Rubin F. Kleinman B. Al1shuler 0. Curcio J. Cokin B. Bornstein

29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36 . 37.

Ford Gorin Allen Bedell B. Kono1e S. Brown P. Levison S. Dre ssler R. Sarnoff

K. A. J. J.


SIGMA NU

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12 . 13.

B. Casey D. Landry R. Rezendes R. Davids T. Tacey J . Gugglimeti G. Comunale L. Reardon J . Capnio T . Lemeshka R. Hawksley K. Silvestro M. Bastow

14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

R. DeGregorio J . Potter S. Primiano R. Bernier M. Pa1rarch R. Remmington S. Murano G. Rivard T . Passerale M . Brown G. Houlker T. Drake M. Spino

President-R. Jenkins Vice-President-M. Brown Secretary--J. Bogtar Treasurer-R . Heffernan Social Chairman-R. Degregorio


PHI MU DELTA President-C. Primiano Vice-President-F. Feraco Secretary--J. Jeanotte Treasurer-A. Clegg House Manager-S. Aiello Steward--J . Gatley 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

D. Piccirilli W. Barney B. Thompson C. Thompso n M. Grey J . Chapman R. Ren zi J . Lopes K. Kempper T. DiPao la G. Marcello 0 . Mc Entee D. MaGee C. Connery J . DeNuccio S. Sharf J . Coppa C. Madison

19. 20. 21 . 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

27 . 28. 29. 30. 31 . 32. 33. 34 . 35. 36.

D. Bentley L. Hyde S. Aie llo R. Martin A. Parmelee A. lzzo W. Drapala H. Gatley M. Lu zz i G. Marcoccio J . Messere G. Capal bo K. Wild J . Gatley B. Thornton J . Haik J . Scan lon B. Grigelv ich

142


President-M. Fliecher Vice-President-E. Kennaghan Secretary-W. Sawyer Treasurer-S. Zarchen Social Chairman-P. Gruber

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PHI SIGMA DELTA 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12.

S. Abatiello D. Forman R. Gil stien A. Parkenson W. Stewart M . Lazarus R. Abrams J. Boulmetis R. Herman J . Telfeyan J. Levein R. Main

13. M. Rotenberg 14. M . Liebow itz 15. S. Rodyn 16. A. Pressor 17. M . Tannenbaum 18. D. Weinberg 19. B. Seltzer 20. P. Gruber 21. M. Fl eischer 22. A. Kravetz 23. S. Mandel l 24. M . Kaprilian


SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Pres ident-H . Hoopis Vice-Presid ent -W. Donnelly Secretary-A. MacAllister Treasurer-V. Altruda Social Chairman-G. DeValerio 1. B. Shea 2. D. Narcessian 3. D. Randall 4. T. Winterbottom 5. L. Bradley 6. R. MacGowan 7. B. Hicks 8. G. Lamson 9. E. Quinl an 10. F. King 11 . W. Negri 12. J. Lyons 13. H. Hoodis 14. B. Mac Allister 15. B. Ka ufman 16. C. Cohen 17. G. Devaleri o

18. B. Donnelly 19. D. Tanner 20. J. Raw ley 21 . C. Caprio 22. L. Hanan 23. M. Skerdon 24. "Gus" 25. Jose 26. M. Borassi 27. P. Merkel 28. B. llich 29. A. Russo 30. V. Ortega 31. V. Altruda 32. D. Coates 33. C. Morse


THETA CHI President-A. Nelson Vice-President-M. O'Brien Secretary-R. Massimino Treasurer-E. Sivanson Pledge Marshaii--J. Clarkin 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

H. Najarian G . Vanasse E. Stein D. Mills J. Lombardo J. Fahy M . Keller B. Andreani D. Kelley A. Nelson R. Henault M. Lindem ann J. Newman A. Flaig J. Carpenter M. Keene D. Vitali J. Clarkin

19. 20. 21 . 22. 23. 24 . 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31 . 32. 33. 34. 35.

P. Calarusso

E. Swanson B. Weyhand G. Luparto F. Pastore T. Pizza J . Smith J. Hutchinson D. Nacci L. Meschino W. Brokaw F. Parente R. Bachaus P. Forte T. Kanelos B. Scola T. Bettez


1. D. Gerstenlauer 2. M. Steiman 3. P. Martin 4. R. Pollack 5. P. Kaepplinger 6. K. Carlson 7. R. Phillips 8. H. Epstein 9. E. George 10. H. Krantz 11 . D. Rosenthal 12. G. Richmond 13. M. Feinbloom 14. W. Martinelli 15. J . Swartz 16. A. Crocker

TAU EPSILON PHI

President--J. Penza Vice-President-M. Feinbloom Secretary--J. Swartz Treasurer-W. Mackinlay Social Chairman--J. Paroline

146


147


ZETA BETA TAU President--J. Sullivan Vice- Pres ident- A. O' Brien Treasurer-B. Schoen Recording Secretary-S. Greenfield

II

1. S. Woo lf 2. D. Faella 3. J. Sul livan 4. J . Hess 5. B. Wiesenburn 6 . D. Maelten 7. L. Stickles B. A. Cipriano 9. S. Greenfield 10. J. May 11 . B. Schoen 12 . P. Lacroix 13. B. Stone

J

148


150


SIGMA PI

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 1 1.

151

R. DeiSesto F. Brome C. Boy le J. Vtell F. Reis J . Hallene D. Campbell J . Rawc li ffe R. Hennekey D. Galipeau J . Thom son

12. B. Dick 13. E. Gianfrancisco 14. J . Berry 15. J. Parker 16. B. Gage 17. A. Nei lson 18. F. Gaschen 19. H. Luchka 20. D. Ken ney 21 . G. Qu imby 22. A. Knight


THETA DELTA CHI President-M. Senesi Senior Executive-V. Moreno Junior Executive-D. Meri Recording Secretary-A. Kenyon Corresponding Secretary---J. Campbell

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

J. Guglielmino P. Rivelli W. 0' Rourke J. Silva J. DeiSesto A. Raspallo A. Gesualdi C. Casciano A. lnfantolino D. Searle R. Kenyon J. Mangiante T. Bru zzese V. Moreno P. Sepe

16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

22.

A. Santaniello S. Ascheltino M. Cocci M. Mendes T. Petronio D. Fargnoli J. Marino D. Read P. Eacuello D. McNiel M. Senesi A. Spaziano J . Delillo

23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. J . Franchina


RIGHT: Co-ed Debbie Albert sparkles with Rhody spirit. ABOVE: Tri-O sorority sisters cart " dead cat" Peggy Girouard to the Rally ABOVE RIGHT : URI cheerleade rs lead the parade to North Parking lot.


RALLIES: The Essence of Student Spirit Rallies provide a kaliedoscopic spectacle of the versatility and spirit so often thought lacking at URI. From the tramp of feet, to the resounding cheers of " Let's go Rhodey! " Rallies are a loud and lively example of what's right on this campus. Caught in the flickering light of torches, faces of Greeks, independents, cheerleaders , football players and the Band alike extoll the Rams to Fight! Score! Win!

155


HOMECOMING 1968: A Day of Victory Homecoming was a day of sunshine skies and victory against Vermont; of queen candidates and crepe paper covered chicken wire ; of alumni and undergraduates. Of the many contests held that day, Phi Kappa Psi and Merrow Hall won first place awards for their homecoming displays and Pamela Holley was crowned Homecoming queen.

!57


Injuries and Hard

Luck Characterize 68 Football Season The Rams began the 1968 season as strong candidates to dethrone the University of Massachusetts as Yankee Conference champions and better 1967's fine 6-2-1 record. The Rams did turn the trick and become the first Ya nkee Conference foe to defeat the University of Massachusetts in three years but key injuries and loss of veteran personnel took its toll as the Rams went into a tail spi n and lost their last four games after climbing to the top of the conference at mid-season .

UPPER RIGHT: Caswell starts the Rams rolling against Brown. LOWER RIGHT: Caswell doing "his thing" in 33-8 rout of Southern Mass.

FRONT ROW : Caswell , Walker, Kaufman , Salkeld, Raggio , Keene , Lyons, Babcock, Murphy, Kelly (Co -Captain) , Kuzman (Co-Captain), Borassi, Spi nney, Orapala, Hogg , Andrew. SECOND ROW: Sheehan, Monaghan, Healy, Negri , Beaudonin, McGroany, Phinney, Hightower, Fay, Abdinoor , Rowley, Narcessiah , Engott, Nunes, Carney, Nester. THIRD ROW: Cataldo, Wheeler , Nordstrom , Williams, McAll ister, Bogdanich , Fasoldt, Skerpon, Gardner, Wallwork , Fiore, Pephens, Spitaletta, Lachonpelle, Hoffman. FOURTH ROW : Wi cks, Richardson, Thurber, Jennings, Cohen , Sullivan, Oevahey, Bencivegla, Dolan, McBrair, McCarthy, Stramm , Gnega, Randell , Walsh. FIFTH ROW: Raggio (Mgr.) , Assi stant Coaches Lantz, Nedwidek, Griffin, Head Coach Zilly, Assistant Coach Dromgold , Trainer Williams , O' Donnell.

!58


!59


160


A strong Temple University team provided the opposition for the Ram 's opener in a night game at Temple Stadium in Philadelphia. The Owls were in mid-season form and the Rams had trouble getting started as Temple prevailed 28-0. Next the Rams traveled to Providence for the big game with Brown. Brown was able to convert two early breaks into a field goal and a touchdown and led 10-3 as the fourth period began. The Ram offense led by Larry Caswell then came to life for the first time this season. The Rams marched 80 yards to make it 10-9 with four minutes remaining in the game. Not willing to settle for a tie the Rams went for two points and victory over Brown but certain victory was lost as Caswell hit ace receiver Hank Walker all alone in the end zone and Walker dropped one of the few passes of his career. Another highlight of the game was the tenacious Ram defense which sparkled all day and put in a great goal line stand holding the Bruins for downs at the one yard line. The Rams opened their home season with Southern Connecticut providing the opposition. Caswell picked up right where he left off at Brown and riddled the Southern defense hitting on 13 of 19 passes for 237 yards and two touchdowns as the Rams walloped Southern 33-8.

UPPER LEFT : Homecoming "68" Brent runs

.. .UPPER MIDDLE: Hank catches . . LOWER LEFT: and Wheeler crashes through for score as Rams destroy Cats. LOWER RIGHT : Brent and Ben move Rams over UMass to Conference lead .

161


Vermont moved into Meade Field for Homecoming and the Rams Yankee Conference opener. The Rams delighted a Homecoming crowd of over 10,000 as they rolled to a 52-10 victory over the Catamounts. Hank Walker scored twice and soccer style kicker Steve Collis kicked 7 extra points and a 45 yard field goal to lead the romp. The high point of the season came the following week as the Redmen of Massachusetts came to Meade Field riding the crest of a 15 game Yankee Conference winning streak. First place in the conference was at stake and a large crowd turned out for the game despite a heavy driving rainstorm. Caswell passed the Rams into scoring position twice in the first period and the Rams cashed in with Pat Spitaletta and Brent Kaufman " going over." Steve Collis converted after each score and the Rams led 140. The heavy rain held down the Ram offense for the rest of the day but the defense again did a great job as they held the Redmen in check until the last play of the first when UMass scored on a desperation 45 yard pass play to make it 14-7 at the half. The second half saw the Ram defense come through with the big play in every crucial situation. UMass was driving for the tying sco re in the closing minutes of play w hen the rugged Ram defenders cracked

162


UMass quarterback Tim Adams loose f ro m the footbal l on the Ram five yard line and Jim Engott recovered for the Rams to preserve the victory. Tom Fay then ran out of the end zone for an intentional safety to make it 14-9 and URI was alone atop the Yankee Conference with a 2-0 Conference record. The win brought the Ram season record to 3-2 with four games remaining. Th e Rams suffered a key injury in the game when QB Caswell suffered a cracked rib. La rry was able to play in the rest of the games but never really hit top form again and this was to be a big factor in the late season slump of the Rams. The Rams next trave led to Orono to meet conference foe Maine winless in four conference games. The underdog Black Bears stunned a lifeless Ram team 21-14. Th e New Hampshire Wildcats were next and first place in the conference was at stake as UNH , UConn , and URI were now tied for first place in the confe rence. Th e Ram s took an early 6-0 lead on a two yard plunge by Burt Kaufman but the stronger, better balanced Wildcats eventually moved on to a 27-6 win despite a top effort from the ent ire Ram team. The Rams now returned home with a 3-4 record to take on a strong Bosto n University

164


team that was rated number four in New England. A top defensive effort headed by Warren Negri held the Terriers to one touchdown but URI offensive errors, a pass interception and a poor snap from center contributed to two more BU scores and the Rams went down 20-3 in their final home game. The Rams traveled to Storrs for the season finale with a possible four way tie for the conference championship riding on the outcome. A UMass victory over UNH and a Rhody victory over UConn on this last Saturday of the season would give all four teams a piece of the title. The UConn Huskies had a definite idea as to who was going to win the conference crown as they completely dominated the Rams f rom start to finish and won easily 35-6. This win coupled with UNH victory over UMass gave UConn and UNH a tie for the conference championship . The Ramsended with a disappointing 3-6 season and a tie for third place in the conference with UMass and a 2-3 conference re cord . In retrospect , it was a disappointing season for the Rams and two losses in particular stand out. The Rams should have been able to top two of the six teams they lost to. They are Brown and Maine. A catch of a conversion pass at Providence and a better team effort at Orono could have given the Rams a respectable 5-4 season.

FAR UPPER: Caswe ll throws as Spitaletta p rotects. FAR L EFT : Stramm goes up to ca tch on a curl pattern . ABOVE: Spitaletta ri ps th rou gh B.U . line o n a quick trap play.

165


Season The University's soccer team completed their most successful campaign to date by ending the current season with a 7-5 record. Included in this record were four Yankee Conference victories enabling the team to share Co-Championship honors with Vermont. This year represented the first time the Rams soccer team had finished with a winning season. This record also makes it a very memorable departure for Coach Bob Butler, who leaves U.R.I. this year to take a position in professional baseball. Co-Captains Charles Primiano and Warren Wetzel did an excellent job in leading the team, which included all-conference selection-Steve Collis, Goalie Robert Clegg, Richard Crocker, the league's high scorer, George Pieara, Hugo Reinso and captainelect Lou Kreitzman.

166


Cross Country T earn Suffers Series of Knee Injuries A series of knee injuries kept the cross country team from attaining their full potential, and resulted in a team record of 0-6 dual , a fifth place in the Yankee Conference Title and a fifteenth place in the New England Championships. Coach Tom Russell looks to next year for a very fine season and places his hope in the returning undergraduate members of this year's squad.

167


To To To To To

dream the impossible dream fight the unbeatable foe bear the unbearable sorrows run where the brave dare not go . fight for the right , without question or pause To be wi lling to march into hell for a heavenly cause . And the world will be better for this That one man scorned and covered with scars Still strove with his last ounce of courage To reach th e unreachable star. " To Dream the Impossible Dream" From " Man of La Mancha" Lyrics by Joe Dam ion

168


MAN OF LA MANCHA

LEFT: S. Penzner, L. Criscuolo, P. Marand attend the strangest " knighting " in Keaney Gym-that of D. Atkinson as Don Quixote in this award winning musical hit.

169


JUDY COLLINS For something 's lost but something 's gained In living everyday. I've looked at life from both sides now From win and lose And still somehow It's life 's illusions I recall I really don 't know life at all. " From Both Sides Now" by Joni Mitchell as sung by Judy Col lins

171


Union Celebrates 14th Birthday

Crazy contests , Las Vegas Night and dancing highlighted the Memorial Union birthday party. Over 300 enthusiastic students filled the Rams Den to watch the pie-eating , coke drinking, turtle race and apple-on-a-string contests. In the evening the Union Board sponsored a Las Vegas night. The games room was packed with funny money gamblers crowding roulette wheels and black jack tables. The evening concluded with a special dance in the Ballroom.

172


LEFT: Sorori ty gi rl Mary MacDonald wa its fo r the signa l to go. LOWER RIGHT: Bob

Rainville wins agai n

173


174


DICK GREGORY " Revolution means destroying your own. A black revolution means tearing up the black community. It cannot be without pain , but we wi ll free ourselves from our hangups. The structure is being tested not by blacks alone. White kids have hit the system and it won 't stay like it is . These kids won 't conform to society's old image When America can be as aware of injustices at home as she is of the ones around the world , then she 'll be a truly vital society. When we can make the democracy work, we won 't have to force it down other people 's throats. If it really is such a good idea, and if they can see it working , they' ll steal it. " Dick Gregory

175


"Dow Shalt Not Kill" In the cou rse of human events small , highl y voca l gro ups of people find a need to cry out. The cry against Dow Chemical Co. was not a random cry ; it was part of a cry which is being heard across the country . These people fe lt a commitment so strong that nothing else mattered. The confl ict in the public's mind toward these actions, is that these protest gro ups are abr idg in g the freedoms of others. To this most protest groups will point to the Nuremburg trials , whi c h conde mn ed the German people for their in action . Today these people feel that the United States is openly participatin g in crimes against the Vietnamese people. Dow actually has a very small part in the ent ire picture , but it embodies eve ry aspect of this problem. One would say that Napalm makes up 05% of th e total production potential and 1% of the profits of Dow. However, how many other government and military co ntracts wou ld be cance ll ed if they sto pped producing Napalm ? Dow was a target, but not a lonely one. Th ese peo pl e continue to work against every aspect of th e Academi c- Industrial-Military complex .

176


THE ASSOCIATION I can't say just lfJhat is real , all I know is what I feel I know The time it is today, and we must find our way My heart it clearly states, the answer's not in hate I once believed that love was but a dream But now I know that love's a flowing stream They 're lying , killing , they ' re pushing their rules They tell me the prophets all were just fools But I know different and I won't be used It's they that are lost, it's they are confused. The Time It Is Today by Russ Giguere sung by The Association (c) 1966 Beechwood Music Corporation

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177


Boycott became the byword of disapproving URI students as they gathered at the open Senate meeting held to vocalize feelings against faculty controlled vacation schedules. Through signs and shouts and Senate bills, ideas and plans were proposed and later comprom ised to placate both students and faculty. The outcome, a welcome one .. . two extra days of Christmas vacation.

178


FAR LEFT: Dejected coed and poster indi-

cate disgust with the Faculty Senate calendar. TOP CENTER: Senator Robinson confers with Senators Perritti, Houston and Pasquale. LOWER MIDDLE: 2000 students leave in disgust after Student Senate refuses to boycott without a referendum of entire student body. LOWER RIGHT: Senator Kilberg defends the Senate action.

Students Call for Boycott for Longer Christmas Vacation

179


A.P.O. Sponsors Christmas Tree Decorating Contest Shivering students hurriedly decorated their small Christmas trees at the annual Christmas Tree Decorating contest sponsored by Alpha Phi Omega. Despite the freezing-cold weather and Hong Kong Flu, students from the housing units assembled in front of the Memorial Union to do some fancy Christmas tree trimm ing. This year's winning entry : Zeta Beta Tau.

180


Merry-Making Medieval Style Through the efforts of both the students and faculty, the Christmas spirit of the 12th century was revived during Medieval Christmas. Leather crafts, baked goods and other Medieval businesses were set up in the simulated market square. Wassail was served and spirits rose. Christmas carols and ancient music filled the square. To climax the evening, " The Second Shepherds' Play" was presented. TOP LEFT: ZBT girl Janice Weinstein re laxes after giving away free loll i-pops. TOP RIGHT: Fran Lavecchia, Mike Moskwa and friends enjoy medieval christmas entertainment. LEFT: Kathy Fra nklin greets students at entrance to market place.

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Orchestra Provides Holiday Entertainment The concert may best be described as the efforts of many combined to blend into one harmonious whole. From conductor to choir to last choir clarinet player, all strove to express their thoughts in the euphony of sound known as music.

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Duke: ... how dost thou, my good fellow? Clown: Truly, sir, the better for my foes and the worse for my friends. Duke: Just the contrary; the better for thy friends. Clown: No, sir, the worse. Duke: How can that be? Clown: Marry, sir, they praise me and make an ass of me; now my foes tell me plainly I am an ass: so that by my foes, sir, I profit in the knowledge of myself, and by my friends I am abused: so that, conclusions to be as kisses, if your four negatives make your two affirmatives, why then, the worse for my friends and the better for my foes. TWELFTH NIGHT William Shakespeare

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INTER SESSION Around the second week in January with finals just around the corner students really " hit" the books. Glassy-eyed and exhausted they pull all-nighters in hopes of passing a course or strengthening their grades. The moment of truth finally arrives and after 15 or 20 hours of tests it 's all over. The Exodus begins. " Florida here I come. " A week later rested students return for another semester of fun and games.

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Basketball Season Ends On A High Note The 1968 season, which started off badly, finished on a high note as the Rams won six of their last eight starts, including a victory over previously unbeaten conference champion, Massachusetts. Coach Tom Carmody, starting his first year as head man of the Rams, experienced early season difficulties finding the right combination, and just as he did, misfortune struck the club. Two of the players, who were beginning to make the Rams jell, Claude English and Eddie Molloy, suffered injuries in the game with Fordham. For Molloy, it was the end of the season except for a token appearance in the final game. English missed only one game and played with his right wrist heavily bandaged in the final fourteen games. It was only tremendous courage by the junior college transfer from Columbus, Georgia, which kept him in action. Claude still dazzled his opponents with his fantastic leaping and speed, and finished the season as the Rams second leading scorer. English was named to the All-Yankee Conference first team and was also co-captain of the team with Joe Zaranka. John Fultz was the mainstay of the Rams this year, as he finished with a season average of 22.6 points per game. Fultz was easily the high scorer, the leading rebounder and foul shooter. John was named to the All New England team , All-Yankee Conference team and the Look magazine District One All American team . Both Fultz 188


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FRONT ROW : John Fultz, Claude English, Leon Mintschenko, Joe Zaranka, Mike Schanne, Ron Louder, Joe Van Oudenhove. REAR ROW : Coach Tom Carmody, Ed Molloy, Fred Kornblith, Bi ll Metkiff, AI Hazard, Harvey Fine, Ron Tiskevich, Asst. Coach Earl Shannon.

and English will be back next season and this combination could prove to be the best front court combi nation in the East. Several thousand fans flocked to Keaney Gymnasium to watch the Rams in the first game of the 1968-69 basketbal l season. St. Michael's, the Ram 's first-opponent, shocked the fans by walking off the floor at half-time with a marginal lead . However, the fans ' confidence was restored when the Rams began to find themselves in the second half of play and regained the lead ... for a short time. St. Michael 's staved off the rally and came up with a stunning victory. Final socre: St. Michael 's 59, U.R.I. 54. Unfortunately for the Rams, the St. Michael 's game set a precedent for the next four games. In the second game U.R.I. was shocked by Brown , 79-59. In game number three, Manhatten showed why they were favored by beating the Rams 7462. The Rams record changed from 0-3 to 0-4 when they lost their first Yankee Conference game to Massachusetts, 65-60. With a standing room crowd of 5,000 fans, the Rams took on the red-hot Providence College Friars. The Rams, hoping for their first victory, were dismayed as the Friars defeated Rhody, 86-76. The tide finally turned as U.R.I. t ravelled to Maine for their second Yankee Conference game. 190


Claude English shot puts Rams in front for an ultimate 92-72 victory.

Fultz scores basket in losing cause to Manhatten.

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With John Fultz shooting 36 points and the Rams hitting a sparkling 58% from the field , Rhody ran the Bears off the court and came up with their first victory. Final score: U.R. I. 111 Maine 101. The basketball season began to brighten considerably for Rhody as their offense began to dominate their games. John Fultz shot an eye-popping 33 points and the team shot a hot 58% from the field as U.R.I. turned back New Hampshire 117107. Their Yankee Conference record was now 21, and their overall record 2-5. After 2 straight victories, the Rams perspired confidence as they headed to the Quaker City Tournament in Philadelphia. Their first foe was a highly regarded University of South Carolina team , against whom Rhody put up a tremendous battle. At half-time the Rams trailed by only 1 point, 37-36. However, the Gamecocks proved too much for the Rams in the second half as they pulled away to an 81-68 victory. U.R.I. faced De Paul University in a consolation game and considerably outrebounded the DePaul team. However, the second half found the Rams waning , and Rhody took it on the chin 95-86. U.R.I.'s record was now 2-7. The Rams returned home to Kingston only to find a California team waiting for them . Rhody played an excellent game and took Irvine into camp. Final score: U.R.I. 81, University of California at Irvine 76. U.R.I. faced Fordham in their next game and Rhody completely outplayed the Rams from New York in the first half of play. Unfortunately for Rhody, two key players were injured early in the game, high-jumping Claude English, and the " Little E" , Eddie Molloy. Their loss not only affected the outcome of the Fordham game (U.R.I. bowed 68-56), but also affected the ensuing games. U.R.I. sadly missed their men. After the loss of Molloy and English, the remaining men on the squad showed courage and conviction as they faced a superior Holy Cross team. Unbelievably, U.R.I. was able to remain fairly close to the Crusaders through most of the second half, but Holy Cross showed their class and pulled away to an 82-61 victory. After the Holy Cross loss, the Rams travelled to Storrs, the hot bed of Huskies enthusiasm. Rhody was defeated 102-92, but not before John Fultz poured in 46 points, the high of his career. Rhode Island improved their Yankee Conference record 3-2 and their overall record to 4-10 as they whipped the Vermont Catamounts 81-70 behind the expert shooting of John Fultz. The Rams could not put two victories together, however, as the Providence College Friars downed Rhody for the second time this season. The final score: P.C. 83, U.R.I. 59. Sixth-ranked St. John's handed the Rams their twelfth loss of


the season, as the Redmen completely outclassed Rhody and coasted to a 73-46 victory. Fortunately for the Rams, the Boston University squad was not playing up to par when Rhody faced them. U.R.I. was able to defeat the Terriers by playing steady and consistent basketball. Final score: U.R.I. 71, B.U. 62. Playing a nationally ranked team is not an easy task as many a Ram will testify. Boston College came to Kingston ranked number one in New England and ranked in the Top Twenty teams nationally. However, the Rams were not easy to dispose of as they played one of their finest games of the season. The outcome was not decided until the closing minute of p lay at which time the Eagles forced the Rams to foul, and Boston Co ll ege put the game out of reach. Fin al socre: B.C. 70, U.R.I. 62. After playing spirited ball against Boston College, U.R.I. faced a Yankee Conference opponent, New Hampshire. With both offense and defense jelling, the Rams ran the men from the North country off the court and kept themselves

in contention for the Yankee Conference Crown. Final socre: U.R.I. 92, N.H. 65. After taking New Hampshire into camp, Rhody expected to do likewise with Maine. However, Maine had other plans as they surprised the Rams with their fine shooting. The Bears cut a late Rhode Island rally short and edged out the Rams despite 32 points by John Fultz. Final score: Maine 85, U.R.I. 81. 192


Tishkevich passes break for a score.

Claude Eng lish saves a wayward pass and throws to Fultz who scores.

off

after

fast

Eddie Mo lloy an d his change-of-pace dribble.

overwhelmed by their foe's prowess from the charity stripe. Final score: American U. 76, U.R.I. 71 . Rhody continued to defeat their Yankee Conference opponents, and this time their victim was the University of Vermont. Rh ody again dominated the second half of play and cruised to an easy 69-58 victory over the Catamounts. The University of Massachusetts came to town as prohibitive favorites, and by the end of the first half it looked as if Rhody would be run directly off the court. The half-time score was U. Mass. 32, U.R.I. 18. The early going of the second half

" Revenge " was the key word for the Rams' bout with Brown University. The Bruins humiliated the Rhody quintet at Marvel Gymnasium, by twenty points, and the Rams squad was not going to permit the Bruins a return performance at Keaney. U.R.I. battled to tie Brown at half-time 33-33. The second half of play found the Rams dominating the court and outhust lin g the Bruins as Rhody went on to win it 71-63. Rhody was defeated in their next game by American University in a game that Am erica n won at the foul lin e. Although Rhody shot eight more field goals than their opponents, they were 193


Schanne beats his man with help of sc reen by Claude English .

looked much like the first half as U. Mass. held a 42-24 edge. However fortitude and hustle basketball proved to be the Rams' assets as they rallied strongly and surged to within five points with only two minutes to go. It was all John Fultz for the rest of the game as he calmly sank one free throw with three seconds remaining to give Rhody a well-deserved 57-56 victory. The final game of the season against the University of Connecticut gave Rhody a 7-3 Yankee Conference record which was good enough for second place. The Rams played solid basketball against the Huskies, and ended an otherwise dismal season on a high note as they whipped U. Conn. 9272. The Rams' overall record for the season stood at a disappointing 10 wins and 15 losses. The Rams are losing three seniors this yearall are excellent backcourt men. They are Leon Mintschenko, Joe Zaranka, and Mike Schanne. These losses should hurt the Rams, but all does not look dim with strong backcourt men such as Eddie Molloy, Ron Ti shkevich (who came on to a strong finish alter getting his first starting role against New Hampshire) , and Phil Hickson, a 6'4" backcourt man coming up from the freshman ranks. Phil led the freshmen in scoring and rebounding and is one of the best prospects for the Rams in recent years. Coach Carmody will be assisted next year by Steve Vacendak, who for the past two years has been an outstanding ballp layer for the Pipers in the American Basketball Association, and who associated with Coach Carmody when he was at Duke University.

John Fultz tips to Hazard to set up play.

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Tishkevich scores on a left-handed , hook layup shot. Zaranka and Mintschenko scramble for rebound.

Bud Hazard scores on jump shot from foul line.

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Track Team Places Third In Yankee Conference URI 's indoor track team was not as successful in 68-69 as it has been in previous years. Their record in dual meet competition was 0 and 3 and Rhody placed third in the Yankee Conference. But Rhody trackmen have something to look forward to in the future. A new athletic bubble is being built beside Keaney Gymnasium and beginning next year the athletes should be able to practice inside instead of outside at Rodman Hall as they always have in the past. Practicing outside has always been a handicap to the trackmen . This year several snowstorms and freezing weather made it almost impossible for the squad to practice. There are few universities, if any, who do not have indoor tracks and it takes a pretty dedicated athlete to brave the freezing cold and the elements. Because URI did not have an indoor track all its meets had to be scheduled away. For this reason they did not have any spectator support. In the future, URI trackmen will be able to train better inside and should get some spectator support.


Ram Outdoor Track Undefeated In Dual Meet The Ram outdoor track squad was unexpectedly powerful in 1969. They went undefeated in the dual meet season but unfortunately placed second to the University of Massachusetts by three points in the Yankee Conference. They came back, however, and three days later gained revenge by defeating the University of Massachusetts 114-35 in a dual meet. Another outstanding victory for the Rhody cindermen was their 75-74 win over Northeastern. In the past three years Northeastern has only been beaten by powerhouse track squads such as Harvard University's squad. The team had good depth in every event and often took all three places in several events in the dual meets. Most of the squad will be returning next year and there are some very promising freshmen who will step into the places vacated by graduating seniors.

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Faces Show Value of Greek System Activities are the products of the bond of brotherhood which is prevalent in all fraternities. Fraternities mean meeting people . .. men working , sociali zing and studying with one another in close friendship. This bond of brotherhood is the life sustaining asset of the fraternity system. It teaches responsibility and maturity to all those who are members of it.

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Sorority Theme Parties One of the pleasant aspects of sorority rush includes the sorority theme parties. During Rush , rushees visit sorority houses to get a better understanding of total sisterhoods. Rush includes an Informal rush and a Formal rush that includes a series of parties .. . Coke, Theme and Formal. Bids for membership are given out the Saturday after the formal parties.

Sig ma Delta Tau's theme party is Japanese sty le.

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Paradise, Hawai ian sty le is Chi Omega.


Sorority Theme Parties (Cont.) The Sorority Theme Party is a second series of parties during the two week formal rush period. Each sorority develops an entertainment party centered on one theme and draws from its own members for talent, scenery construction etc. Parties are held for two consecutive nights to give prospective sorority pledges a chance to visit all the sorority houses.

Delta Zeta 's rush theme is '"By The Sea.'"

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Greek Rush System To Change In order to seek a more natural means of communication with freshman, more meaningful and valuable pledge training and deeper commitments toward culture sorority rush will see a change next year. It wil l include a combination of an all -Greek rush and a non-restrictive, open rush fostering closer and more natural relationships among rushees and sorority women .

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Snowbound All through the night, flashes announced the closing of schools and businesses. An early morning bulletin on WJAR-TV went something like this: " All R.I. schools will be closed today. Repeat. All R.I. schools will be closed today, with the exception of the University of R.I. " Once again, that staunch pillar of knowledge , URI went out of its way to accommodate the student in his quest for knowledge After an invigorating walk from Washburn to Ind ependence .. . we sat patiently awaiting the arrival of our 9:00 God of knowledge ; And we waited ; And we waited. At this point, one of our commuting friends rushed in breathless , not wanting to miss a minute of the " make sure you don 't cut" class. We inquired about her unusual tardiness and she informed us that the " damn " parking lot was covered with about a foot of snow and she was forced to park in a no-parking area. No doubt a ticket was in the offering. Or who knows, the car might be towed away by the time she got back. But when there comes a question between learning and parking, we all know what takes priority at the University. Just ask your teacher, if he 's there . Tlly1E NOW-9:15. Once more, disillusioned students, now numbering 3, looked at each other bewildered. Maybe we had heard wrong this morning. Maybe URI was the only school that was closed. No, we were sure it wasn't that way. But we couldn 't judge too harshly before we knew the reasons of the teacher. We knew that he would have been there if he could have. PATRICIA GIARMMARCO SUE MILLAR

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A Veil of White

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"Dreams are messages which are sent to us from above. They can occur in all types of shapes and forms from beauty to bizarre. They bring omens and nonsense. The origin of their birth however, is enough to allow the light which they bring with them to penetrate into our souls. The Dream of Mankind is Peace on Earth and Good Will Toward Men. "

Sam & Dave and the Rascals Highlight Winter Weekend

From album ONE UPON A DREAM by Feli x Cavliere sung by The Rascals ecopyright 1968 Slacsar Publishing Company, Ltd. ,% Steingarten, Wedeen & Weiss, 444 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10022

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Foreign Students Present International Ball The Tenth annual International Ball sponsored by the All Nations Club University included decorated booths containing individual national products, dancing, and a special dance theme called " A Night In Aruba." The crowning of International Ball queen May Jean Tow of Sigma Kappa brought International Ball 1969 to a close.

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The Dating Game URI Style One of the many Memorial Union sponsored activities is the ABC Dating Game. Emulating the popular TV series, the guest contestant questions three hidden persons and selects her date based on their answers. " Bachelor No. 2 , If all of your friends had told you I was a wild girl but you took me out and I just wanted to swing on the swing , what would you do?' ' " I would lie to my friends."

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APO Sponsors UMOC

Alpha Phi Omega, national honor fraternity, sponsors its second annual Ugly Man On Campus contest. UMOC- t 969 is Steven Brou wer of Phi Sigma Kappa.

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Blue Key Bazaar Is a Success Approximately 2,500 students participated in the Blue Key society's annual charity bazaar held in Keaney Gymnasium. The more than $2,000.00 which was earned by the bazaar resulted from the efforts of the fraternities, sororities and resident halls which operated the booths. Gerry DeMello of Delta Zeta was selected 1969 Blue Key Bazaar queen. All proceeds go to charity through the Campus Chest Fund.

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Introducing Mr. Fraternity ...

Mr. Fraternity Pledge. The contest included areas such as coarseness and grossness. Above--the King.

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And Miss Sorority Pledge

Fee ly Co leman, a sophomore member of Chi Omega sorority is Miss Sorority Pl edge. The co ntes t inc luded areas such as beauty, poise and talent. First Runner Up is Sarah Mc Nulty.

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Gary Ferdman speaks to fellow demonstrators as they occupy Administration building.

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Students "Welcome" CIA to URI In an attempt to gain a basis of support, the leaders of the demonstration formed a coalition between members of the Student Senate, student body and the Students for Democratic Action. The initial aim of the demonstration, as presented by S.D.A. was shifted from a specific focus on C.I.A. to a more general set of issues immediately concerning students on campus. The tactics of the demonstration were again shifted to meet the new focus of attention; instead of an obstructive sit-in at the Placement Office, a non-obstructive sit-in was held in the Administration building . This change in tactics did not allow the Administration to carry out any of its threats--official and unofficial. The demonstration proved one major point ; that students at apathetic U.R.I. are concerned with the issued concerning them. The time is coming when S.D.A. will no longer be the catalyst for the iniation of action to demand reforms , but rather that organization which purports to represent the students and their ideas in the policy making of the University. The demands and ensuing dialogue are on record ; some have been met, while others have not. The method of having the demands put into the hands of the Student Life Committee may produce the desired change , perhaps it will not. It is probable that this will be one of the last demonstrations of this type if the necessary re forms are not made.

An emergency meeting of the Student Senate is held foll owing confron tatio n of Presiden t Baum and students.

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University Theatre Presents "Measure for Measure"

Angelo: Admit no other way to save his life,-As I subscribe not that, nor any other, But in the loss of question,- that you, his sister, Finding yourself desir'd of such a person, Whose credit with the judge, or own great place, Could fetch your brother from the manacles Of the all-holding law, and that there were No earthly mean to save him, but that either You must lay down the treasures of your body To this suppos 'd, or else to let him suffer, What would you do? WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE Act II. Scene IV.

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Two-Part Drug Symposium Sponsored by IFC and AWS Mr. Sidney Cohen, director of th e division of narcotics addiction and drug abuse of the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, Maryland , questioned whether Americans today needed a drug to produce a high at a two-part symposium sponsored by IFC and AWS. " It seems to me that if a person uses a drug to evade defeat .. . or can 't engage intimately with other human beings without its use, it's all a very sad state."

THE RAT RACE Dr. Timothy Leary told a crowd of 1000 students at Keaney Gymnasium that the only way to escape the restriction of conditioning that governs our life in society is by means of pleasure thru the use of chemicals. " There is no excuse for anyone to be uptight more than ten minutes of his life. There is no excuse for everyone not being high all the time."

Art Series Presents Ali Akbar Khan As the fourth program of the URI Art Series, Ali Akbar Khan, Indian Sarodist performed at Edwards Auditorium. Mr. Khan performs with a 25string instrument, the sarod , the oldest instrument known in India. Accompanying Mr. Khan is Shankar Ghost playing the drums and Kathleen Hagan playing the stringed tampura.

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Rain Causes Cancellation of Paddy Murphy Wake There was no weeping and wailing on the Quadrangle this year. Rain caused the cancellation of the traditional Paddy Murphy's Wake celebrated on St. Patrick's Day by Theta Chi Fraternity. That evening at the Theta Chi Fraternity House Paddy rose from the coffin to lecture his many mourners on the evils of alcohol.

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Lucille Berube was selected Campus Coleen.

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TRUTH' IS THE. GREATEST POWER

Peace Fair Held In Union Ballroom The Peace Fair was set up as a benefit for the New England Committee For Nonviolent Action by a group of local women . Amidst the atmosphere created by folk singers and various arts and crafts, there was a distinct political attitude of the C.N.V.A. Peace through Peace. The C.N.V.A. is the organization often associated with the politics of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mahatma Gandhi , and Joan Baez. Its politics are those of promulgation of change through nonviolent methods.

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Memorial Union Provides Many Forms of Entertainment A solace for students, the Memorial Union offers stamps, newspapers, color television and the other essentials of life. Activities and events are sponsored to suit divergent interests from art exhibits to Friday night dances. Pool tables and bowling alleys offer escape from the tedium of studies.

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They Want To Be Heard

A peaceful revolution is something of a paradox, but this theme of the 1969 yearbook is a fair statement of what was happening on the campus during the year. Protest-confrontation-play for power-however you define the current campus mood in this country, and despite the fact that special interest groups sometimes use it for their own purposes, it grows out of a number of legitimate complaints and is generally aimed at building a healthier academic environment. A protest against Dow Chemical Company interviewers resulted in a campus-wide committee to study recruitment and placement policies. A sitin in the Administration Building at the time of CIA interviews dramatized demands for a University governing body which would represent students, faculty and administration. This proposal is currently under study. The Faculty Senate now admits students who wish to listen to their deliberations, and they may be heard if they give advance notice. The committee on changes in the B.A. curriculum included students and held a wellattended open hearing. In the words of a proposed statement of student rights and privileges, " Students shall be free , individually and collectively, to express their views on issues of institutional policy and on matters of general interest to the student body. The student body shall have clearly defined means through representative student government to participate in the formulation and applicat ion of institutional policy affecting academic and student affairs."

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AI "G ive a Damn " Divoll, 1970 Student Senate President.

Tom " Moustache" Bell.

Jeffrey Wright, 1969 Student Senate President.

Liz " Abolish the Senate" Graham.

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Student Senate President: Jeffrey Wright Vice President: Dianne Davis Treasurer: Howard Kilberg Recording Secretary: Fred Tobin Corresponding Secretary: Norris Whiston Member-at-Large: Julia Lepper ACADEMIC AFFAIRS David Chronley Norman Seggel Jack McCaughey Elizabeth Graham Laurie Gurdin

Brenda Chaffe Ellen Levine

TAX COMMITTEE Di anne Davis

Howard Kilberg Laurence Tanner

Carol Najarian Kalhy Buffum CONSTITUTIONS COMM ITTEE Allen Divali Brian Fricot

Ken St. Onge Tom Howard

INTERCOLLEGIATE COMMITTEE Robert Larder Sandra Auc lai r Sue Mistaleski James Paroline

LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS COMMITTEE Nancy Oster Beryl Johnston STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE Alice Tousignant Raymond Pasquale Anthony Robinson

Judy Peretti Gary Ferdman Sue Reynolds Kalhy Buffum Leonard Light Norris Whiston

Julia Lepper Fred Tobin Patricia Darnall

Mike Ross Richard Shadoian Donna Pilkington Francis Pimental

Luci lie Boule Palricia Brady

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Association of Women Students President: Patricia Darnall Vice President: Mary Haczysnki Treasurer: Debbie Haber Recording Secretary: Linda Smith Corresponding Secretary : Andi Cahoon

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" The goal of the sensitivity or human relations lab is to develop in each participant the ability to be his real self with other people and to help other people to be their real selves with him. The sensitivity movement is spreading rapidly, and someday sensitized people will be the rule rather than the exception . I want to be around to see that day. " Chris Jorgensenson AWS Senstitivity Lab

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President: Michael Ross Adm. Vi ce President: Donald Arabian In tern. Vice Presid ent: Greg Mot! Exec. Vice President: Peter Barlow Secretary: Richard Foster Treasurer: Donald Cook

Inter-Fraternity Council

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President : Donna J. White Vice President : Pat Piepszna Corresponding Secretary: Gail Reed Treasurer: RoAnn Mil ler Publicity : Wally Tucker Publi c Relations: Jan Tessier Rush Chairman : Chris Sandor

Panhellenic Association

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Blue Key President: Jess Grossberg Vice President: P. Whitfield Secretary: Myra Hiller Treasurer: Ron Schiess Campus Chest Chairman: A. Nelson Howie Tarman Anne Moriarity Chris Sandor Linda Smith

Pat Brady Debbie Haber Larry Hannan Tony Robinson Lou Krietyman Barbara Shiftner Alex Nelson

Bill Barney

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WRIU Gen. Manager: Stephen Dreyfuss AM Program Director: Stephen Pritzker News Director: Eliot Asser Chief Engineer: A. Beaubien Bus. Manager : J . Carroll FM Program Director: F. Stevenson Secretary: Rhoda Hanzel Ron Abram s Robert Angell Jim Bonne r Bruce Brier David Brown

Bob Castle Joseph Clifford Tom Crosby Roy Daiell Bruce Daniel Steve Demerchant AI Divali Jeff Durham Bill Emmett Richard Evans Ed Giroux William Gordon Samual Goren Ken Grady Maureen Greene Philip Gruber Sheila Hoffman Glenn Holland

James Jackson Ronald Kresch Paul Lacroix Robert Levetin Chris Martin Gerard Michaud

Robert Murphy Doug Nagle Robert Newman John Pantalone Mike Patalano Dave Patty Ronald Pollini Donna Reynolds Steve Robert

James Ross Frank Seigel Bob Shaw Brian Sheekey Downing Simmons

George Simoni Richard Slack Robert Slack Saul Spivack Mark Steiner Paul Temple Stuart Weintraub Mark Welicky Dick Wiken Jim Zimmermann John Zoglio Arde ll Covi II Theresa Daly Dal Oearmin Merylene Lavoie Rick Silverman

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Laurels Chapter of Mortar Board Pres ident : Maria Durante Vice President: Donna Santini Secretary: Ann Stasz Treasurer : Jane Graham Edi to r: Helen Grego ry Elections Chairman: Mary Brusci

El aine Abraham Mclellen Joyce Al ix Patricia Darnall Sandra GroHman Denise McQueeney Anne Moriarty Carol Orchel Lewis Patricia Piepszna Alisun Smith Judith Stern Weisman Janice Tessier Virgin ia Viall Virginia Westeren Eileen Wyss Ferance

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Union Board of Directors Chairman: Ed Pitera Vice Chairman : Mike Rabasca Secretary: Le Mclellan Treasurer: Peter Barlow PERSONAL LEADERSHIP COUNCIL CHAIRMAN Anne Moriarty-Tom Pickering PUBLIC RELATIONS COUNCIL Chairman--Debbie Haber Hospitality-Donna Santini OPERATIONS COUNCIL Bob Plante PROGRAMMING COUNCIL Chairman--Steve Klitgord Arts-M ike Moskwa Activities--Jon Manchester Current Event~Fran LaVechio Recreation--Bob Fu saro Major Events-Skip Marginson

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Sachems Leadership Seminar held at St. Dominic Savio Boys Center.

Sachems Chairman: Wil li am Simonson Treasurer: Peter Whitfie ld Secretary: Anne Moriarty Jess Grossberg Howie Tarman Ed Pitera Mike Ross Donna Santini Donna-Jean White Julie Lepper Pat Darnall

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Editor: Chuck Colarulli Managing Editor : Pat Giammarco Ass'! Managing Editor: Sue Millar News Editor: Ed Gaulin Ass'! News Editor: Bruce Daniel Sports Editor: John Marchant Ch ief Photographer: Doris Wise Busin ess Manager: Jeff Sommers Advertising Manager: Louis Kreitzman Layout: Jeff Kleinman

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NEWS WRITERS Greg Fiske Donna Caruso Bil l Gau li n Cynthi a Comery Fred Tobin Jim Johnson Larry Davey FEATURES Lu cia Droby Maude Fitzgerald M. E. Keegan

â&#x20AC;˘

SPO RTS WRITERS Bill Oziemblewski Paul Kenyon Roger Bennett Bill Benesch Steve Cheslow Pe ter Panag iotis PHOTOGRAPHERS Robert Larder Bruce Garreau Robert Greene Georges Bochstod Elliott Feit Tony Dirocco


Moustache Editor-In-Chief: Thomas W. Bell Executive Editor: Frank Pimental Literary Editor: John Dunnigan Art Editor: Edward Gianfrancesco Business Manager: Randy Hozid Circulation Manager: Ron Letourneau Secretaries: Becky Ferranti Theresa Daly Sue Delorme

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Grist Editor-In-Chief: Edward L. Frisella Managing Editor: Pete Robinson Ass't Managing Editor: Salim Valimahomed Photography Editor: Joe Norris Business Manager: Janet Lee Secretary: Nancy Oster

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Perspective Editor-In-Chief : Richard W. Wise Co-ordinating Editor: George Panichaz Art Editor: Terri Natale Art Board: Bette Drew Walter Petroski Lucy Tillman Susan Sharpe Literary Editor: Rodney MacDow Literary Board : Bruce Garreau Michael Saunders Pippa Oliver-Smith Gregg Morrison Business Manager: Kenneth St. Onge Creative Activities Editor: Barbara Swiatkowski Typist: Donna Bruckshar

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Perspective Photography Club

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That Ram Band & Ramettes President : Louis Procaccini Vice President : Dennis DiSano Secretary: Claire VanWinkle Treasurer: Craig Everett Assist . Librarian : Tom Bate Social Chairman : Donna Swaim Properties Mgr.: A. Tinkham Assist. Band Director: W. Nichols

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Donald Burns: Band Director

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Cheerleaders

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Captain : Christine Sandor Co-Captain : Maureen Duff Secretary/Treasurer: Sue Reynolds Coordinator : Goodie Nuhn Linda Mangles Jean Edson Peggy Dorn Jan Murphy Cindy Bowman Cathy Elderkin


Orchesis

President: Kathy Fedorko Vice President : Mary Lavoie Georgette Daignault Judy Kane

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Women's Athletic Association

President: Peg Sherblom Vice President: Nancy Hertz Secretary-Treasurer: Pat Ruggerio Social Chairman: Peg Lonardo Activities Chairman : Betsy Noonan Historian : Jane Rollins Publicity Chairman : Denise Deignan Beacon Representative: Mimi Hanna Co-Recreational Chairman: Cindy Horlbogen

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Horsemen's Club President: Nancy Hertz Vice-President: Bill McGarrigle Secretary: Claire Van Winkle Treasurer: Melanie Cahill Program Chairman: Freda Stone Pub licity Chairman : Jayne Giusti Exec utive Board Members : Ann Deuney Randi Zimmer

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Jim Martin Pete Panagiotis Dave Hawkins Chuck Horner Dale Terranova Bill Todd Don Bennett

Surfing Club

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Men Commuters and Women Wayfarers Combine Forces

The Commuter Association has restructured its organization. It is no longer two separate organizations of Men Commuters and Women Wayfarers. With their combined efforts, the Commuters have spured new interest in the University. The Commuter is more than just travelling to and from classes ; he is totally involved. Commuters take part in intermural sports, hold many positions in campus organizations and student government. They also sponsor informal coffee hours with students, teachers and administrators and hold Commuter dances.

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Commuter Officers Co-Chairman: Allen Divoll Judy Peretti Corresponding Sec.: Mary Russell Recording Sec.: Debby Kingsbury Treasurer : R. Cicchelli

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COMMUTERS Co-Chairman-A. Divali Co-Chairman--J. Peretti Corresponding Secretary-M. Russell Recording Secretary-L. Standivin Treasurer-A. Cicchelli 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 265

B. Davis N. Demers M. Fiola K. Gebler R. Goulart L. Maynard R. Hampton K. Howell R. Gough R. Lagasse J . Moon J . Pierson E. Phelan B. Kettelty J . Peretti D. Tobin D. Andrews U. Gritt C. Andrew D. Ki ngsbury S. Schmitt B. Chaffee R. Ci cchelli B. Fricot R. Dauplaise B. Boucher K. Cop D. Yemma T. Fiore L. Hampton T. Howard C. Holland M. Ferrucci K. Giebler F. Papa L. Divo ll J . Shaw M. Proul x J . Levesque W. Halliwell W. Larkin C. Crashcup J. Shumate L. Shumate


Alpha Phi Omega Service Fraternity

President: David Schneider Treasurer: Stanley Light Secretary: Neal Brown Mel Fl eischer

John Breguet Louis Maynard

Pete Alfano Joe Napolitano Bob Schwartz Don Vinchkoski Harold Mears

Saul Spivak Les Crandall

Don Keyes Mickey Lazaru s

Phil Gruber Richard Ciccelli Ri chard Greenstein Brian Boucher David Manchester Ron Lomas Steve Dreyfuss

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"Bucky" Davis, Entertainment Co-ordinator and Lucille Boule.

Sophomore Class Officers

Class Officers Seniors President: W. Simonson Vice President: Steve Long

Secretary: B. Everett Treasurer: R. Foster Social Chairman: Peggy Girouard Juniors President: M. Sullivan Vice President: Sue Grady Secretary: V. Salcone

Treasurer : D. Pastore Social Chairman : Lucille Boule Sophomores President: Jim Silva Vice President: Vin DiNapolo

Secretary: M. Cohen Treasurer: K. Malcomson Social Chairman: Michael Medici

The quiet revolution manifested itself in many areas of the social spectrum this year, but none was so clear as the change in the types of popular entertainment brought to this campus. The CLASS OFFICERS under the direction of Steve Long and Bob Davis reversed the policy of past years and provided top name talent at reasonable prices. The job was not an easy one for changing a long standing tradition on the URI campus is a near impossiblility. They started with a small concert featuring Judy Collins and after a startling success preceded to bring the best of the established names to Keaney Gymnasium. Not yet satisfied with the structure of the funding of the CLASS OFFICERS for concert promotion Steve Long, Bob Davis and Fred Tobin drew up the " Student Entertainment Tax " bill which was presented to the Student Senate. The bill provided for a permanent organization responsible for the production of major popular entertainment and also the funding of this organization by a $2.50 per semester tax which would significantly decrease the price of tickets to students. The students showed overwhelming support for this bill in an informal poll of the campus. The Board of Directors of the State Universities although impressed by the percentage of approval asked that an official Student Senate referendum be taken at Spring registration. The bill passed by a 96% margin. The revolution has made its mark this year on the social habits of the students of URI. Although it is not nearly complete, those who conceived of this change hoped it would in some small way help to bring the campus together and make students aware of the educational potential of a seven day week rather than the five day week they found when they arrived four years ago.


PETE WHITFIELD: Blue Key; Vice-President Boosters ... Satchems ... Phi Mu Delta ... Who 's Who. MICHAEL RABASCA : Memorial Union Board of Directors: Hospitality Committee Chairman, Public Relations Chairman , Vice Chairma n ... Summer Orientatio n Program . . . Big Brother Program . . . Sachems ... New Student Week ... Interfraternity Council Judicial Board ... Sex Symposium ... Boosters ... Sigma Chf-Secretary and Scholarship Chairman, Publications Chairman, Vice President ... Who 's Who .

MIKE ROSS : Lambda Chi Alpha, secretary, treasurer ... I. F.C., president, representative Fraternity Manager's Association Board of Con tro l . .. Student Senate ... Sachems . .. Who's Who ... President's Advisory Council ... W.R.I.U .

HOWARD E. KILBERG : Pi Sigma Alpha ... Student Senate-Treasurer ... Senate Student Affairs Comm ittee-Chairman ... Student Life Committee .. . Tri X Committee ... Memorial Union Current Events Committee Coordinator ... Hospitality Committee ... Activities Committee Governor Chafes Intern Resident Advisor ... Moderator of Assistant Council Resident . . Executive Commitee of Studen t Senate .. . Who 's Who.

The Students of URI

268


PEG SHERBLOM: Women's Athletic Association : President, Activities Chairman, Historian, House Rep resentative ... Del ta Delta Delta: Recording Secretary, Physical Education Major's Sponsor Chairman Club: Vice-President . Intram ural : Volleyball , Basketball, Field Hockey, Badminton, Softball ... Honor Club: Riflery, Volleyba ll , Baske tball, Field Hockey . Who's Who.

JAN ICE TESSIER: Mortar Board ... Omicron Nu: VicePresident ... Kappa Delta Pi ... Kappa Alpha Th eta: President . . R.I. National Col lege Queen . KAT Rush Chairman, Social Chairman, Pledge Class President . . . Panhellic Cl ub: Public Relations Chairman ... Home Economics Club: President ... Big Brother -Big Sister Organization : Co-Founder and Co-Chair. Who's Who ... Phi Kappa Phi.

DONNA SANTINI: Coordinator-Hospitality Committee . . Memoria l Union Board of Directors--Chairman : Hospita lity Committee Judicial Board Junior Counci l Chi Omega-Rush Chairman Mortar Board--Vice President Sachems Who's Who.

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MICHAEL AARONSON : Inter Fraternity Counci l Booster's Club ... Sachem 's Seminar ... Big Brother - Community Action Projects ... Lambda Chi AlphaPresident-Rush Chairman ... Cross Country-Captain ... Indoor Track ... Outdoor Track ... Omicron Delta Epsilon ... Dean's Li st ... Who 's Who. BILL SIMONSON: Sachems Class President-Sophomore-J unior-Senior . .. Student Lecture Series Chairman ... Lambda Ch i Alpha ... Varsity Track . Who 's Who

JESS -RICHARD GROSSBERG: Blue Key Society Sachems . . . Homecoming Lawn Di splay Chairman ... Campus Chest Drive Chairman ... U.R.I. Athletic Counci l . Phi Kappa Phi . . Omicron Delta Epsilo~Honor Society in Economics--Treasurer .. . U.R.L Honors Coll oquium .

Student Advisory Counci l to the President ... Student Advisory Council to the Dean of the College of Business . Summer Orientation Program ... Who's Who.

HOWlE TORMAN : Blue Key Society ... Bazaar Chairman . . . Sachems ... Inter Fraternity Council . .. U.R.I.

Ski Team ... Ski Club ... New Student Week Committee . .. Physics Society--IEEE ... Who 's Who.

270


ED PITERA: Freshman Class Soc ial Chairman ... Tau Kappa Epsilon--Treasurer-President Memorial Union Board of Directors--Current Events Committee Chairma,._Chairman of the Board ... Who's Who. PETER BARLOW : Big Brother Program ... Inter-Fraternity Council (vice-president) ... Union Board of Directors (treasurer) . . . Sigma Chi Fraternity ... Who 's Who . I. F.C. Judicial Board (vice-president) . . Varsity Tennis ... I.F.C., editor of Greek Rush Booklet . . Union Board of Directors, chairman of operations.

STEVEN KLITGORD: Memorial Union Board of Directors; Programming Council Chairman, Recreation Committee Chairman, Activities Committee Tau Kappa Epsilon ; Secretary .. . Who's Who.

271


DENISE McQUEENEY: Associat ion of Women Students . . . Panhellenic Club ... Blue Key . . . Jun ior Councilo rs ... Mortar Board ... Phi Kappa Ph i . . Jud icia l Board ... Alpha Delta Pi: President ... Who 's Who.

LIZ MULLEN : Delta Zeta, vice-president ... Memorial Union Board of Directors, chairman, Personnel leadersh ip, chairman of current events ... Vice-President of Sophomore Class ... Judicial Board . . . Grist, activities editor, residence editor ... Junior, Senior Social Committees ... Student Lecture Series, secretary . New Student Week Committee .. . Summer Orientation Staff . . . Counci I for Christian Ministry . . . Sachems Leadership ... Who's Who.

DONNA-JEAN WHITE : Sigma Kappa, rush chairman .. . Panhellenic, president, publicity chairman ... Arts Council ... Beacon . . . Sachems . . . President Baum 's Student Adv isory Group . Who 's Who.

272


JULIA LEPPER: Della Zeta, house manager ... Junior Council ... A.W.S., senior-member-at-large ... Faculty Senate Library Committee, student member .. . Beacon Board of Directors . . Union Board of Directors Student Lecture Series, secretary Student Senate, vice president, member-at-large, chairman, tax committee, executive committee ... Sachems, corresponding secretary ... Who's Who.

I

..1../'" -< ,........ I

'

ALISUN " SUNNY" SM ITH : That Ram Band: Featured Baton Twirler ... Boosters .. Junior Councilors . Mortar Board ... Omicron Nu ... Phi Kappa Phi . Kappa Delta Pi ... Panhellenic Club ... Alpha Delta Pi: Rush Chairman ... Student Senate Committee on Tutorial Services ... Union Activities Comm ittee . Association of Women Students ... Who's Who .

MARJORIE HOUSTON: Student Senate; Chairman of Student Affairs Committee ... Student Senate Executive Committee . Junior Councilors . . AWS ... Union Hospitality Committee . Delta Zeta . . Who's Who.

273


PAT DARNALL : Association of Women Students (president and vice president) Senate Lecture Series . . . Union Board . Beacon Board of Directors ... President to the Advisory Council . .. Junior Counce Ilor ... De lta De lta Delta ... Who's Who.

STE PHEN DREYFUSS: W.R.I.U., general manager . Pres ident's Ad viso ry Ad Hoc Committee .. . Sigma Pi Re lief Fund, co-chairman ... W.A.LU., FM Program Director . . . Alpha Phi Omega (vice president) Select Chorus . .. Who 's Who . .. Concert Choru s

FRED TOBIN : Student Senate, executive committee, member at large, reco rdi ng secretary, legislative affairs chairman , tax committee, legislative affairs committee, presidential bookstore committee, bookstore committee chairman ... Beacon , reporter, associate news editor ... Arts Council . . . Varsity Soccer ... Alpha Epsilon Pi . . Who's Who.

274


JANE BRESLOW: Yacht Club Union Special Events Committee ... Union Activities Committee . Grist, assisting manager, editor-in-chief Who 's Who.

STEPHEN LONG : Vice-President, junior, senior class Student Senate ... Constitution Committee ... Entertainment .. . Phi Mu Delta ... Vice-President, Pledge class ... Who's Who.

SARAH ETCHISON : President, Welden Hall . . Student Advisory Committee ... Nutrix, president, secretary ... Chairman of House Court, Dorr Hall ... Student Personal Committee. College of Nursing . . Who's Who.

ANNE MORIARTY: Delta Zeta, recording secretary . . Blue Key ... Sachems, recording secretary ... Omicron Nu (vice president} ... Mortar Board ... Union Board of Directors, Personal Leadership Council chairman ... Who 's Who . Traffi c Appeals Board Chairman ... Association of Women Students, Member-At Large . . . Judicial Board ... Jr. Counci lors.

275


EO McWILLIAMS: Young Ame ricans For Freedom, chairman ... Young Republican ... Student Comm ittee Against Racism ... Youth For Nixon, Chafee . Dormitory Judicial Board ... S.C.A. R. Scholarship Fund ... Teaching Effectiveness Study Committee Pres idential Committee To Study Recruitment Policy and Union Role in Modern Society ... Who's Who ... College Bowl Team ... Wash ington Intern Program ... Inter Residence Hall Council, newsletter staff editor.

VIRGINIA VIALL : Association of Women Students: Acting Chairman . .. Junior Councilors: Chairman . Boosters . Ram Band Judicial Board Panhellen ic Club Mortar Board ... Deans List ... Who 's Who.

ROBERT W. PLANTE : Phi Kappa Psi ... Freshman Class Treasurer ... Sachems Leadership Seminar . . Booster Society . .. Fraternity Pledge Class Social Chairman . . Physchology Club ... Fraternity Rush Committee ... Lacrosse Club . Co-ordinator of the Memorial Union Recreation Committee ... Union Activities Committee ... Student Memorial Union Board of Directors--"Personnei-Leadership Council" ... Inter Fraternity Leadership Council ... Who's Who.

276


MARY LOU BRUSCI : Delta De lta Delta ... Panh ellenic Award , highest sorority women 's average ... Nutri x Club ... Molar Board Award , highest woman 's ave rage on campu s .. . National Student Nurse 's Associ a-

tion . . . Motar Board ... Ph i Kappa Phi ... Wh o's Who.

PATRICIA PIEPSZNA : Alpha Xi Delta, histor ian, vice president . . . Kappa Delta Pi ... Mortar Board . Panhellenic, representat ive , vice-president .. . Junio r

Counselor, secretary ... Who 's Who.

BARBARA SCHIFFTNER : Cou rse Eva luati on Booklet . .. A.W.S., re prese ntat ive ... Res ident Assista nt ... Counsel or-in -Resi dence Program , cha irm a n ... Union Board of Directors, coord inator of

co llege bowl ... Blue Key Society ... Who's Who.

LE Mc LELLAN : Uni ve rsity Chorus ... Union Boa rd of Directo rs, vice chairm an, se cre ta ry . Mortar Boa rd ... Who 's Who . Student Education Association, char ter member, president Junior Counselor ... Chi Omega, civic and soc ia l chai rm an . In te r-Sorority Council, chairman . . . New Student Week, guide, panelist.

277


SUZANNE FOSTER : University Theatre, Vice-president and secreBOB DAVIS : Orchestra, Tympanist ... Marching Band .. Alpha Epsilon Pi ... Stage Manager for University Production.

tary ... Twelfth Night ... Man's a Man ... Sargeant Musgrave's Dance ... Country Wife ... The Visit ... Dutchman ... Waiting for

Godot ... The Collection ... Ludlow Fair . . Stop the World 1 Want to Get Off.

AL DIVO LL : Student Senate ... Consitution Comm ittee Chairman ... U.R.I. Commuters Association , Co路chairman ... W.R.I.U . ... Crew Team ... Chairman Commuters' Problem Study Group . Fraternity/Sorority Study Group ... University Parking Committee.

278


CHUCK COLARULLI : Beacon, ed itor ... Debate Squad . President's Student Advisory ... Fraternity/So rority Commi ttee .

TOM BELL : Moustache.

SHERRY PECHT : Boosters ... Sachems Seminar .. Rammetts ... Head Rammett ... Junior Councilors ... Alpha Della Pi .

279


JOHN FULTZ : Ph i Mu Delta . . All-New England Conference . All-Yankee Conference ... Look Magazine All American (District I) ... Outstanding University Division Player in Rhode Island ... Top Ten Foul Shooter.

JON MANCHESTER : President, Hopkins Hall ... Memorial Union Board of Directors, activity committee chairman ... I.R.H.C., vice-chairman .

DIANNE DAVIS : Student Senate ; Chairman of Legislative Affairs Committee ... Student Senate Executive Committee ... Jud ic ial Board ... Sigma Kappa.

280


NORRIS WHISTON: Yac ht Club ... Freshman Sailing Team ... Boosters Club ... Intramural Cross Country and Track . . . Varsity Cross Country Te am ... Manager of U.R.I. Indoor and Outdoor Track Teams . President, Burnside Hall ... Inter-Resident Hall Council ... Teaching Aid Program Committee, chairman ... American Society of Civil Engineers ... Student Senate, Intercollegiate Affairs Committee, Constitutions Committee, Student Affairs Committee , Tax Comm ittee , Corresponding Secretary, Executive Committee, Advisor Student Senate Communications Committee.

CLIFF MARGINSON: Union Board of Directors; Chairman of Major Events Committee, Coordinator of Major Events Committee .. . ROTC ... Scabbard and Blade.

GARY FERDMAN: Butterfield Hall; President, Treasurer .. . IRH C .. . SCAR . . . SDA . . Community Action Project; President.

281


The Girls of URI

282


Miss Rhode Island

ARLENE PINTO ... Warwick , Rhode Island College of Arts and Sciences ... Secondary Ed ucation . . . Delta Zeta.

284


International Ball Queen

MAY TOW .. . Providence, Rhode Island ... College of Arts and Sciences . . . Sigma Kappa.

285


Homecoming Queen

PAMELA HOLLEY ... West Kingstown, Rnode Island ... College of Nursing .. . Nursing . . . Chi Omega.

286


Miss Sorority Pledge

FEL Y COLEMAN North KingsCollege of town, Rhode Island Arts and Sciences ... Sociology . Chi Omega.

287


Blue Key Queen

GERALDINE DEMELLO ... Pawtucket , Rhode Island College of Arts and Sciences Elementary Education . . Delta Zeta . .. Representing Theta Delta Ch i.

288


Ca mpus Colleen

LUCILLE BERUBE . . Providence, Rhode Island . .. College of Arts and Sciences ... Elementary Education . . Sigma Delta Tau .

289


Miss "Legs"

SUE ZWIRBLIS Scotch Plains, New Jersey ... Fashion and Merchandising ... Delta Zeta.

290


Coed-Colonel

JERILYN MEARNS ... Kailua, Oahu , Hawaii Chi Om ega .. . Mathematics.

291


Junior Prom Queen

SHARON L. MOREY Home Economics Pawcatuck, Connecticut .. . Chi Omega.

292


Miss Grist

KATHLEEN McCAUGHEY .. . Arts and Sciences ... Cranston, R.I. . Sigma Kappa.

293


This year's Miss University of Rhode Island Pag eant, sponsored by the Inter-Fraternity Council was held in the Memorial Union Ballroom. Contestants were judged on beauty, poise and talent. This year's Miss University of Rhode Island is Miss Shiela Cavanaugh of Hutchinson Hall.

294


Th e Miss University of Rhode Island award which was presented to Miss Pat Darnall symbolizes achievement and academic excel lence. It symbolizes the culmination of four years of devoted service to the University. It symbolizes many hours of tedious work in student leadership. The outstanding senior woman IS Miss Pat Darnal l, 1969 Miss Univers ity of Rhode Island.

295


Military Ball The forty-second annual University of Rhode Island Military Ball is sponsored by the Society of Scabbard and Blade. The Ball , preceded by a cocktail hour and dinner at the Quonset Point Naval Air Station Officers' Club was highlighted by the performance of the Kentish Guard Fife and Drum Corps, a precision drill team from East Greenwich, R.I. Miss Jerilyn Mearns, a 19 year old freshman mathematics major was crowned Military Ball Queen. Miss Mearns, representing Dorr Hall, received the ROTC Brigade 's honorary commander c itation by Cadet Major Peter L. Morrison and Miss Susan Reynolds, retiring Coed-Colonel.

296


Speakers On Campus Senator John 0. Pastore vehemently defends ABM system .

Dr. Benjamin Spock airs critical views on U.S. foreign policy.

297


Paul Mauriot Paul Mauriot, whose recording of " Love is Blue" topped the record charts in this country for seven consecutive weeks during 1968, performed at Keaney Gym Auditorium as part of the URI Arts Council program .

298


Richie Havens It was a real wild night ; as the James Cotton Blues Band filled in until Richie Havens arrived at Keaney Gymnasium Auditorium. Havens arrived about midnight and performed well , but was not appreciated due to the lateness of the hour. Thanks to the fantastic performance by the James Cotton Band the evening was a big success.


The Sigma Chi Derby Innovation was the key point in this year's Sigma Chi Derby Week . With the assignment of a Sigma Chi " coach " to each housing unit, the participants were provided with an assistant during the various activities. Group spirit was also emphasized this year and points awarded to the girls showing the most enthusiasm. Events of the week included a poster contest, and an auctioning of members of Sigma Chi, using baked goods as barter for slave services. The proceeds, in the form of pies and cakes, were then distributed throughout South County hospital. The Derby Steal, won by Weldin Hall, and the various field games held on the Quadrangle completed Derby Week. First place was awarded in the form of a bronze trophy to Alpha Xi Omega. Tucker Hall, defending champion, took second place , followed in third by the members of Aldrich Hall.

300


301


EVENTS Tug-of-War: Alpha Chi Omega Scramble: Merrow Hall Balloon Shave : Merrow Hall Zip Strip : Alpha Chi Omega Wrap Up : Kappa Alpha Theta Butterfingers : Aldrich Hall Alpha Delta Pi Three-Legged Race: Tucker Hall Pie-Eating: Merrow Hall Deck-A-Pledge : Alpha Chi Omega

302


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304


Mere Week: The girl must mere her date pick up her date .. . open any doors for him ... pull out his chair ... light his cigarettes. Mere stands for Male Economic Recovery Week, a popular university tradition sponsored by the Association of Women Students. It included the selection of Rushe Clarke of Chi Phi as Mere King, the Mere Follies, a free movie, and a special day when the dating roles were reversed. One of the highlights during Mere Week was a fashion show called " The Shape Of Things To Come. " Models were Emily Barret, Donna Dunphy, Marti Fairtile, Mary Hashaway, Myra Hiller, Sherry Pecht, Becky Renner, Jessica Topasio , Mary Venditti and Donna Wilkie.

Delta Delta Delta, Sigma Kappa , Sigma Della Tau and Peck Hall perform shorl, humorous skits in informal competition as part of the Mere Follies.

305


Greek Week

Initiated nine years ago at the University of Rhode Island, Greek Week is known to be a highlight in the University's Ca lender. The week of events encompasses al l aspects of the Greek System and symbo li zes both the competi t iveness and cooperation of the fraternities and sororities on campus. Here the Greeks are at their best as they strive to uphold the trad itions of mental and physical fitness exemplified by the ancient Greeks. Another word shou ld be added to the words of competiveness and cooperation which has grown through the past years in the Greek system. The word is SPIRIT. Th e closeness of fraternitysorority relationsh ips stands boldly afront all else with spirit unmatched in any other previous Greek Week.

306


Greek Sing : Phi Gamma Delta-De lta Zeta Tricycle Race : Delta Delta Delta Chariot Appearance: Lambda Chi Alpha-Delta Delta Delta Chariot Race: Sigma Nu Tug of War Chi Phi-Chi Omega Medley Lambda Chi Alpha-Delta Delta Del ta Overall Greek Week Winners: Fraternity-Lambda Chi Alpha Sorority-Delta Delta Delta

\

.

307


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Blue Key and Sachems: Honor Convocations 1969 The Blue Key and Sachems Honor Colloguim was held at Edwards Hall this year. Nine members were added to the Blue Key " host organization. " They were Jill Gropper, Kathleen Hanley, Ellen Bloom, Jeffrey Miller, Reed Holden , Cynthia Swa in , Robert Pollock, Robert Perrel lo and Jerry Vanasse. The Sachems, a senior honor society , tapped ten new members. They were Ellen Levine, Tom Pickering , Mary Ann Haczynski , Myra Hiller, Fran LaVecchio , Allen Divoll , Dianne Davis, Manuel Cunard , Christine Sandor, and Alex Nelson. These organizations recognize students who have shown outstanding academic and extra-curricular ability.

--~.)


Dialogue between President Baum , Mark Conley and others lasted for over two hours.

Afro American Society: Black Students Demand Reforms To most students there was a basic lack of understanding of what was involved by the protest. Most students did not understand what there was to protest ; the conditions on the campus are the best they have ever been. The problem is one that exists across the country ; the conditions are not good enough. The university has failed in its responsibility to the community ; that community which is trying to help itself and desperately needs college graduates. The hardest fact for the university to face is that in order to fulfill its responsibility the structure must become more flexible in order to admit more black students. The fact that there are not enough black students qualifying is not the fault of the b lacks but that of the entire education system which is not geared to handle any other group outside of white middle class " creeping meatbal lism. " The Afro-American Society made this easy for the university to accept. The demand for more black students did not state that the university must take those students who do not qualify by the white standards, but rather the acceptance of all those that do. This, in itse lf, poses a problem in that to fi ll the demanded quota of black students just for next year the university would have to recruit black students. The demonstration itself was very quiet with about 150 people wa lking in a circle or listening to speakers. The high point of the entire day was when the President spent several hours answering the questions of demonstrators. It is truly doubtful that this actually accomplished anything since many felt that the questions were not really answered, nor was any form of meaningful dialogue established . For many the demonstration was a learning experience (same as catalogue College Administration 10). It would appear that it was a necessary step to have this sort of demonstration in order to show people where the university is really at. Judging by the events that night ; broken windows in the administration building and a little threat on one that wasn 't broken, it would appear foolish for the black students not to be prepared for self-defense during the next demonstration. " Quick Martha, get the crosses, white sh eets, and gasoline."

Mark Conley, Afro-American Society spokesman, discusses black enrollment with TV channel 10 newscaster.

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3 12


lan and Sylvia lan and Sylvia share their fo lk music with URI students at Edwards Hall as part of the Art Series presentations.

Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy discusses the black revolution as part of the URI Student Lecture Series.

3 13


Spring Weekend: The Byrds, Chambers Brothers and Foundations A new type of co nce rt on the Quadrang le premiered with the Foundations whose first recocding, " Baby Now Th at I've Found You" hit the num ber one spot on the charts in Brita in and twe nty other countr ies over th e world .

One of the highlights of the Spring Weekend was the performance by the Chambers Bros. , the Byrd s and th e Foundati ons. The Chambers Brothers with such hit albu ms as " The Time Has Come" and " A New T ime--A New Day " have been on al l the nati onal best sel lers charts as has their sing le--" Tim e Has Come Tod ay." Al so at the concert were the Byrds singing th eir well-known hits of past years including " Mr. Tabouri ne Man " and so ng s from their hit album " Dr. Byrds and Mr. Hyd e."


The University of Rhode Island baseball team lost their chance for this year's Yankee Conference title when they were defeated by the University of Massachusetts by a score of 4-1. This loss coupled with 2 defeats by Maine at Orano knocked the Rams out of this year's Yankee Conference. Members of the team include Ed DaCruz, Gary Caffrey, Dickie Walsh , Richie Potvin, Richie Crocker, Skip Eickhoff, Vin Sheehan, Paul Fortin, Glen Gariepy, Ed Tymko, Barry Kleinman, Steve Benjamin, Mike Stecyk, Less Goff, and Captain John Sartini , Yankee Conference batting leader.

3 16


Baseball

317


Golf The URI golf team placed 4th in the New England InterCollegiate Golf Championship and remained a Yankee Conference winner for the 3rd straight year with 6 wins and 2 losses. Dana Quigley, a URI sen ior, became the 1st Ram golfer to win the New England Inter-Collegiate Go lf Championship since Coach Paul Butler performed the feat 14 years ago. The team was undefeated for 2 years in spring competition and until a loss to Connecticut had compiled 37 consecutive victories. Before the loss to Connecticut the team defeated Maine, Brown, Providence College, Hartford, Trinity, Massachusetts and on May 2 won the Yankee Conference by 31 strokes. Members of the team were Dana Quigley , captain and New England and Yankee Conference champion, Chuck Karboski , Nick Scalera, Ace Parmelee, Dick Jenkins, Charlie Silvestro, and Mark Batista. Paul Cieurzo, retiring coach has atta ined a record which may never be matched.

318


Crew

This year President and freshman coach Chris Donaldson and the new head coach , Charlie Thomas, were faced with the loss of most of last year's varsity. However, using freshmen they welded tog ether a fast, spirited frosh boat and a strong though inexperienced JV crew. These crews, seeded against top crews as a result of a successful 68 season , swept one race and one regatta respectively but the lack of experience prevented further victories. Despite a grim financial situation , Coach Thomas and his determined oarsmen are digging in to shape a winning varsi ty crew for the upcoming 69-70 season .

3 19


Fiji Islander: Phi Gamma Delta Theme Party The event that the fraternity men of Phi Gamma Delta look forward to with anticipation is their annual " Fiji Islander, " a three day celebration held on the weekend following the last day of classes in May. To usher in this occasion, the chapter house is decorated in a style reminiscent of the Fiji Islands, and a Fiji man as tall as the house is erected.

Fiji man Jeff Cross and his sarong clad da te enjoy the jung le atmosphere of Phi Gamma Delta's basement.

320


Guests literally drop into the spring weekend party.

321


Fraternity Picnics: The End Of Spring The spring picnics mark the beginning of the end. Classes are over-tomorrow, two weeks of hard studying and finals begin . Then its packing time and the long trip home. It is a time to begin the long goodbyes the sad farewells.

323


SENIOR WEEK '69

The Senior Strut.

326

Class Day.


....:..

Block Island Outing .

Happy Hour at the Beachcomber.

327


Block Island Boat Trip

Michael D. Aaronson Barrington, R.I. Accounting Lambda Chi Alpha

Robert J. Accettullo Fa ll Ri ver, Mass. Pharmacy

Judith A. Adamo Westerly, R.I. Engl ish

Donald R. Agren Rumford, R.I. Horticulture

Thomas G. Aiello Providence, R.I. Eco nomics Theta Delta Chi

linda Aitken Greenvil le, R.I. Education Alpha Delta Pi

Louis R. Alarie Johnsto n, R.I. Electrical Engineering

Carl Joseph Albanese Provi dence, R.I. Engineering Science Phi Gamma Delta

Raymond L. Alfano Providence, R.I. Engl ish

Joyce C. Alix Cumberland, R.I. English A lpha Delta Pi

Glenn L. Allen Peace Dale, R.I. Management

James E. Allen Cumberland, R.I. Landscape Desig n

Ronald Gordan Allen Wakefield, R.I. Electrical Engineering

Edward Alman Providence, R.I. Psycho logy

Harold P. Alterman Providence, R.I. Animal Science

Vincent A. Altruda Providence, R.I. Industrial Engineering Sigma Alpha Epsilon

328


John A. Amara l Cumberland , R.I. Pharmacy

Donald L. Andrews West G reewich, R.I. An imal Science

Joseph E. Amaral Warren, R.I. Physics Phi Gamma Delta

Bijan Amid

Lind a S. Anderson

Tehra n, Iran Industrial Engineering

Coventry, R.I. Elementary Education

Richard Thom as Andrew Warwick , R.I. Insurance

Irene Apostulou Warwick, R.I. Education

Celeste M. Archambault Wa rwick , R. I. Dental Hygiene

James J. Armstrong Warwick, R.I. Elect rica l Enginee rin g

Accou nting

Delta Zeta

Helen Mildred Arnold West Ki ngston, R. I. Secondary Education

William Joseph Arnold Newport, R.I. Management

Providence, R. I.

Darrel Paul Baker Narragansett, R.I.

Marketin g

El ectr ica l Engin eeri ng

Ronald W. Bader

Robert L. Armstrong

Central Fal ls, R.I. Theta Chi

Bryan E. Babcock Newport, R. I.

R. Scott Bachelder No. Kingstown, R.I.

Phys ica l Education

Mechanical Engineeri ng

Lambda Chi Alpha

Sigma A lpha Epsilon

Sigma Phi Epsilon

Kathleen J. Baker Needham , Mass. Dental Hyg iene

Marilyn Parker Baker Narragansett, R.I. Philosophy

Joh n F. Balducc i Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. Marketing Phi Gamma Delta

William L. Autrey Lancas ter, Pa. Chemical En gineeri ng

Sigma Ph i Epsilon

329


John H. Baltz Li vingston, N.J. Landscape Design

Reverie D. Baranski Paterson. N.J. Pharmacy Del ta Delta Delta

Judith A. Barber Kingstown, R.I. Medica l Techno logy

George A. Bargamian Warw ick. R.I. General Bu si ness Ph i Sigma Kappa

Peter G. Barlow No. Provide nce, R.I. English Sigma Chi

Michael A. Barnett Wantagh, N.Y. Accounting Phi Sigma Delta

ETD : 11 :00 A .M .

Timothy Barton Middletown, R.I. En gl ish

Michael J. Barrette Providence, R.I. Psycho logy Lambda Chi Alpha

Steven Bartosiak Cumberland, R.I. Industrial Management Lambda Chi Alpha

Marie-Louise A. Bassi Warwick, R.I. Medical Technology

330

Lenore L. Bayuk North Plai nfield, N.J. Nursing Alpha Xi Del ta

Edith Beauchamp Warwick, R.I. Nursing Sigma Kappa


Helene A. Beaudreault Woonsocket, R.I. Zoology Lambda Del ta Phi

Mitchell E. Bentley Malverne, N.Y. Marketing Management

Elaine Beaumont Narragansett, R. I.

Ilene Frances Beck

Pharmacy

Cranston, R.I. Psychology

Kathryn Bettencourt Warren , R.I. French Edu cation

David W . Binns Warwi ck, R.I. Management

Judith C. Benham Narragansett, R.I.

Michele Marie Bennet Cumberland, R.I.

Business Education

Textiles

Dennis F. Birchall

Lin coln, R.I. Theatre

Charles L. Bischoff Kingston , R.I. Journali sm

Phi Kappa Psi

Tau Epsilon Ph i

Robert P. Bixby Harmony, R. I.

Russel R. Blanchard Oakland, R.I.

Richard N. Blomstedt

Marilyn C. Blood

Providence, R.I.

Providence , R.I.

Richard H. Blouin Warren , R.I.

Electronics

Industrial Management

Managemen t Phi Kappa Psi

Engli sh

Engl ish

Robert H. Boisclair

James William Bonner Ashaway, R.I. Agr icultural Technology

Pamela Hill Boothe Montvale, N.J. Textiles and Clothing

Ch i Phi

Cheryl A. Blount Pawtucket, R. I. Nursing

Meribeth Ann Bohlander Nanuet, N.Y. Home Economi cs

Central Falls, R.I. Chemical Engineering

331


Kathleen Borland Harm ony, R.I. History

Irma S. Botvin Providence, R.I. Sociology

Peter T. Bouchard Peace Dale, R.I. Marketing Tau Kappa Ep silon

Barbara Ann Bouclin Cranston, R.I. Engli sh

Patricia Gail Boudreau Pawtucket, R.I. Engli sh Kappa Alpha Th eta

Paula Marie Boudreau Gloucester, Mass. Medical Technology Delta Zeta

David T. Boule Central Fall s, R.I. Marketing

John J. Bovi East Prov idence, R.I. Account ing

Deborah L. Boyle Cranston, R.I. Social Sciences

Louis A. Branca Wes terly, R.I. Ag ricu ltural Science

Rebecca Brayton Foster, R.I. Biology

Elaine Joyce Brenner Woonsocket, R.I. Psychology

Jane E. Breslow No. Bellmore, N.Y. Psychology

Richard R. Briggs Cranston, R.I. Electrical Engineering

Anne M. Broderick Providence, R.I. Ita lian Chi Omega

Charles F. Brown Jr. Pawtucket, R.I. Psychology Sigma Alpha Epsi ion

332


Cynthia A. Brown Lincoln, R.I. Textiles Kappa Alpha Thela

Neal B. Brown Cranston , R.I. Political Science Phi Sigma Delta

Richard N. Brown Ashaway , R.I. General Business Tau Kappa Epsilon

Robert Brown Johnston, R.I. Business Education

Wayne lee Brown No. Plainfield , N.J . Business Management Phi Mu Delta

Mary Lou Brusci East Greenwich, R.I. Nursing Delta Delta Delta

Stephen R. Bucci Riverside, R.I. Political Science Lambda Chi Alpha

Ann E. Bulkley Warwick, R.I. Socio logy Delta Zeta

Michael F. Burke Warre n, R.I. Civi l Engi neering Sigma Ph i Epsi lon

William F. Burke Ill Warwick, R. I. Mechanica l Engineering

Janice Leaver Burns Warwick, R.I. Textiles and Clothing

Jeffrey T. Burrel Westerly, R. I. Civil Engineering

Susan M. Butterfield Greenville, R. I. Pharmacy Sigma Kappa

Patric ia Cabral Tiverton , R.I. Home Economics

Frances Angell Calef Cranston, R. I. Psychology

Anne Bryson Cameron Barrington, R.I. Business Education Delta Zeta

Joanne Marie Campbell Cranston, R.I. Nursing

Ron Canzonieri Cranston , R.I. Business Management Phi Sigma Kappa

Antonia Marie Capasso Narragansett, R.I. Italian

Nancy J. Caperonis Tiver ton , R.I. Nursing Sigma Kappa

333


Dante L. Caprara Jr. Warwick, R.I. Industrial Management Phi Sigma Delta

Joseph Michael Caprio Providence , R.I.

James Carroll Johnston, R.I. Bu siness Administratio n

Martha Gail Carangelo Port Clinton, Ohio Biology

Kathleen C. Cardoza

C. Thomas Carson West Warwick, R.I.

Gail Patricia Carter Uxbridge, R.I.

Business Management

Pharmacy

Donna Caruso E. Providence , R.I. Journalism

Sigma Pi

Zeta Beta Tau

Lambda Delta Phi

Delta Delta Delta

Garry F. Cerrone Brooklaw, N.J . Art Lambda Chi Alpha

Brenda M. Chaffee Coventry, R.I. Political Science

Ann M. Champagne Warwick, R.I. English

Brian J. Chandler No. Kingstown, R.I. Economics Phi Sigma Kappa

Pauline Chauvin

Helen Vernon Chellew No. Kingstown, R.I. Psychology

Judith Lauraine Cheney No. Attle boro, Mass. Food and Nutrition

Nancy D. Cherau No. Kingstown, R.I.

Manville, R.l : Home Economi cs

Business Management

Home Economics

Joan M. Carr Wakefield , R.I. Elementary Education

Sigma Nu

334

Nursing

James A. Centracchio Warwick , R.I.

Psychology

Jane Charlesworth Charlotte, N.C. English Sigma Kappa

Richard W. Chester West Warwick, R.I. Physical Education


Being seasick can be fun.

Christine G. Chiacu Woonsocket. R.I. Psychology A lpha Xi Della

Ruane Michael Chute Pawtucket, R.I. Philosophy Lambda Chi Alpha

Rich ard J. Cicchelli Providence, R.I. Adve rtising

John E. Clarkin Jr. Warwi ck, R.I. In surance Theta Chi

Robert H. Clegg W. Ac to n, Mass. Geography Phi Mu Delta

Patricia Cline Coventry, R.I. English

Richard H. Clough No. Smithfield . R.I. Political Science

John B. Coduri Westerly. R.I. Zoology Phi Sigma Kappa

Michael Coe Lincoln , R.I. Marketing

Sylvester J. Cofoni Jr. Westerly , R.I. Zoology

Michael A. Cohen Provid ence, R.I. Hort iculture Alph a Epsi lon Pi

Norma Guny Cohen Providence, R.I. Child Development

Domenic Colaiacomo Warwi ck, R.I. Engl ish Ph i Mu Della

Edna R. Colliander Greene, R.I. Animal Science

Frances A. Comeau Woonsocket, R. I. Nursi ng

Joan A. L. Considine Cumberland , R. I. Home Eco nomics Della Delta Delta

335


David M. Conte Johnston, R.I. General Busi ness Theta Delta Chi

James A. Conte Providence, R. I. Eng ineering Science

Mary E. Conway No. Kingstown , R.I. Engl ish

Barbara Cook Ti verton , R.I. Dental Hygie ne

Deborah E. Cook West Warwick , R.I. Child Development

Dorothy Cooney Portland, Conn. Mathematics

Stephen G. Corsair Providence, R.I. Civil Eng ineeri ng

James P. Corsetti Providence, R.I. Chemistry

Harold A. Cort Provi dence, R.I. Management Alpha Epsilon Pi

Donna Costigan Cumberland, R.I. Sociology Sigma Kappa

Carol Ann Craghan Cranston, R.I. Engli sh

Phyllis E. Cramer Providence, R.I. Speech Sigma Delta Tau

Joan Doris Crandall Cheshire, Conn. Engl ish Alpha Ch i Omega

Leslie H. Crandall Wakefield, R.I. Acco unting

Armand J. Croce Provi denc e. R.I. Psychology Phi Gamma Delta

Diane C. Crockett Middletown, R.I. English Chi Omega

Thomas A. Crosby Groton, Conn. En glish Tau Kappa Epsilon

Peggy Pierce Crossley E. Greenwich, R.I. English Alpha Delta Pi

Inez Patricia Crowley Narragansett, R.I. Child Deve lopment

Allan J . Cumps Narragansett, R.I. Tech nology-Agricu lture

336


Carol F. Cunningham Warwick , R.I. Physical Education

Pau la M. Curc i Providence, R.I. Child Development Sigma Delta Tau

F. Thomas Currier Westerly , R.I. Business Economics

Jadwiga Dabrowski Providence, R.I. Business Administration

Edward Dacruz Pawtucket, R.I. Marketing

Su san G. Daniels Holden , Mass. Food and Nutrition Kappa Alpha Theta

Patricia E. Darnall Morris Plains, N.J. Home Economics Delta Delta Delta

Raymond L. Dauplaise West Warwi c k , R.I. Accounting

Robert Dahmer Levittown, N.Y. Finance

M ichael Dalessio Barrington, R. I. Civil Engineering

ETA : 12:30

Richard F. Daley Central Falls, R. I. Mechanical Engineering

Louis Michael Damiani Riverside, R.I. Zoology

337


Lawre nce Davey Garden City, N.Y. Political Science

Diane M. Davidson Warw ick, R.I. Child Development Delta Delta Delta

Judith Graveline Davis Narragansett, R.I. Eng lish

Robert Paul Davis Newport, R.I. Zoology Alpha Epsilon Pi

Edson A. Dean Ill Warw ick, R.I. Mathematics

Dennis De Angelis Providence, R.I. Electri cal Engi neering

James Joseph DeAngelis Cranston. R.I. Civil Engineering Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Bruce E. Deary Warwick , R.I. Chemical Engineering

Ronald De Biasio Provide nce, R.I. Elec tri cal Engineering Phi Sigma Kappa

John Joseph DeCotis Smithfield, R.I. Mechanical Eng ineering

Betty Jean DeCrescenzo Bristo l, R.I. En glish

Elizabeth J. Deering Warwick, R.I. Phys ical Education Alp ha Chi Omega

Da lias Tim Defee Middleton, R.I. Psychology

Karin M. Degnan Warwick, R.I. Sociology Ka ppa A lpha Th eta

David A. Delano Providence, R.I. General Busine ss

Judith A. Dellagaotta Warwick, R.I. Home Economics Educat ion

Raymond Del Sesto Cranston, R.I. Industrial Engineering Sigma Pi

Carol A. Deluca No. Providence, R.I. Biology

Sandra Carol Deluca Cranston, R.I. Nursing

Sophie Elizabeth DeMarkey Byram , Conn. His tory

338


Paula J. Demers Warwick , R.I. Psychology

Connie Rae Denner Cranston, R.I. English

Gerald F. DeNuccio Warwick, R.I. Biology Phi Mu Delta

Jean Marie OeRensis East Providence, R.I. Home Economics

Basil Edson DeWolf Kingston, R.I. Industrial Engineering

Sandra Mary DeWolfe West Warwick, R.I.

John Paul Dias Middletown, R.I. Physical Educat ion Phi Mu Delta

Thomas John DiBiase Cranston , R.I. Pol itical Science Theta Chi

John A. DiFonzo East Provi dence, R.I. Elect rical Engineering

Judith R. Dillon

Charles Howard Diluclio E. Greenwich, R.I. Political Science

Arthur Dimeo Cranston, R.I. Political Science

Mario Adamo Di Sirio Pawtucket, R.I. Business Administration Theta Chi

Thomas Alan DeMello Tiverton , R.I.

English

Cranston, R.I.

Sociology

William E. Doherty Warwick, R.I. Management

Phi Sigma Kappa

Home Economics

Eugene J. Donegan Bloomfield, N.J. Chemistry Phi Sigma Kappa

Patricia A. Donilon Warwick , R.I. Biology Chi Omega

339

Robert S. Donohue Wickford , R.I. Mathematics

Robert Joseph Dodd Providence, R.I. Mathematics

Sigma Phi Epsilon

Wayne T. Doodson Warwick , R.I. History


Block Island Picnic

John J. Dorato Jr. Newport , R.I. Spanish

Harry E. Dorsey Jr. Cranston, A. I Mechanica l Engineering Tau Kappa Epsilon

Alma A. Doty Yorktown Heights, N.Y. History

Joan Louise Downey W. Warwick, R.I. Child Develo pment

Margaret A. Doyle Pawtucket, R.I. English

Suzanne Carole Drexler Ridg efield, N.J. Child Development Alpha Xi Delta

Stephen L. Dreyfuss Warwick , R.l Marketing

Kathryn E. Driscoll Providence, R.I. Hi story

Maureen Patricia Drought East Greenwich, R.l. Child Development Alph a Chi Omega

Robert E. Drury Coventry, R.I. Accounti ng

Roger Dubord Bristol, R.I. Mathematics Phi Sigma Kappa

Keith Francis Duerr Bradford, R.I. Engl ish

Gertrude Marie Duffy Newport, R.I. Home Economics

Robert Allen Duggan West Warwick, R.I. Biology Sigma Nu

Joanne M. Dunn Warwick, R.l Physical Education Chi Omega

Peter H. Duquette Northf ield, VI. Pharmacy

340


Marcia Durante Johnston, R.I. Mathemati cs Sigma Kappa

Suzanne Marie Outilly West Warwick, R.I. Journali sm

Sharon M. Oyer West Warwick, R.I. History

Marilyn M. Eagan Cranston, R. I. Sociology Sigma Kappa

Kenneth T. Edds Barrington, R. I. Zoology

Shirley F. Edwards Scituate, R.I. Home Economics

Varnam P. Elliott Cumberland, R.I. Social Science

William Enos Emmett Lincoln, R.l Civil Engineering

Patricia Lynn Engel Carolina, R.I. English

Karen Farrell Enright Pawtucket, R.I. Nursi ng Alpha Xi Delta

Harold D. Epstein Beacon, N.Y. Psychology Tau Epsilon Phi

Kenneth A. Epstein New Haven, Conn . Chemical Engineering

Jerome E. Erwin E. Greenwich, R.I. General Business

Andrea Jean Escalette Brookhaven, N.Y. Zool ogy Chi Omega

Sarah Ann Etchison Provid ence , R.I. Nursing

Kathryn C. Evans Murray Hill , N.J. Geology

Bette Lou Everett Fairhaven, Mass. Psychology Kappa Alpha Theta

Elaine A. Fabrizio Cran ston, R.I. History

Linda Fairlie West Hartford, Conn. Philosophy Kappa Al pha Th eta

Abdol Reza Faiz Shiraz , Iran Mechan ica l En gineering

341


William A. Famiglietti North Providence, R.I. Management

Marie A. Favicchio Providence, R.I. Engl ish

Kathleen Mae Fedorko Kingston , R.I. Office Administration

Melvyn Norman Feinbloom Teaneck, New Jersey Insurance Tau Epsilon Phi

Bruce W. Felmly Fanwood, New Jersey Political Science

Frank Joseph Feraco Brewste r, New York Geography Ph i Mu Delta

Theodore 0 . Feragne Warwick, R.I. Engli sh

Eileen Wyss Ferrance West Warwick, R.I. Bi ology

Michael Raymond Ferrance East Greenwich, R.I. Zoology Sigma Phi Epsilon

Patricia Ferraro Wakefield, R.I. Nursing Alpha Xi Delta

Tom Fiore Providence, R.I. Zoology Tau Kappa Epsilon

Jerald Fireman Providence, R.I. Alph a Epsilon Pi

342


Robert Raphael Fischer Providence, R. I. Finance

Jeffrey N. Fisher New York, N.Y. Insurance Tau Epsilon Phi

Maude C. Fitzgerald Providence. R.I. English

Pamela Ann Fitzgerald Cranston, Rl. English

Helten E. Flanagan West Warwick, Rl. Education

Melvin A. Fleischer Pawtucket, Rl. Management Phi Sigma Del ta

Carolyn Frances Flori Providence, R.I. Psychology

Kathleen F. Flynn Northboro, Mass. Geography Kappa Alpha Theta

Linda Jean Forest Coventry, Rl. Food and Nutrition

Joseph G. Formicola Jr. Providence. R.I. Management Theta De lla Chi

Susan Jean Forrest Cumberland, Rl. Sociology Delta Delta Delta

Ann Fortunato Old Tappan, N.J. Child and Famil y Development

Richard K. Foster Lincoln, Rl. Biology Lambda Chi Alpha

Suzanne Foster East Providence. R.I. Theatre

Judith Fox Providence, R.I. Child Development Sigma Delta Tau

Gail Carol Fracassa Providence, R.I. Medical Technology

Edward D. Frame Mantoloking, New Jersey Zoology

Mary Jean Francis East Providence , Rl. Nursing

Margaret Garrett Franco Wakefield, Rl. History

Michael Bruce Frazel Riverside, R.I. Bacteriology

343


Donald W. Frederick Cranston, R.I. Agriculture Science Phi Mu Delta

Grace Hall Freeman Warwick , R.I. English Sigma Kappa

Lorine S. Freeman Warwick , R.I. Child Deve lopment Ch i Omega

Enid Ru th Frucht Pawtucket, R.I. Ch ild Devel opment

Robert Dean Fusaro Westerly , R.I. Physical Education Sigma Chi

William M. Gage Warwick , R.I. Physical Education Sigma Pi

Paula A. Gagne East Providence, R.l Nursing Alpha Chi Omega

Diane Gagnon Coventry, R.I. Math ematics

Christopher George Gale Barrington, R.I. Agronomy

Richard G. Galli Warwick, R.I. Journalism

Michael Kenneth Galligan East Greenwich, R.I. Sociology Phi Mu Delta

Mrs. Carol A. Galvin Cranston , R.I. Child Deve lopment

Judy L. Gardner Jamestown, R.I. Nursi ng

Henny Garfunkel Providence, R.I. Chi ld Development

Virginia Alice Garvin Providence, R.I. Psychology

Paula J. Gauthier Tiverton, R.I. Nursing

Raymond L. Geary Jr. Warwick , R.I. English Lambda Chi Alpha

Elyse J. Gebski L ittle Compton, R.I. Textiles and Clothing

Ronelle Wynn Genser Providence, R.I. Mathematics

John W. Geoghegan Newport, R.I. Accounting

344


Beverly Barbara George Central Falls , R.I. Music Education

Lawrence F. Gerner Linden, New Jersey Chemical Engineering Phi Kappa Psi

Lynn Elizabeth Gerrick Pittsburgh , Penn. Textiles and Clothing Kappa Alpha Theta

Pamela Susan Gershman Providence, R.I. Child Development

Susan Harriet Gidley South Dartmouth , Mass. English

Linda Ann Gillet Morristown, New Jersey Journalism Alpha Xi Delta

Christine Gilman Middletown, R.I. Nursing

Ray 0 . Gilmore, II East Greenwich, R.I. Marketing Management Zeta Beta Tau

William T. Giordano Cranston, R.I. Management

Janice Cunniff Giorgianni Cranston, R.I. Home Eco nomics Edu cation

Irene Evelyn Girard Woonsocket, R.I. Medical Technolog y

Margaret L. Girouard Harrisville, R.I. Sociology De lta Delta Delta

Leoda Giroux Greenville, R.I. Engl ish

Donna Lee Gittleman Cranston, R.I. Child Development Sigma Kappa

Anthony Stephen Glad Aliquippa , Penn. Physics

Frank N. Gladding W. Barrington , R.I. Management Sigma Alpha Epsilon

345


...... Martha W. Gladding W. Barrington, R.I. English Sigma Kappa

Richard H. Goodard Jr. Westwood, Mass. Civil Engineer ing Lambd a Ch i Alpha

Donna Lyn ne Goldman Warwick, R.I. Nursing

Michael Thom as Golembeski Henry Gorenski Riverhead , New York Ster li ng, Conn. Electrical Engineering Bu siness Ed ucation Phi Si gma Kapp a

Michael Dennis Grace Greenv ille, R.I. Economics Sigma Phi Epsilon

Carol Gosciminski W. Barr ington, R.I. Textiles and Clothing Delta Delta Delta

Andres D. Gomez Union City, N.J. Business Management

Jane E. Graham Coventry, R.I. French Education

John Edwards Graham Jr. Slocum, R.I. General Bu si ness

Ronald W. Graiko Cumberland, R.I. Ph ilosophy Chi Phi

George David Gravelin Warwick, R.I. Frenc h Edu cation

JoAnne L. Gravina Warw ick, R. I. Denta l Hygiene

Lynn Catherine Greco Cranston, R. I. Music Educa t ion

Bonnie Raye Green Wa rw ic k , R.I. H istory

Geoffrey L. Green Providence, R.I. Insurance Alpha Epsilon Pi

Susan Greenberg Brooklyn, New York Psychology Alpha Xi Delta

Eda Anne Greene Foster Center, R.I. Journalism

Joan I. Greenfield Providence, R.I. Sociology

Roger G. Gregoire Woonsocket , R. I. Mechanical En gineering Sigma Ph i Epsi lon

3 46


Helen Elizabeth Gregory Joyce E. Grinnell Warwick, R.I. No. Scituate, R. I. Home Econom ics Education Sociology

Michael K. Groleau W. Warw ick, R.I. H istory

Sandra Ann Grollman Lakewood , N.J. Nursing

Sharon Lee Grosch Johnston, R. I. Zoology

Jess Richard Grossberg

Barbara Grossman Providence . R.I. Home Eco nomics

Paul Vincent Gruczka Woo nsoc ket, R.I. Eng lish

Ann Guerin Wa rwick, R.I. Biology

John C. Guglielmetti Provid ence, R.I. Food Technology Si gm a Nu

Nancy K. Gunckel Somerville, N.J. Texti les and Clothi ng A lpha Delta Pi

Sharon L. Hackett East Greenwich, R. I. Sociology Delta Zeta

George E. Haddad Pawtucket, R.I. Mechanical En gi neering

John W. Haggis Newport, R. I. Electrical Engineering

Richard Hall Metu chen, N.J .

Marie Hallas N. Provi dence, R. l Child Deve lopment A lpha De lta Pi

Paula Louise Hand Warwick, R.I. Chi ld Developmen t

James Francis Hanley Ill Windso rlocks, Conn. Zoology Phi Sigma Kappa

Lakewood, N.J. Insurance

John Edward Gulino Westerly, R. I. Marketing Management

Gayle D. Hall Midd letown, R.I. Biology

Accoun ting

347


Judith A. Hansen Bonnet Shores, R. I. English

Rhoda Lee Hanzel Providence, R. I. Bacter iology

Patricia A. Hardman Providence, R.I. Elementary Edu catio n

Isabel W. Harford Peaced ale, R.I. Mathematics

Marilyn I. Harris Silverton , New J ersey Bo tany Sigma Kappa

Teresa Justine Harrison Wa rw ick, R.I. Market ing Management

John D. Harvey East Matunuck , R. I. Busin ess Edu cat ion

Philip Hashway Pawtucket, R.I. Mechani c al Engin ee ring

Paula Haskell Cranston, R. I. Engli sh Edu cat ion

Anne Reilly Hazard Salem , Mass. Biology

Roberta A. Hazen Cranston, R.I. Soc io logy

Robert J. Heath Johnston, R. I. Electrical Engineering

Robert F. Heffernan Fanwood , New Jersey Finance Sigma Nu

Ronald S. Heilig Middletown, R. I. Physical Education

Roderick Henderson Kingston , R. I. Pharmacy Sigma Phi Epsil on

Jane Mary Hennessey Pawtucke t, R.I. Sociology De lta Ze ta

348


Robert E. Heroux Attleboro, Mass. Pharmacy Chi Phi

Cynthea Hershey Lancaster, Penn. Dental Hygiene

Robert Charles Higgins Newport, R.I. Electrical Engineering

Gerald Stephen Hill Bristol , R.I. Industrial Engineering Lambda Chi Alpha

Virginia A. Hoffman Hingham , Mass. Dental Hygiene

Bonnie Holbrook Wakefield, R.I. Market Management

Pamela Jane Holley Wesl Kingston, R.I. Nursing Alpha Chi Omega

Carolrn Jean Holm Cranston, R.I. Texti les and Clothing Alpha Chi Omega

Richard Allen Hone West Warwi ck, R.I. Management

Ernest R. Honour Cranston, R.I. Geography Phi Kappa Psi

Harry Peter Hoopis Providence, R.I. Accounting Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Miriam A. Houston Westerly, R.I. Elemen tary Education

Gloria Howard Cranston , R.I. Theatre

Susan Howells Cumberland, R.I. Engl ish

Thomas F. Hughes Fiskeville, R.I. Pharmacy Phi Gamma Delta

Marilyn Jean Hunt Cranston, R.I. Elementary Education Sigma Kappa

Barbara A. Huppee Middletown, R.I. Journalism

Kathleen R. Hutchison Wayne, N.J. English Sigma Delta Tau

Mary K. Hutchinson Middletown. R.I. Mathematics Alpha Chi Omega

Marsha Diane Huttler Middletown, R.I. Psychology Sigma Delta Tau

349


Patricia L. lannessa Lincoln, R.I. Bacteriology Alpha Delta Pi

Russell Ide Warwick, R.I. Mechanical Eng ineering Ph i Sigma Kappa

Claudia Ann lmpagliazzo Warwick, R.I. Nursi ng

Robert F. Ingham Warw ick, R.I . Insurance Phi Mu Del ta

Jackson lntlehouse Provi dence. R.I. Mathematics Phi Kappa Psi

Alan Wayne Isherwood Tiverton, R.I. Civil Eng ineeri ng

Alan lzzo Providence, R.I. Physics Phi Mu Delta

Evelyn F. Jacoby East Greenwich, R.I. Eng li sh

Robert E. Jackson Jr. Providence. R.I. Geology

David E. Jacques Coventry, R.I . Industrial Engineering

Nancy S. James Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y. Texti les and Cloth ing Chi Omega

Donna Elsyse Jarett Hudson, N.Y. Chi ld Development

Toni M. Jarvis Chepachet, R.I. Engli sh

Judith A. Jencks Cumberland, R.I. Medical Technology

Richard 0. Jendzejec Coventry, R.I. Agricultural Economics Sigma Nu

Nancy Bowker Jenest Rum ford, R.I. En glish

3 50


Richard Leland Jenkins Marshfield, Mass. Finance Sigma Nu

David B. Johnson Scituate, R.I. Chemi stry

Deborah Ann Johnson Narragansett, R.I. Mathematics Sigma Kappa

Judith Ellen Johnson East Greenwich , R.I. Nursing Chi Omega

Victoria Johnson East Greenwich, R.I. Nursing

William Carter Johnson II Bristol, R.I. Zoology Phi Kappa Psi

Barbara Ann Jones Cranston , R.l English

Robert R. Jones West Warwick , R.I. Mechanical Engineering Phi Kappa Psi

Sharon Lynette Jones W. Barrington, R.I. Eng lish

Steven James Jubin Coventry, R.I. Medical Techn ology

Margaret Ann Kafka Flushing, N.Y. Nursing

George Anthony Kane Riverside, R.I. Insurance

Jay Kapsinow Warwick, R.I. Biology

Anita G. Kassof Brooklyn , N.Y. Elementary Education

Francine A. Katzman Brooklyn , N.Y. Ch ild Development Sigma Delta Tau

Miriam Kaufman路 Nilton , Mass. Textiles and Clothing Sigma Delta Tau

David W. Kazanowski Warw ick, R.I. Industrial Engineering

Everett Keene Greenville, R.I. Physical Educat ion Tau Kappa Epsilon

Kenneth M. Keene Slocum, R.I. Marketing Management

Karen Elizabeth Kelty West Kingston, R.I. Child Development

351


Arlene Bergrem Kennedy Providence, R.I. Nursing

Dianne Marie Kenny Warwick, R.I. Physical Education Alpha Della Pi

William R. Kenny Johnson , R.I. Electrical Engineering

Robert W. Kenyon Narragansett, R.I. Pharmacy Phi Sigma Kappa

Irene J. Kesse Athens, Greece Business Education

Rober! Edward Kidder Malden, Mass. Zoology

Howard E. Kilberg Providence, R.I. Political Science

JoAnne Frances Kilguss Providence, R.I. Sociology

George A. Kinnear Jr. Pawluckel, R.I. Civil Engineering

Joan L. Kirsner Yonkers , N.Y. Political Science Sigma Della Tau

Linda C. Kitchin Kingslon, R.I. Child Development Lambda Della Phi

Charlotte L. Klein Brislol, R.I. Social Sciences Alpha Chi Omega

Susan Klein Norwalk, Conn. Home Economics Education Kappa Alpha Thela

Barry K. Kleinman Brooklyn, N.Y. Insurance Tau Epsilon Phi

Steven Paul Klitgord Lima, New York Zoology Tau Kappa Epsilon

James Edward Knapp Weslerly, R.I. Industrial Engineering Sigma Chi

Kennelh Douglas Knapp Norwalk, Conn. Electrical Engineering

Dennis R. Knight Providence, R.I. Geology

Michele Lee Kofl Wesl Orange, N.J. Texliles and Clolhing

Donna E. Kogul Wakefield, R.I. Psychology

352


David J. Koloski Hadlen, Mass. Mechanical Engineering Sigma Phi Epsilon

Chong M . Kong Kow loon, Hong Ko ng Pharmacy Phi Kappa Psi

Rienette S. Kopel Providence, R.I. Sociology

Carol Ann Koper North Kingstown , R.I. Spanish Sigma Kappa

Anestis T. Kostari des II Newport, R.I. Botany Zeta Beta Tau

Stephan Mark Koteen Warwick , R.I. In surance Tau Epsilon Phi

Ruth Alice Koulbanis North Kingstown , R.I. Fine Arts

Evelyn Koury Cumberland, R.I. English

Harold A. Koussa Narragansett, R.I. Engineering Science

Donna Kushrir Cumberland , R.I. Economics Alpha Chi Omega

William W. Labonte Pawtucket, R.I. Eco nomics Lambda Chi Alpha

Charles L. Lacallade Warwick, R.I. Mechanical Engineering Sigma Pi

353


Martin R. Lackoff Manchester, N.H. Electrical Eng ineeri ng

Richarx A. Lagasse Coventry, R.I. Insurance

Sandra Jeanne Laime Pascoag, R.I . Nurs ing Chi Omega

John Edward Lalli Newport, R.I. History Sigma Chi

Eugene L. Lambert Wakefield , R.I. Electrical Enginee ring

Suzanne M. Lambert Cumberland . R.I. Dental Hyg iene

Daniel Taggart Lamore Central Fall s, R.I. Industrial En gineering

Rene A. Lamoureux Pawtucket, R.I. Management Lambda Chi Alpha

Sheila Lamstein Massapeq ua Park, N.Y. Nursing Sigma Delta Tau

Leo H. Lapane, Jr. East Prov idence, R.I. Chemistry

Julie LaPietra Weste rly, R.I. Elementary Education Alpha De lta Pi

Carol Ann LaPlant Westerly , R.I. Italian

Robert Hope Larder Woonsocket, R.I. Politica l Science

Elizabeth A. Larmie Narragansett, R.I. Child and Family Developmen t

Jean D. Larson Greenville, R.I. Marketing Management

Alan M. Lasher New York , New York Mathematics Alpha Epsilon Pi

Karen L. Laudati Scituate, R.I. Textiles and Clothing

Leo R. Lavoie Warwick , R. I. Management Phi Sigma Kappa

Barbara F. Lawton Cranston , R.I. English Chi Omeg a

John A. Lelli Cranston, R. I. Physics Chi Phi

354


Susan E. Lelli Cranston, R.I. Math , Education Alpha Xi Del ta

Richard George Lemay Woonsocket, R.I. Industrial Management Lambda Chi Alpha

M ildred Leonard Pawtucket, R.I. Engl ish

Julia Ann Lepper Kingston , R.I. Biology Delta Zeta

Josephine M. Lero Bristol , R.I. Home Eco nomics Education

Natalie Ann Lero Bristol, R.I. Italian Alpha Delta Pi

Jeannette R. Lessard Woonsocket, R.I. Office Admini stration

Pamela Jean Letterle We sterly, R.I. Eng ineering Science

Jeff Levein Cranston, R.I. Industrial Management Phi Sigma Delta

Harold Levin Cranston, R.I. Insurance Tau Epsilon Phi

Erica lee Lewis

Evelyn Lichaa Providence, R.I. Psychology

Stanley R. Light Newport, R. I. Zoology

Charles A. Lindberg Warwick , R.I. History

Claudia A. Lindell Warwick, R.I. Botany Kappa Alpha Theta

No. Kingston, R.I. Theatre Kappa Alpha Theta

Patricia Louise Liguori Rumford, R.I. Biology

355


James P. Linnane Cranston, R.I. Agri cultural Science

Robert Louis Lombardi Barrington , R.I. Market Management

Sigma Alph a Epsilon

Harold J. Luchka Warwick , R.I.

Barry 0. Loeckler

Cranston , R.I. Mechanical Engineering

Lambda Chi Alpha

Phi Mu Delta

George J. Lonquist Jr.

Roger Paul Lord

Warwick , R.I. Mechanical En gineering Tau Kappa Epsilon

Tiverton , R.I. Electrical Engineering

Edmond B. Lynch

John L. Lyons Edina, Minn. English Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Pauline Adele Lukas Cranston, R.I. Sociology

L. Lunardelli Warwick , R.I.

Civil Engineering

Sigma Pi

Alpha Chi Omega

Delta Zeta

Lorraine D. Macari

Rodney W . MacDow

Cranston , R. I.

Barrington, R.I. Psychology Phi Kappa Psi

Beryl G. Mack Woonsocket , R.I.

Frederic Maddalena East Greenwich, R.I.

Elementary Edu c-ation

Chemical Engin eering

English Alpha Delta Pi

Nursi ng

356

Robert G. Lohman

Lincoln , R.I. Pharmacy

Greenville, R.I. C hemica l Engineering

Ernest A. Maher Cranston, R.I. English


Margaret Maloney Cransto n, R.I. Art

Mary Maloul Beacon, N.Y. Psychology

Richard J. Mandeville Forestd ale, R.I. Wi ldli le, Bio logy Chi Phi

Robert S. Manganaro Warwic k, R. I. Psycho logy Chi Phi

Michael Manion Cranston, R. I. French

Richard J. Maresca Warw ick, R.I. Economics

William R. Marginson Providence, R.I. Economics

Marshall J. Margolis Providence , R.I. Chemi stry

Steven Markhart Cranston , R.I. Mechanica l En gi neering

Dorothy Marsden Lin col n, R.I. Child Developme nt Delta Zeta

JoAnn M. Martineau East Greenwich , R.I. Nursing

Rosalba G. Martini Cranston, R.I. Italia n

Richard Alan Marton West Warwick , Martone Music Educa tion

Lazarus Antonio East Africa Ag ric ul tural Technology

Paula A. Masi North Providence, R.I. Chi ld Development

Ronald J. Massimino Provide nce , R. I. Animal Pathology Theta Chi

Robert James Masterson Providence, R.I. Mechanical En gi neering Phi Sigma Kappa

Mary Mattera Cranston, R.I. Education Alpha Delta Pi

Gale H. Martin Warwick, R.I. English

Elizabeth A. Masella Providence, R.I. Med ical Technology

357


William E. Matteson Warwick, R.I. History Phi Kappa Psi

Pamela Maxwell Glocester, R.I. Art

Carrol McCarren Pawtucket, R.I. Theatre

John M. McCarthy West Warwick, R.I. Business Education Sigma Nu

Stephen T. McCohrane Alexandria, Virginia Political Science Phi Kappa Psi

Betsy R. McDermott Narragansett, R.I. Textiles and Clothing

John R. McDermott Narragansett, R.I. Economics Phi Gamma Delta

Patricia A. McDowell Bergenfield, N.J. Medical Technology Alpha Delta Pi

Gordon S. McElhaney North Kingstown , R.I. Business Sigma Pi

Kevin J. McEntee Providence, R.I. Sociology

Charles E. McGinnis Narragansett, R.I. Physical Education Sigma Nu

Wilfred F. McHale Warwick, R.J . Mathematics Zeta Beta Tau

Elaine A. Mclellan Lincoln , R.I. Speech Chi Omega

Denise E. McQueeney Warwick, R.I. Philosophy Alpha Delta Pi

Francis E. McVey Sm ithfield, R.I. Civil Engineering Phi Kappa Psi

Susan Swistak McWeeney Jamestown , R.I. Zoology Alpha Chi Omega

358

The Man With The Camera


Edmund F. McWilliams Woonsocket, R.I.

George Medeiros

Paul Meierowitz

New Bedford, Mass.

Pawtucket, R.I.

Pol itical Science

Pharmacy

Insurance

Lambda Chi Alpha

Phi Sigma Delta

Janis M. Merluzzo Cranston, R.I. Physical Education Delta Zeta

Gerard Arthur Michaud Woonsocket, R.I.

David J. Midgley Providence, R.I.

Susan M. Millar Wayne, N.J.

Charles Miller Providence, R.I.

Accounting

Bacteriology

Hom e Econ omics

Politica l Science

James Metcalf Cranston, R.I. English Th eta Chi

Garrison D. Miller

Greenville, R.I. Bio logy

Alpha Delta Pi

Joan Miller Provid ence , R.I.

Child Development Sigma De lta Tau

Lynda Miller Cumberland , R.I. Engl ish

w. Mills

David G. Mills Pawtucket, R.I.

John

Mechanical Engineering

Zoology Phi Gamma Delta

Tiverton , R.I.

Roanne D. Miller Pawtucket, R.I. Chi ld Dev. and Fami ly Rei. Sigma Delta Tau

Stephen R. Miller East Providence, R.I.

Susan M . Miller Bristol, R.I.

Zoology

Nursing

Victor Peter Minus Jamestown , R.I. Industrial En gineering

Lucille F. Minuto

Barbara B. Mitola Johnston, R.I.

359

Providence, R.I. Nursing

Education


Harry Mittleman Providence, R.l General Business

Orestes P. Monterecy Providence, R.I. Civi l Engineeri ng

Stanso n A. Moody

Newport, R.I. Zoology Phi Gamma Delta

James 0 . Moretti Cranston, R.I. Agronomy Chi Phi

Anne Marie Moriarty Pawtucket, R.I. Education Delta Zeta

Martha M. Morrone Westerly, R.I. Psychology Alpha Delta Pi

Carol Ann Morse Providence , R.I. Mathematics

Gregory J. Moll De lmar, N.Y.

Edward F. Mulcahey Pawtucket, R.I. Agronomy Theta Chi

Elizabeth (Joan) Mullen Pawtucket, R.I. English Delta Zeta

Vito Moreno Providence , R.I. Civil En gineering

Theta Delta Chi

Accounting

John C. Moon North Kingstown, R.I. Finance

Rosanne E. Mooradian Provi dence, R.I. Secondary Edu cation

Alpha Xi Delta

Robert A. Morissette

Peter L. Morrison

Central Fa lls, R.I.

Medfield , Mass.

Agriculture Technology

Industrial Engineering

Donna L. Mottram Warw ick, R.I. Pharmacy

Warwick , R.I. Pharmacy

Richard L. Moultrop

Phi Gamma Delta

Sandra Phair Mundy

Dennis Patrick Murphy

Slaterville, R.I. History

Mt. Lakes, N.J. Bu siness Agriculture

Tau Kappa Epsilon

360

Jean Etten Murphy Cranston, R.I. English Sigma Kappa


JoAnn Murphy Little Compton, R.I. Sociology

Mary G. M urphy

Roger F. Nadeau Westerly, R.I. Biology

Carol A. Narciso

Block Island Dance

Cranston , R.I.

Zoology

Westerly, R.I. Secondary Education Kappa Alpha Theta

Patricia A. Murphy Portsmouth, R.I. Psychology Delta Delta Delta

Robin D. Myrick Farmingdale, N.Y. Speech Pathology Alpha Delta Pi

Maurice J. Nadeau

Stephen A. Nardelli Greenville, R.I. Physical Education Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Donna Nardone

Henry J. Nardone

Westerly, R.I. Business Educati on

Westerly, R.I. Zoology

Teresa M . Natale West Warwick , R.I.

Phillip M. Neary Warwick, R.I. Agricul tural Edu cat ion

Lyn n Neelan Yardley, Penn.

English

Nancy R. Newbury Newport, R.I.

Helen Niedzwiecki New Britain, Conn.

Management

Psychology

361

Central Falls, R.I. Electrical Eng ineering

Child Development Chi Omega

Kathleen A. Niggl Providence, R.I. Pharmacy


Nancy S. Noga Fall Ri ve r, Mass. Sociology

Elizabeth E. Noonan Barrington. R.I. Physical Education

Gilbert T. Normand Pawtucket, R.I. Economics Sigma Ch i

Carole Novick Newport, R.I. Zoology Sigma Delta Tau

Mohamed A. Nur Kingston , R.I. Civil Eng ineering

Mark A. O'Brien Central Falls, R.I. Finance Theta Chi

Richard W. O'Brien East Greenwich, R.I. History Zeta Beta Tau

Jacqueline A. O'Connell Annapolis, Md. Psychology

Michael L. O'Connor Providence , R. I. An imal Science

Sharon A. O'Connor Warw ick, R.I. Soc iology Del ta Zeta

Virginia A. Oexner Foster, R.I. Physics

Alice Olivastro Cumberland , R.I. Psychology

362


Susan P. O'Neil Portsmouth , R.l Eng lish Chi Omega

Janis G. Oster West Kingston, R.I. Child Development

Michael M. Palian Providence, R.I. Indu strial Management Theta Delta Chi

Norman M . Parker Warwick, R.I. Fren ch

Victor J. Ortega Whippany, N.J.

William L. Osborne Warwick, R.I. Industrial Engineering Sigma Chi

Patti L. Osiecki Mi ll town, N.J. Education Delta Delta Delta

Ronald A. Osowski Kin gston , R.I. Mechanical Engineering

William 0. Oziemblewsk i Pawtucket, R.I. Journa lism

Arthur Page Westerly, R.I.

Donald E. Paiva

Irene S. Palmer Westerly, R.I. Mathematics

Edmund T. Parker Cranston, R.I. Civil Engineering

Linda L. Parkhurst

Asahel F. Parmelee

Georgetown, Mass.

Westerly, R.I. Management

Kathleen Paroline Barrington , R.I. History

Finance

Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Julia M . Ousterhout Narragansett, R.I.

Chemistry Kappa Alpha Theta

Elaine A. Palm

Wakefield , R.I. English

Medical Technology Sigma Kappa

Phi Mu Delta

363

Management

Phi Sigma Kappa

East Providence , R.I. Civil Engineering

George A. Parker

Coventry. R.I. El ec tri cal Engineering

David G. Parsons Westport , Mass.

Management Sigma Nu


laura L. Partelo Ashaway, R.I. Eng lish

John W. Parys Warw ick, R.I. Mechanica l Eng ineeri ng

Ferdinanda Pastore W. Warwick , R.I. Physica l Education Th eta Chi

Michael A. Patalano Providence, R.I . Accoun ting Sigma Nu

Raymond P. Payson Bristol, R.I. Geology

Margaret l . Pease Kingston , R.I. English

Sherry L. Pecht Livingston, N.J. General Admin istration Alpha Delta Pi

Frank Peduto Provide nce , R. I. Civil Engineering Theta Delta Chi

Jody P. Pellatt Springfield , Pa . Textile and Clothing Ch i Omega

Linda Pelletier Providence, R.I. Textiles, Clothing and Related Art s

Philip F. Pelletier Newport , R.I. Music Edu ~at i o n

Susan T. Pelley East Greenwich, R.l English Chi Omega

Patricia L. Pelonzi Beverly, Mass. Nursing

Joseph F. Penza Johnston, R.I. Accounting Tau Epsilon Phi

John F. Perini No. Providence, R.I. Management Th eta De lta Chi

Barbara J. Perrin Ashaway, R.I. Dental Hygiene

Th e Trip Home

364


Donna J. Petti West Warwick, R.I. Pharmacy Delta Delta Della

JoAnn Pettinicchio Warwick , R.I. Pharmacy

Dianne l. Phillips Warwick, R.I. History Sigma Kappa

Peter K. Piascik No. Providence, R.l Industria l Engineering

Patricia A. Piepsznci Cumberland , R.I. Biology Alpha Xi Delta

John D. Pierson West Warwick, R.I. Industrial Management

Linda A. Pietras Providence, R.I. Bacteriology

Lawrence J. Pietrzyk Pawtucket, R. t. El ectrical Engineering

Charles W. Pigeon Narragansett, R.I. Industrial Engineering

Joseph L. Pilosa Cranston, R.I. Agricultural Science

Susanne Pino Central Falls, R.I. Music Education

Arlene L. Pinto Warwick , R.I. Secondary Education Delta Zeta

Daniel P. Pisaturo Johnston, R.I. Physical Education Sigma Alpha Epsi lon

Edward W. Pitera Providence, R.I. Chemical Engineering Ta u Kappa Epsi Ion

Robert W. Plante Pawtucket, R. t. Engli sh Phi Kappa Psi

Mary Jane Pluta Pawtucket, R. t. Sociology A lpha Chi Omega

Marian Polaicofl Elmont, N.Y. Chi ld Development

Steven M. Polak Warren , R.I. Management Lambda Chi Alpha

Marianne P. Polojanic Oradell , N.J. Office Administration Sigma Kappa

Theodore G. Pliakas Cranston, R.I. Bacteriology Tau Kappa Epsilon

365


Maureen Prenda Bristol , R.I. English

Glenn C. Prezkop Madison , Conn. Agricultural Science Tau Epsilon Phi

Dale Primiano Westerly, R.I. English Delta Zeta

Louis J. Procaccini East Providence, R.l Mathematics

Anthony J. Puniello Bristol, R.I. History Phi Sigma Kappa

Nancy 0 . Pulnam Kew Gardens, N.Y. Child Development

Taha A. Qirbia Crater, Arden Electrical Eng ineering

James A. Qirbi Providence, R.I. Chemical En gineering

Michael T. Rabasca Warminster , Pa. General Administration Sigma Chi

Lorraine H. Raft Union, N.J. Sociology Delta Zeta

Richard Raggio Great Neck , N.J. General Administration Sigma Chi

Robert G. Ramsay Warwick, R.I. Mechanical Eng ineering Phi Sigma Kappa

Michael A. Ranfile Newport, R.I. Management Phi Sigma Kappa

Karen L. Rapp Cranston, R.I. Economics Alpha Chi Omega

Albert M. Read Edgewood, R.I. Biol ogy Sigma Alpha Epsi lon

Nancy Reed Sudbury, Mass. Medical Technology

William E. Reed E. Greenwich, R.I. Management Phi Mu Delta

Fred C. Reimels Narragansett, R.I. Biology Phi Sigma Kappa

Douglas L. Reinhart Millord , Conn. Management Sigma Chi

Thomas V. Powers Central Falls, R.I. Mechanical Engineering Sigma Phi Epsilon

366


Hugo N. Reinoso Guayquil , Ecuador Geology

Diane M . Remington Bristol , R.I. Child Developmen t

Lance M. Remsen Needham, Mass. Agricultural Science

Becky R. Renner West Warwick , R.I. Textiles Delta Zeta

Jean V. Renola Providence, R.I. Child Development

Frederick Reynolds Ill Narragansett. R.I. Management Sigma Phi Epsilon

Judith A. Reynolds Jamestown . R.I. Child Development Delta Delta Delta

Marilyn J. Richards Peace Dale, R.I. Child Development

Gerald Richmond Pawtucket, R.I. Insurance Tau Epsilon Phi

Thomas H. Richmond Peace Dale, R.I. Civil Engineering

Shirley A. Ripa Newport, R.I. Spanish Education

Robert C. Risho Pawtucket, R.I. Horticulture

Terence J. Robb Vernon , Conn. Physical Education

Steven T. Robert Providence, R.I. Mathematics

Ilona S. Robertson Foster, R.I. Psychology

Donald B. Robinson Warwick, R.I. Insurance Tau Kappa Epsilon

367


Donna L. Rocke Barrington , R.I. Chi ld Developmenl Alpha Delta Pi

Jane E. Rollins Warw ick , R.I.

David Roome North Scituate , R.I.

Physical Education Delta Delta Delta

English Zeta Beta Tau

Robert C . Rose Saunderstown , R.I.

Michael L. Ross

Mark H. Rotenberg

Pawtucket. R.I. Engli sh Lambda Chi Alpha

Providence , R.I. Agronomy

Constance J. Roulier A bington, Mass.

William B. Rouse Portsmouth, R.l Mechanical En gineering

English

John M . Rotter Providence , R.I. Chemi cal Engineering

Denta l Hygiene

Phi Sigma Kappa

Mary Ellen Russell Richmond , R.I. Engl ish

Friday Beach Party

Phi Sigma Del ta

Elaine J. Ruggieri West Warwick, R.I. Psychology

Phi Kappa Psi

Joseph C. Russillo

Thomas P. Ryan

Cranston , R.I. Advertising

Compton, R.I. Political Science

368

Francis E. Ruhle Coventry, R.I. Industrial Management

Phi Kappa Psi

William Ryan W . Barrington , R.I.

English Sigma Alpha Epsi Ion

Janice E. Rzemien

W. Warwick, R.I. Eng lish Education Alpha Xi Delta


Roberta B. Sabella Wakefield, R.I.

Salah M. Saleh Kingston, R.I. Civil Engineering

Lambda Delta Phi

Dyan Saccoccio Cranston , R.I. Child Dev. and Fami ly Rei. Sigma Dappa

Marian E. Sammataro Westerly, R.I. Child Develo pment

Barbara Sandler Bronxvil le , N.Y. Bacteriol ogy

Nicholas J. Santangini Providence , R.I. Business Management

Sigma Della Tau

Tau Kappa Epsilon

Mary-Ellen Scanlon Worcester , Mass. Dental Hygiene Alpha Delta Pi

David Schack Westbury, N.Y.

Theodore C. Schmults Barrington, R.I. Psychology

Virginia B. Schutter! Foster Center, R.I. Marketing Management Alpha Delta Pi

Elementary Educa tion

Sandra L. Sayles Cranston , R.I.

Physical Education

Toby Ann Schmulowitz Linden , N.J. Sociology

Pharmacy

Stephen C. Salkeld Brielle, N.J. Civil Engineering Sigma Chi

Nancy J. Salter Warwick, R.I. Child Dev. and Family Rei. A lpha Chi Omega

Donna Santini

Alan J. Sarnoff Oceanside, N.Y.

Warwick, R.I. Psychology Chi Omega

Barbara L. Schifftner Wyckoff, N.J. Sociology

Finance

Alpha Epsilon Pi

Carolyn H. Schilling West Point, N.Y. Nursing

Alpha Chi Omega

369

Mark D. Schweibish East Islip, N.Y. Music Education

Janis M. Scorpio Riverside , R.I. Marketing Mgt.


Cynthia B. Searle East Providence , R.I. English Delta Zeta

Jean M . Seruidio Weste rly, R.I. Business Education

Willard F. Seaton Warwick , R.I. Mechanical Engi neering

Terrance L. Se lle Provid ence, R.l Sociology

Benton J. Selt zer Providence, R. I. Industria l Engineering

Teresa M . Senatore

Weste r ly, R.I. En glish

Phi Sigma Delta

Mary Ann Shackleton West K ingston, R.I. C hild Development

Susan J. Shea Newport, R.I. Speech Education Alp ha Chi Omega

Linda Shedden Wh ippany, N.J. Mathematics Alp ha Ch i Omega

Cindy Sheldon Warw ick, R.I. Home Ec. Ed ucation Delta Delta Delta

Salty L. Sheldon Weste rly, R.I. Ele mentary Education Chi Omega

Bruce S. Sherma n Doug laston, N.Y.

Portsmouth , R.I.

Accounting

Phi Sigma Delta

370

Ann E. Sherry Eng lish Alpha Xi Delta

Catharine A. Sheehan H ingham. Mass. Mathematics

Peggy L. Sherblom T iverton, R.I. Physical Education

Delta Delta Delta

Dean A. Shinn Adelphi , Maryland Geology Theta Chi


Donald R. Shor Forest Hills, N.Y. Psychology

Donald I. Siegel Spri ngs, N.Y. Geology

Sonya Silberman Provide nce, R.I. Spanish Education

Alyce M. Silva Barri ngton, R.I. Art A lpha Chi Omega

Ann Simmons

Deborah L. Simmons

Downing B. Simmons

Warwick, R.I.

Westerly, R.I. Sociology

Patricia M. Simmons Ri verside , R.I. Nursing

Steven Simmons Warwick , R.I. Mechanical En gineering

B. B. Simonini Cranston , R.I. Marketing Management

Textiles and Clothing

Middletown, R.I. Child Dev. and Fami ly Rei.

Sigma Nu

Karen M. Singleton Portsmouth, R.I. Education

Marcia S. Sinkler Wakefie ld, R.I. English

Arlene M. Sirkin

Kenneth J. Skelly

Cranston, R.I. French

Providence, R.I. Pharmacy

Alisun L. Smith Williston Park, N.Y.

L. Michael Smith Kingston, R.I.

Susan B. Snow Narragansett, R.I.

Cindy L. Snyder

Education

Industrial Management

Th eatre

Alpha Della Pi

Chi Phi

Botany Lambda Della Phi

Delta Delta Della

Gail Slade Pawtucket, R.I. Sociology

371

Judith A. Skier Hawley, Pa. Dental Hygiene Sigma Ka ppa

Cranston , R.I.


M. Barbara Sobota Pawtucket, R.I. Speech

Harold Sock North Smithfield , R.I. Psychology

Ellyn R. Sokoi Merrick, N.Y. Biology Sigma Delta Tau

Anthony H. Sousa Cumberland, R.I. Business Education

Alan R. Spachman Cranston, R.I. Ind. Management Chi Phi

Ronald S. Spagnole North Providence, R.I. Business Education Theta Delta Chi

Malcolm L. Spaulding Foster, R.I. Mechanical Engineering

John B. Spencer Vergennes, Vt. Agricultural Technology Theta Chi

Leon B. Spinney Winthrop, Mass. Agricultural Technology

Bradley H. Spooner Portsmouth, R.I. Electrical Engineering Phi Kappa Psi

Harry J. Spring Riverside, R.I. Civil Engineering

Paul E. St. Pierre Wakefield, R.I. Industrial Engineering

George R. St. Onge West Warwick , R.I. Engineering Science

Richard P. St. Onge Cranston, R.I. Agricultural Technology Tau Kappa Epsilon

Paul J. St. Jean Canton, Mass. Marketing Mgt. Sigma Phi Epsilon

Carolee Stadnicki Pawtucket, R.I. English Delta Zeta

Steven Standish Middletown, R.I. Business Mgt. Phi Gamma Delta

Ann M. Stasz Westerly, R.I. English

Shirley R. Stayman Warwick, R.I. Sociology

Stella St. Pierre East Providence, R.I. Textiles and Clothing Sigma Kappa

372


Gail Steiner Providence, R.I. Psychology

Craig S. Stenning Cranston, R.I. Politica l Science Sigma Phi Epsilon

Linda-Jane Stern Baldwin Harbor, N.Y. Indu strial Engineering

Donald T. Stewart Kingston, R.I. Business Mgt. Sigma Alpha Epsilon

Raymond J . Stillwell Portsmouth, R.I. Civil Eng ineering Sigma Phi Epsil on

Peter Stockman Pawtucket, R. I.

Jennifer Stone Wakefield , R.I. English

Christine L. Stuczyk Cumberland, R.I. Bacteriology Kappa Alpha Theta

Barry C. Sullivan Newport, R.l Business Mgt.

Edward E. Sullivan Coventry, R.I. History

John P. Sullivan East Greenwich , R. I. Electrical Engineering Zeta Beta Tau

Marylou Sullivan Nashua, N.H. Psychology

Susan Sullivan Riverside , R.I. English Alpha Chi Omega

Linda L. Sutcliffe Frank lin , Mass. Dental Hygiene Alpha Delta Pi

Richard E. Suter Cranston, R.I. Electrical Engineering Lambda Chi Alpha

Wayne Sutter Albertson, N.Y. Electrical Engineering Sigma Phi Epsilon

Art

"Happy Hour" At The Beachcomber

373


Stephen J. Svehlik Warwick, R.I. Business Mgt.

Edward P. Swanson Warwi ck, R.I. Accounting Theta Chi

Jeffrey G. Swartz Providence, R.I. History Tau Epsilon Phi

Barbara J. Swiatkowski Pawtucket, R.I. Sociology

Audrey M. Swiderski Providence, R.I. Bu siness Administration Lambda Delta Phi

Geraldine A. Szarko Warwick , R.I. Nutrition Alpha Xi De lla

Richard W. Szumita Pawtucket, R.I. Business Mgt.

Marlene A. Tabor Bristo l, R.I. Food Nutrition Chi Omega

Laurel A. Tall Barrington, R.I. Nursing

Sharlene M. Tahakjian Providence, R.I. Child Devel opment Della Zeta

David B. Talan Providence, R.I. Chemical Engineering

Barbara Tansey Warren , R.I. English

Barbara A. Tarzwell Wakefield , R.I. English Lambda Della Phi

Lynne P. Tashiro Narragansell, R.I. Pharmacy

Eleanor R. Tate Portsmouth, R.I. English

Martha C. Taylor Barring ton, R.I. General Bu siness Lambda Della Phi

374


William David Taylor Lincoln , R.l English

Janice A. Tessier Pawluckel, R.I. Child Dev. and Famil y Re i. Kappa Alpha Thela

Robert E. Theroux Lincoln, R.I. Accounting

Dianne E. Thibodeau Greenville, R.I. Socio logy

Martin H. Thomae Bayside, N.Y. Chemistry Tau Epsilon Phi

Linda Bache Thomas Norlh Sciluale, R.I. Marketing Management

Allen W. Tinkham Harmony, R.I. Music Education

Slephen P. Tippe Cranston, R.I. Business Mgt.

Marlene H. Tishler Cranston , R.I. Sociology Sigma Della Tau

Penelope l. Titterington West Kingston, R.I. Elementary Education

Fred Tobin Hewlell, N.Y. Journalism Alpha Epsilon Pi

John T. Feher Cumberland, R.I. Industrial Engineering Sigma Pi

Christine S. Tomczyszyn Woonsocket, R.I. Journali sm Lambda Della Phi

Barry Torman Cranston, R.I. lnduslrial Mgl. Phi Sigma Della

Howard A. Torman Rockville, Md. Engineering Science Alpha Epsilon Pi

Aleyn J. Torrey Boston , Mass Sociology Alpha Chi Omega

Jules A. Tremblay Manchester, N.H. Pharmacy Ph i Kappa Psi

Jane E. Trewhella Pascoag , R.I. El ementary Education Alpha Della Pi

Andrew J. Tucker Soulh Kingslown, R.I. Spanish Sigma Chi

Jennifer T. Turano Weslerly, R.I. Business Education

375


Robert A. Urciuoli

Cynthia A. Valentine

Providence, R.I. Accounting

Newington, Conn.

Child Development

Sigma Nu

Virginia L. Viall East Providence, R.I. Mathematics

Linda L. Vliet Whitehouse Station , N.J. Dental Hygiene

Michael R. Varrieur Providence, R.I. Industrial Engineering Sigma Phi Epsilon

Edward Venditti Warwick, R.I. Civic Engineering Theta Chi

Mary E. Venditti Warwick, R.I.

Shirley M. Volante Providence , R.I. Child Dev. and Family Ret.

Virginia L. Vosburgh Coventry, R.I.

Gerald Volta

Business Education

Chemistry Sigma Nu

George L. Vredenburg

Susan S. Waldman

Bradford, R.I. History

Providence, R.I. Elementary Education

Dennis J. Walker Kingston , R.I.

Alpha Ch i Omega

Alpha Delta Pi

Joseph N. Waller Wakefield, R.I. Electrical Engineering

376

Michael T. F. Wallar Pawtucket, R.I. Political Science Sigma Chi

Home Economics Education

Alpha Delta Pi

Providence, R.I.

Business Administration

Tau Kappa Epsilon

Marion E. Walsh Providence , R.I.

English


Sara Ann Walsh Denial Hygiene

Edward W. Wardyga East Provid ence, R.I. An imal Science

Carl 0 . Weaver Kingston, R.I. General Administration

Duane M. Weber Kingsto n, R.I. Electrical Engineering

Lawrence 0 . Webster

Wendy J. Weinmall Covenlry, R. I. Mathematics Alpha Delta Pi

Bradford E. Weisenburn Coxsackie, N.Y. Horticulture Zela Beta Tau

Judith S. Weisman Pawt ucket, R.I.

Rena T. Weisman Providence, R. I.

Poli ti ca l Science

Medical Technology Sigma De lta Tau

Joanne E. Westberg Warwick , R.I.

Patricia L. Westbrook

Virginia M. Westeren

East Greenwich, R.I.

Office Administration

Ed ucation

West Barrington, R.I. Chemistry Lambda Delta Phi

Newington, Conn.

Dorothy M. West Warwick, R.I. Bacteriology Alpha De lta Pi

Lin Wareham

Fosler, R.I. Psychology

Charlestown, R.I. Mechanical Engine ering

Delta Delta Delta

Delta Delta Delta

377

George E. Washburn Lincoln, R.I. Chemical Engineering Phi Kappa Psi

Robert F. Waterman Camden, Maine Pharmacy Lambda Chi Alpha

Robert R. Webster Rumford , R.I.

Carl Weinberg Cranston, R.I. Industrial Engineering Phi Sigma Delta

Horticulture

Barbara J. Welch Huntington Station, N.Y. Foods and Nutrution Kappa Alpha Theta

Deborah T. Westin Sayville, N.Y. Zoology


Martha C. Wexler Providence, R.I. Education

Sandra L. Whiteley Pawtucket, R. I. Art Delta Zeta

Paula M. Williams Warwick, R.I. English

Lewis Wintman Providence, R.I.

History

Thomas Alan Weyant

Westerly, R.I. Secondary Edu cation Sigma Chi

Peter W. Whitfield Cranston , R. I.

Biology Phi Mu Delta

Norris Whiston Kingston , Mass. Civil Engineering

Donna-Jean White Warwick, R.I. Journalism

Sigma Kappa

Karen D. Whorrell Washington , D.C. Dental Hygiene

Michael F. Wilbur Barrington , R.I. Bu si ness Mgt.

Theta Chi

Catherine Wilson Narragansett, R.I.

James E. Wims

Psychology Alpha Chi Omega

History

Accounting

Rona ld T. Wisniewski

Susan E. Wlodkowski West Barrington, R.I. Textiles and Clothing Alpha Chi Omega

Ruth E. Williams Cumberland, R.I.

Pawtucket, R.I. Mechanical Engineering

Priscilla A. Whitehead Coventry, R.I. Physical Edu cation

Pawtucket, R.I.

James F. Wilkinson Cranston, R.I. Hortic ulture Phi Sigma Delta

Nancy Winpenny Warwick, R.I. Physical Edu cation

Sigma Nu

378

Richard Wool East Meadow, N.Y. Bu siness Finance

Alpha Epsil on Pi

Saul Woythaler Newport, R.I. Electrical Engineering


Phillip G. Wright Lincoln, R.I. Agriculture Sigma Chi

Barbara D. Wronski Warwick , R.I. English

Richard A. Yanco West Warwick , R.I. Electrical En gineering Theta Ch i

Rene A. Yates West Warwick , R.I. Industrial Mgt.

Yvette G. Zannini Pascoag, R.I. Education Kappa A lpha Theta

Alan G. Zartarian Warwick , R.I. General Business Phi Sigma Kappa

Caryl L. Zimberg Cranston, R.I. Textiles and Clothing

James P. Zompa Warwick , R.I. Poli tica l Science

Thomas W. Zona N. Providence, R.I . Business Mgt.

Donna Zorabedian Cranston, R.I. Speech Therapy Sigma Della Tau

The Big Day

379

Robert A. Zambuco Cranston, R.I. History


U.S. Senator Claiborne Pell delivers commencement speech.

Greetings were given by Governor Frank Licht. President Werner A. Baum and Mrs. John M . Sapinsley, chairman of the Board of Trustees of State Colleges look on .

380


LET THE DANDELIONS GROW

" Those who view the campus disturbances with alarm will, I hope, pause to reflect that unrest and ferment often have been roads to progress in our country. There is, however, a danger in the current campus turmoil. In too many cases, the confrontation of minds has deteriorated into a confrontation of bodies. It is not dissent that is the real problem today but violence. Many would be surprised at how responsive your government and other institutions can be when concerned citizens work and make them work. Many have not given these institutions a fair test , and today I would urge you to do so by becoming active yourselves. And if you ever have to choose between manicuring your lawn or adding to your knowledge or participating in community affairs, I hope you ' ll let the dandelions grow and learn more and be more active." U.S . Senator Claiborne Pel/

Above : Throughout the commencement exercises one may see reflected , the pam~ and ceremony of a feudal society and the intricacies of the medieval art of heraldry-m the ritual and the dress.

381


GRADUATION; The Last Line A record total of 1647 degrees were awarded by the University of Rhode Island at its 83rd Commencement. There were 745 B.S. , 433 B.A ., 423 master's, 19 Ph.D.'s and two honorary doctorates, in addition to 25 associate in science degrees for the two year programs in dental hygiene (16) and commercial fisheries (9).

382


383


ELAINE ABRAHAM Narragansett, R.I. STEPHEN A. ADAMS Warwick , R.I. DONALD ALBERICO Providence, R.I. BERNARD L. ALDERSON Warren, R.I. JUNE ALLEN East Greenwich, R.I. WI LLI AM D. ALLEN Providence , R.I. ROBERT ALOSI

M ITCH ELL BENTLEY Malverne, N.Y. MIC HAEL BERGER Providence, R.I. DAVID BERNSTEIN Warwick , R.I. ARMAND BESSETTE Cranston , R.I. CU RTI S BESSETTE North Kingstown , R.I. WILLIAM BETTY Newport, R.I. JOYCE BILLING

Riverside, R.I.

Cranston , R.I.

ERIC F. ANDERSON Peace Dale, R.I. JAMES ANDERSON Providence, R. I. TODD ANDR EWS Westerly, R.I. DONALD ARABIAN

ROBERT BINDER Isla nd Park, N.Y. ANTHONY BISCEGLIO West Warwick, R. I. WAYNE BLAC KM AR Providence, R.I. RICHARD BLAKE Pittsburgh, Pa. RUSSELL BLANCHARD Oakland , R.I. ROBERT BOISCLAIR Central Falls, R.I. JACK BOLNICK Fl oral Park, N.Y. RICHARD BONNEAU

West Warwick , R.I.

GEORGE ASKEVOLO Providence, R.I.

MARY ASTING Peace Dale, R.I.

HAROLD ATCHESON Kingston , R.I. LIONEL E. AUDET Johnston, R.I. DAVID AUDETTE Kingston, R.l HELMET AUG ENSTEl N Sand Hill Cove, R.I. DENNIS AVILA Warre n, R. I. LOUI S AZZA Barrington, R.I.

RICHARD BACKER Worcester, Mass. JOANNE BADESSA Pawtucket, R.I. JOSEPH BAINS Bristol, R.I. JOHN BALDWIN

New Bedford , Mass.

SUSAN BOOTHROYD Wallingf ord, Conn

MICHAEL BORASSI Yonke rs , N .Y.

LEON BOUVIER Wakefield , R.I. CLIFFORD BOWDEN Warwick, R. I. PAUL BOWEN

BARRY CAPALB O Carolina, R.I. DALE CAPALBO Westerly, R.I. JAMES CAPALDI Provid ence, R.I. RAYMOND CAPECE N. Providence, R.I. CHRI STIN CAPIZZANO Wester ly, R.I. FRANK CARACC IA Narragansett, R.I. MICHAEL CARCIERI Sm ithfield , R. I. RICHARD CARDARELLI N. Providence , R.I. JOHN CARDIN Exeter, R.I. JOHN CARDOSA N. Providence, R.I. KENNETH CARLSON Narraganse tt, R.I. RICHARD CARROLL Warwick, R.I.

JACKL YN CARTER Slocum , R.I. JONATHAN CASWELL Narragansett, R.I.

LAWRENCE CASWELL Pa wtucket , R.I. HOWARD GATLEY Providence , R.I. FRAN K CENTAZZO Bristol, R.I. DONALD CERULLO Providence, R.I. AUSTIN CHADWICK Cranston , R.I. GEORGE CHAMBERS

Cranston , R.I.

Provi denc e, R.I.

JEFFREY BOWIE North Scituate, R.I. DAVID BRADLEY Cranston, R.I. WILLIAM BRAITSCH

PAUL CHAMPAGNE Woonsocket, R.I. GUY CHAMPLIN Warwick , R. I. LINDA CHAPPELL

Linco ln , R.I.

Warwick, R.I.

East Matunuck, R.I.

LAWRENCE BALKUS

DAVID BRANDLEY

Prov id e nce, R.I.

Pawtucket , A. I

CHARLES BANNISTER Peace Dale, R.I. MICHAEL BARRETT

C ran sto n, R.I.

SANDRA CHAPPELL Wakefield , R.I. ALBERT CHARBONNEAU Centerdale, R.I. JANE CHARLE SWORTH Charlotte, N.C. DAVID CHENEVERT

RICHARD BROOMFIELD

JOEL BAZAR

ARTHUR BROWN Providence, R.I. BONNY BROWN N. Kingstown , R.I. MARJORIE BROWN

Cranston, R.I.

Providence, R.I.

ANDRE BEAUBIEN North Smithfield, R.I. THOMAS BELL Kingston , R.l RICHARD BELLISLE Cranston, R.I. CARL BENKER II

ROY BROWN

DEBORAH CHORNEY

Warwick , R.I.

N . Providence , R.I.

RICHARD BROWNELL Newport, R.I. ROBERT BRUNELLE

RONALD CICERCHIA

Provid ence , R.I.

ROBERT BASTOW Providence, R.I.

W arwick , R.I.

THOMAS CHISHOLM Ri ve rside, R.I.

Providence, R.I.

Lisbon , Conn.

Cra nston , R.I.

DONALD BENNETT Westerly, R.I. JANE BENNETT North Kingstown , R.I. DAVID BENTLEY Lincoln, R.I. HARRY BENTLEY Cumberland, R.I.

KATHLEEN CALDERI SO Bristol , R.I. JOSEPH CALISE

SCOTT CLANCY Wakefie ld , R.I. RU SH CLARK Lindfield N.S.W. , Austl. WARREN CLARK Littl e Compton, R.I. DREW CLARKE

Providence, R.I.

Jam estown , R.I.

Warwick , R.I.

RI CHARD CALDARONE

PATRICIA CALLAHAN Cumberland , R.I. SUSAN CAMPBELL Madison, N.J .

384

DIANNE COFFIN Jam estown, R.I.

M ICHAEL COHEN Cranston, R.I.


ROBERT COHEN Provi dence, R. I. EDITH COLE Fosler, R.I. GEORGE COLVIN Pawtucket, R.I. TAD CONSTANT East Greenwich, R.I. PETER COOK Central Falls, R.I. RICHARD COONEY Cranston , R.I. CHRISTIN CORREIA Central Falls, R.I. LEO CROSBY Pawtucket, R.I. MICHAEL CRUISE Pascoag , R.I. JOHN CURRAN , JR. Foster, R.I. LINDA CUTTING North Kingstown, R.I. MICHAEL DALESSIO Barrington, R. I.

EDWARD DAMOTA Coventry, R.I. ROANDL DANNECKER East Greenwich, R.I. ROBERT DAVIS West Warwick, R.I. PAULA DECARLO Pawtucket, R.I. ROBERT DELD.EO Tiverton , R.I. WILLIAM DEMAGISTRIS Providence, R.I. BRIAN DEMERS Coventry, R. I. WALTER DEMERS Coventry, R.I. THOMAS DEMMA Newport, R.I. DAVID DEPALMA N. Providence, R.I. JAMES DESTOUT Warwick, R.I. GLEN DEVALERIO North Providence, R.I. CHARLES DEVINE WARWICK, R.I. ROBERT DEVITO Providence, R.I. ALBERT DiPAOLO Providence, R.I. DONALD DiMAIO Providence, R.I. GREGORY DiMARTINO West Warwick , R.I. SUSAN DiMATTEO Barrington, R.I. MICHAEL DiMEO JOHNSTON , R.I. JON DINNEEN Providence, R.I.

ROBERT DiSTEFANO Providence , R.I.

HENRY OlTMAN Foster Center, R.I. ROSALEEN DIVONA KENTON DOLINICH Kingsto n, R. I.

WILLI AM DONNELLY Wa rwick, R.I.

WAL TEA DRAPALA Pawtucket, R.I. ELI ZABET DREW Westerly, R. I. DANIEL DRI SCOLL Narragansett , R.I. JOHN DUCKWORTH Cranston, R.I. KEITH DUERR Westerly, R.I. DONNA DUNPHY Westerly, R.I. PAU L EACUELLO Cranston, R.I. DIANE EASTMAN Warwick , R.I. BERNARD EBBITT Newport, R.I. BARRY EDELMAN Merrick, L.l. , N.Y. LINDSAY EDWARDS Sayville, N.Y. HAROLD EPSTEIN Beacon, N.Y. KENNETH EPSTEIN New Haven, Conn.

JEROME ERWIN East Greenwich, R.I.

ANDREA ESCALETTE Huntington, N.Y. SARAH ETCHISON Providence, R.I. KATHRYN EVANS Murray Hill, N.J. STEVEN FALES East Greenwich, R.I.

DENNIS FARINA Cranston, R.I. KAREN FARRELL Pawtucket, R.I. JAMES FEELEY North Providence, R.I.

MELVYN FEINBLOOM Teaneck, N.J. MARA FEINSTEIN Providence, R.I. BRUCE FELML Y Fanwood , N.J. FRANK FERACO Brewster, N.J. THEODORE FERAGNE Warwick , R.I. GARY FERDMAN Pawtucket , R.I. JOANNE FERGUSON Cumberland, R.I. MICHAEL FERRANCE East Greenwich, R.I. PATRICIA FERRARO Wakefield, R.I. STEVEN FERRETTI Middletown, R.I. ROBERT FISCHER Cranston, R.I. MAUREEN FITZGERALD Providence, R.I. CHRISTOP FLEMING Jamestown , R.I. SAMUEL FLINT Providence, R.I.

385

RICHARD FOSTER Lincoln, R.I. ROBERT FREDETTE Newport, R.I. LAURA FRENCH North Kingstow n, R.I.

THOMAS FREY Narragansett, R.I. BRIAN FRICOT Coventry, R. I. MURAY FRIEDMAN Providence, R.I. HELEN FRIEN D E. Greenwich, R.I. DONNALEE FRON CE Kingston, R.I. ENID FAUGHT Pawtucket, R.I. KENNETH FULLER East Greenwich, R.I. HERMINA FURTADO Warwick , R.I. DIANE GAGNON Coventry, R.I. WALTEA GAIGE Lancaster , Pa. THOMAS GAMMINO Peace Da le, R.I. HAGOP GARABEDIAN Providence, R. I. LEIGH GARDINER North Kingstown, R.I. PAULA GAUTHIER Tiverton , R.I. CHARLES GAUVIN Wakefield, R. I. RAYMOND GEARY Warwick, R.I. ELYSE GEBSKI Tiverton, R.I.

GLENN GEIGNETTER Northport, N.Y. JULIUS GELADE Providence, R.I. MICHAEL GERZEV ITZ Warwick , R.I. DENNIS GIAMMARCO N. Provid ence, R.I.

LINDA GILLET Syosset, N.Y. CHRISTIN GILMAN Middletown , R.I. RAY GILMORE East Greenwich , R.I. RICHARD GIRARD East Providence, R.I. RICHARD GIULIANO Providence , R.I. GWEN GLABACH Greenfield , Mass.

GREGORY GLOVER East Greenwich, R.I. LESLIE GOFF Warwi ck, R.I. JEFFREY GOFTON Warwick , R.I. MARSHALL GOLDBERG Pawtuc ket, R.I. WILLIAM GOLINI Cranston, R.I. BRIAN GORMAN Prov id ence, R.I.


CAROL GOSCIMINSKI West Barrington, R.I. EUNICE GOULD N. Providence, R. I. K ENNETH GRADY Greene, R.I. DOUGLAS GRAINGER Wellesley, Mass. WILLIAM GRANT Wincheste r, Mass.

JUDITH GRAVELINE Pawtucket, R.I. CURTIS GRAY West Barr ington , R.I.

SANFORD GRAY Cranston , R.I. RONA GREENBAUM Cranston , R. I. RICHARD GREENHALGH Warwick, R.I. DOUGLAS GREGORY Narragansett, R.I. HELEN GREGORY Warwick, R.I. FRANK GRENGA Providence, R.I. KAREN GRESIO Bristol, R.I. THOMAS GRIFFIN Warwick , R.I. WILLIAM GRIFFITH 2ND Sau nderstown, R.I. FREDERIC HAAS Providence, R.I. BENJAMIN HADSELL JR. N. Kingstown, R.I. STEPHEN HAESELER Wethersfield, Conn. ROBERT HALL Middletown, R.I. PETER HAMMERSCHLAG Warwick , R.I. TH OMAS HARDY

GERALD HILL Bristo l, R.I. TERRY HOGG Buffalo, N.Y. ROBERT HOLDEN Lincoln, R. I. JANE HOLDSWORTH Caribou , ME. ALBERT HONNEN Portsmouth, R.I. DONALD HOOD Easton, Pa. CLAIRE HOOPER Annapolis , Md. DARYLE HOPKINS Cranston , R.I. MARJORIE HOUSTON Cranston , R.I. GLORIA HOWARD Cranston , R.I.

ANNE HOXSIE Narragansett, R.I.

ERROL HUNT Providence , R.I.

KATHLEEN HUTCHISON Wayne, N.J. LESLIE HYDE Greenville, R.I. DAVID IANNUCCI

ROBERT KERSHAW Lincoln , R.I.

ROBERT KIDDER Malden , Mass. WILLIAM KILCUP Johnston, R.I. DONALD KING Middletown, R. I. BARBARA KINGSBURY Middletown, R.I. DONALD KNEE Warwick , R.I.

ALAN KNIGHT Warwick , R.I.

DENNIS KNIGHT Provid ence , R.I.

THOMAS KN IGHT Barr ington , R.I.

FRANCIS KOWAL JR. Pawtucket, R.I. SHARON KURTZER Providence, R.I. PETER KWONG Provid ence, R.I. RICHARD LABELLE Narragansett, R.I. LUCILA LAJE Howa rd . R.I. STEPHEN LANDES

R.I.

Johnston, R.I.

Providence ,

JOSEPH INFANTOLINO East Greenwich, R.I. GEORGE ISSA Central Falls, R.I. RICHARD JACKSON Pawtucket, R.I. ROBERT JACKSON

STEVEN LANDRIGAN E. Gree nwich , R.I. PAUL LANE

Providence , R.I.

NANCY JACOBS Warwick , R.I.

CYNTHIA JADOSZ

T iverton ,

R.I.

MICHAEL LAPISKY Warwick , R.I. KENNETH LAPRE Warwick, R.I. VERONIKA LASZLO Barr ington, R.I. BARBARA LAWTON

Cranston , R.I.

Cranston , R.I. Cranston , R.I.

RICHARD HARLOW

DIANE JEWETI Narragansett, R.I. DAVID JOHNSON

Hampden, Mass.

Cranston , R.I.

Woonsocket , R.I.

PAUL JOHNSON

JOHN LELLI

Cranston, R.I.

Cranston, R.I.

Saunderstown, R.I.

RICHARD HARRINGTON West Roxbury, Mass. BRUCE HARRISON N. Kingstown, R.I. RICHARD HARRISON Pawtucket, R.I. DAVID HARTLEY Cumberland , R.I. GEORGE HAYDEN Kingston , R.I. THOMAS HAYNES Greene, R.I. ROBERT HEFFERNAN Fanwood, N.J. RONALD HEILIG Middletown, R.I. JOSEPH HELLER Newport, R.I. RODERICK HENDERSON Kingston, R.I. DALE HENNESSEY Adamsville, R.I. FRANK HENRY JR. Warwick, R.I. GERALD HENSON West Kingston , R.I.

RONALD LEE HENRI LEFEBVRE

RICHARD JOHNSON

SUSAN LELLI

Kingston , R.I.

Cranston, R.I.

RICHARD JORDAN Pawtucket, R.I. PETER JOUKLARIS Warren, R.I. GAYLE JURCZYK Coventry, R.I. JOHN KAPLAN Wakefield , R.I. JOHN KARANFILIAN Oradell, N.J . ANNETIE KASABIAN

RICHARD LEMAY Woonsocket, R.I. ALAN LEMERY Warwick , R.I . MILDRED LEONARD Pawtucket, R.I. NANCY LEONARD Wood river Jet. , R.I. JULIA LEPPER Kingston, R.I. WILLIAM LEPRE

Newtonville, Mass.

Narragansett, R. I.

BRENT KAUFMAN Brooklyn, N.Y. CAROL KAUFMAN Providence , R.I. RACHEL KAUFMAN Providence , R.I. JOHN KEANEY Providence , R.I. BENJAMIN KELLY Lake Lynn, Pa.

KAREN LESHNER Cranston, R.I. KENNETH LEVINE Providence, R.I. JOSEPH LICHAA Providence , R.I. CHERYL LIGHT Wickford, R.I. LEONARD LIGHT Wickford , R.I.

386


SHEVRA LIGHT New York City, N.Y. HAROLD LIGHTMAN Providence, R.I. WU-HSIEN LIN Osaka, Japan AUDREY LINCOLN E. Greenwich , R.I. CHARLES LINDBERG Warwick, R. I. CLAUDIA LINDELL E. Greenwich, R.I. PETER LINDEMANN Warwick, R.I. WILLIAM LINHARES E. Provid e nce, R.I. CHARLES LINK Charlestown , R.I. JEFFREY LIPET

RICHARD McGAHEY

M ILTON NELSON

Provid e nce , R.I.

Barrin gton, R.I.

DAVID McCARTHY Pawtucket, R.I. RAYMOND McDERMOTT Newport, R.I. RALPH McELROY North Scituate, R.I. OWEN McENTEE Warwick , R.I. MARGARET McFARLAND Westerly, R.I. RICHARD McCOWAN

ROBERT NELSON Provide nce, R.I.

DENNIS NERI Provi dence, R.I. S. KEPNER NESTER Geneva, N.Y. NORMAN NEWBERRY North Kingstown , R.I. GEOFFREY NEWBOLD Saunderstown , R.I.

THOMAS NOONAN

Barrington , R. I.

Providence, R.I.

THOMAS NORRIS Storrs, Ct. FRANK NOTA

STEPHEN LYMAN

KENNETH McLEOD Warwi ck , R.I. PATRICK McNAMARA North Scituate, R.I. RAYMOND M EDEIROS Little Compton, R.I. GEORGE MEDEIROS JR. New Bedford , Mass. VALERIO M ELLO Cumberland, R.I. JAN IS MERLUZZO Cranston , R.I. LOUIS MERRITT Jamestown, R. I. JOHN MESSERE

Narraganse tt, R.I.

Cranston , R.I.

Warwi ck,

WILLIAM MACKINLAY Pawtucket, R.I. FREDERIC MADDALENA East GreenwiCh, R.I. PAUL MAHON EY Peace Dale, R.I. RONALD MAIN Westerly, R.I. BERNARD MAK E

BENJAMIN MILLER Wakefield , R.I. LYNDA MILLER West Warwick, R.I. JEFFREY MILMAN Pleasantville, N.Y. LEON MINTSCHENKO Somerville, N.J. WILLIAM MOFFITT North Kingstown , R.I. ORESTES MONTERECY

ALBERT OWEN Warwick , R.I. PETER PALAGI Pawtu cket, R.I. STEPHEN PALMISCIANO N. Providence, R.I. ROBERT PALUMBO Cranston , R.I. GEORGE PANICHAS Pawtu cket, R.I. H. DAVID PAPAZIAN Provi dence , R.I. KENNETH PARADISE

Provi dence, R.I.

STEPHEN LOGEE Lincoln , R.I. CHARLES LONG Bethpage, N.Y. STEPHEN LONG Cranston , R.I.

WILLIAM LUND Warwick, R.I.

Providence , R.I.

SUE MANFREDI Kingston, R.I. KARIN MANOUGIAN Cranston, R. I. JOS EPH MARANDOLA Cranston, R.I. CHRISTA MARCOU X Pawtucket, R.I. LORETO MARINI Providence , R.I.

ROBERT MARSHALL Warwick, R.I. ALBERT MARTIN Warwick , R.I. EDWARD MARTIN Providen ce , R.I. JOYCE MARTIN Alb ion, R.I. W. ALBERT MARTIN

Providence, R.I.

EDWARD MOORE JR.

Providence , R. I.

MICHAEL NOVOSAD Ea st Greenwich, R.I. JOHN OCONNOR Provid ence, R.I. VINCENT ONORATO N . Providence, R.I. ROBERT ONYSKO West Warwick, R.I. CAROL ORCHEL Hampton, N.H. ALBERT ORM ISTON

R.I.

Barrington, R.I.

T iverton, R.I.

RONALD MORISSETTE Central Falls, R.I. PAUL MORRIS Pawtucket, R.I. TERESA MOSCARITOLO Westerly, R.I. HARRY MROZOWSKI Ports mouth, R.I. ROBERT MUESSEL Cranston , R.I. MICHAEL MURGO JR.

GERALDIN PARKER Kingston , R.I. ARTHUR PARMET Providence , R.I.

JANE PEARCE Wak efield, R.I. RACHAEL PERCELAY Pawtucket, R.I. DENNIS PEREIRA Warren, R.I.

DAVID PERLIN! Pawtucket, R.I. MARC PERLMAN Roslyn, N.Y. RONALD PETTELLA Cranston , R.I. BARRY PHILLIPS North Scituate, R.I. THOMAS PIEKUT New Bedford , Mass. CHARLES PIERCE Ill

RAYMOND MATHIEU Pawtucket, R.I. WILLIAM MATTES

WILLIAM MURPHY Coventry, R.I. JOHN NAGLE Westerly, R.I. JOSEPH NAPPI Bristol , R.I. BADER NAQI Washington, D.C. SUSAN NASSA Provid e nce , R.I. RICHARD NATHAN Kingston , R.I. MAZEN NAZZAL

Warren , R.I.

Amm an, Jordan

Van Buren, Me.

ILENE MATZNER

DENNIS NELSON West Hempstead, N.Y.

CLARK POTTER North Kingstown, R.I.

N. Prov idence , R.I.

ROBERT MASI N. Providence, R.I. MELODY MASSA Bristol , R.I. KAMAL MASSOUDA Provi dence, R. I.

Providence, R.I.

387

Saunderstown , R.I.

RALPH PLANT T iverton, R.I.

MALCOLM POIRIER


LAWRENCE POULOS Providence , R.I.

SANTO PRESTI Ren sselaer , N.Y. LYNNE PRESTON N. Bennington, Vt. CHARLES PRIMIANO West Acton, Mass. STEPHEN PRITZKER Provid e nce , R.I. GERALD PROVENCHER Pawtu cket, R.I. JASEM QABAZARD Kingston, R.I. DANA QUIGLEY Barrington , R.I. RALPH RACCA Cranston, R.I. ANN RACINE Lincoln, R.I. NORMA RAINEY Pawtu cket, R.I. STEPHAN RAVO Provide nce, R.I. JAMES RAWLINGS Rumford, R.I. WILLIAM REID South Pori/and , Me. JOHN REILLY Warw ick , R.I. FRANCIS REIS North Kingstown, R.I. JOHN REKOS Central Falls, R.I. RONALD RENZI Cranston, R.I. JUDITH REYNOLDS Jamestown, R.I. CURTIS RICHARDSON N. Providence , R.I. THOMAS RIESER North Kingstown , R.I. HERISTAL RIGOLLET Warwick, R.I. JOHN RIVERS Pascoag, R.I. WILLIAM ROBERTSON Warwick , R.I. ROBERT ROCHA Pawtucket, R.I. EDWARD RODAK Hadley, Mass. GERALD ROD/NSKY Cranston , R.I. ROBERT RODINSKY Cran ston, R.I. HARRY ROGGERO Newport , R.I. ROBERT ROGLER Sm ithf ield, R.I. MAIKEN ROHDIN Westerly, R.I. HENRY ROSA JR. Middletown , R.I. RONALD ROSEN East Mead ow, N.Y. WILLIAM ROSENBERG Malverne, N.Y. SUSAN ROTH Narragansett, R.I. DORIS ROWEY Wes t Warwick, R.I.

BRUCE RUSSELL Ba rr ington, R.I. SARAH RUSSELL Fra nklin , Mass. JOSEPH RUSS/LLO Cranston, R.I. WILLIAM RUTLEDGE Providence, R.I. WILLIAM ROUSE Portsmouth , R.I. CAROL SALHANY Central Falls, R.I. MARY SAL/MENO Westerly, R.I. JAMES SALINGER Cumberland , R.I. THEODORE SANFORD Saunderstown , R.I. JOSEPH SANTORO Providence. R.I. JOHN SARTIN/ Pawtucket, R.I. BARBARA SATHER E. Providence, R.I. DAVID SAUCIER Cranston , R.I. RICHARD SAVIGNANO Seekonk, Mass. JAMES SCANLON Canton , Mass. MARCIA SCATIERGOOD Narragansett, R.I. ERNEST SCHENCK Esmond, R.I. RONALD SCHIESS Bergenfield, N.J. JAMES SCHLACHTER Ro c hes~er , N.Y. ROBERT SCHMIDT Newton, N.J. BRUCE SCHOELLE Rockville Center , N.Y. WALTER SCHWEIKART Warwick, R.I. DANIEL SCOLARO/ Cranston, R.I. FLORENCE SCOTI North Kingstown , R.I. BARBARA SEAVEY N. Kingstown , R.I. GEORGE SEAVEY East Greenwich, R.I. EMILIO SENES/ JR. Cranston, R.I. JOHN SHAWDEE Warwick , R.I. ROBERT SHEAR Cranston, R.I. SONYA SILBERMAN Providence, R.I. ALYCE SILVA Barrington, R.I. RICHARD SILVA Warren , R.I. EUNICE SIMMONS Middletown , R.I. H. WILL/A SIMMONS Little Compton, R.I. DOWNING SIMMONS JR. Westerly , R.I. MARK SIMON Brooklyn, N.Y.

388

ALEC SINEL Pawtucket, R.I. HEPHZIBA SINGER Westerly, R.I. EDWARD SKURKA Coventry, R.I. BARRY SLOBODOW Cranston, R.I. ELIZABET SMITH Cranston , R.I. HELEN SMITH West Kingston , R.I. JOHN SMITH Narragansett, R.I. KATHY SMITH Westerly, R.I. LEO SMITH Kingston , R.I. STEPHEN SPOTIS Newport, R.I. PETER STANISH Providence. R.I. .JOHN STENHOUSE Westerly, R.I. ,JANE STEV ENSON Middletown, R.I. ALBERT STICKLES Ill Alexandria. Va . CAROLYN STONER Wyoming, R.I. WILLIAM STROHL Levi ttown , N.J. TIMOTHY SU LLI VAN Providence, R.I. RAYMOND SYLVESTRE Providence, R.I. PHILLIP TALDONE Providence. R.I. CHARLES T APPERO Bristol , R.I. OSCAR TASSONE Providence, R.I. LEE TAYLOR Riverside , R.I. BENJAMIN TEDESCHI Cranston , R.I. PATRICIA TEJA Forestdale, R.I. EVERETI TESTA N. Providence , R.I. CHARLES THOMPSON Westerly, R.I. GLENN THOMPSON Cranston, R.I. ANDREW THORESEN Needham, Mass. STEPHEN TILANDER Barrington, R.I. DAVID TOBIN Bradford , R.I. HOWARD TOLMAN Providence , R.I. WILLIAM TONDERYS N. Providence, R.I. EDMUND TOOHER Providence, R.I. ALAN TORTOLANI Providence, R.I. MARY TUCKER Newport, R.I. DONALD TULLOCH


PETER TURCOTTE Providenc e, R.I. WILLIAM TURNER Providence , R.I. EDWARD TURNQUIST Providence, R.I. EDWARD TYMKO JR. Pawtucket, R.I. THOMAS UUSTAL East Greenwich , R.I. FRANK VACCA Westerly, R. I. GERALD VALENTE Portsmouth, R.I. RICHARD VANDEPUTTE Forestdale, R.I. JOHN VELINO Narragansett, R.I. KATHLEEN VELINO Narragan sett , R.I. BERNARDI VERDE Providence, R.I. RICHARD VERRIER Coventry, R. I. JANICE VERY Wa rwick , R.I. JOSE VICTORIA N. Kingston , R.I. ERNEST VIEIRA Jamestown, R.I. RICHARD VITI Ki ngston , R.I. ALFRED VUONO Bradford, R.I.

HENRY WALKER Jersey City, N.J . ROBERT WALSH North Kingstown , R.I. JOHN WARNER Newport, R.I. DENNIS WEBSTER Narragan sett, R.I. WARREN WETZEL JR. Mendham , N.J. NANCY WHALEN Cumberland , R.I. JOHN WHATMOUGH N. Provid e nce, R.I. JOHN WHEATLEY Warwick , R.I. THOMAS WHIPPLE John ston, R.I. GERMAINE WHITMAN Bradford , R.I. EDWARD WIGGINS Pawtucket, R.I. RAYMON D WILCOX Warwi ck , R.I. ELLIOT WILK Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. NANCY WILLIAMS Jamestown, R.I . RICHARD WILNER West Hempstead , N.Y. SAMUEL WOLSTENCROFT Westerly, R.I.

389

JOHN WOODRUFF Rumford, R.I. ROBERT WOODS Barrington, R. I. JOHN WRENN Prov1dence, R.I. JEFFREY WRIGHT Springfield, Pa. THOMAS WRIGHT We sterly, R.I. DONALD WUNSCHEL Graniteville, R.I. EILEEN WYSS East Greenwich , R.I. LINDA YESSIAN Warwick , R.I. RONALD YO UNG Wakefield , R.I. ROBERT ZAMBUCO Cran ston , R. I. YVETTE ZANNINI Pascoag, R.I. JOSEPH ZARANKA Linden, N.J. ALAN ZARTARIAN Warwick , R. I. RICHARD ZBYSZEWSKI Warren . R. l JUDITH Z EINE Lincoln , R.I. CARYL ZIM BERG Cranston , R.I.


Yearbook Credits Peter Ro b inson-Ma na ging Editor

Nancy Oster-S ec retary and Personalities Editor

Edward L. Frisella---Editor- in-C hief

Andrea Renwanz- Literary Editor

G e org e tt e Daignault-S p ecial Assistant

Joe Norri s-Chief Ph otography Edi to r

Salim Val imahomed--Ass't Managing Editor

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Jay Kapsinow----Commuters Editor and Photographer John Marchant-Photographer

Steve Freeman---Circulation Editor

Debbie Smith and Alice Stewart-Special Assistants Mike Kingsbury-First Semester Photog raphy Editor

Sue Bradl ey-Seniors Ed itor

Duri e Newman--Special Assistant

Rachael Mod l izewski-G raphi cs Ed itor

PICTURES NOT AVAILABLE : Janet Lee--Business Manager Joanne Nerone---Residences Ed itor Jim Norris--Sports Editor Karl Kussa--Assistant Sports Editor Bruce Gerreau--Photog rap her Rick Nelson-Chief Layout Ed itor Diane Babcock-Second Stage Layout Editor Melodie Shaw-Proofs



YEARBOOK_1969