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University of Toronto

Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 21, NO. 1

is t

Active Sport and social change

Beware of Trolls Shaming of athletes on social media Gold from the Gold Coast Blues shine at the Commonwealth Games

Bearing Witness Alumna honoured for exposing plight of women in conflict zones


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SUMMER 2018 / VOL. 21, NO. 1

22

Inside 4

Water Walkers

14

 it as a Firefighter F L essons for everyday life.

Protecting life. Protecting movement.

Outside the Lines 16 

Squash coach, punk rocker and painter John Lennard hones his many crafts.

22 The Good Fight

Why some athletes can't just play the game.

10

34

32 The Story of Chertie Gertie

Betty Eley shares her love of fossils.

34 Expanding Horizons

Giving a boost to experiential learning.

44 Swinging into Classic Uniforms Looking back at gym fashion.

Editor

Photography

Editorial Comments

Sarah Baker

Claus Andersen, Samantha Barr, Martin Bazyl, Avril Benoit, Mary Beth Challoner, Joel Jackson, Nicola Goldsmith, James Kachan, John Hryniuk, Jing Kao-Beserve, Romi Levine, Arnold Lan, Ian McNicol, Robert Reyes Ong, Lisa Sakulensky, Lee Schofield, Seed9, Glenn Tachiyama

P: 416-978-1663 sarah.e.baker@utoronto.ca

Associate Editor Jelena Damjanovic

Art Direction and Design Joel Jackson

Cover Illustration Joel Jackson

Pursuit is published twice a year by U of T’s Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education.

Contributors

www.pursuit.utoronto.ca

Samantha Barr, Mary Beth Challoner, Jill Clark, Jelena Damjanovic, Janet Gunn, Valerie Iancovich, Joel Jackson, Romi Levine, Makeda Marc-Ali, Elaine Smith

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Message from the Dean

CHANGING THE GAME B

eing active, through sport or recreation, has significant positive impacts not only on an individual's mental and physical health, but also on academic and professional performance, and the development of life skills and social networks. The scientific evidence of this is unequivocal and broadly accepted.

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A lesser known, but growing, body of research is exploring the impact of sport and physical activity on us, as a collective. History has shown that sport and physical activity can be powerful tools by which to inspire social change – and in these turbulent times we are it witness to almost daily expressions of advocacy and activism on courts and playing P u r s u fields. FAL L

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Changing the game is an audacious goal. The students, staff, faculty and alumni of our Faculty are doing just that. Through research, scholarship and programming, we are working together to break down the physical and metaphorical barriers standing in the way of individuals and groups benefiting from being physically active or engaged in sport. In this issue of Pursuit, we share stories about work we are doing to foster opportunities for individuals with disabilities, to protect athletes from abuse, and to advance social justice and causes of racial and gender equality. I hope these stories inspire you to see sport and physical activity as the powerful agents of change they can be.

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Field Notes

Water Walkers Protecting life. Protecting movement.

W

ater research may not be the first thing people associate with the Faculty, but as graduate student Stephanie Woodworth sees it, nothing could be more related.

“If we think about the human body as being 70 per cent made up of water, that alone should be enough reason to study water in order to understand the active human body.” But, Woodworth’s interest in water goes far beyond. She is interested in exploring the inequities with water security in Canada and how it shapes our movement and our lives.

“We talk about increasing sport and physical activity participation in the North, but we’re not taking into account that a lot of these communities don’t have access to drinking water,” she says. “So, how are they supposed to participate in sport and physical activity when they don’t have access to life’s basic necessity?”

Woodworth points to the similarities in the Global South where “imported” “Access to safe, clean water sport for development initiatives often determines how we’re able to move, fail because they overlook the realities where we’re moving, why we’re moving of the people living there. This spring, and if we’re moving. It ultimately she had a chance to discuss these issues shapes our entire lives.” first-hand as one of two Canadian youth ambassadors invited to attend the “Access to safe, clean water determines International World Water Forum in Brazil. how we’re able to move, where we’re moving, why we’re moving and if we’re moving. The Forum is the biggest water-related event organized by the It ultimately shapes our entire lives,” says Woodworth, World Water Council to promote awareness, build political who is in her second year of a master’s degree in exercise commitment and trigger action on critical water issues. Prior sciences at KPE. to attending the Forum, Woodworth joined 70 youth from 50 countries at the World Youth Parliament for Water, a youth She is focusing her research on the Anishinawbe Water network acting for water. Walks, a movement initiated in 2003 by two Anishinawbe grandmothers, who started walking the perimeter of the Great Lakes to raise awareness about the importance of “We’re all working together to share ideas and resources for actions we can all take collectively within our communities preserving clean water from pollution. and further,” she says.

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Field Notes

Woodworth has already made a significant contribution. She co-wrote a children’s book called Canada’s Great Water Adventure to inspire children to take an interest in water and outdoor adventure. The book follows the adventures of Fernando, an exchange student from Brazil, and Brooke, a young Canadian whose family is hosting Fernando, as they visit each Canadian province and territory to learn about Canada’s diverse history, its waterways, and water’s impact on livelihood and well-being.

For those wondering about her transition from kinesiology to geography, Woodworth again points out the obvious connection. “Physical cultural studies in kinesiology examine the power relations that are created and reproduced through the spaces in which bodies exist, so my integration into human geography will be expanding my analysis of space, and “Physical cultural studies in kinesiology bodies and space.”

examine the power relations that are created and reproduced through the spaces in which bodies exist.”

So, what’s next for this prolific student? Woodworth’s hope is to continue expanding her understanding of water security in North America with a PhD in human geography, so that she can continue to raise awareness about the importance of protecting water and the inequities of water access in Canada.

“I think it’s really important that we have these diversities of subject matter,” says Caroline Fusco, associate professor at KPE and Woodworth’s supervisor. “Stephanie’s study doesn’t just address water and indigeneity, but also women, who are the keepers of water. The fact that she could rely on our Faculty’s expertise, while also taking courses with Eve Tuck, associate professor of critical race and Indigenous studies at OISE, and Bonnie McElhinny, associate professor in anthropology, is a testament to the wealth of scholars working on social justice issues at U of T.”

“But, most importantly, I want to continue building relationships between people and water to show that we all have water bodies and that we’re all connected to bodies of — Jelena Damjanovic water. I want to expose those connections and strengthen them, so that we’re all water stewards and protectors,” she says.

Pursuit | Summer 2018

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Field Notes

Performance, Protein & the Female Athlete

A

new study out of the Faculty, Hospital for Sick Children and Ajinomoto Co. suggests female athletes need 50 per cent more daily protein than non-active men. Carbohydrates and fat provide athletes with fuel and energy, but protein also helps athletes recover from the demands of sport and exercise. “Despite the fact that females are just as active as males, existing studies primarily address the nutrient needs of males, and in particular strength and endurance athletes,” says Daniel Moore, an assistant professor at KPE.

Moore’s study looks specifically at the recommended daily intake of protein for females in team sports. The study had six active young women perform a test to simulate the stopand-go activity of soccer. They then consumed meals treated with a tracer, a protein building block of amino acid. Moore and his team tracked the tracer through breath and urine samples to see how much of the protein was used to build the new protein needed to recover from exercise. The study showed that female athletes in variable-intensity exercises should

“The study showed that female athletes in variable-intensity exercises should have more than double the recommended protien.” The current recommended dietary allowance for protein is 0.8 g/kg per day for the general population. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends athletes consume 50 per cent more than this, or between 1.2 and 2 g/kg per day. This is a broad range, however, and may not reflect the needs of athletes with unique exercise demands. “These recommendations look at athletes performing weightlifting or endurance exercises,” says Moore. “Athletes in team sports need high levels of endurance. These recommendations leave them guessing how much protein they need.”

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have 1.71 g/kg per day of protein – more than double the recommended 0.8 g / kg per day for the general population and the 0.93 to 1.2 g/kg per day for non-exercising males. “The results provide more populationspecific recommendations for daily protein requirements, especially for females participating in team sports,” Moore says. Moore’s next study will investigate protein requirements for female and male athletes in team sports and — JD weightlifting. Photo/ Martin Bazyl

Keeping athletes safe: Q&A with Professor Gretchen Kerr

Reports of sexual abuse in sports have prompted discussions on what can be done to safeguard our athletes. Professor Gretchen Kerr, vice-dean of academic affairs at the Faculty, is a volunteer athlete welfare officer with Gymnastics Canada. An expert researcher in abuse, harassment and bullying in sport, Kerr spoke to us about her role in developing preventative initiatives and the implications for other sports.


Field Notes

Professor Kerr Appointed Vice-Dean at School of Graduate Studies

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rofessor Gretchen Kerr has been appointed vice-dean of programs and innovation at the School of Graduate Studies beginning July 1, 2018. Kerr will promote and support program innovation across all three campuses. In addition to providing oversight to SGS’s Graduate Centre for Academic Communication (GCAC) and Graduate Professional Skills (GPS) program, she will support graduate units in making programmatic changes that are responsive to changing circumstances while improving the graduate student experience and quality of education at the University of Toronto. Kerr is currently serving as vice-dean, academic affairs, at KPE, where she has distinguished herself as a leader of program innovation, particularly in the areas of workintegrated learning and professionalization. She was instrumental in launching the Master of Professional Kinesiology program, the first graduate program of its kind in Ontario. She is also an internationally recognized scholar in the areas of abuse, harassment and bullying in sport, coach education and women in coaching. Most recently, she contributed her expertise to the roles of chair of the

What is the role of an athlete welfare officer?

Has there been an increase in complaints of that nature?

An athlete welfare officer helps to protect athletes from maltreatment, including sexual, emotional and physical abuse, and neglect. In gymnastics, we focus on prevention by educating coaches, sport administrators, athletes and parents. I also act as a third-party resource who gathers information when there is a formal complaint.

There has been an increase in complaints of sexual abuse because gymnasts now have the necessary conditions to disclose their concerns. However, it’s the emotional abuse within the coach-athlete relationship that is the most frequently reported maltreatment in gymnastics. This includes demeaning or humiliating comments, public shaming, intimidation and threats, and other controlling coaching practices. Emotional abuse garners less media attention, because it is assumed to be a part of developing athletic talent. But, these practices are contrary to what we know about optimal learning and development. And, sadly, research suggests that emotional abuse is experienced by female and male athletes across all sports and competitive levels.

What prompted you to volunteer in this role? It was an opportunity to apply my research to inform education, policy, practice and advocacy. Often my research questions stem from experiences in the field. Being on all sides – research-education-practice – is extremely rewarding.

Photo/ Seed9

University-wide Expert Panel on Education and Prevention of Sexual Violence and co-chair of the working group responsible for developing the newly released sexual violence prevention training module. “My sense of losing a tremendously important colleague who has been a guiding light of our academic programs for many years is matched by pride that our Faculty has been an environment where Professor Kerr has been able to develop professionally and demonstrate the very accomplishments that have drawn the attention of the University’s leadership to her,” said Professor Ira Jacobs, dean of KPE. Kerr holds a PhD in exercise sciences from U of T’s Faculty of Medicine and a master’s in physical education from York University. She joined U of T in 1991 and brings nearly 20 years of experience in academic administrative experience to SGS. “I have no doubt that she will be an exceptional addition to the SGS community and I look forward to the energy, commitment and vision that she will bring to this new role,” said Joshua Barker, dean and vice-provost for graduate research and education at U of T’s — JD School of Graduate Studies.

What are some of the proactive and progressive initiatives Gymnastic Canada has been developing to prevent athlete abuse? We’re looking at research-based, multifaceted strategies to address policy development and dissemination, educational initiatives and advocacy campaigns. Sport organizations, including Gymnastics Canada, are establishing Safe Sport Committees to adopt safeguarding policies, educate their members, and provide neutral, third party individuals to receive concerns.

Are those measures enough to promote meaningful change? Some argue these are band-aid solutions that fail to address the underlying causes of athlete maltreatment. Athletes will be at risk until we change beliefs about how to best develop their talents. We will be successful when the advancement of athletes’ developmental needs and rights are viewed as integral to optimal performance. This requires research-informed policy development, education and advocacy – areas where researchers can make significant contributions. — JD

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Field Notes

Outpacing Cancer Professor Linda Trinh brings expertise in cancer survivorship and physical activity

A

ssistant Professor Linda Trinh knows how to go the distance. She is an ultramarathoner and a prolific researcher who applies the same philosophy to both passions. “The mind you enter a race with is not the mind you finish with. It’s a journey of rediscovery, anticipating challenges and overcoming them. You have to adapt at all times.” Trinh completed her PhD at the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Alberta, focusing on exercise and health in kidney cancer survivors. Now she is the newest KPE faculty member, but already a familiar face since she completed her post-doctoral fellowship here in 2015. Trinh says she was inspired to work alongside a Faculty that focuses on physical activity in preventing and

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managing chronic disease, and its access to specialized populations. “I’m excited to contribute to a world-class research and teaching environment to fill a gap in the physical activity and cancer survivorship agenda. No other Canadian institution has such a robust exercise oncology expertise housed in one Faculty,” says Trinh.

She also looks at the intersections between cancer and aging as it relates to cognitive functioning and brain health, opening doors to connect with Baycrest Health Sciences, Sunnybrook Hospital and the Toronto Neuroimaging Facility.

“We all have slightly different perspectives and expertise, so the potential to innovate and fulfil my research ideas here is incredible.”

A top-rated teacher from the University of Illinois, Trinh also has established many US partnerships that will serve to enhance the Faculty’s already strong international reputation.

Trinh’s research takes an evidencebased and theoretically driven approach to looking at physical activity and sedentary behaviour interventions among cancer survivors. “I want to provide survivors with the strategies to stay active, including anticipating and overcoming barriers to being active.”

“Dr. Trinh’s research and teaching align well with the Faculty’s Academic Plan, mission and vision,” says Dean Ira Jacobs. “I’m very optimistic about how her expertise in exercise oncology will develop, the research synergy with other colleagues, and the positive impact she is sure to have within the Faculty and beyond.”

— Valerie Iancovich

Photo/ Glenn Tachiyama


Field Notes

Hands-on Learning New funding expands opportunities beyond the classroom

E

ven more students from the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education will soon be able to learn outside the classroom. The Faculty has received two years of funding from the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development’s Career Ready Fund, a new government program under the Career Kick-Start strategy. The program supports the Ontario government’s Highly Skilled Workforce goal to provide meaningful experiential learning activity to all post-secondary students before they graduate.

research institutes and government and non-profit organizations. “Experiential education, when done right, can be highly rewarding for students, community partners and the University. There is a growing emphasis on advancing experiential education across higher education, although it is time and resource intensive,” explains Professor Ashley Stirling, KPE’s

strategically explore how to encourage more Bachelor of Kinesiology (BKin) students to choose this option. Professor Stirling, together with Professor Gretchen Kerr, KPE’s vicedean of academic affairs, have been at the forefront of the advancement of experiential education. They co-wrote “A Practical Guide for Work-Integrated Learning,” which is receiving international attention as a resource for integrating experiential education learning opportunities into university and college programs.

“Experiential education, when done right, can be highly rewarding for students.”

Now KPE will be able to include community engagement opportunities in the undergraduate curricula, in addition to the elective upper year courses. KPE will also hire additional experiential education personnel to better support students and mentors in community placements, and expand its community partners which now includes hospitals, clinics, schools, sport and recreation centres, Photo/ James Kachan

director of experiential education. “This funding is exactly what we need to expand our learning opportunities to more students and maintain the highest standards of educational quality.” Under the current curriculum, experiential education courses are elective and 180 students of a potential 500 opt to sign up. Now the Faculty can

“Our Faculty is ahead of the curve in advancing experiential learning in postsecondary education across the country,” says Kerr. “This funding provides a wonderful opportunity for us to improve our courses by augmenting the professional experiences students gain through the BKin program.” — VI

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Field Notes

Faith and Sport

The complexities of team play for Muslim women

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hen Asma Khalil was 11 years old, her friend invited her for a swim in her condo’s pool. After five minutes, they were asked to leave by the manager who told them their swim attire was making the other swimmers uncomfortable. Khalil and her friend were wearing swimsuits and hijabs, a head covering worn in public by some Muslim women. Now in her second year of a master’s degree at the Faculty, Asma recalls this episode as one of a series of uncomfortable situations that fueled her interest in researching the experience of hijabi athletes competing in the West.

“I wanted to learn more about other Muslim women and how they experience sport.” she says. “I felt as though a lot of research on this topic didn’t really capture the complexity within the Muslim community.” Her study participants come from very

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diverse backgrounds. Their parents aren’t just from one cultural or national background. They are Pakistani, Egyptian, Italian and Ghanaian, to name a few. Some of them have a parent who’s not a Muslim or a parent who has converted to Islam. They exist at the intersection of different identities, which has a profound impact on how they present themselves to different communities.

feel that their behaviour isn’t just a reflection of themselves, it’s a reflection of their community. The hypervisibility associated with the hijab means that they are constantly self-monitoring and modifying their behaviour.”

Khalil’s research is also looking at the social interactions the women have with their non-Muslim teammates and coaches. She found their experiences range from very positive to negative. “The younger participants say their A main aspect of her research, teammates are like their sisters, but for conducted under the supervision of Assistant Professor Katherine Tamminen, others the relationship doesn’t translate off the field. For example, there is a lot is the way in which broader discourses of drinking after games, which may about Islam in the West impact the serve to exclude the Muslim girls who sport experiences of her participants. don’t drink.” Coaches also played an “In a sporting context, they could be important role in the experiences of angry with a ref’s call, but they can’t hijabi athletes. Some coaches stood up yell like their teammates because this for their athletes when referees refused might be the only time that this referee interacts with a Muslim girl and they to allow them to play for wearing the Photo/ Joel Jackson


Field Notes

“Muslim athletes’ faith is very important to them and it is the lens through which they operate, but they don’t want to be viewed as just a hijab.” hijab, while others questioned their hijabi athletes and made them feel uncomfortable for not wearing shorts or “Western sport attire”. There is one thing on which they all agreed. “Their faith is very important to them and it is the lens through which they operate, but they don’t want to be viewed as just a hijab,” says Khalil. “They are athletes who work very hard at their sports.” They also want to send a message to the Muslim community that they don’t feel that they have the same opportunities that Muslim men do. “Understanding the experience of these young Muslim women, who are living at the intersection of multiple and often competing identities, is very complicated. However, it is also really important to ensure that they are being heard,” says Khalil. — JD

Faculty extends partnership with Canadian Sport Institute Ontario

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he Faculty is pleased to announce that it is extending its partnership with Canadian Sport Institute Ontario (CSIO) to enhance support for Ontario’s top athletes while augmenting learning and research opportunities for U of T students, faculty and staff across a broad range of sport science projects.

“We are extremely excited and honoured to continue our partnership with the University of Toronto,” said Debbie Low, CSIO’s chief executive officer. “Our experience with U of T staff and students has enabled us to develop future worldclass sport scientists that will push boundaries and help to propel Canadian athletes to podium performances.” CSIO is part of a national network of sport centres that provide personal and professional services to high performance athletes and coaches, including access to experts in a variety of areas, from trainers and psychologists to chiropractors and sport psychologists. For kinesiology students, this is an opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the world of applied sport science. Working alongside leading scientists and researchers, the students perform tests ranging from biomechanical analysis with underwater cameras to aerobic endurance tests on top Canadian athletes. “This is a great experiential learning chance for students,” says Professor Ira Jacobs, dean of KPE. “We are fortunate to be able to work with CSIO to help train the next generation of scientists while bringing our unique perspective, experiences and research skills to help the region’s best athletes succeed on the international stage.” — JD

The QS World University Rankings by Subject have once again ranked U of T sport-related disciplines 6th in the world. This ranking, which covers sports (or exercise) science, sports studies and kinesiology – as well as sports psychology and sports management – is now in its second year.

Photo/ Martin Bazyl

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Field Notes

International Shift

Research fuels IOC Gender Equality Review Project

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“These were important achievements, so some of the triumphalism was deserved, but I was a little sceptical about the announcements that these were ‘the Women’s Olympics.’”

The announcement follows years of KPE research highlighting gender inequalities at the Games. The Faculty’s Centre for Sport Policy Studies has done gender audits of the Olympics going back to the London Games of 2012.

The CSPS researchers decided to carry out a gender audit that asked what remained to be done to achieve gender equality at the games. They found there were significantly more medal events for men than women, more male athletes than female athletes and important differences in the circumstances of participation for women.

n International Women’s Day, the International Olympic Committee pledged to advance women’s participation and leadership in sports by promising to act on 25 gender equality recommendations.

“I think it’s fair to say that the Centre for Sport Policy Studies has contributed significantly to the environment that produced these recommendations,” says Professor Bruce Kidd, an Olympian and vice-president and principal of U of T Scarborough.

The researchers followed this with an audit of the Sochi Olympics (2014), and are preparing reports on Rio (2016) and Pyeongchang (2018).

“I think it’s fair to say that the Centre for Sport Policy Studies has contributed significantly to the environment that produced these recommendations.” — Professor Bruce Kidd

He adds that he has shared the U of T surveys with senior IOC staff in Lausanne, Switzerland. “The surveys have not only focused on numbers, but the quality of opportunities, including the nature of events and whether they were equal,” he says. Kidd says the U of T research is reflected in the IOC’s Gender Equality Review Project, which aims to further gender equality across the global sports community by removing barriers to women's and girls’ participation in sports at all levels.

The IOC’s new 25 recommendations were also informed by the work of Nancy Lee, a Varsity Blues swimming alumna and former head of CBC Sports, who was hired as an adviser and co-ordinator for the IOC Gender Equality Review Project.

“The work that went into this report is comprehensive,” she says. “In the past, IOC and IFs have dealt with various women’s issues, but they didn’t look at the whole picture.

“We can’t just talk about getting equal numbers of athletes on “The CSPS has been involved in gender equality work for some the field of play if we don’t have equality in the boardroom and time, but the international shift started in association with if we’re portraying them in a sexist or non-gender neutral way.” the London 2012 Olympics,” says Professor Peter Donnelly, director of CSPS. “There was a great deal of gender equality “This report is comprehensive across the board and the triumphalism (on the part of the male-dominated IOC) outcomes are tangible,” she adds. “There are dates and associated with the fact that there were, for the first time, timelines and people with assigned responsibilities. That women in every sport (with the introduction of women’s should make a difference this time around.” — JD boxing), and women athletes on every team from countries that had previously excluded women from participating.

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Illustration/ Joel Jackson


Field Notes

Public Symposium mobilizes change

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n March 1, the Faculty hosted a symposium called Mobilizing Change, the eleventh installment of its annual public research series. With the Paralympic Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, just a week away, the symposium was well timed to address the importance of accessibility in sport and recreation, as well as the significance of physical activity across the lifespan. “We know already that physical and metaphorical barriers can impact one’s ability to enjoy healthy active living,” said Professor Ira Jacobs, dean of KPE, in his opening remarks. “Our Faculty believes strongly in breaking down such barriers to enable more individuals to become more active throughout their lifetime and reap the many related benefits.” The speakers included KPE’s Professor John Cairney and Assistant Professor Kelly Arbour-Nicitopolous, who were joined by University of Alberta Assistant Professor Danielle Peers and Mount Royal University Professor David Legg. They each drew on their research and lived experiences to reveal the societal implications of limited participation

Photos/ Jing-Ling Kao-Beserve

opportunities for individuals with disabilities, particularly in the area of sport and physical activity. “Stories about disability and sport often focus too heavily on athletes achieving high performance success after a traumatic injury, neglecting the larger, often invisible, population of individuals, including those born with neurodevelopmental and congenital conditions that affect their ability to participate in physical activity,” said Cairney, whose expertise lies in motor development, pediatric exercise sciences and adapted physical activity. Arbour-Nicitopolous, an expert in exercise psychology, disability and physical activity, said engaging youth and emerging adults with disabilities in physical activity within their communities is imperative, not only for reducing the risk of secondary health conditions but for enhancing quality of life in adulthood.

Legg reviewed the legacies of past Paralympic Games, addressing the challenges and opportunities of future Games in helping to create a more equitable society, while Peers questioned how much Para sport systems still reflect the needs and backgrounds of most Canadians with disabilities. “The playground holds more potential for social movements within disability communities than the podium ever could,” said Peers, who won a Paralympic bronze medal and five national championships during her career as a wheelchair basketball athlete. Following an animated Q&A session with the audience, Dean Jacobs said the symposium highlighted the research excellence and creativity to which our Faculty aspires with networks of collaborating scholars from other institutions. He thanked the audience for helping these important conversations have a lasting impact. — JD

The Faculty is seeking major gifts in support of establishing endowed or limited-term research chairs, professorships, and student scholarships in exercise and sportrelated areas of research. For more information please contact Robin Campbell, robin.campbell@utoronto.ca Pursuit | Summer 2018

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Fit Tips

Fit as a Firefighter Lessons for everyday life By Jelena Damjanovic

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s far as stereotypes go, firefighters are the fittest of the public servants. But, as David Frost and his colleagues discovered, even they need a little help in order to be physically prepared for their jobs and life in general.

“Most firefighters identified that life outside of the job is more important to them, so if we’re going to use exercise to address some of the issues they’re facing, they need to see that exercise is having an effect beyond their job.”

Frost discovered that how you exercise can actually change “Firefighters are a lot like athletes, but in addition to the your movement patterns or your movement behaviours physical demands of their job, they also put their lives on the line every day,” says Frost, an assistant professor at KPE. outside of an exercise environment. “Physical activity and exercise are such a big part of what “That’s really important because it highlights that the effort they need in order to be able to perform their jobs well.” we’re making in an exercise environment can change your life,” he says. “So many people put so much effort into Frost’s research is focused on understanding what injuries being healthy and physically active, but they aren’t getting are being sustained by firefighters, how they are being the results that they want. I think we need to place more sustained and what strategies can be used to prevent them. emphasis on how and why we exercise.” “The money that is spent on injuries in the firefighting Frost and his colleagues came up with seven key features population is higher than the general population and that’s causing a huge financial burden on our health care system. If or movement patterns for firefighters that are applicable to we can learn how to prevent some of these injuries, there will everyone. be a trickledown effect on the general population,” he says. “Whether you’re a firefighter working to put out a fire, a child playing on the swings or an elderly person taking Frost believes in using exercise as the primary the groceries home, these guidelines can help with vehicle for preventing injuries, but he is mindful of performance, preventing injuries and improving quality transferring the benefits of exercise beyond the gym of life,” says Frost. and fireground into real life.

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Photo/ iStock


Fit Tips

“Whether you’re a firefighter, a child or an older adult, these guidelines can help prevent injury.”— David Frost Keep your knees in line. If you draw a line from your hip down to your toes, your knees should fall in that line. This applies to walking, running or climbing the stairs. “If you’re walking upstairs or downstairs in your home, getting in and out of the truck or putting on your pants, keep your knee, hip and foot all in a straight line. That’s going to be the best piece of advice I can ever give anybody to help with knee pain,” says Frost.

Keep your back straight. When you’re bending or trying to pick something up, imagine a line drawn through your shoulders and another one through your hips. “Whether you’re picking up your child or the groceries or you’re in the gym doing a push up, keep those lines the same distance apart,” says Frost.

Keep your shoulders away from your ears, to prevent shoulder injuries. Imagine two lines going through the eyes and shoulders. Keep the distance between the two lines the same as you would when standing. Keep your elbows down and close to the body and hold your shoulders back. “Poor posture can cause or exacerbate neck, shoulder and back pain. Crunching your shoulders up to your ears is a very common postural problem that can lead to shoulder injuries,” says Frost.

What to Look for: 1. Body from the front 2. Line from hip to toes 3. Position of knee in relation to line • Medial to the front • On the line • Lateral to the line Coaching Tips: Grip the floor with the toes. Push the knees out. Point knees in direction of toes.

What to Look For: 1. Body from the front, back or side 2. Two lines through hips/upper back 3. Distance between the two lines • Closer than standing • Same as standing • Farther apart than standing Coaching Tips: Stiffen trunk. Let trunk move with hips. Dowel touches head, back, hips.

What to Look For: 1. Body from the front, back or side 2. Two lines through ears/shoulders 3. Distance between the two lines • Closer than standing • Same as standing • Farther apart than standing

Coaching Tips: Elbows down/close to body. Treat motions as push and pull. Hold shoulders back.

Frost is currently doing work with the International Association of Firefighters, to create educational resources that will support their wellness and fitness initiatives. They’ve also made their way into a kinesiology textbook for high school students across Canada. “If we can integrate these steps into education and share them with all exercise professionals, we’re going to prevent many of the injuries that are being sustained and reduce health care costs,” says Frost. Illustrations/ Joel Jackson

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Blues News

Field Notes

Outside the Lines How Blues squash coach, punk rocker and painter John Lennard hones his many crafts

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inding fame as a musician, becoming a recognized artist and succeeding as a star athlete can be lifelong, singular pursuits – but John Lennard has managed to master all three. Lennard is the head coach for University of Toronto’s Varsity men’s squash team, a member of the British post-punk band Theatre of Hate, which found success in the 1980s and continues to have a loyal following, and a painter whose art is on display in galleries across Canada. Music and squash came early for Lennard. He began to play music when he was nine and squash when he was 14. “I went for a lesson with this world-class [squash] player who phoned my mother and said I could be a great player if I worked at it,” says Lennard.

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“I thought well, I was just watching TV so why not, and really quickly I was playing every day.” At 18, Lennard says he joined the Canadian under 23 squash team and made the national men’s team when he was 19. Music remained his passion throughout high school and university, eventually luring him across the pond, the epicentre of the rock music scene at the time. “If you wanted to be a musician in a band that was making waves, England was where it was at,” Lennard says. There, he found bandmates and formed Theatre of Hate, in which he played the saxophone. In a matter of months, the band was thrust into the limelight, quickly becoming a voice for disgruntled young Brits, he says.

Painting/ The Road Home by John Lennard, 2018, oil on canvas, 36 in. x 36 in. / Courtesy of Roberts Gallery, Toronto


Blues News

“It’s difficult to imagine here in Toronto what it was like in England because it was a time of real desperation,” Lennard says. “The miners’ strike, Margaret Thatcher, high unemployment and youth were very restless, so we were the band that kind of stood for all that.” Lennard, being a university grad and a competitive athlete, was the odd man out. “I was used to being around students and these individuals had dropped out of school but they read more than I read, they questioned everything,” he says.

Lennard says he loved the energy of being in the band, with which he toured Europe, enjoying the perks of rock stardom like staying at luxury hotels, playing alongside bands like The Clash, and appearing on the popular British music television show Top of the Pops. While on tour, Lennard decided to visit the National Gallery in London. “I turned to my girlfriend at the time and said, ‘You know something? I feel like I’m a painter.’” Lennard had never before picked up a paint brush and wouldn’t for another seven years when he was finally convinced to take a “class for terrified beginners.” “I went in there and it hit me. I could see my whole life as a painter the first day,” says Lennard. He immediately started devouring art books and went on to study art in New York, Italy and Toronto.

Photo/ Romi Levine

“I never try to define it because as soon as you define it, it’s standing still,” he says. “There’s certain elements of the classical language of painting that I like: shapes, rhythms, forms, a sense of depth, a sense of tension – you take those and wherever you take them, that’s your own language.”

“You’ve got to be really comfortable out of your comfort zone – that’s when it really starts to happen.”

“I always had a bit of a rebellious streak, otherwise I wouldn’t have found it exciting.”

Lennard’s paintings can be seen at the Roberts Gallery in Toronto, the Theilsen Gallery in London, Ontario, and the Masters Gallery in Calgary.

His paintings depict scenes from his travels and dreamy landscapes – but Lennard says his aesthetic is hard to define.

Lennard continues to paint and play music, and for the past seven years, he’s coached U of T’s Varsity men’s squash team. With Lennard at the helm, the team has ranked high at OUA tournaments and had won the Jesters University Squash League championship.

Despite embracing three very different pursuits, Lennard says he’s “not the spontaneous kind of guy who flies off the handle.” His work ethic involves a great deal of discipline and says he often wakes up at 6 a.m. to train, paint or practise music. Lennard shrugs off the rarity of finding success in multiple fields, owing it to a combination of luck and grit – the willingness to put himself on the line. “You’ve got to be really comfortable out of your comfort zone – that’s when it really starts to happen,” he says. “You have to not hang on to any kind of success,” Lennard says, which reminded him of a silly, yet pertinent quote: “Your ego is not your amigo.” “If you start to think you’re something special because you can do something well, that’s where you stop,” he says. “Some people spend a lot of time becoming something and spend the rest of their life defending what they are and I think that’s fine but that will also keep you there.” — Romi Levine

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Blues News

FOR THE WIN 2017-18 saw the Varsity Blues claim 11 provincial and one national title. Well done, Blues!

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Women’s cross-country team won their first U SPORTS national banner since 2002.

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U SPORTS National Championship Banner

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Championship Banners

• U Sports Women’s Cross Country

Provincial All-Star Athletes

• OUA Badminton

The mountain biking team picked up their first University Cup trophy since 2006.

• O UA Baseball • OUA Men’s Fencing • OUA Women’s Fencing • OUA Figure Skating • OUA Women’s Golf

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OUA All-Stars

• University Cup Mountain Biking • OUA Men’s Swimming

Women’s water polo won their sixth straight provincial title.

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All-Canadian Athletes

• OUA Women’s Swimming • OUA Men’s Water Polo • NCWP Women’s Water Polo

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OUA Coaches of the Year

1 225

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U SPORTS Coach of the Year

Academic Achievement Award Winners


Blues News

Honouring our outstanding student-athletes

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niversity of Toronto President Meric Gertler honoured outstanding graduating Varsity Blues athletes at the annual President's Reception in March, saying this was an “extraordinary year for the Blues.”

“There is so much to celebrate, but the pride that we feel for our varsity athletes does not rest solely on the results of the single season,” said President Gertler at the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport, where the lunch took place. “This lunch recognizes each and every Varsity Blues athlete for their commitment, talent and ability to balance academics with the demands of highly competitive athletics.” President Gertler also recognized the entire varsity athletics community, thanking faculty members, coaches, trainers, volunteers and registrarial staff, who work across all of the many divisions of U of T’s three campuses to help student-athletes balance very demanding schedules. “U of T is dedicated to ensuring that we support some of this country’s very finest student-athletes and that is why we build cutting-edge facilities, like the Goldring Centre. If the cohort we are acknowledging today is any indication, I think we can all agree that it is an investment that has already paid off,” said President Gertler.

He shared the anecdote of meeting Catherine McKenna, the federal minister of environment and climate change who is also a U of T alumna, during a recent trip to Ottawa. President Gertler looked forward to telling her about the environmental research and education under way at U of T, but she wanted to talk first about her days as a studentathlete at U of T. “Byron, Catherine says hi,” President Gertler told Byron MacDonald, McKenna’s coach when she was captain of the Varsity Blues women’s swim team. Ana Peric, a fourth-year student in the Rotman’s Commerce program, was among the students honoured with the Silver T Award for her outstanding athletic performance on the Varsity Blues golf team. “This is a great honour. There are so many student-athletes at U of T and to be able to be one of the recipients of the Silver T just lets you stand out and really appreciate all the work that you’ve done, not only for yourself but for the school as well,” she said. “It takes a lot of planning and sacrifices, but knowing what you want, prioritizing and working towards your goal helps.” — JD

2017-18 Silver T Winners • • • • • • • • • •

Carolyn Adams – Track & Field L ila Asher – Figure Skating Bradley Bedford – Baseball Devon Bowyer – Soccer A ndrea Burley – Mountain Biking Rachel Dick – Rowing Melissa Eratostene – Figure Skating Kyle Haas – Swimming Sukhmun Hare – Water Polo S arah Jamieson – Lacrosse

Photos/ Martin Bazyl

• • • • • • • • • •

 adeleine Kelly – Cross Country/Track & Field M W illiam Kinney – Fencing Nicole Knudsen – Fastpitch A lexandra Kraft – Water Polo L aura Krkachovski – Soccer Dan Kuiack – Swimming Megan Lewicki – Rowing Christina Liao – Figure Skating L ukas MacNaughton – Soccer A na Miroslavic – Water Polo

• • • • • • • •

T J Morton – Football A na Peric – Golf Hochan Ryu – Swimming Nirun Sivananthan – Soccer Rostam Turner – Track & Field Donna Vakalis – Fencing Eli Wall – Swimming Tanner Young-Schultz – Baseball

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Blues News

Helping Blues Succeed Varsity Blues Achievement Awards celebrate student-athletes and donors

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hey program medical robots, intern at Canada’s Department of National Defence and know more about fish taxonomy than most people ever will. One even swims the fastest 100 metre backstroke in world history.” This is how Osvald Nitski described the Varsity Blues swimming team at the Achievement Awards hosted by the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education. The evening celebrates the success of U of T student athletes in academics and athletics. This year, 225 studentathletes were honoured for earning an 80 per cent overall average or higher while competing on a Varsity team. Nitski, a mechanical engineering

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student, was named one of Top 8 Academic All-Canadians for the 2016-17 season, in a ceremony hosted by Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Governor General of Canada. As an athlete, he has four medals from the 2017 OUA Swimming Championships, including two gold. Nitski has also been on the Faculty of Engineering Dean’s Honour list each term, has won scholarships and awards, and finds time to volunteer with the Varsity Blues Buddy Up program to help develop skills in elementary students. He saluted the donors for supporting young athletes like him. “A guy like myself from the more unfortunate part of Hamilton usually doesn’t have national titles, yet this is where your support has taken me. I promise there is much more to come.”

Head coach of the Varsity Blues women’s hockey team and program graduate Vicky Sunohara also spoke of her success that includes two Ontario University Championships with the Varsity Blues hockey team, and three Olympic medals since 1988, including two gold. “The work ethic, teamwork and trust you learn through sports serve you well through life,” said Sunohara. “Playing hockey shaped my life and as a coach I want to ensure the next generation of Blues benefits the way I did.” Beth Ali, executive director of athletics and co-curricular physical activity, said donors are “quiet teammates” who lend their support from afar with scholarships. “They don’t dress in Blue and White every week, but they are a crucial part of our success.” — JD Photo/ Jing-Ling Kao-Beserve


Blues News

Blues Shine on the Gold Coast Kylie Masse

Gabriela Stafford

Eli Wall

Nine Varsity Blues athletes represented Canada and U of T at the 2018 Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia The 2016 Olympic bronze medalist and 2017 FINA world champion and world record holder Kylie Masse won the gold in her signature 100 backstroke event. Masse broke the Commonwealth Games record in heats, semifinals and the final, clocking a final time of 58.63 seconds. She also won the 200 backstroke gold medal in a Games record time of 2:05.98, while claiming silver medals in the 50 backstroke and the women’s 4x100 medley relay.

LE A D O T L L A H S R A M IN 2018 FOOTBALL TEAM

The Blues swimming co-captain Eli Wall finished eighth in the 200 breaststroke, 10th in the 100 breaststroke and 12th in the 50-metre event. Wall also helped the men’s 4x100 medley relay team place fifth.

Varsity Blues badminton alumnae Michelle Li, Rachel Honderich and Brittany Tam were also in the Gold Coast representing Canada. Li picked up Canada’s top result, placing fourth overall in the women’s singles.

Olympian Gabriela Stafford took to the track and placed 14th overall in the women’s 1500m race. U of T’s alumnae Alison Lee, Amanda Woodcroft and Nikki Woodcroft helped Team Canada to a bestever fifth-place finish in field hockey.

As a team, Canada reached the quarterfinals before dropping a 3-0 decision to England. — Jill Clark

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reg Marshall has been named the new Varsity Blues football head coach, effective January 2018. Marshall, who was the defensive coordinator, defensive line and linebackers coach for the Queen’s Gaels since 2014, became the 26th head coach in program history. Prior to his post in Kingston, Ontario, Marshall spent 20 seasons in the Canadian Football League (CFL), primarily as a defensive coordinator and linebackers coach. He had two stops in Saskatchewan (1994-99 and 2011 as the head coach) and Edmonton (2000-04 and 2013-14), one in Ottawa, with the then Renegades (2005-06), Winnipeg (2006-08) and Hamilton (2009-10). Most notably, he appeared in back-to-back Grey Cups (2002, 2003) while with the Eskimos, winning it all the second time around. For 13 seasons and with three different teams, Marshall was the coordinator for the Canadian college draft, which produced numerous league all-stars. A scholarship athlete at Oregon State University, Marshall was drafted in the seventh round by Philadelphia and played two seasons in the NFL with the Eagles and the Baltimore Colts. In 1980, he returned to Canada to play with the Ottawa Rough Riders. He spent nine seasons with the Riders, earning the CFL’s defensive player of the year honours in 1983 and the league’s most outstanding defensive lineman in 1983 and 1984. — Mary Beth Challoner Photos/ Above left to right: Seed9, Claus Andersen, Martin Bazyl Below: Joel Jackson Pursuit | Summer 2018

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THE GOOD FIGHT Field Notes

Why some athletes can't just play the game

By Jelena Damjanovic Illustrations by Joel Jackson 22 pursuit.utoronto.ca


Field Notes

“Most of the athletes don’t ‘want’ to be activists, as much as they feel compelled to get involved. They see social or political issues around them and feel like they can’t be silent in the face of these issues.”

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rom Muhammad Ali refusing to be drafted into the US military to fight the war in Vietnam to Tommie Smith and John Carlos giving the Black Power salute at the 1968 Olympics to protest racial injustice, the 1960s saw a number of high-profile athletes challenging the status quo. Half a century later, the world seems once again to be in turmoil, with protests against social injustice, violence and racial inequality spilling from the streets onto sporting fields, and a new generation of athleteactivists emerging. “In some ways, they never went away,” says Assistant Professor Simon Darnell, who has been conducting research in this area to try to develop a better understanding of the experiences of elite athletes who identify as social or political activists. “What is unique about the current moment is that the rapid shifts in media technology are changing the opportunities and platforms through which athletes can be active. And, at the same time, the politics of the current moment have become very polarized and intense, dragging athletes into the same political quagmires that the rest of us are living in.” Darnell found that many athletes are keenly aware of the social and political issues around them and while not all of them are activists, the days of the “dumb jock” stereotype are largely over. “Most of the athletes with whom I have engaged don’t ‘want’ to be activists, as much as they feel compelled to get involved. In other words, they see social or political issues around them and feel like they can’t be silent in the face of these issues.” So, why do so many still frown at athletes speaking their minds on political and social issues? Darnell thinks the culture of sport often makes it difficult for athletes to engage in activism. Fans tend to criticize them, coaches would prefer they just play, and it can be seen as the act of a bad teammate to speak out or “rock the boat.” Pursuit | Summer 2018

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“Athletes aren’t allowed to speak on certain topics. But, the issue at hand here is social rights, so what makes the media better experts than athletes?”

Who’s got the athletes’ tongue? Sometimes the athletes censor themselves. “Major athletes have to sign a contract with their sport association before any international games, essentially signing away their rights to free expression,” says Associate Professor Margaret MacNeill, who studies athletes’ rights and relationships with the media. “They can talk about their experiences, but there are so many stipulations about what they can say,” she says. She believes this goes back to the Black Power salute in the 60s, which led to a rule that prevents athletes from using the podium to make a political statement. MacNeill says the Olympic movement has historically promoted the idea that sport and politics don’t mix, despite evidence to the contrary. And, sport media has historically seen itself more as part of the entertainment industry, therefore shying away from addressing contentious political issues. In the late 1990s, she conducted a survey of 1,200 national and international team athletes, which unveiled that 64 per cent of them didn’t know what their rights were when dealing with the media. “But that was a time when mainly broadcast and print media came to them. With each new media platform that emerges, there are new ways for athletes to speak out – and to get in trouble,” MacNeill says.

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How media shapes public opinion Barinderjit Sangha, a third-year kinesiology student in MacNeill’s class, completed a study on the media representations and audience perceptions of the silent protests started by Colin Kaepernick, the American football quarterback, who refused to stand for the American national anthem at NFL games to protest police brutality. “Historically there is a preconception of what makes an expert. Athletes aren’t allowed to speak on certain topics because they are just athletes, whereas the media are deemed experts. But, the issue at hand here is social rights, so what makes the media better experts than athletes?” says Sangha, whose research focused on how CNN, FOX and ESPN covered the protests. He found that although the media outlets documented the NFL protests, they did not all adequately address the underlying reasons for them. “Due to the lack of media coverage on protest rationale, specifically police brutality and racial injustice, audiences may have been more inclined to view the NFL protests as inappropriate or disrespectful, in part because they were unaware of the NFL athletes’ point of view. Different media produce certain ways of talking about the topic, excluding or restricting other ways of talking about it, which serve to further influence their audiences.” USA President Donald Trump has been among the most vocal critics of the kneeling protest, calling it disrespectful and urging league owners to release anyone who engages in the movement. In a move seen by many as pandering to Trump, the NFL announced a new policy requiring players to stand for the national anthem on the field or wait in the locker room to avoid fines for their teams. Pursuit | Summer 2018

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The times, are they a-changin'? However, athletes are not without recourse. According to Darnell, they can control their own message more than they could previously, thanks to social media. “Athletes like LeBron James, for example, are so iconic and have such global reach and visibility that they no longer need to wait for the traditional press to grant them a voice or platform,” he says. Additionally, the intensity surrounding the politics of race, and the emergence of movements like Black Lives Matter, has increased at the same time that the visibility, power and cultural agency of sports stars has also increased. “Star athletes are more famous than they’ve ever been, professional sports are more lucrative and valuable than ever – at least for the time being – and politics are more divisive than ever. That’s a powerful and productive combination in which athletes can be active and engaged.” However, the precarious nature of athlete labour has not changed, Darnell points out. They can still be cut, they still have short careers, and it’s still incredibly difficult to make it to the professional ranks. “On top of that, many consumers of sport expect athletes, and, it must be said, particularly Black athletes, to just play and be happy to be an athlete. The backlash against athlete activists has not changed – it is still there for athletes like Kaepernick, or any who have the courage to speak out. “I think we all need to recognize that even if we don’t agree with the politics being communicated by a particular athlete, it often takes real courage for him or her to speak out,” says Darnell. “And athletes who do engage in activism often face a backlash or pay a price in terms of their image, legacy or even job security.” Case in point, Kaepernick still hasn’t received a contract offer from an NFL team since becoming a free agent in 2017.

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Back in Canada

“Athletes are more famous than they’ve ever been and politics more divisive than ever. That’s a powerful combination in which athletes can be active.”

Canadian examples of athlete activism don’t tend to have the same profile or reach as the American ones, however Darnell singles out Freyja Reed, a teenager in British Columbia who was kicked off her elite soccer team for protesting its sponsorship by a fish farming company, which she says was environmentally damaging. Andrew Ference played in the NHL for 16 seasons, winning a Stanley Cup with the Boston Bruins in 2011, but his impact away from the ice has been equally impressive. He spearheaded dozens of environmentally friendly projects adopted by teams and he’s been a vocal supporter of LGBTQ equality in hockey. Ference is someone else who embodies athlete activism in many ways, says Darnell. Ference is now working as NHL’s first director of social impact, growth and fan development, but in an interview with ESPN, he spoke of roadblocks that still prevent athletes from getting involved, including public backlash for players voicing their opinions on non-sport matters, as well as internal pressures to stay focused on the game. A strand of Darnell’s ongoing research is to understand what sport organizations can or should do to support athlete activists. “I think many sport organizations are still trying to figure this out, and many of them are happy to support athlete-led charity, more so than athlete activism – recognizing that the line between these can be blurry. However, I think that this is an issue that sport organizations can likely no longer afford to ignore, and they are going to need to have policies in place to protect athlete activists, similar to ‘whistle-blower’ protections in other industries,” he says. Darnell hopes his research will encourage the people who consume sports, including fans, fantasy sport players and ticket buyers, to take some time to think about athletes as fully formed people, not just actors who perform for our pleasure. “Quite frankly, I also hope that the issues that athletes are speaking about, such as racism, inequality and violence, will continue to be talked about and become harder to ignore. Activists of any kind can and do push societies towards progress and change, and we need some of that right now.”

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Beware of Trolls By Valerie Iancovich

Study into athletes’ treatment on social media reveals underbelly of sexism and racism

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efore the age of social media, top athletes enjoyed a certain level of anonymity, which allowed them to focus on their sport and maintain a relatively private life outside of competition. In 2018, however, with the rise of Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms, professional athletes are exposed and scrutinized like never before.

“I had an idea when I was going into this that I was going to see some negative content, but it was far more extreme than I was expecting.”

KPE PhD candidate Ellen MacPherson has been analyzing how fans critique athletes and engage with one another in these social media environments and has found that the conversations reflect complex social issues that extend far beyond the world of sport. MacPherson’s research path was inspired by her master’s work that looked into athletes’ relationships with their peers. Some of her participants talked about being bullied online, which raised a red flag for MacPherson as a topic worthy of more in-depth exploration. She then turned to the study of online social media communications between fans and athletes in the professional sport realm. “I had an idea when I was going into this that I was going to see some negative content, but it was far more extreme than I was expecting.” Her PhD work, supervised by Professor Gretchen Kerr, involved 11 case studies of professional athletes who have verified, public accounts on at least two of the three most popular social media platforms – Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. She focused on how athletes were treated when they did something provocative, in or outside of competition in the Women’s Tennis Association, National Women’s Soccer League, Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, National Hockey League and National Football League. She also extracted data from the sport organizations’ accounts. In total, over 7,700 social media comments were analyzed. She analyzed fans’ use of social media as a vehicle to publicly shame athletes when their behaviours were inconsistent with the social, legal or sport-specific standards generally expected from celebrity athletes. Her research specifically addressed the nature of fans’ responses to athletes’ public displays of resistance or advocacy, allegations of sexual misconduct and domestic violence, instances of dismal athletic performance, and the use of performance-enhancing drugs.

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“...the online comments quickly escalated from performancerelated remarks to outright objectification.”

“We went into the research thinking that we might find some unkind responses and angry people,” she explains. “But we found that the online conversations extended beyond what athletes had done to conversations about gender in which there was clear sexism and discussions about faith in which athletes who practise certain religions were demeaned. Conversations related to race issues in the US were also rampant through the online communications.” This study highlighted the disinhibition effect – common in online environments, where the anonymity and instantaneous nature of these spaces enable people to behave differently than they would in faceto-face interactions. This enables people to detach their communications online from everyday life and might inspire fans to respond to athletes’ behavioural conduct in more hostile or discriminatory ways. One of MacPherson’s case studies analyzed how the public reacted to Eugenie Bouchard’s poor 2015 performances, after her incredibly successful 2014 season where she earned Most Improved Player honours, appeared in Grand Slam semifinals and achieved a top 5 ranking.

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When she went to Wimbledon in 2015, she lost after the first round despite having made it to the finals the previous year. “You might expect that the fans would be critical of her results given her prior success, but the online comments quickly escalated from performancerelated remarks to outright objectification. Fans would say things like, ‘You’re such a bad tennis player. You should turn to pornography instead because then at least people would enjoy what you’re putting out there.’” In another case study, she examined online fan reaction to Maria Sharapova’s use of performance-enhancing drugs. Those comments were less sexually derogatory, but condescending and entirely focused on her gender and looks. “The fans seemed to offer forgiveness and consolation because they perceived her to be attractive,” MacPherson explains. “They acknowledged that she used a performance-enhancing drug but followed that with, ‘It’s okay because you’re still beautiful and a great role model.’ The violation seemed to be excused because of her physical appearance.”


“I saw denigrating messages of victim blaming.”

MacPherson compared that fan reaction to the backlash against Blue Jays first baseman Chris Colabello who tested positive for anabolic steroid use. “The fans never addressed his appearance or his gender,” she explains. “They focused exclusively on the drug use and they responded to that directly.” MacPherson also examined three cases involving athletes accused of sexual and domestic violence. NHL player Patrick Kane was accused of rape (and was later acquitted). NFL player Johnny Manziel was accused of domestic assault and Adrian Peterson was accused of child abuse. In cases of sexual violence against women, the fans often defended the athlete. “I saw denigrating messages of victim blaming,” she explains. “Fans were often quick to minimize details of the accusation or absolve the athlete of potential blame and turn it completely on to the woman who was involved. Fans would say that these women were only after the athlete’s money and celebrity status, so they were obviously lying about their allegations. Online messages reflected the sentiment that these famous athletes can get anyone that they want, so why would they have to resort to raping or assaulting someone?” Last fall when the media frenzy began surrounding Colin Kaepernick, the NFL player who took a knee during the national anthem to protest the injustices faced by racial minorities, MacPherson wasn’t surprised; those conversations about race and patriotism were happening months before on social media. “But once

Kaepernick made a public display of resistance, a mob mentality emerged online. Conversations ranged from denial of the presence of racial inequalities in society, to demeaning and explicit comments about Kaepernick’s personal character, including messages suggesting Kaepernick is advocating for issues that ‘carry no weight,’ that his behaviour is racist towards Caucasians, or that he doesn’t belong in the United States if he continues his protest. There were messages of support for Kaepernick but they got lost amongst attacks on his character.” Similarly, comments that reflected racial discrimination were also targeted at other athletes of colour in the sample. For MacPherson, the research reflects how sport, celebrity, politics and discrimination are entwined in the online environment. “This research extends far outside of sports. The findings so closely reflect what is going on more broadly in society with respect to sexism, racism and other forms of discrimination.” In the social media sphere, these athletes are the targets of divisive issues in society at large. “In reality, most of these conversations are not actually about what the athletes did or didn’t do, but rather a mirror of society’s struggles on a much larger scale.” Ellen MacPherson has been selected by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology, for their 2018 Sport Psychologist Young Researcher Award. Ellen is being recognized by AASP for her work on “On-line public shaming of professional athletes” under the guidance of Professor Gretchen Kerr. Pursuit | Summer 2018

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Field Notes

The Story of Chertie Gertie (also known as Fossil Flossy) By Jelena Damjanovic Photography By John Hryniuk

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rowing up around the sedimentary rock of Manitoulin Island in the 1930s, Betty Eley was always interested in fossils, but paleontology wasn’t something young women did at that time. In fact, Eley may have been the first girl from her hometown to go to university. Her mother, inspired by her success in track, steered her towards an education in physical health at the University of Toronto. “Even though the war was on and we were all told to be serious and to think about doing things for our country, we did have a lot of fun together,” says Eley of her university days. “I played on the basketball and volleyball teams and that was great fun. Helen Gurney was the basketball coach. She was shorter than all of us, but she was the boss.”

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Ironically, the war also opened up new opportunities for women. The summer after she came home from her first year at university, Eley was asked to go to a school in the country and teach for two months because the teacher wanted to enlist in the war. The following summer, she was invited to run a fresh air camp for young girls in Sudbury. “So, here I was at the grand old age of 19 or 20 running a camp,” chuckles Eley. After graduating in 1944, she decided to apply to teacher’s college, but put those plans on hold to accept a teaching position at Kennedy Collegiate in Windsor in place of another teacher who had enlisted in the war. She became the head of the department of girls’ physical education and stayed on for the next five years, but spent every summer back on Manitoulin Island, collecting fossils. She eventually finished teacher’s college, got married and had five children, all the while growing her fossil collection. Having small children helped, she says, because they were so close to the ground. With a couple of friends who were also very interested in fossils, she travelled to a quarry in Sylvania, Ohio, on a regular basis amassing a large collection of fossils from the Devonian period, which was part of the Paleozoic era, otherwise known as the Age of Fishes. She donated the fossils to the Cincinnati Museum Center, but continued to add to her collection from Manitoulin Island. It was Eley’s husband, a professor of engineering at the University of Windsor, who nudged her to turn her passion into a career. “He came home one day and said ‘We have a new professor teaching paleontology, you must come and take the course.’” But, Eley discovered she couldn’t study to be a paleontologist without a degree in geology, so she went back to school part-time to get the degree.

With her husband taking on a job at the University of British Columbia, the family moved to Vancouver and Eley enrolled in a master’s program for paleontology, writing a thesis on chert, a mineral with a special affinity for organic material, making it fertile ground for fossils. In addition to earning a master’s degree, she earned the nickname of Chertie Gertie. And, she found time to volunteer as a swimming teacher at the hospital for children with disabilities.

she would have special cabinets built for her fossils if she ever decided to donate them. So, she did and to make it more meaningful, she wrote a little book on fossils to accompany the collection. The book was called Manitoulin Fossils for the Young of All Ages and she signed it as Fossil Flossy. She also drew pictures above the cabinets to give visitors an idea of what the fossils looked like when they were alive. And, she donated a collection of fossils to the local nature centre and gave talks on fossils over the summer. “I’ve had a very busy, interesting life,” says Eley, who turned 96 in February and still makes sure to exercise regularly. “People don’t realize the importance of being active. You’ve got to exercise, you’ve got to keep walking if you’re going to go into old age,” she says. She is thrilled that her fossils have become part of permanent exhibits in museums, but she’s made sure to keep a few of her treasures, including a piece of sea bottom more than 400 million years old, with the fossils showing on top. “Eventually this, too, will go in the museum, but I couldn’t live without it now,” she says.

The family returned to Toronto after five years and Eley got an invitation to work at the Invertebrate Paleontology department at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) on a joint project with archeology to trace the source of spear points made of chert. “I went there to work for six weeks and I ended up working there until I was 80,” says Eley. She wrote a book called Cherts of Southern Ontario and published a number of papers. Her specialty was a group of fossils called acritarch. The family still spent every summer on Manitoulin Island, so Eley kept busy with her fossil collection. One day, the curator at the local museum told her

Her advice to generations coming behind her is to pursue their interests and keep working at what they love. “I’ve been a very lucky person to pursue what I was really interested in, but then again I was lucky to be born on Manitoulin Island, with its sedimentary rock and fossils. The Laurentian Mountains next door are all hard rock,” she says. If you remember Betty from your time at U of T, she would love to connect with you. Email samantha.barr@utoronto.ca to get in touch.

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Field Notes

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Photo/ Jing Kao-Beserve


Expanding Horizons Postgraduate research support gets a boost from long-time donor By Janet Gunn

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ohn Wildman, a long-standing donor of the Faculty, is making a donation to create an experiential learning fund for graduate students to help “open doors” in their careers. “Supporting students with potential is a good investment,” he says.

Wildman first became connected with the Faculty when the Fitness Institute was hiring graduates during his 23-year career there. He says the students “contributed to [the Institute’s] success” and he was proud to see them contribute to society. The Fitness Institute established an undergraduate scholarship at the Faculty in 1993, in memory of its co-founder, Lloyd Percival. Percival was inducted into the Athletics Canada Hall of Fame and was recognized as a visionary and self-educated expert on health and fitness.

Graduate students gain experience by attending conferences, symposia and other scholarly meetings. They must often travel to present their work in other cities in Canada or internationally – and that travel can be costly. Associate Dean of Research Luc Tremblay says, “The experience of preparing conference presentations and handling questions Now 25 years later, Wildman is giving back again – but this from an expert audience is an invaluable learning experience. time, he says “it’s personal.” In addition, students get to hear and discuss cutting-edge research with top scholars, which leads to new connections “I am excited to create this experiential learning fund because and collaborations. Research conference participation it represents my family’s advocacy for some of the best provides unparalleled learning and networking opportunities. and brightest students who have goals to change society for This is why we are very grateful for this generous donation the better. We are living in a complex world that requires that will facilitate conference participation.” innovative ways to solve problems,” says Wildman. “We need to encourage students to work hard. Learning outside the Wildman’s generous gift comes at a time when the number of classroom can help breakthrough thinking that leads to new graduate students at KPE is increasing, putting more pressure ideas for our future.” on existing research grants to provide experiential learning to all students. Wildman, now retired from his role as president Wildman, was one of a family of three boys who all went to and CEO of the Fitness Institute, is determined to have a positive university about the same time. He says it was a struggle and impact on this and hopes others will follow his lead. knows that lending a student a helping hand has a great payback – even when they are not your own. “It’s a wonderful “Supporting the University has been the most prideful thing feeling to watch the progress of those you have supported – I have done in my business career,” says Wildman. “As time an investment in academic excellence and research is one of goes on, I meet the students and parents, and see the reward. the beginnings of a better society.” It’s very satisfying.” Pursuit | Summer 2018

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Alumni Updates

Bearing Witness Alumna honoured for exposing plight of women in conflict zones

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ally Armstrong (MSc, 2001) made an impact on the Canadian public early on in her career: in 1993, her story for Homemakers magazine about the gang rape of women during the Balkan conflict spurred 9,000 outraged readers to send letters to the magazine demanding action for the women.

“Sally has prompted response from a lot of people who don’t see themselves as activists,” says Professor Margaret MacNeill, one of her master’s degree instructors. “She’s amazing in the ways she has inspired people to do things differently.” Armstrong was promoted to Officer of the Order of Canada in December for “contributions as a journalist and filmmaker highlighting human rights and the struggles of women in the world’s conflict zones.” The award is

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very fitting: The Order’s motto is “They desire a better country.” Armstrong’s strong belief in human rights, especially women’s rights, has spurred other Canadians to act, making not only Canada, but also the world, a better place. As a journalist who covers conflict from the point of view of what happens to women and girls, Armstrong has travelled to places such as Afghanistan, Iraq and Liberia, bearing witness to the lives of the women living in conflict zones. Her next assignment will take her to South Sudan to train women there to be journalists capable of reporting on local, as well as international, issues. “Sally is a natural-born teacher,” says Professor Bruce Kidd, former KPE dean and current principal of U of T Scarborough. “She’s imparting ideas

all the time. Having her as a student in our [master’s] program was like having another faculty member.” Armstrong began her career as a physical education teacher and says she still teaches the children she meets on assignment how to play volleyball and do gymnastic stunts. “I really like my job,” Armstrong says. “Every time I go on an assignment, I say, ‘This is the last one,’ but I keep going. “I’m forever dazzled by the ways people cope, manage and push through barriers.” Armstrong, herself, continues to dazzle Canadians with her insights and dedication to opening a window onto other lives. — Elaine Smith

Photo/ Avril Benoit, Médecins Sans Frontières


Alumni Updates

KPE Career Café shows many paths to a dream job

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PE students came out in record numbers to this year’s Career Café, an annual event where alumni share stories after graduating.

Tabatha Amponsah wanted to hear what graduates are doing now. Shalom Howe was interested to learn about different careers in kinesiology and make connections for future employment. They weren’t disappointed, hearing 18 successful graduates share stories about their professions, including physiotherapy, naturopathic medicine, anesthesiology and more. Alumnus Yuri Elkaim was on the soccer team and wanted to be a physician. He’s now a New York Times best-selling author and founder of Healthpreneur, a site that helps health and fitness entrepreneurs build successful online businesses. “Students value direction and hearing perspectives from those who paved the path. If we can share what’s worked and lessons learned, one idea may spark something for them,” said Elkaim. James Rutherford dreamed of becoming a baseball player or going into medicine after graduation. Today, he plays baseball recreationally and manages big projects like the Union Station Revitalization, a skill he credits to “working with people in the gym after graduation.” Howe says before the event, she hadn’t thought about entrepreneurship. “Many spoke about their own businesses,” she said. “Their jobs weren’t connected to kinesiology, but their education helped them get there. That was cool to hear.” Amponsah agreed. “This event opened my eyes to the breadth of kinesiology and all the jobs you can do beyond it.” — JD Photo/ Arnold Lan

Upcoming Events Blues Football Alumni Network Golf Tournament and Dinner Tuesday, August 7, 2018 King Valley Golf Club, King City, Ont. Registration and information: uoft.me/BFAN-golf2018

Varsity Blues home openers: Saturday, September 1 Football vs Waterloo – 7:00 p.m. Friday, October 12 Men’s Hockey vs Ryerson – 7:00 p.m. Saturday, October 13 Women’s Hockey vs Windsor – 7:00 p.m. Friday, October 26 Women’s Volleyball vs McMaster – 6:00 p.m. Friday, October 26 Men’s Volleyball vs McMaster – 8:00 p.m. Friday, November 2 Women’s Basketball vs Algoma – 6:00 p.m. Friday, November 2 Men’s Basketball vs Algoma – 8:00 p.m.

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Alumni Updates

Getting Together

Pictured: Jane Rupert and Mona Mitchell (left to right, in horse and buggy with the driver), Elizabeth Clarke-Meneguzzi, Nabil Tadros, Wendy Smith-Heard, Group Guide (No Name given), Ken Arnott, Louis Meneguzzi, Sandra Arnott, Jeff Heard (left to right, on camels) A GROUP OF KPE and OISE alumni travelled to Egypt in March on a sightseeing trip led by alumnus and Varsity Blues tennis coach Nabil Tadros. The group visited the pyramids (pictured) and also did some charity work at a Jesuit school (formerly an orphanage) in a small town called Armant, near Luxor.

(left to right) Juri Daniel, Byron MacDonald, Robin Campbell

Swimming Alumni Pre-Meet Reception VARSITY BLUES swimming alumni gathered at the Athletic Centre “beach� (i.e. the lobby overlooking the pool) for a pre-meet reception on February 22 to catch up with friends and former teammates. The event saw a reunion of three generations of Varsity Blues swim coaches (pictured above). The group later headed into the stands to cheer on the Blues as they competed in the national U SPORTS Championships.

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GREY CUP CHAMP and Varsity Blues football alum Levi Noel stopped by the St. George campus in January. Here he is posing with the Cup and former Varsity Blues football head coach Greg Gary.

Photo/Top: Courtesy of Nabil Tadros, Bottom Left: Samantha Barr, Bottom Right: Mary Beth Challoner


Alumni Updates

U of T alumni and staff represent Canada at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games

ALUMNUS Paul Poirier was one of 17 figure skaters on the national team competing at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in Pyeongchang. Poirier and his partner Piper Gilles finished in eighth place in ice dancing. Poirier completed a bachelor’s degree in linguistics at U of T and skated for the Varsity Blues for one season, winning the gold medal in the men’s open free skate at the 2012 OUA championship and helping U of T to a bronze-medal finish. This was his second Olympics: Poirier also represented Canada at the Vancouver Games. Former Varsity Blues rugby player Heather Moyse earned her master’s degree in occupational therapy from U of T in 2007. She represented Canada in bobsleigh at this year’s Winter Olympic Games, finishing sixth with partner Alysia Rissling. Moyse won her second straight bobsleigh gold medal at the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, after winning gold at the Games in Vancouver and making history with pilot Kaillie Humphries as the first Canadian women to win Olympic bobsleigh gold. In addition to these competitors, U of T’s David L. MacIntosh Sport Medicine Clinic had two staff at the Games supporting the Canadian team: massage/athletic therapist Marcel Charland and physician Lee Schofield. Charland and Schofield were part of the Core Health Services Team of Team Canada. — JD

(left to right) Odeta Kasa, John Wildman

Honouring our Best and Brightest MORE THAN 250 faculty members, staff, students, parents and generous supporters came together to celebrate the academic achievements of our students in December at the Faculty’s annual Reception for Scholars event. Student award winners had the opportunity to meet and thank the donors to their awards in person and explain the profound effect financial awards have on their education. To learn more about supporting KPE students, please visit donate.utoronto.ca/kpe.ca Photo/Top: Lee Schofield, Bottom Left: Jing Kao-Beserve, Bottom Right: Nicola Goldsmith

(left to right) KPEAA executive Madalyn Tworzyanski (co-deputy), John-Peter Bonello (co-president), Sing-Yan Ng (co-president), Anastasia Vlahiotis (co-deputy) PHE 4 ALL is an annual tournament organized by the Kinesiology & Physical Education Athletic Association. This year’s event took place on March 3 and we were delighted to welcome back a handful of KPE alumni. Although the Class of 2018 were victorious, the sportsmanship and cooperation demonstrated embodied the spirit of our Faculty. Pursuit | Summer 2018

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In Memory

Field Notes

Advocate, athlete and trailblazer Remembering Helen Gurney

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ong before there was a robust Varsity Blues women’s program, when Hart House was an old boys’ club and women had to travel to Yonge Street to take their phys ed classes, there was Helen Gurney, working tirelessly to make physical education and physical activity more accessible for girls and women. The dear friend of the Faculty and a University College alumna passed away at her home on October 28, 2017, at the age of 99, following a lifetime of advocating, educating and waving the blue and white. “There was so much to admire about Helen,” Professor Bruce Kidd recalls. “She fought for opportunities for girls and women in physical education and sports throughout her life, during the discouraging days of the conservative 1940s and 1950s and the quite different feminist activism of the 1960s and 1970s, with a fierce determination, shrewd sense of strategy and a gracious

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public style, always with a smile. I learned a lot from her about how to make change when the odds seemed stacked against you, as they so often were with her.”

everything,” Kanep recalls. “It was a man’s world! When she worked for the ministry, she would always talk about these issues in particular when it came to budgets.”

During her undergrad years, Gurney competed in interfaculty swimming and basketball. This passion for sport fuelled her decades-long career as a physical education teacher, department head and eventually to the role of provincial inspector in Physical and Health Education. It was during those years as an inspector that she met fellow alumna and educator Viuu Kanep. Years later, Kanep befriended Gurney and was often at her side for Blues games and other athletic events. Kanep admired Helen’s career.

Gurney chronicled some of her peers and early women pioneers of sport at U of T in her book, A Century to Remember: The Story of Women’s Sports at University of Toronto. Its pages are filled with the stories of the earliest struggles for U of T women to participate in sport in any capacity, right up until the late 20th century when women were leading the charge in Varsity sport. Kanep says her friend was “at the forefront of the conversations, strong in her ideas and logical in her reasoning.”

Gurney was a strong advocate of getting more women coaching women’s teams at all levels and to serve as referees and officials and as leaders in the sport communities – an ideal that university and other sports organizations are still working towards. “Guys coached

The world of sport, for women and girls in particular, lost a dear friend and ally in Gurney’s passing. But her legacy will live on, thanks to the trails she blazed for the countless educators, coaches, athletes and friends who have followed — VI in her footsteps.


In Memory

We Remember...

Ruth Brown BPHE 5T2, OISE 7T7, MEd 8T0

Rollit (Rolly) Goldring BPHE 5T8, Woodsworth 6T2, OISE 6T3, MEd 6T5, Basketball

Ruth passed away at the age of 87, surrounded by her loving family. Ruth spent 30 years teaching in Toronto public schools. She loved films, jazz, her cats and dogs, collecting art and antiques, reading, travelling and debating political and social issues, including women’s rights. Ruth will be remembered as a fighter, a visionary and a force of nature.

Rolly passed away at the age of 80 after an eventful life. He was a dear friend to many neighbours, teammates and colleagues. Rolly was a dedicated educator and a visionary who had a long and successful career with the Scarborough Board of Education. During his tenure at U of T, he was a member of the Varsity Blues men’s basketball team. He had a lifelong passion for sports and the honour of representing Canada on the 1964 Olympic basketball team.

Calvin Caldwell UC 5T4, OISE 6T0, Swimming Cal, who passed away in his 92nd year, was defined by a thirst for life. He landed in Shanghai with the merchant marine at the age of 20, just after the Second World War. Many other travel adventures followed before he returned to school in his mid-twenties. He was a member of the Varsity Blues swim team during his U of T career. Cal had an incredible zest for knowledge and read voraciously. He was passionate about English literature and taught it for many years.

Andrew Grodzinski UC 6T4, Football

C. William Daniel Engineering 4T7, Football

E. Gordon Hachborn UC 5T4, Law 5T8, Swimming

While a student at U of T, Bill was president of the Engineering Society, won a senior football T, was winner of the 3T5 Second Mile Award and graduated with honours in engineering. He began his professional career as a petroleum engineer with the Shell Oil Company, and, in 1974, became president and chief executive officer of Shell Canada. He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1982. He will be remembered as one of a rare breed of gentlemen who never failed to have a kind or thoughtful word.

Gordon, who passed away at the age of 87, was a highly respected judge who was known for being exceedingly patient, wise and kind. During his time at U of T, he was an active member of the swim team. His superior swimming ability won him many accolades, both competitively and in water polo. He loved the law and did his best to “do justice” as a lawyer, judge and teacher.

Kathleen Dilkas (nee Kanetos) BPHE 0T5, OISE 0T6

Margaret died peacefully at age 94 with her family by her side. Margaret was born and raised in Gordon Head, but came to Toronto and earned her PHE and teaching degrees. Margaret’s other interests included gardening, flowers, bridge, sewing, knitting and quilting, but her family was most important to her.

Kathleen, a beloved wife, mother, daughter and sister, passed away suddenly at age 39. She was a beautiful and caring person who touched the lives of many and will be forever remembered by her many extended family, friends, colleagues and cherished students.

Andy stoically faced cancer, exhibiting his characteristic strength and resolve. He passed away at age 76. The former Varsity Blues football player began his career in the pharmaceutical industry and moved on to real estate. He will be remembered as a caring and thoughtful man who cherished family and friends.

Margaret Kenning (nee Lifton) BPHE 4T4

Pursuit | Summer 2018

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In Memory

We Remember... William Lachance BPHE 4T9, Basketball

Robert Pinkney Engineering 5T5, Football

Bill passed away at home in Craigleith at the age of 92 following a short illness. Bill was a gifted athlete; his talents led, after his army service during the Second World War, to a physical education degree. During his time at U of T, Bill played for the Varsity Blues basketball team and also enjoyed softball. Upon retirement, he fulfilled a lifelong dream by sailing for the Caribbean with his late wife, Gerry, also a PHE grad.

Bob passed away at the age of 83. He was an engineering student at U of T in 1955 and was also a member of the Varsity Blues football team. He was a cherished grandfather to 12 and great-grandfather to five children.

Clifford Worthy Lawrence BPHE 5T4, OISE 5T9, MEd 6T2 Cliff passed away peacefully at the age of 88. After leaving his beloved U of T, Cliff embarked upon a career in education. Following retirement in the mid-80s, Cliff’s great joy was participating in the lives of his grandchildren. Cliff’s boisterousness, energy and social disposition were his calling cards, providing opportunities to share stories and laughter with strangers and friends alike. John Clifford Mills Engineering 4T8, Fencing John died peacefully with his family at his side at age 93. Born in Toronto in 1923, John was proud of his hometown and of the family’s role in its history. While earning his degree in engineering, John was a member of U of T’s fencing team. Joan Parkes (nee Dixon) Trinity College 6T1, MSc 6T8, Basketball, Baseball Joan’s undergraduate degree in chemistry led her to obtain a master’s degree in biochemistry and pursue a career in laboratory research at U of T and The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute. Throughout her lifetime, her love of sports and the outdoors led her to pursue a diverse array of interests and activities. While at U of T, she competed in intercollegiate diving and skiing events. Her father nurtured her interest in sailing from an early age, and in the cooler months, she kept active playing paddle tennis at the Badminton and Racquet Club. One of Joan’s proudest accomplishments was acting as the T-Holders representative on the U of T Sports Hall of Fame selection committee. She received the Arbor Award in recognition of her many years of outstanding contributions to this committee.

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Dr. William (Tim) Purves Dentistry 6T7, Football Tim was a loving husband, father and grandfather and a truly great friend to many throughout his 92 years. A natural athlete, Tim played for the Varsity Blues football team. He was a well-loved and respected dentist who considered his patients his friends. Michael Sokovnin UTSC 7T7, OISE 7T8, Football Mike was a beloved husband, father, brother and son who unexpectedly passed away at the age of 65. He was a starting tackle with the Varsity Blues for five seasons between 1972 and 1977, earning an all-star selection when U of T won the Yates Cup as league champions in 1974. He also earned all-Canadian honours in 1976, the year he was selected by the Hamilton Tiger Cats in the Canadian Football League draft. Leonard Turner BPHE 5T0, Tennis Leonard passed away peacefully in his 95th year. After marrying his wife Verna in 1947, Len moved to Toronto to earn his PHE degree. Len was an excellent golfer, curler and hockey and tennis player, which were passions throughout his life. He collected many awards and won many championships as a result. He will be remembered for his gentle nature, keen intellect, playful sense of humour and wit.

Our condolences to friends and family. If you have an in memory note to share, please contact Samantha Barr at samantha.barr@utoronto.ca


KRISTINE DRAKICH has logged countless hours on volleyball courts at U of T and around the world, as a standout player and an inspiring coach and mentor. She has chosen to leave a legacy gift in her will, to support the programs she believes in. You can do the same. By planning your bequest now, you can ensure that our academic, research and athletics programs continue to grow and evolve for the benefit of future generations.

“My heart is in U of T. I credit my mentors for inspiring me to be a coach and the volleyball program for inspiring young women to lead. Through sports you learn how to take risks, be resilient and make a difference. I want to continue supporting the incredible women who flourish in this program and I want to help make a difference to those who come long after us.�

To learn more or to discuss making a planned gift to the Faculty, please contact Robin Campbell, Executive Director, Advancement and Alumni Affairs, robin.campbell@utoronto.ca Samantha Barr, Manager, Alumni Relations and Advancement Campaigns, samantha.barr@utoronto.ca

BOUNDLESS

JOIN ME. LEAVE A LEGACY.


Replay

Field Notes

Swinging into classic uniforms

F

ashion trends have a way of making a comeback every now and again, but so far there’s been little interest in reviving the bloomer style of shorts. Such was the look of the gym uniform worn by women in the BPHE program at one time. “Our gym uniform was a one piece outfit we called rompers. For some reason they seemed to always come in a sky blue colour,” says Mary Benson (nee Ecclestone), pictured right enjoying some physical activity with her classmates. “We wore white socks and white sneakers, which were expected to be kept white.”

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Sneakers that were worn in the gym were for gym use only, in order to spare the hardwood floors from shoes worn outside. “This was true for high schools, too,” says Benson. “That is why the dances were called ‘sock Hops.’” The rompers had an elasticized waist and the bottoms had a bloomer effect. “They were quite comfortable and even though they were not flattering, seeing that everyone had to wear them for gym, nobody really thought about it,” says Benson. The gym uniforms were eventually changed to include shorts and a T-shirt, which have survived the test of time, even by fashion’s fickle standards. — JD


1974-75 Cross-Country Teams

FACULTY OF KINESIOLOGY & PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND THE T-HOLDERS’ ASSOCIATION PRESENT

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

SPORTS HALL OF FAME

Each year, athletes, teams and builders are inducted into the Hall of Fame in recognition of their place in U of T’s athletic legacy. T-Holders, staff, athletes, media and members of the general public with an interest in Varsity athletics, are invited to nominate an individual or a team for induction into the Hall of Fame. To view current Hall of Fame members and learn more about their contributions to sport, please visit: halloffame.utoronto.ca For more information about selection criteria or to submit a nomination, please visit: uoft.me/nominate-hall-of-fame

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