Coz McNooz Summer 2020

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Director’s Letter Dear Johnston Alumni and Community, We write to you at a time of incredible transition: national and global protests widen the anti-racist movement, public health officials try to manage a global pandemic, and colleges and universities aim for institutional change in the midst of a budget crisis. When most of the content of this issue of the Coz McNooz was created, Covid had not forced the closure of Bekins and Holt, along with much of our social and economic realities. Black Lives Matter protests had not yet forced an absolutely necessary reckoning with the current forms of racial violence and bias embedded everywhere in society. So, in some ways, this issue of the Coz is a time capsule from a different world.  On July 1, the Johnston Directorship rotates from Julie to Tim. This is the second personnel change this year; please again help us in welcoming Joselyn Gaytan as the new Johnston Registrar. While these are indeed changes, what will not shift in our coming year is that our mandate as an institution rooted in the complexities of a focus on community, will continue to include supporting students as they shape individualized educations that connect their passions – activism, academics, interdependence – in and beyond the classroom. Like most educational institutions, we’ll be working online quite a bit this fall – it’s a chance for Johnston to experiment and innovate online pedagogies that support student-driven curriculum, content, assignments, and engagement. Faculty in the Center are working over the summer to make sure that our teaching methods will not only produce exciting seminars, but that they also actively address some of the pitfalls of online education, which we know can exacerbate unequal access to learning opportunities based on race and class. Other work over the summer involves preparing our living and learning spaces to be occupied under the new realities of social distancing, sanitization, and personal protective equipment. Maggie and MG are already well underway in making these adjustments.  As always, Johnston is grateful to our alumni for your contributions to our community in the form of discussion, mentorship, engagement, and material contributions. Because of these contributions, students in need of housing over the summer are living in Brockton and working on a “graduation book” for our 2020 grads who didn’t get to have an in-person Johnston Commencement. For food insecure students, we have a free food pantry accessible throughout the summer. We are also able to provide employment for students in economic need. Additionally, the first floor of Holt is getting an ADA accessible door, which is the first step in making the first floor of Holt fully accessible (shout-out to Amy Wilms, Assistant Dean in Academic Success & Disability Services, for her help with this!) These are just some examples of how we continue to use alumni support to support students, even when class isn’t in session. We’d like to thank all the current students, MG, and alums for producing the content and design of this issue of the Coz. All the best,

Julie Townsend and Tim Seiber


Director’s Letter Dear Johnston Alumni and Community, We write to you at a time of incredible transition: national and global protests widen the anti-racist movement, public health officials try to manage a global pandemic, and colleges and universities aim for institutional change in the midst of a budget crisis. When most of the content of this issue of the Coz McNooz was created, Covid had not forced the closure of Bekins and Holt, along with much of our social and economic realities. Black Lives Matter protests had not yet forced an absolutely necessary reckoning with the current forms of racial violence and bias embedded everywhere in society. So, in some ways, this issue of the Coz is a time capsule from a different world.  On July 1, the Johnston Directorship rotates from Julie to Tim. This is the second personnel change this year; please again help us in welcoming Joselyn Gaytan as the new Johnston Registrar. While these are indeed changes, what will not shift in our coming year is that our mandate as an institution rooted in the complexities of a focus on community, will continue to include supporting students as they shape individualized educations that connect their passions – activism, academics, interdependence – in and beyond the classroom. Like most educational institutions, we’ll be working online quite a bit this fall – it’s a chance for Johnston to experiment and innovate online pedagogies that support student-driven curriculum, content, assignments, and engagement. Faculty in the Center are working over the summer to make sure that our teaching methods will not only produce exciting seminars, but that they also actively address some of the pitfalls of online education, which we know can exacerbate unequal access to learning opportunities based on race and class. Other work over the summer involves preparing our living and learning spaces to be occupied under the new realities of social distancing, sanitization, and personal protective equipment. Maggie and MG are already well underway in making these adjustments.  As always, Johnston is grateful to our alumni for your contributions to our community in the form of discussion, mentorship, engagement, and material contributions. Because of these contributions, students in need of housing over the summer are living in Brockton and working on a “graduation book” for our 2020 grads who didn’t get to have an in-person Johnston Commencement. For food insecure students, we have a free food pantry accessible throughout the summer. We are also able to provide employment for students in economic need. Additionally, the first floor of Holt is getting an ADA accessible door, which is the first step in making the first floor of Holt fully accessible (shout-out to Amy Wilms, Assistant Dean in Academic Success & Disability Services, for her help with this!) These are just some examples of how we continue to use alumni support to support students, even when class isn’t in session. We’d like to thank all the current students, MG, and alums for producing the content and design of this issue of the Coz. All the best,

Julie Townsend and Tim Seiber


Kathryn Green Lecture Series

Janet Hoffman ‘73 By Benjamin Lachelt ‘20 “The real reason I could never be a federal judge was this transcript, because they always find them... my courses were: Philosophy of the Demonic, Reason and Revolution, The Story of the Demon. So I mean what would that have looked like on national television? Let’s think about that moment in time. But, I was really glad that I took all those courses because what I learned from each one of them was something unique and special that helped with the journey that I’m talking about today.” - Janet Hoffman, ‘73

Johnston College alumna Janet Hoffman (‘73) stepped away from her busy Portland law firm, Janet Hoffman & Associates, for a couple days to grace the Johnston community with a Kathryn Green lecture unique in its insights and hilarity. Students and faculty alike were held captive by her warm presence and rare, lawyerly capacity to articulate profound ideas in flowing, easy-tounderstand narratives. With more temporal distance from her Johnston years than just about any alum, Hoffman’s reflections on the significance of the Johnston experience were particularly revelatory. As a current student, I would argue that Hoffman’s perspective helped me appreciate and understand my education more than that of anyone else. A shamelessly abridged account of Janet’s life as a student is as follows: Janet Hoffman entered Johnston College in 1969, its inaugural year, and unlike the majority of her peers, did so as a freshman and not as a transfer student. Somewhat eclectic and rebellious, Hoffman always had a pet rat named Charlotte on her shoulder and was almost expelled from housing both herself and several puppies in the “men’s” dorm. A hallmark of Hoffman’s education was her one-and-a-half years of study in Scotland and Ireland, wherein she studied political science at the University of Edinburgh and conducted field research in the Scottish Highlands and in an Irish workers community. Hoffman taught a class on Scottish folklore upon her return from the British Isles and graduated with a Johnston College degree in Political Science with supplementary work in Philosophy and Anthropological field study.

The arc of Hoffman’s education was marked by great development and overcomings. She initially struggled as a student due to what her advisor, Professor Emeritus Kevin O’Neill described in her précis as “severe defects in her background.” Yet, by the time she graduated, she had “transformed herself from a poorly educated and uncertain individual into a purposive, intellectually-skilled, articulate person.” In her lecture, Hoffman attributed much of her growth in college to the way in which Johnston serves as a trial ground where failure is permitted and where people can learn what makes them tick socially, emotionally, and academically before moving on to more consequential circumstances in life. College as a territory of transformation was probably the most dominant topic throughout Hoffman’s lecture. Some of her eloquence on the subject reads as follows: “The reason why I’ve stayed close to the College and have come back is the philosophy of the teachers. One of the things that I think is critical about this kind of education is the fact that you can be who you are and they can let you grow and even fail and come back stronger learning from the things you have failed at.” For Hoffman, the self-discovery she underwent during her time as a Johnston student was integral to her decision to become a lawyer. After her Johnston years, she went on to earn a J.D. from Boston College Law School. As a law student, Hoffman worked for the cooperating branch of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund which defended Angela Davis, Muhammad Ali, and the prisoners of Attica Correctional Facility, while she was there. Over the course of her law career, one of Hoffman’s most famous cases was when she was one of the primary criminal defense lawyers hired by the Rajneesh community to defend it and some of its members in the criminal investigation. (In fact, she even had an office at Rancho Rajneesh in Central Oregon!) Of the Kathryn Green lecture series in general and of Janet’s lecture in particular, Malie Minton, an especially grateful Johnston fourth-year, gave us this perspective: “It is always astounding to me to see reflected in the alumni the deep sense of passion that they have for their careers and life. It makes me think about how Johnston from its start has instilled passion, drive, and creativity within its students. It was great to hear Janet reflect back on her time as a Johnston student and to hear her advice about law school and practicing law. I truly enjoyed the lecture and appreciated Janet’s thoughtful reflections, stories, advice, and wisdom that she shared with us all.” We know that Malie’s impressions were shared among many at the Center. Thank you, Janet, for visiting the Center once again and for your lasting positive impact upon us.


Kathryn Green Lecture Series

Janet Hoffman ‘73 By Benjamin Lachelt ‘20 “The real reason I could never be a federal judge was this transcript, because they always find them... my courses were: Philosophy of the Demonic, Reason and Revolution, The Story of the Demon. So I mean what would that have looked like on national television? Let’s think about that moment in time. But, I was really glad that I took all those courses because what I learned from each one of them was something unique and special that helped with the journey that I’m talking about today.” - Janet Hoffman, ‘73

Johnston College alumna Janet Hoffman (‘73) stepped away from her busy Portland law firm, Janet Hoffman & Associates, for a couple days to grace the Johnston community with a Kathryn Green lecture unique in its insights and hilarity. Students and faculty alike were held captive by her warm presence and rare, lawyerly capacity to articulate profound ideas in flowing, easy-tounderstand narratives. With more temporal distance from her Johnston years than just about any alum, Hoffman’s reflections on the significance of the Johnston experience were particularly revelatory. As a current student, I would argue that Hoffman’s perspective helped me appreciate and understand my education more than that of anyone else. A shamelessly abridged account of Janet’s life as a student is as follows: Janet Hoffman entered Johnston College in 1969, its inaugural year, and unlike the majority of her peers, did so as a freshman and not as a transfer student. Somewhat eclectic and rebellious, Hoffman always had a pet rat named Charlotte on her shoulder and was almost expelled from housing both herself and several puppies in the “men’s” dorm. A hallmark of Hoffman’s education was her one-and-a-half years of study in Scotland and Ireland, wherein she studied political science at the University of Edinburgh and conducted field research in the Scottish Highlands and in an Irish workers community. Hoffman taught a class on Scottish folklore upon her return from the British Isles and graduated with a Johnston College degree in Political Science with supplementary work in Philosophy and Anthropological field study.

The arc of Hoffman’s education was marked by great development and overcomings. She initially struggled as a student due to what her advisor, Professor Emeritus Kevin O’Neill described in her précis as “severe defects in her background.” Yet, by the time she graduated, she had “transformed herself from a poorly educated and uncertain individual into a purposive, intellectually-skilled, articulate person.” In her lecture, Hoffman attributed much of her growth in college to the way in which Johnston serves as a trial ground where failure is permitted and where people can learn what makes them tick socially, emotionally, and academically before moving on to more consequential circumstances in life. College as a territory of transformation was probably the most dominant topic throughout Hoffman’s lecture. Some of her eloquence on the subject reads as follows: “The reason why I’ve stayed close to the College and have come back is the philosophy of the teachers. One of the things that I think is critical about this kind of education is the fact that you can be who you are and they can let you grow and even fail and come back stronger learning from the things you have failed at.” For Hoffman, the self-discovery she underwent during her time as a Johnston student was integral to her decision to become a lawyer. After her Johnston years, she went on to earn a J.D. from Boston College Law School. As a law student, Hoffman worked for the cooperating branch of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund which defended Angela Davis, Muhammad Ali, and the prisoners of Attica Correctional Facility, while she was there. Over the course of her law career, one of Hoffman’s most famous cases was when she was one of the primary criminal defense lawyers hired by the Rajneesh community to defend it and some of its members in the criminal investigation. (In fact, she even had an office at Rancho Rajneesh in Central Oregon!) Of the Kathryn Green lecture series in general and of Janet’s lecture in particular, Malie Minton, an especially grateful Johnston fourth-year, gave us this perspective: “It is always astounding to me to see reflected in the alumni the deep sense of passion that they have for their careers and life. It makes me think about how Johnston from its start has instilled passion, drive, and creativity within its students. It was great to hear Janet reflect back on her time as a Johnston student and to hear her advice about law school and practicing law. I truly enjoyed the lecture and appreciated Janet’s thoughtful reflections, stories, advice, and wisdom that she shared with us all.” We know that Malie’s impressions were shared among many at the Center. Thank you, Janet, for visiting the Center once again and for your lasting positive impact upon us.


Redlands Alumni for Black Lives Matter

Bowie Rivera ‘22

Jahmari Johnson ‘21

Kalei MacDonald ‘23

By Jonathan Garcia ’16

Johnston Summer Interns: A Gift for the Grads

For decades, Black students at the University of Redlands have been insisting on systemic change. It is not hyperbole to state that these calls for change have been ignored and delayed, or when acted upon, cosmetic, fraudulent, and short-lived in nature. The Redlands Alumni for Black Lives Matter is a group of alumni mobilizing fellow graduates of the University of Redlands to insist this change come fully and swiftly this time. We have demands. We have a petition to sign. We are asking every signee to cease all donations to the University of Redlands until these demands are met. In just two weeks, we have gathered over 1000 signatures, engaged over 50,000 individuals, and are acquiring press and exposure.  Join us. As a non-Black POC, I am identifying my role during this time as one of action and support for the Black community. You have influence at the University of Redlands as alumni. Please consider using it for the advancement of our future alumni. As a Johnston alum, I’d like to think it is always our duty to hold power accountable. I write these words with love.

Pici Dennon ‘21

As a graduate of the Johnston Center for Integrative Studies, I need to say something to you—we must do better. As we watch our cities rise against the systemic violence towards Black people that has plagued this country since its founding, I urge you to take a look at the University you have graduated from—we are not exempt.

Aria Hurtado ‘21

Kelly Sandoval ‘21

By Pici Dennon ‘21 Amidst the trying times brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Johnston Center still finds a way to support students in need of summer employment. Managing to create an internship program in a completely remote setting, this group of employees works methodologically with Zoom, internet clouds, and epic emailing skills to collaborate on a special project. Split into two groups: content creators and designers, students work with staff members M.G. Maloney and Maggie Ruopp to create a yearbook dedicated to the graduating class of 2020. Content creators Bowie Rivera ‘22, Jahmari Johnson ’21, and Kalei MacDonald ’23 are practicing outreach skills by writing personalized calls for submissions, file management, as well as scouting community photographers for submissions. As emails are sent out and content is sent in, designers Aria Hurtado ’21, Kelly Sandoval ‘21, and Pici Dennon ‘21 are working on a design brief. As a whole team, the group works together through consensus on deciding title of the book, a social media call for submissions as well as ideas for imagery, themes, and the color palette. The book will highlight visual art and photography submitted by the class of 2020 to showcase their last year in college. It was a memorable year, even in light of the massive COVID-19 deaths and police brutality happening at this time. The book team is brainstorming ways to uplift graduates of color and their amazing contributions to the whole U of R campus. This yearbook will be no graduation ceremony on Bekins Lawn, but it will be a way for the Center to give back to the students who lost the experience they worked incredibly hard towards over the last four years. Students and staff working on the project aim to have the manuscript sent to local printer Citrograph by mid-August. Once printed, Johnston will mail the publication to the class of 2020 and house a copy of it in the Jimmie Room Bekins Library (and Coyotess Den archive) for current students to enjoy.


Redlands Alumni for Black Lives Matter

Bowie Rivera ‘22

Jahmari Johnson ‘21

Kalei MacDonald ‘23

By Jonathan Garcia ’16

Johnston Summer Interns: A Gift for the Grads

For decades, Black students at the University of Redlands have been insisting on systemic change. It is not hyperbole to state that these calls for change have been ignored and delayed, or when acted upon, cosmetic, fraudulent, and short-lived in nature. The Redlands Alumni for Black Lives Matter is a group of alumni mobilizing fellow graduates of the University of Redlands to insist this change come fully and swiftly this time. We have demands. We have a petition to sign. We are asking every signee to cease all donations to the University of Redlands until these demands are met. In just two weeks, we have gathered over 1000 signatures, engaged over 50,000 individuals, and are acquiring press and exposure.  Join us. As a non-Black POC, I am identifying my role during this time as one of action and support for the Black community. You have influence at the University of Redlands as alumni. Please consider using it for the advancement of our future alumni. As a Johnston alum, I’d like to think it is always our duty to hold power accountable. I write these words with love.

Pici Dennon ‘21

As a graduate of the Johnston Center for Integrative Studies, I need to say something to you—we must do better. As we watch our cities rise against the systemic violence towards Black people that has plagued this country since its founding, I urge you to take a look at the University you have graduated from—we are not exempt.

Aria Hurtado ‘21

Kelly Sandoval ‘21

By Pici Dennon ‘21 Amidst the trying times brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Johnston Center still finds a way to support students in need of summer employment. Managing to create an internship program in a completely remote setting, this group of employees works methodologically with Zoom, internet clouds, and epic emailing skills to collaborate on a special project. Split into two groups: content creators and designers, students work with staff members M.G. Maloney and Maggie Ruopp to create a yearbook dedicated to the graduating class of 2020. Content creators Bowie Rivera ‘22, Jahmari Johnson ’21, and Kalei MacDonald ’23 are practicing outreach skills by writing personalized calls for submissions, file management, as well as scouting community photographers for submissions. As emails are sent out and content is sent in, designers Aria Hurtado ’21, Kelly Sandoval ‘21, and Pici Dennon ‘21 are working on a design brief. As a whole team, the group works together through consensus on deciding title of the book, a social media call for submissions as well as ideas for imagery, themes, and the color palette. The book will highlight visual art and photography submitted by the class of 2020 to showcase their last year in college. It was a memorable year, even in light of the massive COVID-19 deaths and police brutality happening at this time. The book team is brainstorming ways to uplift graduates of color and their amazing contributions to the whole U of R campus. This yearbook will be no graduation ceremony on Bekins Lawn, but it will be a way for the Center to give back to the students who lost the experience they worked incredibly hard towards over the last four years. Students and staff working on the project aim to have the manuscript sent to local printer Citrograph by mid-August. Once printed, Johnston will mail the publication to the class of 2020 and house a copy of it in the Jimmie Room Bekins Library (and Coyotess Den archive) for current students to enjoy.


BREEZY:

As a young alum, Breezy saw herself as “the between place of formal professor and former student,” when it came to teaching her directed study. She built the content for the course as a condensed compilation of her studies at dB Berlin into a monthlong immersive experience. The group of us, Breezy and about eight other Johnston students, ended up in the Bekins basement Jam Room, huddled around one computer. Breezy described teaching music production with an emotional lense “I take a psychological approach to music production, which is super scientific and mathematic. I approach the technical things in a emotional way.”

From Bekins to Berlin By Kelly Sandoval ‘21

We learned about the evolution of recording and gained listening skills in order to hear the production and identify what about the production of a song made it into a “good” song. In true Johnston fashion the topics discussed in the class had no limit. “It was funny because I came there to teach music production, but we ended up having a lot of conversations about... just what was going on and the emotional stuff. I think when you work in music or in the creative fields at all, what’s going on in your emotional self is so important. I hopefully was able to give the students tools to express themselves through music with whatever sort of trauma they were going through.” Breezy took her teaching role to another level. Not only did she know when to joke around she also knew when to hold us to a high standard. She made time for one-on-one meetings with all the students and always encouraged us to find time in the Jam Room to work on not only music, but ourselves. Although a hectic time, the class was just what we needed. The presence of Breezy was what we needed.

Hanna Bratton ‘14 AKA hip hop artist Breezy made her comeback to Johnston Complex on different occasions over the past four years. Performing at 50th Renewal, the Race on Campus conferences, and Buff Fest, Breezy also she graced our presence for a “little” workshop after Renewal. Last May term, Breezy came back not just as an alum with a gig but as a facilitator for a month-long directed study in Sound Production. What started as just a one-time workshop soon bloomed into a collective seminar. Breezy began connecting with Johnston’s Sound Collective and sharing her postgrad experience in Berlin, Germany where she earned a diploma in Creative Music Production and Sound Design at dBs Berlin in 2016. When she started talking to current students interested in sound, Breezy remembers, “I felt like I had learned so much. Especially because I started dabbling in music production in Johnston when I started (there) in 2012. It kind of felt full circle to come back.” The fateful year of 2016 was also when Johnston students started the Race on Campus collective and launched their first conference. Although Breezy was not there she was closely connected to the students who founded it and was able to attend in ‘17 and ‘18. “Race on Campus started to change my relationship with the community because it became less of like this flower power—like earthy crunchy alternative thing—and more like, ‘Okay, we want to actually address what is going on in the world.’ There were things that I was feeling there as a student that I was not able to articulate. Then I saw Johnston kind of shift and become more open to talking about this sort of thing, which was almost like my minor, as far as my own studies go.”

Last September, Breezy moved back to Berlin. With the world’s civil unrest and continual spread of COVID-19, Breezy finds herself feeling lucky for her current location in Germany where she can deal with the spread of the virus diligently. Germany gave great financial support to freelance artists like Breezy, who had six gigs booked for the festival season, all to be cancelled. “When I think about what’s going on in the world, the status quo, and the big picture it sometimes feels really helpless. I feel really disempowered. But then the power to make music, the power to make sound that people literally have in their ears and the ability to speak directly to people I feel is such a gift and a privilege. And I think that I’m really looking forward to continuing to make music that exposes what’s really going on. You know for a queer, Black woman who was born and raised in the States—just giving this perspective like, I am here.” To listen to Breezy’s music, you can visit http://www.imfeelinbreezy.com/


BREEZY:

As a young alum, Breezy saw herself as “the between place of formal professor and former student,” when it came to teaching her directed study. She built the content for the course as a condensed compilation of her studies at dB Berlin into a monthlong immersive experience. The group of us, Breezy and about eight other Johnston students, ended up in the Bekins basement Jam Room, huddled around one computer. Breezy described teaching music production with an emotional lense “I take a psychological approach to music production, which is super scientific and mathematic. I approach the technical things in a emotional way.”

From Bekins to Berlin By Kelly Sandoval ‘21

We learned about the evolution of recording and gained listening skills in order to hear the production and identify what about the production of a song made it into a “good” song. In true Johnston fashion the topics discussed in the class had no limit. “It was funny because I came there to teach music production, but we ended up having a lot of conversations about... just what was going on and the emotional stuff. I think when you work in music or in the creative fields at all, what’s going on in your emotional self is so important. I hopefully was able to give the students tools to express themselves through music with whatever sort of trauma they were going through.” Breezy took her teaching role to another level. Not only did she know when to joke around she also knew when to hold us to a high standard. She made time for one-on-one meetings with all the students and always encouraged us to find time in the Jam Room to work on not only music, but ourselves. Although a hectic time, the class was just what we needed. The presence of Breezy was what we needed.

Hanna Bratton ‘14 AKA hip hop artist Breezy made her comeback to Johnston Complex on different occasions over the past four years. Performing at 50th Renewal, the Race on Campus conferences, and Buff Fest, Breezy also she graced our presence for a “little” workshop after Renewal. Last May term, Breezy came back not just as an alum with a gig but as a facilitator for a month-long directed study in Sound Production. What started as just a one-time workshop soon bloomed into a collective seminar. Breezy began connecting with Johnston’s Sound Collective and sharing her postgrad experience in Berlin, Germany where she earned a diploma in Creative Music Production and Sound Design at dBs Berlin in 2016. When she started talking to current students interested in sound, Breezy remembers, “I felt like I had learned so much. Especially because I started dabbling in music production in Johnston when I started (there) in 2012. It kind of felt full circle to come back.” The fateful year of 2016 was also when Johnston students started the Race on Campus collective and launched their first conference. Although Breezy was not there she was closely connected to the students who founded it and was able to attend in ‘17 and ‘18. “Race on Campus started to change my relationship with the community because it became less of like this flower power—like earthy crunchy alternative thing—and more like, ‘Okay, we want to actually address what is going on in the world.’ There were things that I was feeling there as a student that I was not able to articulate. Then I saw Johnston kind of shift and become more open to talking about this sort of thing, which was almost like my minor, as far as my own studies go.”

Last September, Breezy moved back to Berlin. With the world’s civil unrest and continual spread of COVID-19, Breezy finds herself feeling lucky for her current location in Germany where she can deal with the spread of the virus diligently. Germany gave great financial support to freelance artists like Breezy, who had six gigs booked for the festival season, all to be cancelled. “When I think about what’s going on in the world, the status quo, and the big picture it sometimes feels really helpless. I feel really disempowered. But then the power to make music, the power to make sound that people literally have in their ears and the ability to speak directly to people I feel is such a gift and a privilege. And I think that I’m really looking forward to continuing to make music that exposes what’s really going on. You know for a queer, Black woman who was born and raised in the States—just giving this perspective like, I am here.” To listen to Breezy’s music, you can visit http://www.imfeelinbreezy.com/


Ahoy! Change in the Johnston Director’s Ship By Benjamin Lachelt ‘20

In this contemporary era with many new and “novel” transitions (e.g. COVID-19), a much more exciting transition specific to the Center is now upon us. After five years of hard, thoughtful, and innovative work, Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities, Julie Towsend, will hand off the Directorship of the Center to Johnston’s Assistant Professor of Science and Media Studies, Tim Seiber, in July. This will be an exciting change for Julie, who will be able to return to teaching full-time without the burden of juggling the Directorship in tandem with her responsibilities as a professor. Tim is in an excellent position to succeed as Director and will arguably be the most trained Director in Johnston’s history, given both his presence during two stable Directorships (that of Johnston Professor Kelly Hankin’s and that of Julie’s), as well as he and Julie’s diligent preparation up to this point. Tim will nonetheless assume the position with a healthy dose of humility—as he says in regards to this anticipated transition,” My primary task is to not sink the place...not to pull a Titanic.” The Directorship as a role or job is nearly about as difficult to define as it is to perform. In other contexts, the position could be seen as the equivalent of a dean or provost of a small college, yet what makes it especially unique is the way in which it is an administrative role with faculty status. The Director teaches a minimum of three courses a year, and in this way, the Center has two-and-a-half full-time faculty members. The Center designed the position as such because faculty members, unlike administrators, cannot be hired or fired at the whim of the University’s dean, provost, or president. As Julie notes, “We have it this way because of where we want to sit institutionally in relation to the college.” The Director is in a strong position to advocate for the Center’s curricular autonomy and unique approach to admissions, management of students’ academic progress, alumni relations and fundraising. Since Johnston faculty never intended to become administrators in higher education for life, the Center’s three full-time faculty members take turns as Director every five years or so in order to share the burden. Despite the hybridity of the role, its administrative duties far outweigh its scholarly ones. Julie can attest that 8085% of her work as Director was allotted to administrative tasks. In her words, “A good portion of my day is spent fielding emails that could come from students (mostly Johnston students), faculty members all across the college, registrarial matters having to do with Johnston students, fundraising issues coming at us from development or advancement, admissions stuff… You basically have stuff flying at you from all different directions and you’re just trying to triage emails...” The Director is also responsible for being an ambassador to anyone arriving on campus, whether it be prospective students, recently hired administrators, or people from the University’s new Marin campus.

Note: The interview for this article was conducted before the COVID-19 pandemic. Like most institutions of higher education, Johnston is focused on how to interpret our educational philosophy in the context of physical distancing, online learning, and quarantine.

While much of the Director’s work has to do with the maintenance of the Center, the Director has the additional responsibility of being the Center’s foremost visionary. “And so, of course, all of this is happening and it is a full time job to just keep the flames from engulfing everyone,” says Tim. He continued, “And at the same time you’re trying to run an institution, a small one within a larger one, and take it someplace... you can’t just spin wheels all the time.” Julie has proven to be remarkable as said visionary. She worked to get us within “spitting


Ahoy! Change in the Johnston Director’s Ship By Benjamin Lachelt ‘20

In this contemporary era with many new and “novel” transitions (e.g. COVID-19), a much more exciting transition specific to the Center is now upon us. After five years of hard, thoughtful, and innovative work, Professor of Interdisciplinary Humanities, Julie Towsend, will hand off the Directorship of the Center to Johnston’s Assistant Professor of Science and Media Studies, Tim Seiber, in July. This will be an exciting change for Julie, who will be able to return to teaching full-time without the burden of juggling the Directorship in tandem with her responsibilities as a professor. Tim is in an excellent position to succeed as Director and will arguably be the most trained Director in Johnston’s history, given both his presence during two stable Directorships (that of Johnston Professor Kelly Hankin’s and that of Julie’s), as well as he and Julie’s diligent preparation up to this point. Tim will nonetheless assume the position with a healthy dose of humility—as he says in regards to this anticipated transition,” My primary task is to not sink the place...not to pull a Titanic.” The Directorship as a role or job is nearly about as difficult to define as it is to perform. In other contexts, the position could be seen as the equivalent of a dean or provost of a small college, yet what makes it especially unique is the way in which it is an administrative role with faculty status. The Director teaches a minimum of three courses a year, and in this way, the Center has two-and-a-half full-time faculty members. The Center designed the position as such because faculty members, unlike administrators, cannot be hired or fired at the whim of the University’s dean, provost, or president. As Julie notes, “We have it this way because of where we want to sit institutionally in relation to the college.” The Director is in a strong position to advocate for the Center’s curricular autonomy and unique approach to admissions, management of students’ academic progress, alumni relations and fundraising. Since Johnston faculty never intended to become administrators in higher education for life, the Center’s three full-time faculty members take turns as Director every five years or so in order to share the burden. Despite the hybridity of the role, its administrative duties far outweigh its scholarly ones. Julie can attest that 8085% of her work as Director was allotted to administrative tasks. In her words, “A good portion of my day is spent fielding emails that could come from students (mostly Johnston students), faculty members all across the college, registrarial matters having to do with Johnston students, fundraising issues coming at us from development or advancement, admissions stuff… You basically have stuff flying at you from all different directions and you’re just trying to triage emails...” The Director is also responsible for being an ambassador to anyone arriving on campus, whether it be prospective students, recently hired administrators, or people from the University’s new Marin campus.

Note: The interview for this article was conducted before the COVID-19 pandemic. Like most institutions of higher education, Johnston is focused on how to interpret our educational philosophy in the context of physical distancing, online learning, and quarantine.

While much of the Director’s work has to do with the maintenance of the Center, the Director has the additional responsibility of being the Center’s foremost visionary. “And so, of course, all of this is happening and it is a full time job to just keep the flames from engulfing everyone,” says Tim. He continued, “And at the same time you’re trying to run an institution, a small one within a larger one, and take it someplace... you can’t just spin wheels all the time.” Julie has proven to be remarkable as said visionary. She worked to get us within “spitting


distance” from getting all of Johnston’s registrarial forms online; leveraged funds to get both Bekins Basement and Holt Lobby revamped through funds from the Johnston Community Endowment and the Ahmanson Foundation; worked with admissions to and new sources of financial aid funding such as the Cal Grant to recruit a much more economically diverse set of students including a significant number of commuter students; figured out ways to accommodate commuter students; developed self-designed summer internships to ensure housing for food and housing insecure students. Julie also has and continues to work for more ADA accessibility on Johnston Complex; raise money for Johnston adjunct professors and an additional Johnston professor (perhaps, one day); negotiate more Johnston autonomy.

If the notion of our very own hip professor with edgy academic interests by day and club-invigorating DJ skills by night becoming Director isn’t exciting enough, students, staff, and faculty alike might be pleased to know that Tim’s Directorship will come with some additional exciting changes. For one, the Johnston Director’s office will move to the South side of Bekins (where Tim’s office is now), which will mean that Tim and Johnston Department Coordinator Kerry Robles will be able to add more steps to their pedometers by that much more. Johnstonians should also note that the Center will soon have a new living-learning handbook compiled by Assistant Director M. G. Maloney. This handbook will demonstrate, in the words of Julie, “We have sanction from the university attorney that as long as we are addressing issues of safety, liability, and student well-being... we do not have to conform to the Student Affairs policies around student behavior except in very serious cases.” This entails more autonomy for the Center. Julie and Tim would both like to note that they would not be able to do what they do without the support of Johnston alumni and founders. Many thanks to all that support and have supported both the Center’s existing processes and its ability to innovate.

Tim will inherit many of these projects and sees that his job will be to adhere to and, when possible, achieve the vision that Julie laid out. “The vision is to complete the thing,” he says. The road ahead will not be easy for Tim or the Center, as they will not be immune to pressures from both within and outside that have posed significant difficulties for Julie and the Center up to this point. Pressures external to the Center include general threats to alternative models of higher education in the wake of Marlboro College’s collapse and Hampshire College’s complete restructuring; the push for more quantitative data rather than qualitative data in order to determine whether a student deserves to have financial aid or remain in college; contexts of debilitating student debt in this country; the need to accelerate equity and support to the increasingly diverse populations of students attending liberal arts colleges. Internal pressures include the ever-increasing difficulty of maintaining a consensus-based community within the “current technosocial environment,” as Tim calls it, “where talking to each other isn’t really what you’re after. It is like the best, most bombastic blurb on a YouTube video or twitter feed has made its way into how students live.” This, in addition to today’s increasing political polarization and the chronic difficulty of figuring out how one becomes part of the Left which young adults have probably experienced since the dawn of Johnston, have given the ability to have real conversations in Johnston an undesirable fragility. Tim and the Center will have to figure out how, as Julie puts it, to “have an in-person, face-to-face consensusbased community when the blueprint for social interaction is social media for our current students.” Adversity noted, we have untiring faith in Tim and the Center. Johnston is, after all, quite experienced in the department of overcoming adversity—if it did so before it can do it again.

“Sal-utations!” Greetings from Tim Seiber’s dog Sal


distance” from getting all of Johnston’s registrarial forms online; leveraged funds to get both Bekins Basement and Holt Lobby revamped through funds from the Johnston Community Endowment and the Ahmanson Foundation; worked with admissions to and new sources of financial aid funding such as the Cal Grant to recruit a much more economically diverse set of students including a significant number of commuter students; figured out ways to accommodate commuter students; developed self-designed summer internships to ensure housing for food and housing insecure students. Julie also has and continues to work for more ADA accessibility on Johnston Complex; raise money for Johnston adjunct professors and an additional Johnston professor (perhaps, one day); negotiate more Johnston autonomy.

If the notion of our very own hip professor with edgy academic interests by day and club-invigorating DJ skills by night becoming Director isn’t exciting enough, students, staff, and faculty alike might be pleased to know that Tim’s Directorship will come with some additional exciting changes. For one, the Johnston Director’s office will move to the South side of Bekins (where Tim’s office is now), which will mean that Tim and Johnston Department Coordinator Kerry Robles will be able to add more steps to their pedometers by that much more. Johnstonians should also note that the Center will soon have a new living-learning handbook compiled by Assistant Director M. G. Maloney. This handbook will demonstrate, in the words of Julie, “We have sanction from the university attorney that as long as we are addressing issues of safety, liability, and student well-being... we do not have to conform to the Student Affairs policies around student behavior except in very serious cases.” This entails more autonomy for the Center. Julie and Tim would both like to note that they would not be able to do what they do without the support of Johnston alumni and founders. Many thanks to all that support and have supported both the Center’s existing processes and its ability to innovate.

Tim will inherit many of these projects and sees that his job will be to adhere to and, when possible, achieve the vision that Julie laid out. “The vision is to complete the thing,” he says. The road ahead will not be easy for Tim or the Center, as they will not be immune to pressures from both within and outside that have posed significant difficulties for Julie and the Center up to this point. Pressures external to the Center include general threats to alternative models of higher education in the wake of Marlboro College’s collapse and Hampshire College’s complete restructuring; the push for more quantitative data rather than qualitative data in order to determine whether a student deserves to have financial aid or remain in college; contexts of debilitating student debt in this country; the need to accelerate equity and support to the increasingly diverse populations of students attending liberal arts colleges. Internal pressures include the ever-increasing difficulty of maintaining a consensus-based community within the “current technosocial environment,” as Tim calls it, “where talking to each other isn’t really what you’re after. It is like the best, most bombastic blurb on a YouTube video or twitter feed has made its way into how students live.” This, in addition to today’s increasing political polarization and the chronic difficulty of figuring out how one becomes part of the Left which young adults have probably experienced since the dawn of Johnston, have given the ability to have real conversations in Johnston an undesirable fragility. Tim and the Center will have to figure out how, as Julie puts it, to “have an in-person, face-to-face consensusbased community when the blueprint for social interaction is social media for our current students.” Adversity noted, we have untiring faith in Tim and the Center. Johnston is, after all, quite experienced in the department of overcoming adversity—if it did so before it can do it again.

“Sal-utations!” Greetings from Tim Seiber’s dog Sal


MARCH 4

TH

Photos by Aria Hurtado ‘21

Johnston Sophomore Ella Staats (pictured below, right) started a Pro-LGBTQ+ rights counter-demonstration in response to an anti-LGBTQ+ demonstrator on the street corner behind Holt Hall.


MARCH 4

TH

Photos by Aria Hurtado ‘21

Johnston Sophomore Ella Staats (pictured below, right) started a Pro-LGBTQ+ rights counter-demonstration in response to an anti-LGBTQ+ demonstrator on the street corner behind Holt Hall.


Kathryn Green Lecture Series

Erik Saltzman ‘15 By Pici Dennon ‘21

Starting the decade off with a Katheryn Green lecture entitled the freelance game: Discipline, skills, Money, Erik Saltzman visited the Johnston Community to talk about his journey of freelancing after college. Erik is a NYC based freelance video editor, director, and director of photography, who has collaborated with artists like Boy Harsher and Travis Scott. He shot a number of commercials for athletic apparel giant, Adidas, such as this one featuring a poem by Gil Scott-Heron. While a student, Erik created Redlands Media House with his friends, a collective that facilitated the productions and screenings of student films along with live music shows and the occasional skateboarding trick or two. But after graduating in 2015, with an emphasis in “Media and Culture,” Saltzman recalled a challenging time, with a lot of personal hardships. This experience shaped the core of what Saltzman came back to share with the Johnston Community— perseverance and discipline through hard times. Erik described his professional experiences immediately after college as “starting before you are ready.” By identifying a concrete goal and working towards it relentlessly, Saltzman got through a mental health depression. Erik noted three key essentials to moving forward when you’re stuck: (1) discipline (2) skills (3) money. Erik pointed out discipline, skills, and money are intertwined with each other but all are equally important. Saltzman also spoke of comfort as the enemy towards moving forward, as it is a force that prevents you from focusing on your next goal. Elaborating on each point, Saltzman described the cycle of his freelancing; discipline is used to create skills; those skills are then used to make money. Not only that, but Erik tied the cycle back to one’s self-worth. For example, acquiring a skill to “fall back on” during hard times is both good for one’s self esteem, and one’s “flow” of potential money.

Erik divided skills into two types: “hard skills” which have to do with technical details and “soft skills” which involve less physical craft like directing. When asked about the importance of hard skills versus soft skills towards the end of his talk, Saltzman explained how every day you learn more, and how both of his main professional skills (re: editing and directing) are important. He compares his philosophy to the Johnston independent study, stating that “Independent studies are all life is.” When asked how to maintain discipline during the Q & A, Saltzman explained, “(It is) all about cutting down what you’re doing. You have to really figure out what you want to do, and trust the process that follows.” Erik believes distilling large goals into one or two ideas will help develop the focus necessary to work towards it successfully. He also addressed media industry questions and shared some of the sacrifices people have to make to follow their passions. Erik left with some advice for the Johnston Community after observing a recent community meeting; “Don’t tear each other apart. Don’t make anyone in this room the enemy... Work on bigger things.” Leaving on a reminder of the danger of comfort, Erik implored students to not worry about their own comfort and, “do it for the community.” A unifying message for students to consider.


Kathryn Green Lecture Series

Erik Saltzman ‘15 By Pici Dennon ‘21

Starting the decade off with a Katheryn Green lecture entitled the freelance game: Discipline, skills, Money, Erik Saltzman visited the Johnston Community to talk about his journey of freelancing after college. Erik is a NYC based freelance video editor, director, and director of photography, who has collaborated with artists like Boy Harsher and Travis Scott. He shot a number of commercials for athletic apparel giant, Adidas, such as this one featuring a poem by Gil Scott-Heron. While a student, Erik created Redlands Media House with his friends, a collective that facilitated the productions and screenings of student films along with live music shows and the occasional skateboarding trick or two. But after graduating in 2015, with an emphasis in “Media and Culture,” Saltzman recalled a challenging time, with a lot of personal hardships. This experience shaped the core of what Saltzman came back to share with the Johnston Community— perseverance and discipline through hard times. Erik described his professional experiences immediately after college as “starting before you are ready.” By identifying a concrete goal and working towards it relentlessly, Saltzman got through a mental health depression. Erik noted three key essentials to moving forward when you’re stuck: (1) discipline (2) skills (3) money. Erik pointed out discipline, skills, and money are intertwined with each other but all are equally important. Saltzman also spoke of comfort as the enemy towards moving forward, as it is a force that prevents you from focusing on your next goal. Elaborating on each point, Saltzman described the cycle of his freelancing; discipline is used to create skills; those skills are then used to make money. Not only that, but Erik tied the cycle back to one’s self-worth. For example, acquiring a skill to “fall back on” during hard times is both good for one’s self esteem, and one’s “flow” of potential money.

Erik divided skills into two types: “hard skills” which have to do with technical details and “soft skills” which involve less physical craft like directing. When asked about the importance of hard skills versus soft skills towards the end of his talk, Saltzman explained how every day you learn more, and how both of his main professional skills (re: editing and directing) are important. He compares his philosophy to the Johnston independent study, stating that “Independent studies are all life is.” When asked how to maintain discipline during the Q & A, Saltzman explained, “(It is) all about cutting down what you’re doing. You have to really figure out what you want to do, and trust the process that follows.” Erik believes distilling large goals into one or two ideas will help develop the focus necessary to work towards it successfully. He also addressed media industry questions and shared some of the sacrifices people have to make to follow their passions. Erik left with some advice for the Johnston Community after observing a recent community meeting; “Don’t tear each other apart. Don’t make anyone in this room the enemy... Work on bigger things.” Leaving on a reminder of the danger of comfort, Erik implored students to not worry about their own comfort and, “do it for the community.” A unifying message for students to consider.


JNST Radio Buzz By Benjamin Lachelt ’20

JNST Radio seeks to plan more events with live music and visua l art in the future. In the works is a possible collaboration between the Associated Students of the University of Redlands (ASUR) and KDAWG Radio that envisions a carnival-esque festival on the quad replete with two stages for local bands, a headlining artist, a Ferris wheel, and food trucks.

Borne out of both frustration with the greater university’s bureaucratic hegemony on art and media production on campus, Johnston Radio emerged in 2017 as a collective of Johnstonians that worked to support, create, and disseminate student art in community, particularly that of more eclectic and experimental varieties. The founding of the collective was somewhat swarm like, in that, from what alumnus Trevor Warren (‘19) describes of its infancy; “Lots of people were interested. I think the first meeting was like fifty plus people, which in Johnston is kind of insane for a collective.” Of the collective’s initial intentions, Warren reflects, “It became another experiment to share, experience, and view art; hopefully with it having more longevity than past attempts.” Though the founding of Johnston Radio was not a deliberate attempt to resuscitate the late Redlands Media House (also developed by Johnstonians) the former generally does seem to carry on the latter’s tradition of supporting student art and curating events.

The collective has also set its sights upon affording Johnston community members opportunities to attend “underground” music venues in Los Angeles. The hope is that this would both better inform the collective’s event planning and help the collective scout interesting bands to bring to Johnston in the future.

About three years into its existence, JNST Radio remains strong in its membership and energy. The collective has become a sort of arts and media octopus, if you will, with its hands in most of the somewhat disaggregated aspects of Johnston’s creative sphere. In addition to developing a website that showcases student podcasts, music, music videos, visual art, and clothing, the collective has also organized several events with live performances. Previous events thrown by the collective include “JNST Fest,” which featured nine bands (three of which were composed of Johnston students) with student artists tabling on Bekins Lawn, and a wonderfully decorated Valentine’s Day “Stupid Cupid Sucker Party.”


JNST Radio Buzz By Benjamin Lachelt ’20

JNST Radio seeks to plan more events with live music and visua l art in the future. In the works is a possible collaboration between the Associated Students of the University of Redlands (ASUR) and KDAWG Radio that envisions a carnival-esque festival on the quad replete with two stages for local bands, a headlining artist, a Ferris wheel, and food trucks.

Borne out of both frustration with the greater university’s bureaucratic hegemony on art and media production on campus, Johnston Radio emerged in 2017 as a collective of Johnstonians that worked to support, create, and disseminate student art in community, particularly that of more eclectic and experimental varieties. The founding of the collective was somewhat swarm like, in that, from what alumnus Trevor Warren (‘19) describes of its infancy; “Lots of people were interested. I think the first meeting was like fifty plus people, which in Johnston is kind of insane for a collective.” Of the collective’s initial intentions, Warren reflects, “It became another experiment to share, experience, and view art; hopefully with it having more longevity than past attempts.” Though the founding of Johnston Radio was not a deliberate attempt to resuscitate the late Redlands Media House (also developed by Johnstonians) the former generally does seem to carry on the latter’s tradition of supporting student art and curating events.

The collective has also set its sights upon affording Johnston community members opportunities to attend “underground” music venues in Los Angeles. The hope is that this would both better inform the collective’s event planning and help the collective scout interesting bands to bring to Johnston in the future.

About three years into its existence, JNST Radio remains strong in its membership and energy. The collective has become a sort of arts and media octopus, if you will, with its hands in most of the somewhat disaggregated aspects of Johnston’s creative sphere. In addition to developing a website that showcases student podcasts, music, music videos, visual art, and clothing, the collective has also organized several events with live performances. Previous events thrown by the collective include “JNST Fest,” which featured nine bands (three of which were composed of Johnston students) with student artists tabling on Bekins Lawn, and a wonderfully decorated Valentine’s Day “Stupid Cupid Sucker Party.”


In Memoriam: Ralph Angel By Cody Gates ‘93, Art by Syd Kilroy ‘21

I learned today that poet Ralph Angel died on Friday in Los Angeles. It’s all a bit overwhelming. Memories keep coming back to me in flashes, moments I hadn’t thought about for many years: the night Lynda Hull died while Ralph was hosting a reading by a visiting poet… Jeff Wilson and I seeing the light on in his office late at night and sneaking up there where he promptly told us “You can hang out, but the beer stays in the hallway”… for some reason having a copy of the script for the third Chinatown film by Robert Towne in his desk drawer… There’s so much I want to say and all of it seems rather a poor tribute. He was a mentor and professor and friend. He could be irascible and funny and heartbreaking all at the same time.

A student on another first day of class asked what it would take to get an A in the class. Ralph said “You have an A. Get the fuck out.” Jeff Lytle was Ralph’s student assistant, while I was the English department assistant. Besides filing and photocopying, our duties included running to the bookstore to buy Benson & Hedges Ultra Light 100s from Maureen Forys. Maureen claims that this is where we first met.

He chastised me plenty of times to not be satisfied with the easy or the clever, and then I found out later he went and said nice things about me behind my back. The first day of one poetry workshop—taking place as it often did in the reading room in the Hall of Letters—was a typical late afternoon class favored by the creative writing faculty (and creative writing students). It was clear and cool and the mountains seemed to be right at the edge of campus. Ralph took roll, passed out a syllabus and some poems, then proceeded to talk for the next hour and a half about poetry, about art, about movies. At one point, in describing how this class would operate, he said “You can fuck with me but you cannot fuck with the work.” The sun slid down and the room settled in to darkness and no one got up or turned the light on. Ralph kept talking. Finally, he said “I’ll see you all Thursday” and everyone got up in the darkness and quietly left. He wasn’t above a little drama from time to time.

It’s difficult for me to express my gratitude for everything that Ralph offered to me. There are so many great people I had the privilege of working with at Johnston/University of Redlands—Joy Manesiotis, Rob Stuart, Daniel Kiefer, Nancy Carrick, Bill McDonald and so many others—and they all hold a special place in my memory and my education and my heart. I saw him a couple of times over the years when he would deign to visit the Bay Area. He would be generous and attentive to students or people attending a reading, and then dish cattily like the Angeleño he had become. I’ll miss you saying at readings “What are we doing here when we could be watching Kiealowskis’s The Decalogue right now…” Goodbye, Ralph.


In Memoriam: Ralph Angel By Cody Gates ‘93, Art by Syd Kilroy ‘21

I learned today that poet Ralph Angel died on Friday in Los Angeles. It’s all a bit overwhelming. Memories keep coming back to me in flashes, moments I hadn’t thought about for many years: the night Lynda Hull died while Ralph was hosting a reading by a visiting poet… Jeff Wilson and I seeing the light on in his office late at night and sneaking up there where he promptly told us “You can hang out, but the beer stays in the hallway”… for some reason having a copy of the script for the third Chinatown film by Robert Towne in his desk drawer… There’s so much I want to say and all of it seems rather a poor tribute. He was a mentor and professor and friend. He could be irascible and funny and heartbreaking all at the same time.

A student on another first day of class asked what it would take to get an A in the class. Ralph said “You have an A. Get the fuck out.” Jeff Lytle was Ralph’s student assistant, while I was the English department assistant. Besides filing and photocopying, our duties included running to the bookstore to buy Benson & Hedges Ultra Light 100s from Maureen Forys. Maureen claims that this is where we first met.

He chastised me plenty of times to not be satisfied with the easy or the clever, and then I found out later he went and said nice things about me behind my back. The first day of one poetry workshop—taking place as it often did in the reading room in the Hall of Letters—was a typical late afternoon class favored by the creative writing faculty (and creative writing students). It was clear and cool and the mountains seemed to be right at the edge of campus. Ralph took roll, passed out a syllabus and some poems, then proceeded to talk for the next hour and a half about poetry, about art, about movies. At one point, in describing how this class would operate, he said “You can fuck with me but you cannot fuck with the work.” The sun slid down and the room settled in to darkness and no one got up or turned the light on. Ralph kept talking. Finally, he said “I’ll see you all Thursday” and everyone got up in the darkness and quietly left. He wasn’t above a little drama from time to time.

It’s difficult for me to express my gratitude for everything that Ralph offered to me. There are so many great people I had the privilege of working with at Johnston/University of Redlands—Joy Manesiotis, Rob Stuart, Daniel Kiefer, Nancy Carrick, Bill McDonald and so many others—and they all hold a special place in my memory and my education and my heart. I saw him a couple of times over the years when he would deign to visit the Bay Area. He would be generous and attentive to students or people attending a reading, and then dish cattily like the Angeleño he had become. I’ll miss you saying at readings “What are we doing here when we could be watching Kiealowskis’s The Decalogue right now…” Goodbye, Ralph.


Are you seeing things? Nope; that’s the

Johnston College logo on a contemporary sweatshirt, alright! Available for purchase with free shipping through the U of R’s bookstore:

http://bit.ly/32QP3qH The Coz McNooz is a bi-annual newsletter for Johnston’s alumni and friends.

Publishers: Tim Seiber Julie Townsend

Editor:

M. G. Maloney

Designers: Pici Dennon Aria Hurtado Kelly Sandoval

Photographers: Hanna Bratton Mary Cahill Aria Hurtado M. G. Maloney Blair Newman Caillie Roach

Artists:

Mikyle Gray & Ilana Ludovico Aria Hurtado Syd Kilroy

Coz McNooz Assistant: Benjamin Lachelt

Instagram:

@JohnstonCenter

Facebook:

Johnston Center For Integrative Sudies