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FALL 2018 • VOLUME 18, NO. 1

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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

FROM OUR PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Dr. Nick and Mrs. Linda Bruno at the ULM President’s home, Bon Aire.

Dear Alumni and Friends of ULM, Tuesday, September 18, was an historic day at the University of Louisiana Monroe. It will be remembered as the day that changed not only the university, but all of north Louisiana. At 11 a.m. a groundbreaking ceremony signaled the start of construction on the anticipated Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM). The 100,000 square foot anticipated medical school building will be between the Laird Weems Center and Bon Aire. Special guests were Gov. John Bel Edwards, officials from VCOM and members of our legislative delegation. Having the anticipated medical school on the ULM campus will result in staggering opportunities in north Louisiana. The economic impact alone is estimated at $40 million the first year, 2020, when the first class of Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) students starts in the fall.

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Our region, which suffers from too few physicians and too many people in poor health, will have medical students and future residents and interns assigned to rural hospitals and clinics where they are needed most. Many will stay and open their own practices. If you drive into campus on Warhawk Way or Bon Aire Drive, you’ll see a stately two-story building at 4400 Bon Aire. This

PRESIDENT

is the new home of the ULM Foundation and Alumni Association, the Laird Weems Center. It is the featured story in this issue of the ULM Alumni Magazine. The $1.5 million facility was financed through private contributions and named for two individuals who pioneered our alumni and development efforts. I am pleased to report that for the third year, U.S. News & World Report has named ULM a Best National University. This standing continues to be significant and one we are especially proud to maintain. This year there was a need to return Health Sciences and Pharmacy to their own colleges, thus the College of Health Sciences was re-established and the College of Pharmacy remains. The growth in both colleges, with students demanding more programs, requires focused management for each one. ULM has received several critical accreditations in the past year, plus the development of new programs. Accreditations were given to the Master of Science in Nursing, School of Education by CAEP, and continued, unqualified accreditation of the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD). The long-awaited Doctor of Physical Therapy program, was approved and will begin accepting students in 2020. The search is underway for a director.

This has been a time of increases, such as in research with patents in cancer treatments to better predicting tornadoes through our fully functioning Doppler radar system. I am pleased to report the SOAR campaign increased to an impressive 90 percent of its goal. There was quite an increase at Spring Commencement with 923 diplomas awarded, the largest in the history of the university. This is the result of academically prepared students because of the unwavering commitment of our faculty and staff and reflects increases in graduation rates. In the pages of this magazine are stories of some of the bigger accomplishments at the University of Louisiana Monroe. There are many stories left out because of space, and many yet to be told. I believe that’s one of the most exciting things about the future of ULM – so much of our story will be told in years to come. The university is poised for tremendous advancement for our students, alumni, faculty and staff, and for the world around us. Thank you and please support the university as we look to the future.

TAKE FLIGHT! Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D. ULM President


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CONTENTS

LAIRD WEEMS CENTER ULM FOUNDATION, ALUMNI ASSOCIATION IN NEW HOME ON THE BAYOU

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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT: MARK WILLIAMS

30 GROUNDBREAKING ULM ANTICIPATES VCOM MEDICAL SCHOOL

14 DR. SHAH AWARDED PATENT FOR CANCERFIGHTING DISCOVERIES

36 ALTON CLAY’S INSPIRING JOURNEY TO ALL-AMERICAN — AND BEYOND

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CHARLIE AND KAY MCDONALD LEAVE LASTING LEGACY FOR ULM

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CONTENTS

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MAGAZINE FALL 2018 • VOLUME 18, NO. 1

EDITORIAL TEAM

PRESIDENT Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D. CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER Lisa F. Miller (MS ’94) EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS & STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS Julia B. Letlow, Ph.D. (BA ’02, MA ’05) DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS Hope Young, Editor CREATIVE DIRECTOR Srdjan Marjanovic (BFA ’12) GRAPHIC DESIGN COORDINATOR Shanette L. Washington (BFA ’02) DIGITAL MEDIA EDITOR Emerald McIntyre (BFA ’13) SOCIAL MEDIA SPECIALIST & WATER SKI COACH Joey McNamara EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ULM FOUNDATION & ALUMNI RELATIONS Susan Chappell (BBA ’82, MBA ’87) PRESIDENT, ULM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION W. Adams Rodgers IV (BBA ‘98) DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS Melissa Kiper (MBA ’07) ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS Jenny Pankey (BS ’97) CONTRIBUTORS Paul Letlow Brent Tippen Andy Hagedon David Brown The ULM Magazine is published for members of the ULM Alumni Association and friends of the University of Louisiana Monroe and friends of the ULM Alumni Association. Send letters & comments to: The ULM Magazine Office of Marketing & Communications 700 University Ave. Monroe, LA 71209-2500

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Email: ulmmagazine@ulm.edu Any letters or comments may be published and edited for length and style. Contents © 2018 by the University of Louisiana Monroe and the ULM Alumni Association. All rights reserved. The University of Louisiana Monroe is a member of the University of Louisiana System.

ULM ONLINE ACCOLADES ULM Online has garnered impressive rankings, especially as new programs have been added. Here are some of the rankings this year: • #1 Most Affordable Online Radiology Technology (out of 10, College Choice) • #1 Most Affordable Online Master’s in Gerontology (out of 10, College Choice) • #1 Most Affordable Master’s in Forensic Psychology (out of 5, College Choice) • #2 Most Affordable Online Master’s in Education Counseling (out of 30, College Choice) • #2 Most Affordable Online Master’s in Secondary Education (out of 15, Top Master’s in Education) • #3 Most Affordable Online Master’s of Arts in Teaching (out of 13, Top Master’s in Education) • #4 Best Online Colleges in Louisiana for 2018 (out of 10 OnlineColleges.com) • # 4 nationwide Best Online Master’s of Business Administration (out of 50, Best College Reviews) • #4 Best Online Master's of Business Administration in Louisiana (Best College Reviews) • #7 Nation’s 10 Most Affordable Master’s in Gerontology Online 2018 (GradSchoolHub.com) • #8 Best Online Bachelor’s of Science Degree Completion in Dental Hygiene (out of 10, SR Education Group) • #8 Best Online Master’s in Forensic Psychology (out of 10, College Choice) • #10 Best Online Radiology Technology (out of 19, College Choice) • #12 Best Online Master’s in Secondary Education (out of 15, Top Master’s in Education) • #12 Best Online Master’s of Arts in Teaching (Out of 50, Best Education Degrees) • #14 nationwide Best Master’s in Gerontology (College Choice) • #21 Best Online Master’s in Educational Counseling (out of 30, College Choice) • #48 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology (out of 50, TheBestSchools.org) • #58 Best Online Colleges for 2018-19 (out of 100, The Best Schools) • #100 Online MBA Program (out of 199, U.S. News & World Report)


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DIRECTOR I

Melissa Kiper Director of Alumni Affairs (318) 342-5244 mkiper@ulm.edu

We are thrilled to be in the new Laird Weems Center that honors the contributions and achievements of Billy Laird and the late Don Weems to our university. Billy Laird, who served as executive director of the ULM Foundation for over 30 years, and Don Weems, alumni director for almost as many years, established the vision to engage and serve alumni, friends and benefactors of ULM. Our team plans to continue this vision and grow our membership. We encourage everyone to be an active member of the Alumni Association and support the Foundation. Our Alumni Association members play an important role in helping shape the future of our university and create a supportive community around our students. Our family atmosphere serves and develops our students and, in turn,

produces graduates who are competent, mature, and poised for success. We work closely with other departments on campus and organize a wide range of events — some social, such as our VIP Alumni tailgates; some knowledge sharing, such as our Alumni Chapter events; and some celebratory, such as Alumni Spotlights and the Alumni Awards Brunch. We strive to engage in programs and activities that strengthen alumni ties to the university and encourage lifelong support of the University of Louisiana Monroe. We are also committed to supporting alumni in their careers. We work closely with ULM’s Career Connections and offer support with career fairs, job openings, and mentoring programs.

FROM THE DIRECTOR

t is with great pleasure that I serve as your Director of the University of Louisiana Monroe Alumni Association. As a graduate of ULM, I am thankful to be back home again and able to give back to the university that gave me so much. Jenny Pankey, the Associate Director, and I are both passionate about ULM and are eager to meet fellow alumni at our upcoming events. If you haven’t been on campus in a while, take time to visit and see the progress along the bayou.

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FROM THE ALUMNI

Alumni are one of our university’s greatest assets. The alumni connection begins with interest and a responsibility to give back, it continues with worthwhile relationships with one another and with students, and it ends with a benefit for all involved. We encourage you to get involved this year. Great things are happing at the University of Louisiana Monroe where “The Best is on the Bayou.”

TAKE FLIGHT!

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MELISSA KIPER Director of Alumni Affairs


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BY HOPE YOUNG

LAIRD WEEMS CENTER

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

photo by Emerald McIntyre

ULM FOUNDATION, ALUMNI ASSOCIATION IN NEW HOME ON THE BAYOU

LAIRD WEEMS CENTER

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ith a nostalgic nod to the past and an eye toward the future, the new Laird Weems Center is an impressive sight on the banks of Bayou DeSiard. The center is the new home of the ULM Foundation and Alumni Association. It is located at 4400 Bon Aire.

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The building is named to honor the contributions and achievements of Billy Laird and the late Don Weems to the university.


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Laird, who served as executive director of the ULM Foundation for more than 30 years and Weems, alumni director for almost as many years, established the vision to engage and serve alumni, friends and benefactors of the university. The services they started decades ago continue today to enrich the lives of many associated with ULM. Architectural firm Catalyst Design, L.L.C., designed the building in the Progressive Classic style. The approximately 9,500 square-feet structure with 6,748 square-feet heated was built by Blue Heron Homes by James Reneau, who is a 2004 graduate of ULM in Construction Management. Daily construction oversight was provided by longstanding benefactor George Schaeffer. Inside are offices for 13 Foundation and Alumni staff members, plus meeting rooms, a kitchen and foyer. Nonie McKie Interiors decorated the facility. McKie, a member of the ULM Class of 1974, said the Laird Weems Center is “ … a timeless classic design with contemporary details.” At a cost of $1.5 million, the Laird Weems Center is an excellent example of money well spent by providing a new facility for the Foundation and Alumni Association while adding a unique building to campus. Financing for the new facility was through private donations and naming opportunities.

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The Donor Recognition Program provides for naming opportunities in the Laird Weems Center. Contact the ULM Foundation Office for more information at 318-342-3636, email foundation@ulm. edu or make a donation at https://www. ulm.edu/foundation/.


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photo by Emerald McIntyre

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COVER STORY

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BY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

The late Dr. Paul Dunn taught Melissa entrepreneurship and served as a mentor, demonstrating focus during the pursuit of her MBA. Director of the Louisiana Small Business Development Center, Dunn was personable and helpful. Melissa learned the importance of small business development and the impact those businesses have on our community. She particularly remembers a project working with an up and coming financial adviser who is still in business today. Her experiences with Dunn and the LSBDC opened her eyes to ULM’s resources for small business.

“With the Alumni Center’s charge of promoting member engagement and building relationships between the school and the community, the two are wellsuited for the task.” – MELISSA KIPER AND JENNY PANKEY

Having worked at ULM before, both women know the landscape of the campus, Melissa served as an academic adviser in The Student Success Center; Jenny as an admissions counselor and recruiter. Building and maintaining membership and momentum is at the heart of their professional backgrounds. With the Alumni Center’s charge of promoting member engagement and building relationships between the school and the community, the two are well-suited for the task. The ULM Alumni Foundation and Alumni Affairs staff is housed in the new Laird Weems Center. The name honors the “contributions and achievements of Billy Laird, executive director of the Foundation for more than 30 years, and the late Don Weems, alumni director for almost as many years.” The Center's staff welcomes alumni and community members to visit ULM’s campus and participate in school wide events. Melissa and Jenny call themselves the “dream team” They’re both passionate about ULM, and working to promote its vision is a bonus. They’re eager to show how they’ve grown since their days spent walking the campus as students and give back to the place that gave them so much. Melissa insists, “We have so much in our own backyard,” and Jenny wants to make sure the community knows what all is going on at ULM. Their camaraderie makes for an intriguing dynamic, one sure to enhance the Alumni Foundation’s place and relevance in the community. Returning to their roots brings their experiences full circle, and Melissa and Jenny are honored to serve ULM and, ultimately, come back home again.

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Jenny’s mentors were Kay Prince, a professor of English who coordinated the president’s social events, and Frances Self, who showed Jenny how to dress, answer phones and carry herself as a professional, acting as Jenny’s “mom away from home.”

Working together is nothing new to Melissa and Jenny, both past presidents of The Junior League of Monroe. They served on each other’s boards in The League and demonstrated strong leadership qualities. Familiar with each other’s styles and experience, the two are excited to bring their partnership to the ULM Alumni Association. As presidents, they perfected the art of public speaking, built community connections, learned how to handle a team and run a nonprofit organization.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Jenny Pankey is a proud product of ULM. A graduate in communication, much of her experience came when she was a student worker in President Lawson Swearingen’s administration. Jenny got to see ULM from the inside out - greeting politicians, helping with the 31 Ambassadors and quickly was immersed into professional situations, an experience that serves her well in her new role as Associate Alumni Director. Jenny comes from a family of communicators, so her major was a natural choice. She likes to talk, a skill she credits to her grandparents, who were animated speakers, and her aunt, a local news anchor. She speaks of her time at ULM with the enthusiasm of a lifetime Warhawk and is positively giddy to be back in her element.

As a graduate assistant, Jenny worked in the history department under the tutelage of Dr. Terry Jones and the late Dr. H.P. Jones.

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“Coming home again,” is how Melissa Kiper describes taking on the role of Alumni Director at the University of Louisiana Monroe. Melissa graduated with a Master’s in Business from ULM in 2007 and her +30 in 2013. Melissa calls herself a “hometown girl” and is thankful to have found a position that combines her passions: business, academics and community involvement. She is a graduate of West Monroe High School and has a Bachelor’s in Marketing. She always knew she wanted to work in business in some capacity, but still pursue her love of education and philanthropy. Her parents, Glynn Kiper and Nancy Dever, are also products of ULM. Her dad graduated in political science and her mother in math education. ULM is home and she is eager to invest her efforts into further cementing ULM’s connection to the area.


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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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BY BRENT TIPPEN

Intermountain Management, by one of his ULM business professors. Mark traveled across the United States opening different hotel properties, gaining valuable experience that would lead him to his own business venture in New Zealand, now in operations for more than 9 years.

Today he owns and operates Williams Hotels, a private hotel chain in his home country that employs more than 200 people. Mark who grew up in Greymouth, New Zealand, came to ULM on a scholarship to join the National Water Ski Championship team and earned his business degree in 2008. Recently, Williams returned to ULM for a nostalgic visit and shared some of his thoughts.

Studying at ULM taught him life lessons on both hospitality and kindness. Mark said “the people made the place” at ULM and taught him many lessons on being kind and to maintain a down-to-earth approach to business. Friends and secondary family at ULM helped Mark along his journey, and he credits many of them, alongside a strong work ethic, for his success today. The late Dr. Paul Dunn, a former professor in the ULM College of Business and Social Sciences, said something that stuck with Mark throughout his career, “Management is not getting people to get something done, it is simply getting things done.” That is very true today as Mark continues to wear many hats in his hotel business from management to housekeeping to even a pilot. He does whatever it takes for his guests and staff to have the best experience.

Looking back 10 years, Mark wishes he would have broadened his academic view of ULM, realizing the many world-class programs on campus, like the Aviation Management School. His main advice to current students at the university, “Take the time to broaden your academic scope while you’re still in school and explore all of the academic offerings at the university.” Operating a community-based business, Mark took lessons from ULM back to New Zealand and recently brought in another ULM graduate, Seth Hall, a close friend and colleague. Seth quickly rose through the ranks and now manages human resources and special projects for Williams Hotels. Mark recently visited ULM and was excited to see the continued reinvestment in the university facilities. “New buildings and development are the obvious upgrades, and the athletic facilities are top notch,” Mark explained. “But the values of the university are the same and it is exciting to go on campus and see many of my old professors here and still loving their jobs.” While on campus, Mark had the opportunity to interact with the current ski team, which is what originally brought him to ULM. The current captain of the ski team, Alex King, is from Mark’s home town in New Zealand and Mark credits himself with being one of Alex’s first coaches. “It is nice seeing such a great atmosphere within the team and its coaches, the new facilities are amazing and the community are as always very proud of the team’s achievements,” he said. We are proud to welcome one of our own back on campus at ULM and look forward to many more successes of Mark.

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Mark’s career interest started as a young child, where his family owned one hotel in New Zealand. As he explored his career options at ULM, it was those childhood memories that guided him to work in Louisiana with Intermountain Management. In Monroe, Mark was introduced to Dewey Weaver, CEO of

– MARK WILLIAMS

Mark obtained his pilot license and now flies helicopters and fixed-wing planes both for fun and for business. Mark uses aircraft to get around to different hotel properties in remote locations so that he can be at his businesses more frequently and help move key staff around to different properties.

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

It all began with one of his first and fondest memories at ULM, entering a public speaking class at the library overlooking the bayou with mostly American students. With a somewhat different accent than most students, Mark’s first assignment was to give a self-introductory speech to the class. His fellow classmates loved his accent so much that the class quickly turned into two days of Mark presenting an overview of New Zealand.

“New buildings and development are the obvious upgrades, and the athletic facilities are top notch, but the values of the university are the same and it is exciting to go on campus and see many of my old professors here and still loving their jobs.”

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When Mark Williams graduated from the University of Louisiana Monroe in 2008 with a degree in business management, he found his way back home to New Zealand.


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COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

BY HOPE YOUNG

DR. SHAH AWARDED PATENT FOR

CANCER-FIGHTING DISCOVERIES www.ulm.edu

DR. SHAH HOLDS THE MARY E. AND DARRELL L. CALHOUN ENDOWED CHAIR AND IS PROFESSOR OF PHARMACOLOGY IN THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY.

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COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

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– DR. GIRISH SHAH

S

hah discovered the mechanism by which malignant cells escape their organ of origin to spread into other organs, and based on this discovery he created compounds that affect the “dissemination of malignant cells … and inhibit cell invasion,” according to the patent. He developed methods focused on preventing metastasis (the spreading of cancer cells from the primary location to other parts of the body).

of generating such inhibitors and their therapeutic applications.” Cancers referred to in the patent include prostate carcinoma, bladder carcinoma, esophagus cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinomas of lung, ovarian adenocarcinoma, pancreatic carcinoma, and rectal carcinoma.

“Cancer becomes lethal only when it metastasizes to other organs. Our discovery will help control lethality of this disease by attenuating metastatic process, and provide a new option for treating this deadly disease,” Shah said.

“Dr. Shah’s work is very exciting and has great potential to help make improvements in health care. Awarding of this patent recognizes the uniqueness of his work and helps protect his discoveries,” said Dr. Eric Pani, ULM Vice President for Academic Affairs. “We look forward to his continued research and to bringing this and more of his inventions to commercial markets.”

The patent was awarded March 30, and is titled “Inhibitor of metastasis, methods

Shah’s research was funded through a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

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“Our discovery will help control lethality of this disease by attenuating metastatic process and provide a new option for treating this deadly disease.”

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

photos by Emerald McIntyre

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BY HOPE YOUNG

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CHARLIE AND KAY MCDONALD LEAVE LASTING LEGACY FOR ULM

photo by Emerald McIntyre

ULM FOUNDATION (left to right) Dr. Glenn Anderson, Kay McDonald, Dr. Eric Pani, Charlie McDonald, President Nick J. Bruno, Susan Chappell, Nick Floyd, Dr. Wendy Bailes, and coach James Malone stand elated with a generous donation to the ULM Foundation by Charlie and Kay McDonald.

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his year, longtime University of Louisiana Monroe supporters Charlie and Kay McDonald made an irrevocable gift by donating a $250,000 paid-up life insurance policy with the ULM Foundation as owner and beneficiary. The funds are designated to benefit the following:

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1. Establish the “Charles H. and Kay King McDonald Superior Graduate Student Endowment” in support of the Interprofessional Education Center fellowship with a gift of $120,000. Upon receipt of the gift proceeds, the ULM Foundation will apply (during the open application period) to the Louisiana Board of Regents Support fund for an $80,000 match (contingent upon the existence of the Louisiana Board of Regents matching gift programs at the time the life insurance proceeds become available). 2. In recognition of the positive impact Don Weems and Billy Laird made on

ULM students and alumni, name the Laird Weems Center Lobby as “Charles H. and Kay King McDonald” with a gift of $95,000 and a match of $5,000 from the ULM Foundation. 3. Name the Head Track Coach Office in Brown Stadium as “Charles H. (Charlie) McDonald” with a gift of $35,000. Charlie arrived on the NLSC campus as a student in 1960. From 1960–1965 he was a member of the NLSC Track Team along with three world record holders (Dave and Don Styrom and John Pernell). He was also a member of the Student Government Association and the Health and Physical Education Association. Charles and Kay McDonald met on the ULM campus in 1968. Between 1968 and his retirement in 2002, he served ULM as the Coordinator of Student Activities, the Director of Student Development, Dean for Student Affairs, Adviser for the Union

Board and Adviser for the SGA. He and Kay have supported the university with monetary gifts as well as “sweat equity.” Neither hesitate to help in any way possible when it comes to promoting the university. Charles and Kay hope that this estate gift will inspire others to donate to the university through similar vehicles.

Contact a ULM Foundation Development Officer today for more information on Planned Giving at 318-342-3636. More information can be found at https://ulm. giftlegacy.com/


With the end of the year approaching, here is a checklist of some tax-wise year-end charitable gifts that can provide you with tax savings and possible income benefits:

IDEAS FOR YEAR-END

• MAKE A GIFT OF APPRECIATED ASSETS • FUND A CHARITABLE GIFT ANNUITY • ESTABLISH A CHARITABLE REMAINDER TRUST • MAKE A GIFT OF LIFE INSURANCE • CREATE A CHARITABLE LIFE ESTATE

2018 KICKOFF WITH DOUG PEDERSON

BENEFITS

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SMART

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TA X-WISE GIVING STRATEGIES

To learn more about how you can benefit from these gifts, please contact us.

ULM Foundation | 318.342.3636 |foundation@ulm.edu 700 University Avenue| Monroe, LA 71209

What are the tax benefits of an IRA charitable rollover gift? An IRA rollover has several significant tax advantages. It allows you to give from pre-tax assets. If you do not itemize or are subject to charitable deduction limits, the IRA rollover still allows you to give while receiving tax benefits. An IRA rollover gift could also help you avoid income that could push you into a higher tax bracket.

May We Help You? To learn more, please contact us. Please check off your preferences, fill in your information, and mail this form back to us. We would welcome the opportunity to answer further questions and work with you. Please send me more information on IRA charitable rollover gifts. The best way to contact me is by: Email Mail Phone I’ve already included your organization in my estate plans. Street __________________________________________________ City ____________________________________________________ State/Zip ________________________________________________ Phone __________________________________________________ Email___________________________________________________ (All inquiries are treated with complete confidentiality.) This information is not intended as tax, legal or financial advice. Gift results may vary. Consult your personal financial advisor for information specific to your situation.

701/2 or older | Direct up to $100,000

Satisfies your annual required minimum distribution, or RMD, up to the amount of your gift Allows you to give from pre-tax assets and your distribution is excluded from taxable income Helps avoid limits on charitable deductions and prevents you from being pushed into a higher tax bracket Simplifies the giving process. It's easy to do— just notify your IRA custodian Minimizes the effect your giving has on your cash flow. The gift is from your assets, not your checkbook

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Name __________________________________________________

IRA

Charitable Rollover Gift


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COLLEGE OF HEALTH &LEGACIES PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

LEGACIE S

PLACE POSTAGE HERE

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University of Louisiana Monroe Foundation Laird Weems Alumni Center 4400 Bon Aire Drive Monroe, LA 71203


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COLLEGE OF HEALTH &LEGACIES PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

“He’s a Hall of Famer, but also Hall of Fame man,” said former ULM receiver Tag Rome. “He’s a high integrity individual and he’s done it for a long time. He’s been a part of our athletic history.”

BY PAUL LETLOW

FRANK HOFFMANN HOFFMANN MADE HIS FINAL CALL FROM THE RADIO BOOTH IN 2017 For 42 years, FRANK HOFFMANN recorded the first draft of history for fans as the iconic play-by-play “Voice of the Warhawks.”

trademark “Touchdown Northeeeeeeeast” to “Touchdown Warrrrhawks” when the university made name and mascot changes.

From high atop Malone Stadium and farflung stadiums across the country, Hoffmann painted pictures with words. His accounts are the soundtrack to all our ULM memories, including milestone wins, tough losses and everything in between. Hoffmann called nearly 1,000 ULM football and basketball games over four decades, and his tenure was the eighth-longest current run in the nation among football broadcasters.

For 28 years in basketball, he gave us rapid-fire updates from the Calvin Natt era up through the shot-swatting heroics of Wojiech Myrda and into all seven NCAA Tournament appearances under head coach Mike Vining.

“I grew up listening to Frank Hoffmann call NLU games,” said Nick White, who will handle all radio play-by-play duties for ULM football this year. “What a tremendous talent! He had a way of making you feel like you had a front row seat to the game.”

Hoffmann shared the broadcast booth with a cast of familiar characters including Richard Burgoyne, Lou St. Amant, Bruce Hanks, Stan Humphries and Scott McDonald. Dave Farrell and Buddy Embanato have also called games with Hoffmann.

Hoffmann’s signature sound didn’t change over the years but he was forced to alter his

Others like Tag Rome, Joey Trappey and Nick White contributed to broadcasts as sideline

As Hoffmann became more near-sighted with age, he said his spotter became one of his most important allies. Anyone who has ever peered down at the field from the lofty press box at Malone Stadium understands the challenges he faced there. As friends and colleagues recalled their time with Hoffmann, certainly they noted his headset skills.But more importantly, they also talked about his class and character. “He’s a Hall of Famer, but also Hall of Fame man,” said former ULM receiver Tag Rome. “He’s a high integrity individual and he’s done it for a long time. He’s been a part of our athletic history.” Incredibly, Hoffmann’s radio work was only a side gig for him. He served the community admirably for years as an educator and now as a respected state representative. Overall, his impact in northeastern Louisiana has been widespread and impactful in many arenas.

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Although Hoffmann made his final call from the radio booth in 2017, his legacy will echo through time.

The thrill ride through the 1987 football season wouldn’t have been quite the same without Hoffmann giving us the vocal tour. The polished broadcaster admits that he lost it when Stan Humphries hit Jackie Harris with a Hail Mary to beat Northwestern State, but we all understood. The Team of Destiny had that effect on us all.

reporters. Cory Crowe kept the broadcast on air as the engineer.


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“Outside of work, her activities are just as prolific. Durham is devoted to the promotion of human welfare, the advancement of social reforms, and is a true philanthropist.”

BY HOPE YOUNG

LACY L. DURHAM THIS GRADUATE OF ULM HAS DEGREES IN ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE LACY L. DURHAM has been in Dallas, Texas, for many years, but her education roots are in at the University of Louisiana Monroe where she earned degrees in both accounting and finance. Durham is a senior manager in Deloitte Tax LLP’s Global Employer Services Rewards practice. She has 15 years of tax experience and 11 years in compensation and benefits. Durham specializes in qualified and non-qualified retirement plans, executive compensation, fringe benefits and health and welfare plan consulting. Prior to joining Deloitte, Durham worked at the U. S. Department of Labor, Employee Benefit Security Administration.

www.ulm.edu

Outside of work, her activities are just as prolific. Durham is devoted to the promotion of human welfare, the advancement of social reforms, and is a true philanthropist. Durham is an ally of women, children and disadvantaged persons who otherwise

have no voice. She frequently writes and speaks on issues around abuse/neglect, human trafficking, education reform and youth mentorship. She has helped write and produce several award-winning projects aimed at addressing these issues to help champion and raise awareness She is a past chair of the American Bar Association Young Lawyers Division, the largest association of its kind in the world. She has received numerous awards and accolades, including the Dallas Business Journal 40 Under 40, Texas Lawyer Extraordinary Minorities in Texas Law, Dallas Regional Chamber Young Professionals Athena Award, Dallas Women’s Foundation Maura Young Leader Award, TRiO Achievers Award, Altursa International Outstanding Woman of Tomorrow Award and more. In addition, two of her alma maters have recognized her outstanding contributions. Lacy received the Southern Methodist University Black Alumni Association History Makers Award and has the honor of the Southern

University Law Center’s Distinguished Alumnus Award. She is also an active member of many professional organizations and bar associations including the American Bar Association, Dallas Bar Association, National Bar Association, Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), National Association of Black Accountants and the National Black MBA Association to name a few. She is a graduate of Leadership Dallas and the Dallas Business Council for Arts. She is a proud member of the Junior League of Dallas and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. She also holds an MBA from Louisiana Tech. Durham obtained the distinction of Juris Doctor from Southern University Law Center and a LLM in Taxation from Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law. She is admitted to practice law in Louisiana and Texas; she is also a certified mediator.


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COLLEGE OF HEALTH &LEGACIES PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

www.ulm.edu


24 BY HOPE YOUNG

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TIME TRAVEL

NEW BOOK TELLS ULM HISTORY THROUGH PHOTOS

CAMPUS NEWS Heather R. Pilcher , left, and Cyndy Robertson used photographs to tell the story of the University of Louisiana Monroe in the new book.

www.ulm.edu

“We have a rich and wonderful history that northeast Louisiana, as well as our alumni, can be proud to be a part of.” – HEATHER R. PILCHER

T

he old saying, “A picture is worth a thousand words,” certainly applies to the newly released book of historic photos curated from the archives and Special Collections at the University of Louisiana Monroe. The book, “University of Louisiana Monroe,” is by Assistant Professor Heather R. Pilcher, Coordinator of Collections, and now-retired former Special Collections librarian Cyndy Robertson. The co-authors had access to the thousands of photos housed in Special Collections. Pilcher said it took about five years to gather and scan the photos. Many more than the 213 in the book were considered for the project. “I looked at about 1,500 photos,”

Pilcher said. She was looking for a variety of photos with historical significance, local interest and images of campus life. It was a challenge deciding which photos to use and which to leave behind. “Right up until the end, I would find a photo I wanted for the book,” Pilcher said. “Sometimes one just jumped out and I said, ‘This one is going in the book.’” Pilcher has experience with historical pictorial books, having written one about her hometown of Atlanta, Texas. “University of Louisiana Monroe” is part of Arcadia Publishing’s The Campus History Series. Pilcher saw the book as a way to tell the story of ULM’s 87 years.


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photos by Emerald McIntyre

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– CYNDY ROBERTSON “My main goal for doing this work was to promote the history of our school. We have a rich and wonderful history that northeast Louisiana, as well as our alumni, can be proud to be a part of,” Pilcher said.

the years. “The book is arranged chronologically so that the reader can easily see the growth of the campus,” Robertson said. Robertson has a personal connection to the campus, its history and the book. “This project was especially meaningful to me as my father’s undergraduate degree was from Northeast Louisiana State College,” Robertson said. The book, published by Arcadia Publishing and The History Press, is $21.99 and available from Pilcher in Special Collections on the fifth floor of the library. “University of Louisiana Monroe” is also available from local retailers, major bookstores and Amazon. Proceeds from the book will go to the library.

CAMPUS NEWS

“The book is arranged chronologically so that the reader can easily see the growth of the campus.”

“My main goal for doing this work was to promote the history of our school. We have a rich and wonderful history.” – HEATHER R. PILCHER

During its history, the institution has thrived under several names, and naturally, peoples’ memories are tied to time and place.

Robertson said one of the most common questions visitors to Special Collections ask is about ULM’s name changes over

www.ulm.edu

“All the alumni I have spoken with have shared such wonderful memories of their time here. They usually refer to the school by the name it was when they attended, whether it be NLSC, NLU, or ULM,” Pilcher said.


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COLLEGE OF HEALTH & PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

www.ulm.edu


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COLLEGE OF HEALTH & PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

THE YEAR IN

PHOTOS

www.ulm.edu


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BY HOPE YOUNG

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

NEW PROGRAMS

TEACHING, CONSTRUCTION AND MORTGAGE ANALYTICS

CAMPUS NEWS photo by Emerald McIntyre

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he University of Louisiana Monroe has expanded its offerings in several in-demand fields, including teaching, construction and mortgage analytics.

For college graduates wanting to teach, ULM will offer the non-degree PostBaccalaureate Certificate (PBC) Practitioner Teacher Program. It is 21 online hours for either an elementary or secondary education certification.

www.ulm.edu

“The School of Education at ULM is excited to offer a new alternative pathway to teacher certification,” said Myra Lovett, Ed.D., Interim Director of the School of Education. “In an effort to meet the growing need for alternative certification programs in our state, we have responded to the requests of our partners in K-12 school districts by offering this non-master’s pathway to certification.” Also approved is the Bachelor of Science in Construction Management where the final 60 hours are completed through ULM Online.

“We are excited to offer online construction management classes so that working adults can complete this indemand program.” – DR. RON BERRY

“We are excited to offer online construction management classes so that working adults can complete this in-demand program,” said Dr. Ron Berry, Dean of the College of Business and Social Sciences. “Our Industry Advisory Board was extremely supportive of these efforts and encouraged the development of the program to help meet the workforce needs of the industry. Our program will be an excellent way for graduates of two-year construction programs to complete their bachelor’s degree completely online.” The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Mortgage Analytics is an 18-hour course that will also be offered through ULM Online. “The post baccalaureate program in mortgage analytics was created in partnership with JPMorgan Chase Home Loan Division to meet industry needs,” Berry said. “Offering the program online will allow working professionals the opportunity to complete the program in a convenient, flexible format that fits their busy schedule.”


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photo by Joykid/Bigstock.com

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– DR. ERIC PANI

BY HOPE YOUNG

HEALTH SCIENCE PROGRAMS EXPAND WITH

CAMPUS NEWS

“It broadens our health science and doctorallevel professional programs, advancing us toward our strategic vision. But more importantly, the graduates from this program will help alleviate a statewide shortage of physical therapists and will improve the quality of life for Louisianians.”

DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY

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he University of Louisiana Monroe has added another significant program to the College of Health Sciences — the Doctor of Physical Therapy. “This is another step forward for ULM,” said President Nick J. Bruno. “This and future programs will be started that will provide professionals needed in our region and state.”

Dr. Eric Pani, Vice President of Academic Affairs, said Board of Regents member Charles McDonald noted that ULM’s breadth of health science programs makes it stand out as a leader in the education of professionals in those fields. “I am very excited about adding this program to ULM’s academic portfolio,” Pani said. “It broadens our health science and doctoral-level professional programs, advancing us toward our strategic vision. But more importantly, the graduates from this program will help alleviate a statewide shortage of physical therapists and will improve the quality of life for Louisianians.”

“This approval by the Board of Regents is

“We now will begin the task of developing the facility and faculty with the intent to welcome our first class in the summer of 2020,” Alford said. In 2015, the regulations for physical therapists changed. Licensed physical therapists now must hold a clinical Doctor of Physical Therapy, so it is a graduate program. Alford explained that students will apply to the Doctor of Physical Therapy program after completing a pre-physical therapy major or concentration such as kinesiology or biology. At ULM the concentration is in the kinesiology major, also known as Exercise Science Pre-PT. “ The streng th of ULM’s ESPT concentration is one of the reasons that a Doctor of Physical Therapy program is likely to be very successful here,” Alford said. “We have our own ‘homegrown’ pool of strong applicants in addition to those that will come to use worldwide.”

www.ulm.edu

University leaders and Health Sciences faculty have worked several years to achieve this goal, according to Dr. Ken Alford, Interim Dean of the College of Health Sciences.

the culmination of several years of continuous effort by a group of people at ULM and we are very excited to move forward. Our region has a shortage of qualified physical therapists and the development of the program will help to serve all of Louisiana and provide an excellent professional career path for our students,” he said.


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

“The future is bright because of visionaries like the president of ULM.” – GOV. JOHN BEL EDWARDS

CAMPUS NEWS Linda and Dr. Nick J. Bruno with their hardhats and shovels at the groundbreaking for the anticipated Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, also referred to as VCOM. BY HOPE YOUNG

dean for the anticipated medical school was to be hired. The new dean is Ray Morrison, DO.

ULM ANTICIPATES VCOM MEDICAL SCHOOL

Heritage Park is on Bayou DeSiard between the Laird Weems Center and the ULM Ski Team house. The large plot is dotted with pecan and oak trees, which provide much-needed shade and add a calmness to the atmosphere.

GROUNDBREAKING

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he magnitude of the ceremony and groundbreaking for the anticipated Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) at the University of Louisiana Monroe was evident to the hundreds who gathered in Heritage Park on September 18, 2018.

www.ulm.edu

This was something big. Scorching temperatures and stifling humidity were not enough to keep a very interested and diverse crowd from attending. VCOM is a nonprofit, private (501) c-3 four-year osteopathic medical school

offering the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree. The Virginia campus is in Blacksburg, Va., the Carolinas campus is in Spartanburg, S.C., and the Alabama campus is in Auburn, Ala. The groundbreaking is the last phase in a three-step process the state of Louisiana required to legitimize the partnership between ULM and VCOM. First the Board of Regents approved VCOM to operate a medical school in Louisiana; second, the Board of Supervisors approved a land lease between ULM and VCOM and third, a

Guests speakers included Gov. John Bel Edwards; VCOM President and Provost Dixie Tooke-Rawlins, DO, FACOFP; University of Louisiana System President Dr. Jim Henderson; VCOM Board Chairman John G. Rocovich Jr., JD; ULM President Nick J. Bruno Ph.D.; Monroe Mayor Jamie Mayo; State Representative Francis Thompson; American Osteopathic Association President Mark Baker, DO; VCOM Dean Ray Morrison, DO and State Representative Katrina Jackson. In each one’s brief remarks, one fact was apparent: VCOM is going to change ULM


— and change north Louisiana — and change the entire state.

Before introducing Bruno, the governor praised his foresight, saying, “The future is bright because of visionaries like the president of ULM.”

Gov. John Bel Edwards speaks before the groundbreaking ceremony.

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“It’s exciting today to be governor to welcome VCOM,” Edwards said. “This will do more than raise the quality of life (through healthcare), it’s estimated to generate $60-$77 million a year. Higher ed is synonymous with opportunity, think about the opportunity for young people.”

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Bruno thanked the legislative delegation, elected officials, organizers of the event, community supporters and everyone who believed ULM would be home to a medical school. He described how Tooke-Rawlins and Rocovich made a surprise visit to ULM and, “They asked me what I wanted and I said more doctors, better healthcare for our region and the state,” Bruno said. “Then I showed them the site.” Tooke-Rawlins commented, “I think this is meant to be.”

The sweltering heat did not keep away the visitors and guests who attended the groundbreaking for the anticipated VCOM.

CAMPUS NEWS

VCOM is now in the process of seeking national accreditation from the Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA), and if all of the steps go as planned, the anticipated campus could open to its first class as early as the fall of 2020.

photos by Emerald McIntyre

www.ulm.edu

Guest speakers at the groundbreaking were, from left, Dean Ray Morrison, DO; Dixie Tooke-Rawlins, DO; VCOM Board Chairman John Rocovich Jr.; Gov. John Bel Edwards; ULM President Nick J. Bruno; State Rep. Francis Thompson; AOA President Mark Baker, DO; UL System President Jim Henderson and Monroe Mayor Jamie Mayo.


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CAMPUS NEWS

ULM FISHING TEAM

www.ulm.edu

DOMINATES ON THE WATER

Courtesy of FLW/Photos by Andy Hagedon


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T

he ULM Fishing Team brought in big wins this season, with standouts Thomas Soileau and Hunter Freeman winning the Yeti FLW College Fishing Championship on the Red River.

Freeman won the automatic entry into the Forrest Wood Cup after weighing a five-bass limit totaling 7 pounds, 11 ounces. Soileau weighed a five-bass limit totaling 6 pounds, 9 ounces, giving Freeman the win and advancing him to compete against the best anglers in the world August 10-12 on Lake Ouachita in Hot Springs, Arkansas, at

Courtesy of FLW/Photo by David Brown

the Forrest Wood Cup. Freeman will have to try again for the big win. Tyler Craig and Spencer Lambert were named 2018 Carhartt Bassmaster College Series Team of the Year. Teammates Craig and Lambert fished every competition possible and placed in most of them. They were 2nd at the Toledo Bend Tour, 17th at Pickwick Lake, 33rd at Cherokee Lake and 2nd at Clear Lake, Calif. They qualified (triple) for the National Championship at Tenkiller Lake.

â–

CAMPUS NEWS www.ulm.edu


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MEET THE NEW ADMINISTRATORS

CAMPUS NEWS DR. MICHAEL CAMILLE

DR. JOHN PRATTE

DR. KEN ALFORD

DR. JUDY FELLOWS

Vice President for Info Services & Student Success

Dean of College of Arts, Education, and Sciences

Interim Dean of College of Arts, Education, and Sciences

Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs

www.ulm.edu

SCOTT MCDONALD

TOM HOOVER

MELISSA KIPER

Chief Administrative Officer & Interim Director of Athletics

Chief Information Officer

Director of Alumni Affairs


photo by Emerald McIntyre

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BY HOPE YOUNG

NEARLY $275 FOR MOBILE WEATHER LAB

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he National Science Foundation awarded a nearly $275,000 Major Research Instrumentation award to the University of Louisiana Monroe so the university can purchase a compact, portable Doppler Wind Lidar system. This equipment uses lasers to study atmospheric characteristics such as wind, turbulence and aerosols. It will allow ULM to better research storms and air quality to improve public safety and human health.

– DR. NICK J. BRUNO

Doppler weather radar. ULM President Nick J. Bruno said the new instruments will further the university’s study of dangerous weather. “We are very happy for the successful National Science Foundation grant of nearly $275,000. As the only university in Louisiana with an atmospheric science program, the grant will allow our faculty and students to continue research efforts into dangerous weather, which could lead to answers in making our citizens safer,” Bruno said. “I want to thank Congressman Abraham for his support of this grant.” ULM investigators on the grant include principal investigator Dr. Todd Murphy, Dr. Kenneth Leppert, Dr. Joydeep Bhattacharjee, and Dr. Michael Chenoweth. “We are essentially building out a mobile atmospheric profiling laboratory. The NSF grant will allow us to take our instrumentation to where the active weather is actually happening, instead of just remaining static and hoping the weather moves over you,” Murphy said. “There are only a handful of such mobile profiling labs across the United States; however, there is a great need in our field to build more of these labs to support new and improved knowledge of atmospheric processes.”

Dr. Abraham has been a strong supporter of ULM’s atmospheric science program. In 2016, he worked with the university and the Federal Communications Commission to help the university get an operational license for its

The research team will study convective initiation and the onset of severe weather, lake and sea breeze circulations and coastal processes, precipitation and cloud physics, and aerosol science and air pollution.

www.ulm.edu

“Severe weather can develop seemingly without warning. ULM is studying ways we can detect these storms faster and more accurately, and I am pleased that these federal funds will be used to help ULM with its mission of making Louisiana a safer place,” said Abraham, a member of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

With the new grant, the ULM research team will acquire a Halo Photonics Stream Line XR, which is a pulsed Doppler Wind Lidar with an eye-safe laser, high pulse rate, low use energy, and coherent heterodyne detection, according to the grant abstract provided by the NSF. The research team will use the Lidar along with existing instruments such as a microwave radiometer, rawinsonde system, and surface instrumentation so that it can be used both in mobile field study settings or at a fixed location on campus.

The award was announced by U. S. Rep. Ralph Abraham, M.D., R-Alto.

CAMPUS NEWS

“I want to thank Congressman Abraham for his support of this grant.”

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NSF GRANTS ULM


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

FEATURE STORY

ALTON CLAY’S BY PAUL LETLOW

www.ulm.edu

INSPIRING JOURNEY TO ALL-AMERICAN — AND BEYOND


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

FEATURE STORY

www.ulm.edu


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A

lton Clay could have thrown in the towel.

Clay figured he’d become a bigtime football star coming out of North Caddo High School. Circumstances steered him in a different direction, to the University of Louisiana Monroe, where he persevered through a series of obstacles and emerged as an All-American thrower for the track and field team. “Glorious, illustrious ULM,” Clay said. “I love it here with all my heart. It’s been perfect for me.” ULM’s former track and field star pushed forward and persevered to achieve greatness in athletics. And as ULM patrons learned from hearing him play piano and speak eloquently at The Pursuit in August, Clay is one of a kind away from the arena, too.

FEATURE STORY

“I’m Alton,” he told the large crowd that night. “ULM Business Administration graduate, two-time Sun Belt Conference champ, first-team All-American, NCAA runner-up and currently interning at one of the largest hotel management companies in the country, Intermountain Management. I've worked with purchasing and procurement team for 11 months and I love it more and more there every day. “I’m very honored to be in the place I am today and to have such a platform to speak to you.” Clay finished his college career with an amazing flourish. In March, Clay earned Most Outstanding Field Performer at the Sun Belt’s Indoor Championships after winning the weight throw (75-5 1/4 / 22.99m) and placing third in the shot put (55-8 1/2 / 16.98m). The Vivian native became ULM’s 71st All-American in program history with his second-place effort in the weight throw (75-4 / 22.96m) in the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships. Then in May he placed in the top four in the hammer throw, shot put and discus at the 2018 Sun Belt Outdoor Championships and was named the Men’s Field Most Outstanding Performer by the league’s head coaches. Clay posted a personal-record 217 feet, 5 inches (66.27 meters) in the hammer throw, just short of qualifying for the NCAA Championships.

www.ulm.edu

How did he become so successful? “Hard work,” ULM track and field coach J.D. Malone said. “He believes in himself and is not intimidated by others.”

Although his self-confidence was tested at times over the years, Clay never stopped trying. As a junior at North Caddo, Clay was being recruited as a football player and had several scholarship offers on the table. He figured he’d spend his college Saturdays on the gridiron with a Division I program. “Track was never the dream,” he said. A coaching change at his high school prior to his senior season altered his fortunes. The new staff moved him to offensive line where he was out of position and undersized. “I’m 6-3, 250 pounds,” Clay said. “That’s a rarity in Division I football. I don’t think I’ll play left tackle. No regrets. I gave it my all and was the best left tackle I could be. But this kind of stalled the recruiting process. They stopped coming and I stopped getting calls.” In the summer of 2013 after high school, Clay still didn’t know if he’d even go to college. “I reached a point in my waiting where it wasn’t enough,” Clay said. “I had to put works with my faith. I had all the faith in the world that I’d be OK.” He started sending emails and making calls. One university gave him an opportunity. “That’s the University of Louisiana Monroe, and I’m forever grateful,” he said. The original deal was he’d be on partial scholarship for track and field and be a preferred walk-on in football. However, Clay said NCAA rules allow a student-athlete to run track on a football scholarship but not play football on track’s dime. “Once I played my first down of football, my track scholarship would be completely voided,” he said. “I readily accepted that risk because I knew it would pay off in time.” Full speed ahead, Clay trained with the football team but a knee injury in practice proved to be the end of his career. ULM’s former head coach Todd Berry advised him at that time to stick with track and field. “I took his advice and I continued to try to be the best I could be,” he said. “Everything I did, I did with that mindset.” Two years later, Clay had just won his first Sun Belt Conference championship in the weight throw as a junior when his personal life took a devastating turn. “My father passed away,” he said. “My father (Alton Clay Sr.) was the most important thing

“My dad always told me that God would always put all the right people in my life to align me with my destiny. That’s exactly what happened here at ULM.” – ALTON CLAY


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“In addition to it coming as a surprise, it was the most hurtful and disarming thing to ever happen to me in my life. It was the worst thing to ever happen to me.”

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ever to me. He was my mentor, my pastor and someone I could confide in. The person I was most comfortable with on this Earth.

Clay said he wanted to give up and move back home to Vivian to live with his mother again. “I wanted to,” he said, “but the way my dad raised me that was nowhere near an option. He always told me that God would always put all the right people in my life to align me with my destiny. That’s exactly what happened here at ULM.” Malone was happy Clay stuck it out, and not just because of his athletic prowess.

FEATURE STORY

“Alton has wonderful character,” Malone said. “He is a Godly young man with purpose. He is funny, kind, and considerate of others - a great leader.” Clay’s accomplishments placed him in elite company in ULM’s track and field lore. “Alton joins the ranks of some very good throwers from NLU/ULM,” Malone said. “He almost became our 17th national champion. Beginning with Coach Bob Groseclose and continuing to today, for whatever reasons we have been blessed with some great throwers here in Monroe. When you consider that the American record holder in the javelin, Breaux Greer, is a Monroe native and ULM graduate, that is quite unique. Alton joins this distinctive group. “I don’t know if he is an Olympic level athlete, but he is planning on continuing to train and compete. After I look back on the journey he has taken so far, I would not be surprised at all to see him as a world - class thrower and on a national team. “ Clay’s voice never wavered at The Pursuit as he shared his emotional story. Clearly, his strength isn’t just a physical phenomenon. “I was given opportunity after opportunity,” he said. “No, it wasn’t perfect. But in a sense, it was because it was perfect for me. From my perspective, it was perfect and it went exactly how I envisioned it. In a way.

www.ulm.edu

“I knew I was going to be great. I thought it was going to be football. Hey, track and field? Even better.”


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ULM Warhawks football team joins Doug Pederson on the stage during the Kickoff finale revealing the new athletic identity. (Top) ULM Hall of Famer Tag Rome interviews Doug Pederson, former ULM quarterback and current head coach for the Philadelphia Eagles. (Bottom)

photos by Emerald McIntyre

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CAMPUS NEWS www.ulm.edu


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

BY PAUL LETLOW

2018 KICKOFF WITH

DOUG PEDERSON O

CAMPUS NEWS

ne of the University of Louisiana Monroe’s favorite sons, Doug Pederson, returned to his alma mater in the spring for the fundraising event for the Warhawk football program, “2018 Kickoff with Doug Pederson.” In just his second year as a head coach in the National Football League, Pederson led the Philadelphia Eagles to a 13-3 regularseason record, including the NFC East title, as well as wins over the Atlanta Falcons (1510) and Minnesota Vikings (38-7) in the NFC playoffs and a 41-33 victory over the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LII. A three-year starter at quarterback for ULM (formerly Northeast Louisiana) from 1988-90, Pederson completed 556 of 1,006 throws (.553) for 6,315 yards and 33 touchdowns. He still ranks among ULM’s all-time Top 10 in pass attempts, pass completions, passing yards and TD passes. As a senior in 1990, Pederson led the Southland Conference in passing yards (2,152) while guiding the team to the league championship (5-1) and a trip to the NCAA I-AA playoffs. He also still holds the school’s single-game records for pass attempts (71), completions (46), passing yards (619) and TD passes (5) - all set against Stephen F. Austin in 1989.

www.ulm.edu

Pederson talked about his journey from Ferndale, Wash., to his experiences as a student-athlete at NLU and later as a quarterback in the NFL. He also shared his remarkable story of launching his coaching career at Calvary Baptist Academy in Shreveport to becoming a head football coach in the NFL.


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he spring skiing tournament season closed on a high note with the 2018 NCWSA All-Stars, hosted by the reigning Division 1 National Champions, the University of Louisiana Monroe. ULM is in the South Central region. The annual collegiate All-Stars brings the 10 best men and 10 best women skiers in each event (jump, slalom, trick) to compete in the ultimate battle of regional supremacy. The Midwest held the All-Star title for four years, but as interest in the tournament has grown, so does the level of competition. The conditions were almost perfect, with the exception of a short-lived glare that hit skiers on their opening passes. The South Central region started with skier Siani Oliver in second place in women's slalom. In Men's trick followed. The South Central region held strong with ULM skier Danylo Filchenko winning first with a score of 5770. ULM’s Tom Poole took fourth with a score of 3300, followed by teammate Tycho Hof who won fifth with a score of 1930.

CAMPUS NEWS

With the University of Louisiana Monroe’s commencement ceremony ending, competitors gave the passers-by a little taste of the most extreme water ski event, Jump. Following the little jump sneak peek was women’s trick. South Central claimed the first three podium spots with ULM’s Katerina Svecova coming in first with a score of 3410. Sunday morning began early with men’s slalom. The gold medal went to ULM’s Tom Poole. He was followed by teammates Danylo Filchenko and Alex King tying for fourth with 2.5 buoys at 35 off. The 2018 All Star tournament concluded with the remaining top-seeded jump rotations. ULM’s Emma Brunel came in second and fourth was Katerina Svecova with 108 feet.

BY NCWSA

photos by Emerald McIntyre

www.ulm.edu

ULM SKIERS AS GOOD AT HOME AS THEY ARE ON THE ROAD TEAM WINS TOURNEY ON THE BAYOU

Men's jump proved thrilling as always with South Central skier Danylo Filchinko breaking the bayou record on the final jump of the tournament with an outstanding 187 feet. There was a nail-biter for second place as well, with Eastern Region skier Samuel Greenwood from Alabama and ULM skiers Alex King and Brandon Schipper all jumping 164 feet. Second place had to be determined by meters with Samuel Greenwood narrowly edging out the South Central region with a jump of 50 meters. Alex King and Brandon Schipper tied for third with 49.90 meters. Final award ceremonies followed as skiers anxiously waited to hear who was the best on the bayou. Coming in fourth with a total score of 1,230 points was the West Region. In third, with a score of 2,685 points, was the Eastern Region. And coming in second with a score of 5,2685 points was the Midwest Region. The All–Star champs were ULM and the South Central Region, winning the gold with a score of 6995.


Photo courtesy of Loura and Guy Barr, Jr.

Photo courtesy of Joseph Beard

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LOURA AND GUY BARR, JR.

JOSEPH BEARD

BY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

ALUMNI HONORS GOLDEN Arrow Award – LOURA AND GUY BARR, JR. The Golden Arrow Award is given to a person(s) that has distinguished himself through personal and/or professional achievement. He must have served the University of Louisiana Monroe and the Alumni Association above and beyond the call of duty over a period of years and he must be active with his alumni membership. This year’s Golden Arrow Award goes to a couple that exemplifies these qualities and more. Although the couple are not graduates of ULM, they have adopted the University as if it was their own alma mater. The couple have been married more than 50 years, and many have stated that you don’t see one without the other. They are a true team and are quite the dynamic duo. Loura Eastham Barr graduated from Delta State University with a Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education. She taught for 10 years in Mississippi and Louisiana. She lives an active lifestyle and enjoys biking, walking, swimming, travel and baking/ cooking new recipes. She is passionate about the Philanthropic Educational Organization and has worked with the organization for 33 years, serving on the Louisiana State Board for seven years. She loves how P.E.O. educates women and what the organization stands for.

Guy Barr, Jr. graduated from Delta State University in 1964 and later earned a master’s degree from Northwestern University. Guy enjoyed

The Barrs have one son, Guy Barr III, a daughterin-law,andthreegrandchildrenwhokeepthembusy. Guy has served as an elder and deacon of Covenant Presbyterian Church. He is currently a member of Rotary, an active supporter of Family Promise, The Fellowship of Christian Athletes and the DeSiard Street Shelter. He has served as a board member of these organizations and countless others. Guy’s positiveattitude,fairnessandtenaciousspirithaveled him to be a leader in the community and a recipient of many honors over the years. The Barrs believe in ULM because it makes our community a better place. “The University of Louisiana Monroe is something to be proud of,” said the Barrs. The quality of the students and faculty, along with the economic impact ULM has in the surrounding areas, is what the Barrs like most about ULM. “It is the engine that helps run and maintain our cities.” When asked to describe ULM in one word, the Barrs said, “jewel.” “The university provides culture, education, beauty, entertainment, economic opportunities, and most of all, friendships that will last a lifetime.” We are truly blessed to call this couple a friend of ULM and honorary Warhawks.

RISING Young Alumni Award – JOSEPH BEARD The Rising Young Alumni Award is given to an alumnus that is active with their alumni membership, involved in other community organizations, and exhibits philanthropy. The recipient must be a general supporter of his community and actively seeks to positively impact ULM programs and influence others on behalf of ULM. This year’s recipient embodies all these criteria and more. Joseph Beard received a Bachelor of Science in Aviation and a minor in Business from the University of Louisiana Monroe in the spring of 2009. While attending ULM, he was involved and held leadership positions in many organizations including: Campus Activities Board, Student Government Association, Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity and a member of the PREP Staff. After graduating, he has remained committed to helping ULM by serving on the ULM Alumni Association Board of Directors, ULM Athletic Foundation (Warhawk Club), serving as the Ouachita Parish Alumni President and Chapter Advisor of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity. Joseph is married to Betsy Crawley Beard who is also a graduate of ULM and they have four amazing children, Bailey, Josie, Lottie and Jack, and reside in Monroe. They are very active in their church, North Monroe Baptist, and very active in the community. Joseph works for Chase Bank as an Account Executive in their Correspondent Home Lending Division.

www.ulm.edu

Loura also volunteers for the Family Promise Thrift Store once a week and enjoys worshiping at Covenant Presbyterian Church, serving on the missions committee.

a successful coaching and teaching career for seven years before becoming a State Farm agent in 1972 in Baton Rouge. After many promotions and relocations, he retired in 2001 after 30 years as the Mid South’s Regional Vice President for State Farm. He enjoys Bible study, travel, exercising, reading a good book, and being with his grandchildren.

ALUMNI AWARD WINNERS

MR. & MRS. BARR; BEARD


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BY HOPE YOUNG

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

FOUNDATION AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

GO TO OUTSTANDING FACULTY AND STAFF photo by Emerald McIntyre

FOUNDATION AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE Winners of the ULM Foundation Awards of Excellence are pictured with Foundation board member James Moore III, left, and President Nick J. Bruno, right. The winners include, from left, front, Therese Filhoil, Lillian Brown and Debbie Wisenor, and back, Dr. Arturo Rodriguez, Dr. Bill Ryan and Dr. Chris Gissendanner.

F

ollowing President Nick J. Bruno’s State of the University address on Aug. 16, the ULM Foundation’s Awards of Excellence were presented to six faculty and staff. The award recipients showed outstanding accomplishment in service, research, teaching, and creativity. The annual awards were presented by Dr. Eric Pani, Vice President for Academic Affairs.

www.ulm.edu

Lillian Brown, Foundation Award for Service by Classified Staff — This award-winner began her service work at an early age as a Girl Scout. Years later, she taught a Brownie Troop barbershop-style songs so they could earn their Sweet Adelines Harmony Patch. The troop did so well they sang at the War Veterans Home at Christmas. Brown has been a member of (and still is in many), Business and Professional Women of Monroe-West Monroe, Louisiana Junior Chamber of Commerce, Twin City Jaycees

Chapter of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, Sweet Adelines International and Monroe Symphony Chorus. Before coming to work at ULM, Brown earned an associate of science degree and then a bachelor’s degree with a concentration in general business. At ULM, she’s been a word processing operator, editorial assistant, facilities coordinator and administrative assistant 5 for three vice presidents. Today she manages the office and internal workings of the Vice President of Student Affairs. Brown has coordinated the facilities at the University Conference Center, University House, Student Union Building, Student Center and Bayou Suites. She coordinates the Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges

and the Student Involvement Scholarship program. Daily she corresponds with university personnel, students, parents, local and state offices and commercial companies. Serving on many committees through the years, she has helped plan and produce Envision ULM, Quarter Century Club Induction Dinner, Golden Society Associates Reception and Gala, President’s Box for football games, Browse on the Bayou, Presidential Lyceum, Black History Month, Women’s History Month, Hurricane Katrina Relief, Spring Fever and many more. Therese Filhiol, Foundation Award for Service by Unclassified Staff — The winner of this award is devoted to service and seizes the opportunities presented to her on and off campus. Therese Filhiol is a great asset to the university’s international students, as she works in the Office of International Student Services. She is responsible for not only getting and keeping


international students properly enrolled at ULM, but also legally residing in the United States. As a result, she has developed an expert understanding of the state and national immigration regulations.

In 2017, she carried much of the weight of her department when there was no director or admissions specialist. Her workload expanded beyond her title as an adviser to include event planner, student organization supervisor, student labor supervisor and more. She serves as faculty adviser to Global Ambassadors and was formerly adviser for the African Caribbean Association. She is former president of Phi Alpha Theta (2011-12). This winner also works with the Social Studies Fair and the Technology Challenge.

She worked on the Computing Center Helpdesk and went on to be a Coordinator of Graduate Admissions Services. In between Filhiol was with Extended Learning/Quality Enhancement, where she was an online instructor in history for dual enrollment high school students. Dr. Chris R. Gissendanner, Excellence in Research Award — This faculty member joined the ULM Department of Biology in 2004 and hit the ground running. In a few short years, Dr. Chris R. Gissendanner earned tenure and was promoted to Associate Professor. He went on to spend five and a half years in the School of Pharmacy where he established a research lab. In 2017 he went to the College of Arts, Science and Education as Associate Director of the Department of Biology and Associate Professor of Biology. Since 2004, he has published 24 research articles in peer-reviewed international journals. Eleven of those included undergraduate or graduate student co-authors. Gissendanner believes in putting research into the hands of students. He has mentored more than 25 undergraduate students, six master’s students and two Ph.D. candidates. Since he joined ULM, this researcher has received a total of $919,269 in external research funding from such prestigious sources as the Louisiana Board of Regents and National Institutes of Health.

“My specific interest is in the genetic regulation of organogenesis … While my research is basic in nature, knowledge gained from studies on organogenesis provide an understanding of diseases …” Gessendanner said. This ULM researcher is one of “The Best in on the Bayou.” Dr. Arturo Rodriguez, Excellence in Teaching Award — For more than 10 years the winner of this year’s Excellence in Teaching award has developed his teaching philosophy, honed his teaching skills and challenged his students to do more than show up for class - he challenges them to learn. In 2012, Dr. Arturo Rodriguez was awarded tenure in ULM’s College of Business and Social Sciences in the Department of Management. While teaching mostly management courses, he was asked to assist in developing two MBA courses. He is now developing a third course, which will help students by fulfilling two requirements in one course. In 2017 he moved to the Department of Finance. He writes of his teaching philosophy: “My goal in the virtual and actual classroom is to enable students to think critically about the concepts that they are learning in the courses that I teach. I try to go beyond simple definitions, concepts and the course’s textbook, and focus more on how the concept is applied in real business situations.” Rodriguez and a colleague wrote their own textbook for a new Business 1001 course and give it to students at no cost. For him, the recognition from his students is the confirmation of a job well done. Since 2012, his instructor reviews average 4.35 points and none of his reviews have been below 4.0. Rodriguez was honored by the ULM Athletic Foundation in 2014 for exceptional teaching and mentoring to student athletes. Dr. Bill Ryan, Excellence in Creative/ Artistic Activity — The Foundation Award for Excellence in Creative/Artistic Activity goes to Dr. Bill Ryan, who is a prolific author and an inspiration to his students. In October, 2017, his fourth book, “Light Water Light Water Light Water Light,” was

His two books of poetry include, “To Die in Latin” and “Eating the Heart of the Enemy.” During his career, Professor Ryan has received many awards and fellowships, including the Artist’s Fellowship, Louisiana Division of Arts (1994), ULM Endowed Professor of English (2000-03), and Tommy and Mary Barham Endowed Professor of English (2016 and 2017). He has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize three times (1994, 1997 and 2003). His works have been in publications such as the Louisiana English Journal and Willow Springs during his tenure at ULM. His works have been reviewed by some of the most prestigious publications in the country, including Publisher’s Weekly, Chicago Tribune, Boston Globe, Miami Herald, Philadelphia Inquirer, Boston Herald, Los Angeles Examiner, Palm Beach Life and Stars and Stripes. Debbie Wisenor, Excellence in Service Award — The winner of the Foundation Award for Excellence in Service is now in her 20th year at the University of Louisiana Monroe. In 2007 Debbie Wisenor organized a bone marrow drive on campus where more than 2,500 people were added to the National Marrow Donor Program registry. ULM won the Collegiate Award for the Largest Bone Marrow Drive Held on a College Campus in the country. Since 2006 she has organized the campus blood drives and in 2008 received the LifeShare Blood Centers Outreach Award. She was captain of the Race for the Cure for the College of Health Sciences for 10 years. She served two terms on the Faculty Senate where she was on the Academic Standards committee. Wisenor currently serves on the ULM SACS Academic Programs Committee, College of Health and Pharmaceutical Sciences Drug Testing Policy Committee and the CHPS Administrative Council. This award winner has been active in state and national professional organizations, including the Louisiana State Society for Clinical Laboratory Service (two terms as president, 2005-2007) and American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science. She served on the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science on the Program Revitalization Task Force in 2009. Off campus this faculty member volunteers at First United Methodist Church, Relay for Life, American Heart Walk, Cancer Foundation League and CASA Christmas Project.

www.ulm.edu

In 2008, he and a colleague, Dr. Ann Findley, established ULM as a first cohort institution in a national consortium, SEA-PHAGES. ULM remains a member and now there are 100 universities.

This award-winner’s research training is in animal developmental genetics. Developmental geneticists study how genes control the development of complex organisms.

His novel, “Dr. Excitement’s Elixir of Longevity,” was published in hardcover and in paperback. Demand from the public resulted in both printings being sold out.

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FOUNDATION AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

An employee for more than 14 years, Filhiol started at ULM as a student, earning an Associate of Arts in General Studies in 2006. She went on to achieve a bachelor’s (2009) and master’s (2012) in history and in 2013 a Master of Education in Educational Technology Leadership.

In 2015 he was part of a team which received nearly $250,000 from the Louisiana Biomedical Research Network for a core instrumentation facility at the School of Pharmacy.

published by Lynx House Press and is available from Amazon and the University of Washington Press.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

Filhiol often arranges rides, or gives them, when an international student has a doctor’s appointment or needs medical treatment or simply needs to go to the grocery store.

ULM freshmen biology majors take part in the research and have contributed 32 phage genome sequences to the research. (Bacteriophages are micro–organisms which have the potential to treat illness and disease.)


SOAR with us, as we reach #newheights!

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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

OPPORTUNITY SCHOLARSHIPS MORE DOLLARS TO MORE STUDENTS As a direct result of the generosity of you, our ULM alumni and friends, the ULM Foundation is able to reduce the financial concerns of ULM students and their families. Since 2012, you have strengthened the ULM Foundation’s impact on our students with approximately $3 million in cash gifts added to scholarship endowments. Over the last five years, the average Foundation scholarship award has increased by over $700 and the number of students funded has increased by 15%.

INCREASING NATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ULM Faculty and Student performance results continue to receive notable recognition in many disciplines across the university. In support of their efforts, your private gifts ranging in amounts from $10 to $250,000 have enhanced individual programs, departments and organizations. Under the SOAR Campaign, two Endowed Chairs and twenty-nine Endowed Professorships have been established resulting in a total of $8.8 million in additional endowed faculty support funds. Annual funding for faculty who hold these endowed positions exceeds $1,160,000 each year.

www.ulm.edu

After establishing the SOAR campaign for $55.4 million in 2013, the University of Louisiana Monroe has seen a surge in support from the community in an effort to propel the university forward during continued budget challenges facing Louisiana higher education. Total commitments received to date now exceed $50 million! ULM’s constituents, with help from the ULM Foundation, have shifted the University’s future by helping to advance its mission of preparing students to compete, succeed and contribute in an ever-changing global society.


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

RENOVATIONS SERIOUS ATHLETES; SERIOUS ACADEMIANS We take the term “student-athlete” seriously. With more than 80 percent of our athletes achieving honors, your support helps us to take care of the whole student, ensuring meaningful athletic and academic progress, resulting in successful transitions into the workforce. Gifts for every sports program as well as facility, equipment and program enhancements entice superior student athletes to join the ULM Warhawk Family.

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENTS FOR THE ULTIMATE CAMPUS EXPERIENCE

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

ATHLETICS

The beautiful ULM campus, unrivaled in the UL system, is home to many newly renovated and constructed facilities, offering an enhanced student, faculty and visitor experience. Through inscribed bricks, room namings and outright gifts, some of the larger projects completed during the SOAR Campaign, partially or fully funded by your private donations, include the Liew Family International Student Center, Malone Stadium Football Fieldhouse, Laird Weems Center, and Groseclose Track and Field Renovation. Continued improvements are underway, as donations are being accepted to fund renovations to the School of Construction Management, Band building, and Water Ski facility, just to name a few.

r a o s / u d e . ulm www.ulm.edu

6 3 6 3 . 2 4 3 . 8 31 has now exceeded $50 million!


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

ALUMNI CL A S S NOTE S ALUMNI CLASS NOTES

1959 Jon Barker (BA ‘59) retired after 37 years of teaching at Louisiana Tech. He was the Smith Professor of Music for eight years and received the honor of Professor of Music Emeritus.

1963

Carolyn & Paul Lasseigne (BS ‘63 & MS ‘73) celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.

1967

David W. Turrentine (BS ‘67) begins his 54th year with Standard Enterprises, Inc. He is the chairman of the board and part owner in his company. His son Mark Turrentine (BGS ‘06) is President and part owner of SEI.

1972

Dr. Richard Cravatts (BA ‘72, MA ‘73) is President Emeritus of Scholars for Peace in the Middle East. He is author of "Dispatches From the Campus War Against Israel" and "Jews and Genocidal Liberalism" The University’s Jihad Against Israel and Jews.

1974

www.ulm.edu

Betty Moos Franklin (BA ‘74 MSW ‘83) retired July 1, 2017, after 42 years.

1976

Tom Germany (BS ‘76) retired after 42 years in the oil industry. He has worked for ExxonMobil, Premcor, Mobil, Tenneco, Pennzoil, Murphy and

Calumet. He currently lives in Indianapolis, IN. Dorothy Frances Wells (BA ’76) and Robert Wells celebrated their 34th wedding anniversary on Labor Day and are the proud parents of Thomas and Meredith. She is an avid volunteer at Star Valley Medical Center in Afton, Wyoming.

1978

Monty Ingram (BS ‘78) retired after 40 years as a pharmacist, most recent 27 years with NuTech Inc. in Tyler, Texas. He and his wife, Patsy, live in Athens, Texas.

1981

Tamee S. Dark (BA ‘81, MA’ 82) recently retired from State Farm Insurance Cos. after 32 years. She currently lives in Shreveport. Dr. Tim Perry (BA ’81), a local dentist, is a Masters National Cycling champion who has competed in the World Championships. He is married to Jodi Humble Perry (BA ’81).

1982

Tammi Arender (AA ’82) is an anchor/reporter for KNOE-TV in Monroe, LA. She was recently cast in her 14th movie as a SAG-Aftra member. Her movies include Beautifully Broken, Dukes of Hazzard and The Nice Guys. Ben Shockley (BS ’82) and his wife have four children and are proud grandparents of six grandchildren. He enjoys flying planes.

1983 Dr. Lavelle Hendricks (BA ’83) was elected President of the Texas Association of Black Personnel in Higher Education.

1984

Kathy Loe Elam (Nursing ‘84) and Kirk Elam (BBA ‘82) live in Baton Rouge and have three children - Jason 34, Chad 31, and Ashley 30. They are the proud grandparents of four beautiful grandchildren.

1991

Violet Roussel Houser (BBA ’91) is a partner in the CPA firm Johnson, Perry, Roussel & Cuthbert, LLP. She is married to Brent and they have two beautiful girls, Riley & Avery.

1993

Zeynep and Serdar Ciloglu (MBA ‘93), after a career in the private sector, have established a tourism and travel company which services universities for their study abroad tours in Turkey, Greece and Europe.

1997

Jenny Hopkins Pankey (BS ‘97) is the Associate Director of Alumni Affairs at ULM. She is married to BJ and they have one daughter, Ella, 11.

2000

Brandy Pankey (BBA ’00) is currently a business instructor at ULM.


49 photo provided by Special Collections & Archives

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

Katie Robinson Wilder (BBA ’09) and Brandon Wilder (BME ’08) are proud parents of triplet boys, Harvey, Gordon and Ezra. Brandon currently works in the Admissions Office at ULM.

Julia Barnhill Letlow (BA ’02) and husband Luke Letlow welcomed a baby boy Jeremiah John on September 21, 2017.

Brooke Saunier Malain (BS ’12) and husband Jared Malain welcomed a baby girl, Lena Lynn Malain, on April 17, 2018. Brooke is currently a Human Resource business partner at the Woman’s Hospital in Baton Rouge.

2002

2004 Dr. LaTasha M. Atkins (BA ‘04) recently graduated from Tulane University with a Doctorate of Social Work.

2007

Melissa Kiper (MBA ’07) is the new Director of Alumni Association at ULM. Kate Wadsworth Seales (‘07) and husband Clint Seales welcomed a baby girl, Olivia Frances, on February 2, 2018.

2012

2013

Garrison Griffith (BA‘13) was named Dean of Students at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas.

2014

Caleb Smith (BS ‘14, MA ‘17) is an Emergency Management Specialist with FEMA stationed in Dallas, Texas. He is credited for helping in the Texas recovery after Hurricane Harvey. Lanie Roussel (BA ’14) recently graduated from University of Dayton School of Law. She currently lives in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi and works for George Scanlan Blair Law Firm, P.L.L.C.

Leslie Winston (BA ‘07, MA ‘11) has taken a new job as a 504 Screening Specialist for the Calcasieu Parish School System. She is recently engaged to be married.

Jessica Bagwell Guess (BBA ’15) currently lives in Hattisburg, Mississippi with her husband Thomas. They have been married for 14 years and

2015

have two children - John, 14 and James 11. Jessica is an Office Manager at Robert F. Hester PhD, LLC.

2016

Kelsey Ingram (BS ‘16) works as an Oncology Nurse at Baylor Scott/White All Saints Hospital in Fort Worth, Texas. Kimberly Jiles (BGS ’16) currently works at Burney’s Furniture in Monroe and is one of the leaders over her church nursery department.

2018

Cynthia Young (Alumni by Choice ’18) is currently an executive with Capital Area Reentry, a nonprofit in Baton Rouge that helps formerly incarcerated persons with services to transition back into society. Jodi Phillips (Alumni by Choice ’18) is an instructor of Health Sciences in the College of Health Sciences at ULM. Cynthia Arender Machen (Alumni by Choice ’18) has been the 911 Director for Madison Parish for the past 19 years. She implemented the 911 smart system and is only the second parish in Northeast Louisiana to execute the system. Since 2007, she has been the Assistant Homeland Security Director. She has five children and two great grandchildren.

www.ulm.edu

Kassie and Ryan Roussel (BGS ‘07) welcomed their third child. He is a Physical Therapist at Bourgeois Physical Therapy and Sports Rehab.

ALUMNI CLASS NOTES

2008

Dr. Andy Allen (BS ’00, MA ’06 EDD ’14) received the highest honor of Technologist of the Year award from the Louisiana Society of Radiologic Technologists. He is currently an Associate Professor of Radiologic Technology at ULM.


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS

RETIREMENTS

AT-LARGE VICE PRESIDENTS:

AUGUST 2017 Cooper Betty

PRESIDENT: W. Adams Rodgers IV (BBA ‘98) PRESIDENT ELECT: Sara Benecke Brice (BA ‘90) PAST PRESIDENT: Brenda B. Dudley (BBA ‘84, MBA ‘86) VICE-PRESIDENT: Julie Harlan O’Brien (BA ‘80)

BOARD OF DIRECTORS; RETIREMENTS; IN MEMORIAM

SECRETARY-TREASURER: Wally Mulhearn (BS ‘85) AT-LARGE VICE PRESIDENTS: Brian Allen (BA ’90) Matt Bridges (BS ’05) Joseph Beard (BS ’09) Renee Hebert (BA ’98, M.Ed. ’00) Keith Beard (BA ’84) Paul Wilkening (BA ’83, MA ’85) J. Eric Newton (MA ’11) Gerald McHenry (BS ’85) Ashley Aulds (BS ’14, MBA ’15) Justin Mailhes (BBA ’13)

SEPTEMBER 2017 Marilyn McIntosh OCTOBER 2017 Cynthia Robertson Laura Washer NOVEMBER 2017 Marsha McGee DECEMBER 2017 Linda Davis Mary Gauthier-Lewis JANUARY 2018 Dorothy Schween FEBRUARY 2018 Manuel Michel MARCH 2018 LaQuita Danna APRIL 2018 Allen Martin MAY 2018 Kenneth Clow Leonard Clark Paula Thornhill Terri Hendrix Timothy Brown

H. Wade Earnheart (BBA ’72) Lance Futch (BBA ’95) Dr. Jeff Hood (BA ’91, MA ’94) Doug Nielsen (BA ’08) Mary Ann Riddle (BA ’74, BA ’77) Mary Linda McCann (BBA ’91, MBA ‘98) Kay LaFrance-Knight (BA ’68)

Complete bios are available at HTTPS://ALUMNI.ULM.EDU/PAGE/BOARD

JUNE 2018 Barbara White Benny Blaylock Donald White Donna Luse Kirby Campbell Nancy Davis Stephen Richters

IN MEMORIAM

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William Adams Dorothy Adams Neville Allen James Amerson Martha Anderson Patrick Anderson Bobby Arant Peggy Ashcraft Richard Baggett Brooks Bamburg Darlene Barnes Jack Battaglia Eileen Baur Sara Benton Annette Berry Byron Bertrand Myra Blake Charles Branch Mary Brashier Shannon Breithaupt Barbara Breland-Roussel Roy Brooks Lidice Broussard Alicia Brown Ricky Burks Kemal Burnley Richard Campbell Charles Chico Lebane Clement Robert Coleman Gary Covington Albert Crawford Margaret Croft James Deal John Dennis Scott Denton Roberta Downs Paul Dustane Debra Earl Robert Earp Travis Eickman Lynda Ernst Joe Erwin Barrett Fisher Thomas Fitzgerald Fred Foster Stephanie Foster William Foster Alice French Gladys Gaskin Irma George Lonnie Gill Joyce Givens Beverly Goodlett Julian Gray Garry Gray Glen Greene Ebin Greer Terrie Gregory Margaret Griggs Lee Gunn Robert Halbman Sylvia Hammett Marjorie Hammett Alice Hance Leon Hare Gerald Harkins Ralph Harrison Ralph Hastings Luna Hattaway Mary Hatten Jane Hayden Edward Head

Juanita Hendricks Rosalie Herring Stephanie Hibbard Franklin Hoak Betty Holmes John Holtzclaw Alice Hooker William Hoover Harry Hubenthal Jack Humphries Megan Jackson Peggy Johnson Quincy Jones Sylvia Jones Oliver Jones Betty Kelley Donald Kennedy Karl Kettler Gerald Lanclos John Lands Avelie Laws Tom Lee Charlynn Leehy Ronald Lewellyan Bertrand Lindley Linda Lingefelt Ola Mae Maddry Donna Maples Vincent Marsala Bob Martin Carolyn McBride Charles McCallum Constance McCready Fred McDowell Charles McPherson Vivian Miller James Mooney John Morgan Barbara Netherland Camille Newsom Jerry Pace Jane Pizzigno Juliet Pope Jalna Powell Rogers Prestridge Yvonne Pugh Jay Rabalais Curtis Rape Helen Rawls Sheldon Ray James Reeves Kenton Renfroe John Steven Roberts Rowland Robins Patricia Roshto Gregory Ross Yvonne Russell Patricia Sartin John Scalia Vivian Shepherd Richard Simons Tammie Slawson Kirby Smith Michael Spears Thomas Spurlock Donald Stockard Richard Stuart Jerry Thornton Clair Traylor Rhoda Tripp Joseph Tullier Michael Vance Daniel Vanderhoeven

Nell Walters George Watson Cecil Watts Judy Wendling Tyler Whiteside Carolyn Whitman Amy Williams Mark Williams Arthur Williams James Williamson Virginia Wilson Bettye Wink Suzanne Wolff Joseph Womack Renee Wright Rebecca Yarbrough Charles Yates


Alumni Association

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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

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ULM Magazine Fall 2018  

In the pages of this magazine are stories of some of the bigger accomplishments at the University of Louisiana Monroe. There are many storie...

ULM Magazine Fall 2018  

In the pages of this magazine are stories of some of the bigger accomplishments at the University of Louisiana Monroe. There are many storie...