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Jim W. Harvey 863.697.6624

2949 State Road 70 West

Ronnie Trythall 863.697.2182

Okeechobee, Florida 34972

BRAFORD MATERNAL ADVANTAGE

Coming 2-Year-Old Heifers

Join us for the

FALL ADVANCING THE BRAFORD BREED SALE Friday, October 5 in Crockett, Texas

Offering 17 performance-tested and pasture-ready Braford bulls

Lot 410

P.O. Box 243 Union Springs, AL 36089 Alabama: 334-738-2205

Lot 411

Lot 416

Bill Rainer Cattle Co. REGISTERED BRAFORD CATTLE

Lot 519

New SummerďŹ eld, Texas Cell: 903-780-6455 Texas Home: 903-683-1086


Vol. XXXIII, No. 2 2018

Braford pair at Alleman Cattle Co., in Rayne, Louisiana, with a bull purchased from a previous Advancing the Braford Breed Sale.

Feature Story 14 Brafords: Just One Part of the Equation at the Theriot Farms by Hannah Wine

Other Features 4 Vaccination Effects on Reproduction by Hannah Wine

8 BQA: It’s Not Just for the Newbies by Hannah Wine

10 Ensuring That the Operation Is Running Smoothly by Courtney Wesner 5380 Old Bullard Rd., Suite 600, Box 358 Tyler, TX 75703 904.563.1816 www.brafords.org • BrafordNews@brafords.org Like the United Braford Breeders on Facebook! UBB Registration Office As of Sept. 29, 2017 PO Box 1177 Kingsville, TX 78364 361.516.0530 Braford News is the official publication of the United Braford Breeders (UBB). It is published four times a year and is supported by paid advertisements and subscriptions. Advertising and subscription information can be obtained from the UBB office. We appreciate your letters, comments and any editorial material you would like considered for publication.

28 NJBA All American Results

In Each Issue 2 President’s Notes by Jim Harvey

3 From the Director’s Desk by Hannah Wine

12 Association News 18 Junior Focus 28 Show Results

Events September 7 Louisiana State Fair Entry Deadline September 17 Four States Fair Open Braford Points Show and Braford Base Show October 5 Advancing the Braford Breed 11 Sale, Crockett, TX November 3 Louisiana State Fair, Shreveport, LA November 7 Adams Ranch Annual Field Day, Fort Pierce, FL November 8 Adams Ranch Sale, Fort Pierce, FL November 15 Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo Entry Deadline

Editor – Hannah Wine hwine@brafords.org Production Hereford Publications Inc./Creative Services Samantha Albers 11500 NW Ambassador Dr., Ste 410, Kansas City, MO 64153 816.218.2283 • 816.243.1314 fax salbers@hereford.org

Follow the United Braford Breeders!

Zoetis is corporate sponsor of United Braford Breeders.

Editor, Hannah Wine, hwine@brafords.org

Twitter: UnitedBrafordBreeder Instagram: unitedbrafordbreeders Facebook: United Braford Breeders

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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President’s Notes

UBB Board of Directors

I

truly consider it an honor to represent the United Braford Breeders as your 2018 President. On our most recent visit to Texarkana for the 2018 All- American show, my wife, Rene, and I enjoyed ourselves. We are really proud of our youth and are supportive of them since they are the future of our breed. It was a privilege to present the very first Bud Adams Scholarship of $2,500.00 to Madalyn Jennings. Way to go, Madalyn!

by Jim Harvey

I think of our members as friends and feel very fortunate to have made these acquaintances. The common thread is our love for the Braford Breed and our determination to make Brafords even better. The question is, how do we expand and grow? The Braford cattle speak for themselves. This is selfevident if you attend any of the cattle shows or sales. I commend our members for their breeding efforts.

I would like to present an open forum in the fall. This session will be open to all members. I ask that you speak up, speak out and speak loud so that your concerns are heard, but please be constructive with praise (or criticism). Communication is the key to our present and future success. I cannot reiterate enough that I am very proud of our Braford cattle, and I want us to be successful. I also want to thank the Hyman Family for hosting the All-American Show again this year. Their hard work, commitment and delicious food gave all the participants and their families the fortuity to form tremendous memories! Sincerely, Jim W. Harvey

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President — Jim Harvey Harvey Ranch 2949 HWY 70 West Okeechobee, FL 34972 Mobile: 863.697.6624 FAX: 863.763.7524 email: jhbrafords@comcast.net Vice President — Bill Rainer Bill Rainer Cattle Co. PO Box 243 Union Springs, AL 36089 FAX:903.683.9830 Mobile: 903.780.6455 email: granjan.jr@gmail.com Secretary/Treasurer — Scott McCullough 3226 CR 3115 Greenville, TX 75402 Mobile: 903.274.7799 email: wmscottmcc@hotmail.com ​Region 1 Directors — Florida Zach Adams Adams Ranch Inc. 25501 Orange Avenue Fort Pierce, FL 34945 Mobile: 772.215.6268 email: ZachAdamsRanch@gmail.com Will Moncrief Running M Ranch 10006 Journeys End Tallahassee, FL 32312-3710 Office: 850.385.4489 Mobile: 850.566.6070 email: w69cracker@hotmail.com Region 2 Directors — Louisiana Bryan Alleman Alleman Cattle Company 2709 Abbeville Highway Rayne, LA 70578 Mobile: 337.2782586 email: allemancattle@cox.net Heather Green Granger Cattle Co. 3313 Trailer Town Road Jennings, LA 70546 Mobile: 337.540.1748 email: gran3290@aol.com Corey Doucet Doucet Brafords 120 Tans Road Lake Charles, LA 70607 Home: 337.598.5190 Mobile: 337.802.5528 email: coreydoucet@camtel.net Region 3 Directors — Texas Robert Mills Rock Crest Ranch 15535 CR 1123 Athens, TX 75751 Office: 903.489.0837 Home: 903.489.0869 Mobile: 903.676.8930 email: robert@rockcrestranch.com Larry Stanberry LS Brafords 996 VZ CR 1805 Grand Saline, TX 75140 Home: 903.962.7219 Mobile: 214.924.9202 email: lstanberry@earthlink.net Region 4 Directors — All Other States Toni Meacham K& K Cattle Co. 1420 Scootney Rd Connell, WA 99326 Mobile: 509.488.3289 email: tonipierson@rocketmail.com Paul Harris Greenview Farms 334 K-Ville Road Screven, GA 31560 Mobile: 912.294.2472 Fax: 912.586.6991 email: Greenviewpaul@yahoo.com


From the Director’s Desk

Save the Date

by Hannah Wine UBB Executive Director

T

his most useful skill in my cattle industry experience I learned a few years ago on a sea kayaking trip with the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS). We were kayaking the length of the Sea of Cortez on Mexico’s Baja California peninsula, paddling 14 hours that day, just to unpack my kayak for the night, camp, and repack in the morning. The first few days of paddling I must have spent 10 of the 14 hours of paddling thinking about the work that needed to be done at the farm. The other four hours I spent wondering why I ever thought it would be fun to fight waves for hundreds of miles in the blistering sun and pouring rains just to sleep on another rocky beach at night. The NOLS curriculum teaches seven leadership skills, one of those being

tolerance for adversity and uncertainty, which seems particularly well suited to raising cattle. The foundation of this skill is readily taking on challenges, as persevering through adversity can result in the most spectacular feelings of accomplishment and the most profound moments of self-discovery. The skill does not, however, suggest that we need to “suffer at all costs.” Part of its description is to “Live in rhythm with what you cannot control,” and “Control what you can.” It’s a balancing act, deciding when you should push through discomfort or when you should change the situation. As cattle producers you frequently end up in challenging and uncomfortable situations, it’s the nature of the industry – it is under no obligation to provide us with fair weather, predictable prices, or

Life is just as unpredictable as the weather and being able to both tolerate discomfort and change plans based on unexpected events. Being a cattleman isn’t just a profession, it’s a way of life. It’s clear in our association that you, our members, are true cattlemen from your tolerance and adaptability. As a member you should have a sense of pride in raising cattle that are just as tolerant and adaptable as a cowboy. Many of you have had to swim your Brafords to higher ground, battle unexpected winter snows, head out to check cows on crunchy brown grass as the dust blows, thank goodness Braford cattle were made to make things work, even under the harshest conditions. The foundation for tolerance for adversity is readily taking on challenges and persevering. As an association, we, too, feel the challenges of our members. The unexpected

registration papers and genetic prediction data on the most revered cross of cattle in the world. To ensure long-term success for the UBB, we want our membership, our stakeholders, to be part of the long-range planning for our organization. Our membership, the cattlemen who wait out unfavorable conditions for the sweet feelings of success, are our driving force and our number one asset. The UBB Board of Directors will be hosting a long-range planning session this fall and I would like to not only invite each and every one of you, but encourage you to join us. Be sure to visit www.brafords.org for full details about the event.

Many of you have had to swim your Brafords to higher ground, battle unexpected winter snows, head out to check cows on crunchy brown grass as the dust blows, thank goodness Braford cattle were made to make things work, even under the harshest conditions. comfortable market conditions. Challenges like these are what make raising cattle such an incredible experience. When you persevere the feeling of accomplishment is second to none. But at times you must make a change rather than just sticking out a bad situation.

events that effect our members, effect the UBB as an organization, whether it’s a member who loses a lease and has no choice but to sell off cows, or a member who has to wean calves early and ship them to the sale barn. The UBB is in a unique position. We offer

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Vaccination Effects on Reproduction By Hannah Wine

As a cow-calf producer, you’ve invested in the best genetics you can get, studied pedigrees, analyzed EPDs, built marketing programs, and much, much more. Those top-of-the-line pedigrees and trait-leading EPDs are not of much value without calves on the ground to turn a profit. Reproductive performance of your cowherd is critical.

The effects of your vaccination program can often be hard to see, which makes it extra imperative to ensure that vaccinations aren’t the reproductive management mistake undoing all of your hard work.

There are numerous factors that affect reproductive efficiency, such as heifer development, nutrition, cow body condition, bull fertility and more. George Perry, PhD, from the Department of Animal Science at South Dakota State University, explains one very important detail about reproductive management, “The things you do well do not compensate for the mistakes you make. Instead, the mistakes you make cancel out all of the things you do well.”

n Infectious Diseases Affecting Reproduction here are a host of different diseases such as BVD, IBR, Trich, Lepto, Vibrio and more that can affect reproduction. Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD) and Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR or “Red-nose”) are two viruses that impact reproductive performance by decreasing conception rates and embryonic loss. BVD is widespread throughout cattle herds in the United States and the world. BVD is spread through body fluids, including saliva, respiratory secretions and manure. The virus doesn’t linger in the environment, but it can survive long enough to be transferred with infected equipment, needles and palpation sleeves. Signs of BVD depend on the stage of gestation when the cow is infected. “Infection during mid-gestation may result in the formation of persistently infected calves, which occurs as a result of infection during a period of fetal development, roughly between 40 – 120 days of gestation. Persistently infected

4 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018

calves have incorporated the virus into their own body and will shed high levels of the virus throughout their lifetime. Later infections may result in congenital defects, late-term abortions or the birth of congenitally infected calves, which are weaker and more prone to illness than normal calves,” explaines Dr. Perry. IBR or “Red-nose” is a herpes virus (in the same family as viruses causing cold sores in people). It is typically dormant in nerve clusters in the throat area or lower spine and reactivated during times of stress. Any animal exposed to IBR in the past could potentially shed the virus to susceptible animals. IBR is transmitted in nasal secretions from infected animals. IBR affects both the respiratory tract and the reproductive tract. Reproductively, IBR typically results in infertility or early embryonic death and it is also one of the most frequently diagnosed viral causes of late-term abortions (fifth to ninth month of gestation).


n Controlling IBR and BVD in Your Herd Vaccinating all of the cattle in your herd doesn’t mean that every animal will become immune to the potential diseases. An animal’s immunity response to the vaccine will vary. Some animals respond extremely well, and some respond poorly, but most respond somewhere in between. The goal of your vaccination program shouldn’t be to ensure every animal is immune to disease, but instead it is to stimulate immunity in a majority of the animals to ensure that a widespread outbreak doesn’t occur.

n Which to Use: Modified-Live or Killed Vaccines? It’s likely that while making plans for your vaccination protocol, you have asked yourself, do I use a killed or a modified live vaccine? There is plenty of information out there to support going either way. It seems to be a never-ending debate as to which way to go. Modified-live virus (MLV) vaccines trigger the one system of the immune system, cell-mediated immunity, by infecting the host cells with a live virus. Modified-live vaccines are known for a longer-lasting immune response with fewer doses. Whereas killed vaccines, more formally known as inactivated virus vaccines (IVV), stimulate the other system of the immune system, antibodymediated immunity. Killed vaccines require more frequent boostering, but are often recognized for being safer for use on pregnant females. For many years, the research around modified live vs. killed vaccines has focused on the timing of the injections to develop the best immunity and the resulting reproductive effects based on immunity. Recently research by Dr. George Perry along with Russell Daly, DVM, and Christopher Chase, DVM, from the Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences Department at South Dakota State University (SDSU), has uncovered that the vaccine type administered around breeding season plays an instrumental role in conception rates. Take a likely situation. You buy a group of heifers, and you don’t know their vaccination history and need to get the vaccinations taken care of before breeding. With naïve heifers (meaning they have never been vaccinated)

or heifers or cows with an unknown vaccination status, a modified-live vaccination will not only affect the first cycle but extended cycles. The SDSU study found that 10% of naïve heifers vaccinated 36 and 6 days prior to AI with a killed vaccine (ViraShield 6VL5HB) experienced abnormal estrous cycles compared to 38% of naïve heifers vaccinated 8 days prior AI with a modified-live vaccine (BoviSheild Gold FP5). Dr. Perry advises against using modified-live vaccines in naïve females around breeding season. When vaccinating females that have been on a modified-live vaccine protocol their entire life, the SDSU study found that killed vaccines have the greatest impact on pregnancy success. In a group of cows that had been given modified live vaccines as calves, cows that received a killed vaccine 30 days prior to breeding had a 46.5% AI conception rate compared to cows that received a modified-live vaccine 30 days prior to breeding at a 40% AI conception rate and a control group that received saline injections at a 43.3% AI conception rate. “Our studies show that AI conception rates are better with killed vaccines than modified-live vaccines,” says Dr. Perry, “We went on to analyze the impact of exposing these females to IBR and BVD following their vaccination. In the females vaccinated with modified-live, 13% aborted and 17% of their calves or fetuses had IBR and/or BVD. In the females vaccinated with killed, 5% aborted and zero percent of their calves or fetuses had IBR or BVD. Of the females that received saline injections and were then exposed to the IBR/BVD challenge, 73% aborted and IBR and BVD was detected in 100% of the calves or fetuses. You have solid fetal protection if you switch to a killed vaccine.”

n Setting Your Cattle Up for Reproductive Success To ensure you have the immune system covered on your replacement animals, Dr. Perry recommends that you give a modified-live vaccination around weaning time to activate that side of the immune system and then move to using killed vaccines in your replacement females to activate the other side of the immune system, ensuring the best possible reproductive scenario. After all, the more females you get bred early in the breeding season, the heavier and heartier your calves are at weaning, and the higher your profit. “Modified-live vaccines are needed to set up animals; we need that side of the animal’s immune system primed. But, when moving to the reproductive herd, modified-live vaccines can have adverse effects,” explaines Dr. Perry, “There’s mounting evidence of the adverse effects of modified-live vaccines occurring. In our research study of 19 herds and 3,000 animals we have seen a 5-8% difference in conception rates between modified-live and killed vaccines given on label.” Pre-breeding vaccinations programs should be carefully considered when it comes to the proper product and vaccination timing. It’s best to work directly with your local veterinarian to develop a plan that works for your herd, keeping in mind that your vet will know the level of disease exposure of your herd.

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11

Braford Breed Friday, October 5th – 12 p.m. EAST TEXAS LIVESTOCK MARKET

Crockett, Texas

SELLING PERFORMANCE-TESTED, RANCH-READY BULLS 35 BRAFORD BULLS

5 BRAFORD PLUS BULLS

1 5 F—1 BRAFORD BULLS 20 BRED BRAFORD HEIFERS 10 OPEN BRAFORD HEIFERS

Lot

Lot

Lot

Lot

Lot

Lot

50 6

421

4 02

422

410

511

Request a catalog and watch videos at www.brafords.org/sale Regional Sale Contacts: Rhea Shields, LA 225.279.3212 • Rodney Roberson, TX 936.569.4872 Jim Harvey, FL 863.697.6624 • Bill Rainer, AL 903.780.6455 Hannah Wine, UBB Executive Director 540.272.1682 6 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


BRAFORD B

+ PLUS Adding More

The Braford Plus Program Developed with Design in Mind

The Braford Plus program was designed to allow producers the opportunity to register cattle that perfectly mix the maternal strength and built-in longevity of the Braford with the earlier maturing, carcass-driven strengths of the Angus and Red Angus breeds. The end-product is cattle that combine the best of three worlds — cattle that exceed all expectations in terms of longevity, with innate mothering ability, heat tolerance; and that suit the feedlot and packers ever increasing standards for efficiency, rate of maturity; and ultimately land on the right side of the grid. The advantages of the Braford Plus program will be seen in a better ability to market these composite cattle to all sectors, whether it be the commercial cowman, the backgrounder, the feedlot, the packer and ultimately the consumer.

BRAFORD B

What is Braford Plus?

PLUS+

Braford Plus refers to the offspring of the mating of a purebred Braford (3/8 Brahman, 5/8 Hereford) or F1 Braford (1/2 Hereford, 1/2 Brahman) to a registered Angus or Red Angus. Braford Plus cattle can be registered as multi-generational breeding of Braford Plus cattle (i.e., the resulting offspring of a registered Braford Plus bred to a registered Braford Plus). All Braford and F1 sires and dams must be registered with the UBB, and all Angus and Red Angus sires and dams must be on file with the UBB.

BRAFORD B

By the numbers, a Braford Plus is a 3/16 Brahman, 5/16 Hereford and 1/2 Angus or Red Angus if the result of a mating of a purebred Braford to an Angus or Red Angus or, if the Braford Plus is the result of mating an F1 Braford to an Angus or Red Angus, the Braford Plus is a ¼ Brahman, ¼ Hereford and ½ Angus or Red Angus.

Why Braford Plus?

PLUS

The function of crossbreeding is to optimize heterosis and it is important to utilize breeds whose genetics will complement each other. Braford Plus is the convenient way to capture heterosis and value. This crossbreeding system has the ideal balance of maternal and carcass traits. No two breeds offer more commitment to profitability and function in the southeast and southwest United States than the Braford x Angus or Braford x Red Angus mating. Braford Plus cattle are registered with documented parentage and EPDs. Braford Plus offer a simple and powerful way to optimize hybrid vigor. Use Braford Plus cattle to take advantage of management convenience and hybrid vigor in a single package while producing cattle that fit the pasture, the feedlot, and the meat case.

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BQA

IT’S NOT JUST FOR THE NEWBIES By Hannah Wine If you’ve got cattle, you’ve probably gotten a flyer in your mailbox from the local extension office for a Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) certification session at some point over the years. It’s the kind of thing you open and think, “Hmm, don’t they know I aged out of 4-H 15 years ago?” Or maybe you open it and it reminds you, “I really need to do something about that old cow with the bad eye before it gets worse. Let’s figure out withdrawal times and see when I can ship her,” and set the flyer down (never to look at it again) to go hook up the trailer and get the old cow up.

Maybe you haven’t gotten a BQA flyer in the mail . . . .

What Is BQA? BQA programming focuses on educating and training cattle producers, farm advisors, and veterinarians on the issues in cattle food safety and quality. State BQA programs are voluntary, locally led, and administered through organizations such as state beef councils, Land Grant Universities and state cattle associations. The program focuses on production of defectfree food, biosecurity, animal health and well-being, production performance and environmental stewardship.

A Great Refresher Course

identification, body condition scoring and proper injection sites. A portion of the day will be in seminars learning about verification of withdrawal times, recording vaccine serial numbers, proper vaccine handling, National Animal Identification programs, biosecurity and tons of other pertinent industry topics. The program emphasizes the importance of doing things the right way. It just might be that for as long as you can remember, come branding time, dad has been there giving intramuscular injections in the hip. What you might not know is that hip injections cause an injection site blemish

Who Is BQA?

It is never easy to hear you’ve been doing it wrong all along. But in all reality, things change overtime and BQA is a realistic way to keep yourself up to date. Even you know that you don’t know it all. BQA is designed to build on what you already know. You might even learn a trick of two. Sometimes it’s even worse to be reminded you’re doing it wrong when you really know better. BQA is a great refresher course to remind you that some of your old habits have got to go. You know, that little cubby hole in your truck that’s filled with old needles? (I know, it’s safe, they’ve got tops on them… right?) That’s not really where they should go—a sharps container would be ideal-- but BQA is realistic: they’ll suggest you use an old bleach bottle, laundry detergent container or some other opaque sturdy plastic container with a screw-top lid. If worse comes to worse, a soda bottle is better than loose needles in the truck cab.

Nearly every state in the U.S. has an active BQA program. Funding for these efforts ranges from state-derived Beef Checkoff money to national Beef Checkoff support through the Cattlemen’s Beef Board. State-based activities are often enhanced through locally derived private and public grants.

Putting BQA Lessons to Use

that work best for their producers.

It’s not just as easy as spending your Saturday afternoon at the local sale barn listening to speakers and watching demos. Well, it is. But, there’s also the critical point of your absorbing what you’re learning and taking it home and putting it to work. BQA programs cover a wide variety of topics from care and husbandry practices to records management and industry issues. BQA certification is available online, however most producers attend in-person classes, most of which have hands-on sessions on topics like low-stress handling, proper 8 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018

While state BQA programs chart their own direction, program assistance and national leadership is provided by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. The Joint Producer Education Committee continually updates a set of recommended national BQA guidelines from which states can base their BQA programs. The BQA Manual is the overarching protocol, providing some consistency across the state programs. Because the beef industry is so diversified, the program allows states the opportunity to provide specifics

in the steaks from that animal, and they may also toughen the meat in an area up to several inches around the injection site. According to the 1995 National BQA Audit, injection-site blemishes cost the beef industry $188 million annually, and cost producers approximately $7.05 per head. Times have changed. It’s been proven that producers need to make some changes too. For proper injections sites, injections (all intramuscular (IM) and routine


subcutaneous (SQ) medications and vaccines) should be given in front of the shoulders-- never in the rump or back leg. BQA guidelines recommend all medications be given subcutaneously, intravenously, intranasally or orally if possible, noting that it is against BQA guidelines to give SQ injections along the ribs or in the elbow region. Giving injections above the curve of the ribs could cause excessive trim in the area of the prime rib cuts. When intramuscular medications must be used, dad needs to be giving those in front of the shoulder and the injections should never exceed 10 cc per IM site. If you have a 24 cc dose, rather than two 12 cc injections, you should give three 8 cc injections. When it comes to SQ injection amounts, there are no requirements other than what is listed on the product label or recommended by your vet. BQA practices have helped to significantly reduce incidences of injection site lesions in fed beef cattle, but injection site lesions are still a frequent problem in older kill cows and bulls.

BQA and the Big Picture A large part of the beef industry’s job involves making sure that beef is safe and wholesome for consumers. Perhaps you’re thinking, “But I’m a cow/calf producer, I’m not in the fed cattle business.” Truth is, BQA is just as important for

cow/calf producers. Markets cows and market bulls account for approximately 15 to 20 percent of the total annual U.S. beef production. In the 1990s, the USDA mandated that all meat packing and processing plants develop and implement Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programs. However, mandatory regulations do not exist for the preharvest segments of the beef industry. To provide a quality, wholesome product without government regulation, industry groups have developed voluntary safety and quality assurance programs. No matter what type of cattle you raise, the size of your herd or even your reason for owning them, cattle all end up on someone’s plate. Participation in the BQA program is a tool to show our customers, whether they are cattle buyers or beef consumers, that producers take every possible step to raise beef responsibly. BQA does more than just help beef producers capture more value from their market cattle: BQA also builds a positive public image and instills consumer confidence in the beef industry. Participating in BQA is a step toward ensuring the continuation of the lifestyle of raising cattle for the generations to come.

REGISTERED BRAFORDS

THE FUTURE OF OUR BREED! Wade and Lynette Granger 675 Grangerville Rd. • Bell City, LA 70630 337.598.2759 • grangercattleco@camtel.net

Danny Boudreaux 337-905-2330 Cell 337-249-9066 3475 Grand Chenier Hwy. Grand Chenier, LA 70643 boudreauxandson@camtel.net

Michael Boudreaux Cell 337-303-4167 162 Eugene Rd. Lake Charles, LA 70607 mlbbrafords@yahoo.com

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Ensuring

THAT THE OPERATION IS RUNNING SMOOTHLY By Courtney Wesner, Freelance Writer

At this point in the cattle cycle, risk and volatility have been significantly reduced. Cattle prices, in all segments, are well below what producers saw at the peaks a couple of years ago, and market fundamentals have now snuffed out much of the market’s emotion. This decrease of risk and volatility is a well-deserved and needed breath of fresh air for ranchers and farmers alike. However, with a projected lower price structure still staring them in the face through the duration of 2018, it remains very important for producers to evaluate an operation’s efficiency and profitability accurately. The goal of evaluation is simply to ensure business stability and stayablity, as the operation navigates its way back to the rewards of another peak pricing year. Heather Gessner, South Dakota State University Extension Business Management Field Specialist poses seven crucial questions that each producer should ask himself or herself in order to ensure that their operation is running efficiently and profitably.

Q1: Do you operate like a business? There are some very specific guidelines of business operation that Gessner says all farm/ranch managers should execute: • prepare and present your balance sheet, expected cash flow, and profit/loss statement to your lender or banker; •  be prepared to answer questions about working capital availability, this would include past numbers alongside future predictions; •  clearly illustrate trends in return on investment (ROI), debt coverage, and operating expense ratios. Though financial statement preparation may be far from one’s priority on the list of daily work to get done around the ranch, Gessner poses a great thought as to why it becomes so important. “With many of these financial statements, you are putting yourself in a more informed place to make decisions,” Gessner says. “If you know your breakeven, you may not always make money, but you can make decisions to ensure less loss.” With this information in mind, daily operating decisions can be made from a place of fact and not speculation.

Q2: Have you reviewed machinery costs? Gessner cites decreasing machinery costs, on a per acre basis, as a potential cost cutting measure in an operation. In order to execute this, she suggests evaluating and feeling out the prospect of outsourcing and custom rates. She even invites producers to entertain the idea of joint ownership, with family or neighbors, on larger, more costly pieces of equipment. “Every once in a while, producers need to think about giving up some independence if it helps curb costs,” she says.

Q3: Can land costs be lowered? Land cost is another area that Gessner urges producers to try and cut costs. She urges producers to not be afraid to revisit and inquire about current rental agreements and to explore the possibility of lowering rent based on a history of good land management practices or even based upon current downward product pricing structures. Also, while interest rates remain low, it may be a good time to look at refinancing long-term notes. 10 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


Q4: What are your family living expenses? Gessner is an advocate of separate household and business accounts. This allows for costs to be more accurately and effectively tracked and evaluated. It is her advice that the family sit down and develop an attainable and realistic family budget that each member of the unit will adhere to. Her rule of thumb, for those new to household budgeting, is $20,000 per adult and $10,000 per year for each child in the family.

Q5: Can production be improved to boost revenue? Cutting costs is most oftentimes the first place a producer turns when faced with diminishing returns at the end of the year. However, it is important not to overlook the importance that boosting revenue can have on an improvement of the bottomline. Gessner places most importance here on increasing weaning percentage and/or increasing the number of pounds sold as prime opportunities to increase income. This doesn’t happen without investment in genetics, or at face value, a cost up front. She points out that knowing your current weaning percentage and pounds marketed are a prime pieces of information to start evaluation of this question.

Q6: Has the operation’s marketing plan been reviewed? In farming and ranching it’s easy to get caught in the “this is what we’ve always done” way of doing things. However, the reality is that the market is constantly changing, and what the consumer demands does not always remain the same over time. Consider opportunities to add value to your current operation. Value-added opportunities come in many different shapes and packages. Maybe it’s as simple as changing a health protocol, developing a Facebook page, backgrounding, utilizing a bull test program, maketing via video auction, participating in a branded beef program, the list goes on and on.

Q7: Could you provide custom services? An option that every producer should consider to fatten up the revenue column is using owned equipment to provide services for other producers. Gessner suggests such options as baling hay or custom feeding calves, heifers, or even bulls. For those farming families that try to increase income by one family member working off of the daily operation, Gessner stresses that the costs must also be considered. “If town is 70 miles away, is it worth it? What does it cost you?” she questions. “With any changes that are made to the operation, the additional expenses must be evaluated and monitored to ensure that the change isn’t costing more than the revenue it’s generating.” Gessner concludes, “Continuously asking questions to evaluate the efficiency and profitability of a farm or ranch business is a necessity in today’s volatile ag market.”

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Association News Seeking High Quality Open Braford Heifers for the Spring 2019 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale

Bull Development Program: Now accepting commitments for Spring 2019 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale Commitments for the UBB Bull Development Program are being accepted until October 4 for Braford, F-1, odd percentage, and Braford Plus bulls born December 2017 – May 2018. A $50/head commitment fee must be submitted with your commitment form by October 4. For form and complete details on the bull development performance testing program, visit www. brafords.org > Genetics > Bull & Heifer Development.

Commitments for the UBB Heifer Development Program are being accepted until October 4 for open, purebred Braford females calved November 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018. A $50/head commitment fee must be submitted with your commitment form by October 4. Heifers must be delivered to Graham Land and Cattle in Gonzales, Texas, by November 3. For form and complete details visit www.brafords.org > Genetics > Bull & Heifer Development.

Houston International Braford Sale Commitment Deadline November 15 – Consign the kind that you would want to buy and that hurt to sell! The National Braford Show at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo is slated for Saturday, March 2, 2019. United Braford Breeders will once again be holding the International Braford Sale in conjunction with the Houston Stock Show. The sale will be Friday, March 1at 7 p.m. in the East Arena. We had a great sale in 2018, and we’re aiming to make 2019 even better. We are looking for some of the BEST Braford genetics in the breed for this sale. Commitments due November 15. Visit www.brafords.org > Events > International Braford Sale for all of the details or contact Sale Coordinator, Danny Boudreaux or UBB Executive Director, Hannah Wine with questions.

Check out the Everything Braford Group on Facebook Facebook users are invited to join the ‘Everything Braford’ buy/sell group on Facebook. The page is set up for everything Braford cattle related. Advertising for Hereford, Brahman, or Braford cattle or frozen genetics for sale private treaty or public auction is encouraged. UBB members and non-members alike are welcome to use this group as a forum for discussion and information.

New Member Report February Scout Davis, Alvin, TX, Junior Alders Ranch, Midland, TX, Adult Allen & Myra Heard, Fannin, TX, Adult Allison Herring, Alvin, TX, Adult Ashley Livestock, McCoy, TX, Adult Bartley Cattle Co., Tatum, TX, Adult Brad Metzner, Green Ridge, MO, Adult CJ Livestock, Chatham, LA, Adult Charles Barton, Jacksonville, TX, Adult Fairfield Farm, Rosharon, TX, Adult Haynie Ranch, Navasota, TX, Adult Jack Callen, Greenville, AL, Adult James Smithey, Lake City, FL, Adult Johnson Ranch, Florence, AZ, Adult Paben Cattle Co., Waller, TX, Adult TP Farms, Waller, TX, Adult Watson Ranch, Venus, FL, Adult

March Claire Baccigalopi, Creole, LA, Junior Jaxon Smith, Creole, LA, Junior Alee Gunter, Perry, FL, Adult Brad Gambino, Marrero, LA, Adult Courson Livestock, LLC, Andalusia, AL, Adult JD Morman, Wills Point, TX, Adult

12 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018

April Kim D Istre, Gueydan, LA, Adult May Carl Mathis Dixon, Alapaha, GA, Adult CM Cattle, Iowa, LA, Adult Golden Pond Farm, Alba, TX, Adult Reecie Ranch, Church Point, LA, Adult Wyatt Glen Bonsall, Grand Chenier, LA, Adult

June Kalli Smith, Gilliam, AR, Junior Shane & Valerie Broussard, Abbeville, LA, Adult

August Annie Vick, Iowa, LA, Junior Cesilee Oliver, Welsh, LA, Junior Jack Lee, Pinola, MS, Junior Lane Spell, Iowa, LA, Junior McAllen Ranch, Edinburg, TX, Adult Paul Young, Cameron, LA, Adult


Lot 421

Lot 426

Lot 425

Please consider our bulls at the

Lot 422

Advancing the Breed Sale • • • • • Friday, October 5, 2018 • East Texas Livestock, Crockett, Texas • • • • •

Some General Comments about the bulls and their numbers: The Braford breed is in a transitional period with respect to performance reporting and performance evaluation. In the UBB’s new system, the EPDs of multiple generation Brafords seem to fall in the expected ranges and distributions that they have for many years. Use them with confidence. The early generation Brafords and Braford Plus cattle are poorly characterized by their printed EPDs. Please don’t discount their value because of these evaluation shortcomings. We have used top performing Hereford and Red Angus genetics (according to highly accurate EPDs) to create Brafords and Red Angus crosses that should advance your breeding program. If you have concerns about the printed EPDs on these early generation cattle, please take the time to look the Hereford and Red Angus sires up in their respective breed evaluations – or call us to assist you in that process. Buy these early generation cattle with as much confidence as the multiple generation Brafords. Our offering includes several first generation Braford and Braford Plus (Red Angus X Braford) bulls. We have been highly selective in purchasing bulls and semen to produce these new genetics for the Braford breed. We are using these cattle ourselves with great success. Please don’t hesitate to ask any questions you might have about the potential of any of these bulls. Lot 430 Lot 421: This is a polled first generation ET son of the renowned Hereford bull Revolution. Revolution is known for generating daughters that produce influential herdsires for everyone who owns them. This bull is a flushmate to last year’s second high seller in this sale that was selected by Bill Rainer. If you want a big, powerful, high growth bull, you need to give this big brindle rascal a look. Selling full possession but we would like to keep a small semen interest in this powerhouse. Lot 422: This is another first generation ET calf out of our lead donor cow 827/0. He is sired by one of our favorite bulls in the Hereford Breed – NJW 98S R117 RIBEYE 88X ET. 88X is known for producing tremendous daughters with perfect udders and all the milk you need in a beef cow. 88X offspring are also characterized as having lower birth weights, lower mature weights and lots of marbling. This widebody bull with small scurs is a little more moderate in his frame but makes up for it with width and thickness. He is really good. We plan to keep a flushmate that is a year younger. Lot 423: This scurred first generation bull is a son of Churchill Stud. Stud is known for growth, milk, great udders and ribeye area. This dark red bull is an outcross to everything in the Braford breed. Lot 424: This dark colored bull is a Critical Mass son out of a Bill Rainer Martin Manso daughter. He has extremely good EPDs across the board featuring high growth, milk and excellent muscling. This is a big stout bull that should work well on black cows. Lot 425: This first generation ET bull is one of the stoutest and thickest bulls in the sale. His sire, Trust, has been a mainstay power bull in the Hereford breed for several years and has it all – growth, milk, fertility, marbling and ribeye. If you can use a thick power bull that has been dehorned, consider this potential herd bull for Braford breeders. Lot 426: This is a polled multiple generation Braford ET bull. His sire, Mass Transit, is a Critical Mass son that we sold into Oklahoma as a yearling. With a huge ribeye scan, we thought enough of the Mass

Thunderstorm R Cattle Co.

Nacogdoches, Texas 936.569.4872 • rlr@thunderstormrcattle.com

Transit calf to keep a semen interest. The donor dam of Lot 426, Ugly Betty, is a top producing Legacy daughter that we have flushed more than any other cow in our program. This bull is very complete in his look, he is good sheathed and he has EPDs at the top of the breed for growth, milk and carcass traits. Lot 427: You’ve found a power bull in this polled first generation ET bull by Churchill Stud. He is a flushmate to Lot 423 by Stud. He’s big and stout, dark red and is full of muscle. He’ll help a purebred operation or really add some punch to a commercial operation. Lot 428: This polled Gator son is a very clean sheathed attractive bull. He’ll put a ton of Milk into his daughters and plenty growth and carcass value too. Lot 429: This solid Red, polled Critical Mass son has plenty growth, milk and top 1% carcass EPDs. Lot 430: This scurred Gator son has the look and EPDs of a purebred herdsire. Low birthweight coupled with top 1% yearling weight and top 1% milk make for an impressive combination. Out of a top Legacy daughter that’s in our IVF donor group, don’t overlook this complete package that’s a potential herd bull. Lot 431: This dehorned prospect is heifer safe yet is one of our top yearling weight bulls in this sale. He’s exceptionally clean made and out of a very good, high-performance cow we’ve recently flushed. Lot 432: This dark colored, Hereford marked Gator son is extremely clean sheathed. He’s got balanced EPDs and is out of a Critical Mass daughter that is a regular producer. Lot 433: This is a good looking dehorned Critical Mass son. He is out of a very good and consistent Legacy daughter and he had the top REA/CWT in our offering. Lot 502: This is the first Dinero son for us to sell. He is polled and has a lot of early growth. Lot 503: This dehorned Critical Mass son is truly one of the power bulls in the sale. He has a little extra chrome on him but he is big, stout, soft in his makeup and has top 1% EPDs for yearling weight, REA and marbling. Lot 504: Like the Lot 503 bull, this is a big, soft-made Critical Mass son. These two bulls are a matched set with excellent growth and carcass EPDs. This one is out of an older (2009) Hulk daughter that has been an excellent and consistent producer. Lot 505: This is a very attractive, moderate-framed, polled Gator son. He is exceptionally good sheathed, has balanced EPDs and should be heifer safe. Lot 601: This polled power bull is bred a little different as he has about 5% more Brahman content than the 3/8-5/8 bulls. He is big, stout and will impart plenty growth and maternal ability. He will produce purebred Brafords when used on purebred cows. Lot 701: This is the first of our four Braford Plus bulls (Red Angus X Braford). All of these should be heifer safe. He’s a scurred ET son of the popular Red Angus sire Takeover and out of our top producing Legacy daughter. We retained a flushmate to breed to our Braford Plus heifers. Note his carcass ultrasound numbers. Lot 702: This is another Braford Plus scurred bull. Recognize his high ultrasound marbling value. Lot 704: This solid red Braford Plus bull is polled and should make a great heifer bull. Lot 705: This polled Braford Plus bull is one of our favorites. Pay attention to his yearling weight and yearling weight EPD. He is the right size, wide, clean, and has tremendous carcass numbers. He should work on heifers but is much, much more. We’d like to retain a little semen interest in this bull to use on some Braford Plus females.

Wayne Boozer Brafords Douglass, Texas www.thunderstormrcattle.com

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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BRAFORDS: Just One Part of the Equation at Theriot Farms

By : Hannah Wine

“When the floods come, we put cows at my house, it’s the highest point we have. We just stockpile them there until the water goes down and then move them back out.”

Nestled on Highway 14 on the outskirts of the southwest Louisiana town of Lake Arthur is a set of grain bins, with combines parked waiting for harvest, crawfish traps piled in the barn, and miles and miles of rice fields. Lake Arthur is home to about 3,000 people, and to Theriot Farms, a diversified rice, crawfish, and cattle operation. “My grandpa came from Cameron Parish and worked for Superior Oil and started farming here in Jefferson Davis Parish, and we’ve been here since. We work cows and we farm. That’s all we do,” remarked Jason Theriot. Jason, his brother Gerrad, and their father Sidney all farm. “We each have our own separate operations, but we own equipment together and help each other out,” explained Theriot. “On my side of it, I grow about 990 acres of rice, 500 acres of crawfish, 165 commercial cows, 100 commercial heifers and 30 registered Brafords, and oversee 150 head for my dad and brother.” By no means a small operation, Theriot oversees much of the farm work with the help of three hired men on the crop and cattle side and three migrant workers for the seasonal crawfish portion. “Crawfish is probably the most profitable sector of our operation, and other years it’s the cattle. The rice is a struggle with the commodity prices. Honestly, we had to sell some cows when the farming was bad in 2005. Prices were rough. I’ve planted soybeans that just didn’t work. I’m just about to finish paying on soybeans from five years ago,” reflected Theriot. “The crops are harder than the cattle, I can move the cows if it comes to flood or sell them. The crops I have to ride out.” Jason, 38, will tell you he has farmed for 18 years, but it’s clear he’s been farming much longer. “My dad was a farmer, and it’s just what we were raised to do. My dad ran rice and Brahmaninfluenced commercial cows. I loved riding in the combine with him as a kid. He got me started driving a cart when I was eight.

14 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018

Right: Braford breeder Jason Theriot resides in Lake Arthur, Louisiana, with his wife, Charmayne, and children Mason, Sidney and Kinley.

He taught me how to work. When I was about 12, I would pen my dad’s cows just to run them through the chute because I enjoyed it. I was always more interested in the cows, but I farmed too,” said Theriot. Work ethic is something Theriot and his wife Charmayne, a prekindergarten teacher, have instilled in their three children, Mason, 17, Sidney, 12, and Kinley, 7, by raising them on the farm. Mason, a senior in high school, works day in and day out on the farm he does everything from checking rice field water levels to sorting cows. “Mason has about 15 cows of his own, both commercial and Brafords, and we partner on some Brafords together. Next year he’ll be planting crops of his own,” said Theriot. Sidney, named for both her grandfather and her great-grandfather, is the one in the family with the love for cattle, especially the Brafords. When the Theriots’ haul to a In addition to the cattle, Theriot farms 990 cattle show, you can acres of rice and 500 acres of crawfish. always find Sidney quietly working with her cattle. “Sidney flat loves the cattle,” said Theriot. “She loves to show, and she loves the Brafords. She owns four or five of her own, and she’ll surely get more.” Kinley, fondly known as “Chicken” is no chicken by any means. She spends most of her days on top of her horse. She loves baseball and you can often find her working cows alongside the best of them. Brafords are the most recent addition to Theriot Farms. They’re


family affair. “We’re eight years into the Brafords now, we got started with the Brafords when Mason was nine. He wanted to show, and at the time all of my friends were showing Brafords, so we went with it. Now our kids show calves we raise at parish and district shows and Houston each year,” said Theriot. The Braford program at Theriot Farm is a small portion of the cattle operation. “We run cows on eight different places within a 40-mile stretch from Klondike to Holmwood, totaling about a thousand acres,” Theriot explained. “I grass about 100 commercial heifers over the summer, and on the cow side of things I have primarily spring calving cows, with just a handful of fall-born calves. Everything is bred naturally; on my commercial cows I use Angus, Brangus, Charolais, and Braford bulls. On the Braford side, I partnered with the Todd Benoit in 2014 and bought a sale-topping Harvey Ranch bull, HR Profitmaker 4084, from the Bull Development Program Sale. My plan was to get the best bull I could and produce some good Braford females and eventually put some of my own bulls in the Bull Development Program.” Theriot’s experience with commercial cattle has set him up for success in his Braford business. “When I was getting started, I got my first Brafords from Scott Nunez. Since then I’ve bought Braford cattle over the years from Chandler, Bernie Benoit, Bill Rainer, and others,” said Theriot. Theriot’s Braford program isn’t filled with lots of extra bells and whistles, but instead is managed very practically and similarly to a commercial operation. “I don’t have some big method when I’m buying cows. I keep it really simple. If I like them, I like them. They’ve got to have good udders, tight sheaths. So far I haven’t had a huge selection of calves just from a quantity standpoint. The cows have been young, and 2018 has been my first year to really market my calves,” Theriot explained. The simplicity of Theriot’s selection tools has proven to be successful both in the showring and in the real world of performance testing. Theriot consigned his first heifer to the Houston International Sale in March of 2018. She was sired by a bull owned by Shannon Harrington. The heifer topped the sale as the high selling animal, selling to National Junior Braford Association member Mason Mhire of Welsh, Louisiana. Mhire has seen success in the showring with the heifer, standing second in class to the Champion Heifer at the 2018 All American Braford Show in Texarkana.

Lot 506 in the Fall 2018 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale, sired by HR Profitmaker 4084. This bull made his way to the top of the program, scanning with an adjusted 4.49 IMF, making him the highest IMF bull of the more than 70 bulls in the performance test.

In the winter of 2018, Theriot sent three bulls to Gonzales, Texas, for the UBB Bull Development Program at Graham Land and Cattle as a first-time participant. All three bulls surpassed the rigorous performance testing standards to qualify for the Advancing the Braford Breed Bull Sale at the East Texas Livestock in Crockett, Texas, on October 5. One bull in particular, sired by HR Profitmaker 4084, made his way to the top of the program, scanning with an adjusted 4.49 on intramuscular fat (IMF), making him the highest IMF bull of the more than 70 bulls in the performance testing program and uniquely, scanning with just a .22 on adjusted backfat. The age-old farm saying of this is how we do it because this is how we’ve always done it, doesn’t stick at Theriot’s. “We used to send cattle to Graham Land and Cattle to feed them. Now we plant rye grass and don’t have much of a need to ship the cattle over there. I planted millet for the first time this year for some summer grass, and thought it would work out pretty well. We had too much rain from the wet spring, and I got it planted a little too early, and it just didn’t turn out like I’d hoped.” Setting goals, steadily working toward them, and enjoying it along the way seem to keep Theriot going. “I’d like to put heifers in the UBB heifer development program and expand my Braford herd to about 50 Braford cows. I like raising Brafords. They’re easy keepers, and they’re calm. But, it has its challenges. There is the paper work, which I don’t love, and keeping the Braford cows separate with different bulls can be a challenge. But, I love the cow shows for the visiting with people and the social time. It’s a great way to raise kids,” said Theriot. Lake Arthur is in the heart of Braford country and Theriot is close with many UBB members, but he’s followed his own path when it comes to producing Brafords. “I’ve sort of done this Braford thing on my own. Scott Harrington and I talk about Brafords all the time but I’ve kept to my own and done my own

“My plan was to get the best bull I could and produce some good Braford females and eventually put some of my own bulls in the Bull Development Program.” Ms Winkle, raised by Theriot, was the high-selling lot at the 2018 International Braford Sale to Mason Mhire of Welsh, Louisiana, who took second in class at the 2018 All Amercian to the champion heifer.

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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thing when it comes to making the cattle,” said Theriot. Despite Theriot’s following his own path, when it comes time to work cows in the heart of Braford country, it’s a group effort and a community tradition. Family and friends load up their horses and head over to help get cows up for a day of work in the heat and the mud. “I really enjoy working other people’s cows. You spend the days going from place to place, working people’s cows and helping them out,” Theriot said with pride. It’s known throughout Braford country that Theriot has a solid set of horses to work cows with. “Jason always has some really, really good horses. Some of the best ones you’ll find around,” said Chris Green, a UBB member from Lake Arthur. Theriot’s horses

The Braford program isn’t filled with lots of extra bells and whistles, but instead is managed very practically and similarly to their commercial operation.

come from Sweet Lake and the Gray Ranch. “I’ve always ridden mares, in case they get hurt I can still use them as brood mares,” explained Theriot. “We usually work cows twice a year, but we’re penning cows four or five times a year. The way I have cows spread out, I have to move them around a good bit,” said Theriot. “When the floods come, we put cows at my house, it’s the highest point we have. We just stockpile them there until the water goes down and then move them back out.” The unpredictable weather of south Louisiana can make raising cattle in south Louisiana challenging, but that doesn’t seem to faze Theriot. “It’s a matter of having really good friends. You’ve always got help, and it makes it a good time,” said Theriot as he smiled.

Theriot keeps all mares to work cows on so that in the event a mare gets hurt and isn’t able to work, she can be used as a brood mare.

F1 BRAFORD CATTLE 16 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


Selling in the Fall 2018

Advancing the Braford Breed Sale in Crockett Lot 614 January-born F-1 bull (MR. V8 194/7 X DCC H P606 Sharon H6052) Eight elite, registered Braford heifers bred to commercial Brangus bull

Quality genetics for the Braford and commercial industry

A lleman

Cattle Company

Owners: Bryan and Roxanne Alleman Cell 337.278.2586 Office 337.334.9322 allemancattle@cox.net

R egistered UBB Brafords

Owner: Neil J. Alleman 337.581.3171 nja8836@cox.net

2709 Abbeville Hwy. • Rayne, LA 70578

Initial Public offering

HR TRUST ME NOW 53 (130929)

Sired by BR Sooner 6082 ET EPDs: BW: -0.2; BW Mat.: -1.5; WW: 23; YW: 27; Milk: 0; TMAT: 12 ; CWT: 16; REA: 0.22; MARB: 0.01; FAT: 0.04 Percentile Ranks: BW: 30; BW Mat.: 20; WW: 1; YW: 3; Milk: 60; TMAT: --; CWT: 2; REA: 4; MARB: 95; FAT: 85

Semen available $25/straw

Sire of the 2016 NJBA All American Champion Braford Female

Owned by: Alleman Cattle Co. / Bryan Alleman 2709 Abbeville Hwy Rayne, LA 70578 • (337) 278-2586

Shannon Harrington 7068 N Harrington Road Iowa, LA 70647 • 337-485-2442

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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Junior Focus

Welcome Aboard!

NJBA President Hayden Hyman Age: 17 Hometown: Fouke, AR Grade: 12, Genoa High School Years Showing Brafords: 12 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: Maternal power and disease resistance Favorite Show: Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Favorite Candy: Sour Patch Kids President Hayden Hyman

NJBA Vice President Ashlee Primeaux Age: 17 Hometown: Bell City, LA Grade: 12, Bell City High School Years Showing Brafords: 8 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: Easy keepers paired with their maternal ability and early maturity and easy calving, makes it great when you have a large herd and lots of cows calving at the same time! Favorite Show: 2016 All American in Laredo, Texas Favorite Candy: Skittles

NJBA Vice President Ashlee Primeaux

NJBA Secretary Brynlee Boudreaux Age: 15 Hometown: Grand Chenier, LA Grade: 10, Grand Lake High School Years Showing Brafords: 8 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: The loving support of everyone in our breed association Favorite Show: Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Favorite Candy: Blow Pops NJBA Secretary Brynlee Boudreaux

NJBA Treasurer Miriam Hargove Age: 15 Hometown: Manvel, TX Grade: 9, Manvel High School Years Showing Brafords: 1 year Favorite Thing About Brafords: Sweet, gentle disposition Favorite Show: Dixie Nationals Favorite Candy: Chocolate

18 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018

Treasurer Miriam Hargrove


Junior Focus NJBA Reporter Kaitlin Johnson Age: 16 Hometown: Iowa, LA Grade: 11, Iowa High School

NATIONAL JUNIOR BRAFORD ASSOCIATION

Years Showing Brafords: 2 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: That they’re absolutely beautiful Favorite Show: NJBA All American Favorite Candy: Sour Patch Kids Reporter Kaitlin Johnson

NJBA Director Brady Scott Harrington Age: 16 Hometown: Holmwood, LA Grade: 11, Bell City High School

2018-2019 OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS • • • OFFICERS President Hayden Hyman Fouke, Arkansas Vice President Ashlee Primeaux Bell City, LA Secretary Brynlee Boudreaux Lake Charles, LA Treasurer Miriam Hargrove Manvel, TX Reporter Kaitlin Johnson Iowa, LA

Years Showing Brafords: 8 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: Mothering abilities and heat tolerance

• • •

Favorite Show: Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Favorite Candy: Chocolate Director Brady Scott Harrington

NJBA Director Mia Daigle Age: 13 Hometown: Grand Grand Lake, LA Grade: 8, Grand Lake High School Years Showing Brafords: 3 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: Great momma cows and easy to work

DIRECTORS Kylea Mansfield Katy, TX Brady Harrington Iowa, LA Gene Natali Iowa, LA Logan Vest Iowa LA Mia Diagle Grand Lake, LA Joe Natali Iowa, LA Mason Mhire Welsh, LA • • •

Favorite Show: NJBA All American

UBB AMBASSADORS

Favorite Candy: Jolly Ranchers NJBA Director Mia Daigle

NJBA Director Logan Vest

Jamie Davis Pearland, Texas Hayden Hyman Fouke, Arkansas Kylea Mansfield Katy, Texas Mallory Hobson Arkansas

Age: 17 Hometown: Iowa, LA Grade: 12, Bell City High School Years Showing Brafords: 8 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: Ability to survive in almost any climate and mild tempered Favorite Show: Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Favorite Candy: Peanut M&Ms.

NJBA Director Logan Vest

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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Junior Focus NJBA Director Kylea Mansfield Age: 18 Hometown: Katy, TX Grade: Freshman, Blinn College Years Showing Brafords: 3 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: The people at the shows Favorite Show: All American. Favorite Candy: Snickers Director Kylea Mansfield

NJBA Director Gene Natali Age: 16 Hometown: Iowa, LA Grade: 10, Iowa High School Years Showing Brafords: 8 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: What you see is what you get Favorite Show: Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Favorite Candy: Snickers NJBA Director Gene Natali

NJBA Director Joe Natali Age: 13 Hometown: Iowa, LA Grade: 7, Iowa Middle School Years Showing Brafords: 5 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: Getting to travel to all of the different shows with Brafords Favorite Show: State Fair of Louisiana Favorite Candy: Reese’s NJBA Director Joe Natali

NJBA Director Mason Mhire Age: 13 Hometown: XXXXXX Grade: 8, Lacassine High School Years Showing Brafords: 5 years Favorite Thing About Brafords: Their strong stamina to withstand the Louisiana heat and insects Favorite Show: Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Favorite Candy: Skittles NJBA Director Mason Mhire

20 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


Bulls Meeting The Demand Of Cattleman H

85 - Coming 2-Year-Old Hereford Bulls Offered 65 - Hereford Females (Cow Calf Pairs, Bred Cows and Heifers)

NEW E SALE DAT Monday

H

OCT. 22, 2018 At Barnes Herefords Sale Facility Cedartown, GA

WHR 845C B901 BEEFMAKER 435E

UPH Prospector P152 Whitehawk Warrior 845C ET Grandview Cmr 4003 Beth Y115ET

Calved: 08/09/2017 CED

BW

WW

YW

Bull 43828260 DMI

SC

SCF

Whitehawk 4R Revolution 2328 Whitehawk L9 Beefmaid B901ET KCF Miss 3008 M313

Tattoo: 435E

Milk M&G CEM MCW

UDDR

TEAT

CW

FAT

REA

MARB

BMI$

BII$

CHB$

+0.9 +3.1 +75 +123 +0.9 +1.6 +16.6 +32 +70 +2.8 +129 +1.20 +1.10 +96 +0.004 +0.86 +0.23 +$ 28 +$ 25 +$ 39

Please Request Catalog

RMB A568 WHITLOCK 145E ET

Whitehawk 4R Revolution 2328 Whitehawk 2328 Beefmaker A568 KCF Miss 9126J T14

CMR ILR Domino 86P Grandview Cmr Miss 86P Y410 CMR Burks P606 Bonnie 0508 ET CED

BW

WW

YW

DMI

SC

SCF

Calved: 03/16/2017 Milk M&G CEM MCW

UDDR

TEAT

Bull 43780597 CW

FAT

REA

MARB

Tattoo: 145E BMI$

BII$

CHB$

-0.9 +2.1 +61 +98 +0.5 +0.9 +18.7 +27 +57 +0.1 +100 +1.50 +1.60 +76 +0.024 +0.57 +0.29 +$ 29 +$ 25 +$ 32

Roy and Marie Barnes, Owners Kevin Atkins (256) 706-9405 kevinatkins01@gmail.com www.barnesherefords.org

Gary R. Hedrick (678) 858-0914 g.hedrick@whitehawkinc.com Ben Hedrick (404) 216-4274 Herdsman, Diego Gutierrez (678) 629-1804 James Atkins (404) 922-6508 WHITE HAWK www.whitehawkbeefmakers.com RANCH Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

21


T

he United Braford Breeders (UBB) and Cowtown USA hosted the 2018 World Braford Congress in Fort Worth, Texas. International guests from nine countries gathered for a week of tours, seminars, and country reports.

Many thanks to the following sponsors who made the 2018 World Braford Congress possible: TheCattleMarket.net LLC Westway Feed Products Rock Crest Ranch Progentus San Gregorio Ranch

2018 World Braford Congress It was a whirlwind five days filled with Braford cattle, food, friends, and conversation at the 2018 World Braford Congress. The Bauer Family of Bauer Ranch in Winnie, Texas, hosted the pre-Congress tour guests for a fantastic evening of looking through F-1 and Braford Plus cattle, followed by Texas-style fajitas in the party barn. Attendees loaded up the following day to head to Graham Land and Cattle in Gonzales, Texas, where Maurice Janda and Jay LAST NAME showed the group through their yard, which is one of the largest yards in south Texas. Former UBB Executive Director Rodney Robertson joined the group at Graham to show guests through the Spring 2018 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale Cattle that sold the following week. The afternoon included a stop and tour at Sexing Technologies in College Station. After seeing the world-class facilities at Sexing Technologies, guests enjoyed an evening out in the North Gate area of College Station complete with dinner and drinks at Aggieland’s famous Dixie Chicken. The last day of pre-congress tours kicked off with a tour of the Texas A&M Veterinary School and a stop at Kyle Field. After a stop at Texas’s famous Buccee’s gas station, the group made their way north to look through Brafords at Rock Crest Ranch in Athens, Texas. Robert, Carol, Dusty, and Trey Mills served a delicious hamburger lunch at their show barn before loading up on a flatbed to see their cowherd. The group then made their way to the historic Fort Worth Stockyards, where the official Congress activities began with country reports from each of the nine countries represented. This is the first time that all nine countries that are a part of the World Braford Congress have been in attendance for the event. Two days of intensive educational sessions and industry-leading speakers at the River Ranch were the showcase of the event. In true Texas fashion, the Cowtown group ensured that hospitality and meals were top notch for the international Braford guests. The culminating evening events showcased the recognition of the 2018 Braford of the Word recipients. Rounding out the event, the group made plans for the future as Tiziana Prada of Brazil excitedly shared the details for the 2021 World Braford Congress.

22 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


Running

Ranch

Our goal is to produce maternal, moderate framed cattle with lots of growth at weaning and yearling ages. We do not creep feed. We keep replacement heifers from those that were born in the first 60 days of our calving season. We look for structural soundness and use our records, EPDs and ultrasound in making mating decisions. We would like to show you our cattle!

Running

Ranch

4686 N.W. C.R. 150, Greenville, FL 32331

Call for more information

Payne Midyette Will Moncrief Kit Storey 850-566-6070 850-544-5195 850-464-0893 Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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H 2018 All-American Show This summer Braford families from Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas were welcomed to the Four States Fairgrounds in Texarkana, Arkansas by the Hyman Family of Fouke, Arkansas. Nathan, his wife Perri, and their children, Katelin and Hayden are no strangers to hosting the Braford All American, last hosting in 2015. 2018 proved no different! New and experienced members gathered for warm, fun-filled days packed with contests, cattle, and water-park fun. Fourty-seven NJBA members exhibited 105 head of Braford and Braford-Base females and bulls. The All American would not be possible without the support of sponsors. A huge thank you to all the sponsors for their continued support of the All American. Whether this was a family’s first year or fifteenth year at the All American, Juniors joined together as a Braford family for Brafords on the State Line. On the pages that follow, check out the highlights from this year’s All American.

24 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


H 2018 All-American Show Results Judge: Trenton Tosh, Clinton, AR Braford Bull Show Results:

Champion Braford Base Bull: Mr Foster 571 exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA

Champion Braford Base Female: MS JS/DJH Maringouin 06 exhibited by Jayden Wayne Nunez of Creole, LA

Class 1: TS Mr. Rudy exhibited by Kinsley Sibille of Lake Charles, LA Class 3: NPH 1501 Final Drive exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Champion Braford Fall Bull Calf: NPH 1501 Final Drive exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, ARa Reserve Champion Braford Fall Bull Calf: TS Mr. Rudy exhibited by Kinsley Sibille of Lake Charles, LA Class 4: CK Bumble Bee 7247 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Class 5: B/S High Voltage exhibited by Mia Daigle of Lake Charles, LA Class 6: Mr WLCH Dirty Money 1708 exhibited by Brynlee Boudreaux of Lake Charles, LA Class 7: TR CM Quarterback 752P exhibited by Luke Mhire of Welsh, LA Champion Braford Yearling Bull: TR CM Quarterback 752P exhibited by Luke Mhire of Welsh, LA Reserve Champion Braford Yearling Bull: B/S High Voltage exhibited by Mia Daigle of Lake Charles, LA Class 8: JK Piper exhibited by Kailtyn Johnson of Iowa, LA Class 9: AG MT MR 3D exhibited by Destiny Doxey of Lake Charles, LA Class 10: CK MR Lewis 4816 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Champion Braford Senior Bull: CK MR Lewis 4816 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Reserve Champion Braford Senior Bull: JK Piper exhibited by Kailtyn Johnson of Iowa, LA Grand Champion Braford Bull: TR CM Quarterback 752P exhibited by Luke Mhire of Welsh, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull: NPH 1501 Final Drive exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR

Braford Base Bull Show Results:

Champion Braford Bull: TR CM Quarterback 752P exhibited by Luke Mhire of Welsh, LA

Champion Braford Female: HB Miss Hazel 0317 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA

Class 11: Cajuns Mr 172 exhibited by Talan Canik of Lake Charles, LA Champion Braford Base Bull Calf: Cajuns Mr 172 exhibited by Talan Canik of Lake Charles, LA Class 12: MR AN 103 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Class 13: D&D MR J-BEL-D exhibited by Ellen Deshotel of Ville Platte, LA Champion Braford Base Fall Bull Calf: MR AN 103 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Braford Base Fall Bull Calf: D&D MR J-BEL-D exhibited by Ellen Deshotel of Ville Platte, LA Class 14: MR JBJ Monsier exhibited by Klancie Jo Hebert of Welsh, LA Class 15: MR D&D Ribeye Rack 82/7 exhibited by Maeleigh Conner of Grand Lake, LA Champion Braford Base Yearling Bull: MR JBJ Monsier exhibited by Klancie Jo Hebert of Welsh, LA Reserve Champion Braford Base Yearling Bull: MR AN 102 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Class 16: Mr Foster 571 exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA Champion Braford Base Senior Bull: Mr Foster 571 exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA Grand Champion Braford Base Bull: Mr Foster 571 exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Bull: MR JBJ Monsier exhibited by Klancie Jo Hebert of Welsh, LA

Volume Volume 33 33 •• Issue Issue 21 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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H 2018 All-American Show Results Judge: Trenton Tosh, Clinton, AR Braford Female Show Results:

Reserve Champion Braford Base Bull: MR JBJ Monsier exhibited by Klancie Jo Hebert of Welsh, LA

Reserve Champion Braford Base Female: Miss CFCC Rhineaux Rose 1321 exhibited by Grady Richard of Grand Chenier, LA

Class 17: MO MS KK exhibited by Luke Picou of Lake Charles, LA Class 18: MS D&D Pixie 5268 exhibited by Emily Deshotel of Ville Platte, LA Champion Braford Heifer Calf: MS D&D Pixie 5268 exhibited by Emily Deshotel of Ville Platte, LA Reserve Champion Braford Heifer Calf: MO MS KK exhibited by Luke Picou of Lake Charles, LA Class 19: NPH 1054 Kit Kat exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Class 20: S5 GT MS 716 exhibited by Kaitlyn Johnson of Iowa, LA Champion Braford Fall Heifer Calf: NPH 1054 Kit Kat exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Reserve Champion Braford Fall Heifer Calf: S5 GT MS 716 exhibited by Kaitlyn Johnson of Iowa, LA Class 21: BSH Miss Daisy 1704 exhibited by Luke Mhire of Welsh, LA Class 22: HB Miss Hazel 0317 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 23: Savell’s L 276/3 exhibited by Miriam Hargrove of Manvel, TX Champion Braford Yearling Heifer: HB Miss Hazel 0317 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Champion Braford Yearling Heifer: Savell’s L 276/3 exhibited by Miriam Hargrove of Manvel, TX Class 24: WB LG Prom Queen 703P ET exhibited by Hannah Doucet of Lake Charles, LA Class 25: 4G Lil Bit exhibited by Kiley Sibille of Lake Charles, LA Class 26: CK Miss Danni 4286 exhibited by Kylea Mansfield of Katy, TX Class 27: HNH Muscles 1054 Babe exhibited Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Champion Braford Senior Yearling Female: WB LG Prom Queen 703P ET exhibited by Hannah Doucet of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Champion Braford Senior Yearling Female: HNH Muscles 1054 Babe exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Grand Champion Braford Female: HB Miss Hazel 0317 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Female: NPH 1054 Kit Kat exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR

Braford Base Female Show Results:

Reserve Champion Braford Bull: NPH 1501 Final Drive exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR

Reserve Champion Braford Female: NPH 1054 Kit Kat exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR

26 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018

Class 28: Cajuns Miss 174 exhibited by Talan Canik of Lake Charles, LA Class 29: Cajuns Miss 173 exhibited by Caden Harmon of Lake Charles, LA Class 30: X Miss 4-T 157 exhibited by Ashlee Primeaux of Belly City, LA Champion Braford Base Heifer Calf: X Miss 4-T 157 exhibited by Ashlee Primeaux of Belly City, LA Reserve Champion Braford Base Heifer Calf: Cajuns Miss 174 exhibited by Talan Canik of Lake Charles, LA Class 31: MS D&D T-Rouge 217 exhibited by Ellen Deshotel of Ville Platte, LA Champion Braford Base Fall Heifer Calf: MS D&D T-Rouge 217 exhibited by Ellen Deshotel of Ville Platte, LA Reserve Champion Braford Base Fall Heifer Calf: Miss Pearl Manso exhibited by Claire Beth Baccigalopi of Creole, LA Class 32: Miss Southern Spice exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA Class 33: MS D&D Sandy Shores 42/7 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Class 34: Miss Dubina Gold exhibited by Taylon Hess of Iowa, LA Champion Braford Base Yearling Heifer: Miss Southern Spice exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Braford Base Yearling Heifer: Miss Dubina Gold exhibited by Taylon Hess of Iowa, LA Class 35: MS JS/DJH Maringouin 06 exhibited by Jayden Wayne Nunez of Creole, LA Class 36: Miss CFCC Rhineaux Rose 1321 exhibited by Grady Richard of Grand Chenier, LA Class 37: Miss Doogey exhibited by Taylon Hess of Iowa, LA Champion Braford Base Senior Female: MS JS/DJH Maringouin 06 exhibited by Jayden Wayne Nunez of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Braford Base Senior Female: Miss CFCC Rhineaux Rose 1321 exhibited by Grady Richard of Grand Chenier, LA Grand Champion Braford Base Female: MS JS/DJH Maringouin 06 exhibited by Jayden Wayne Nunez of Creole, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Female: Miss CFCC Rhineaux Rose 1321 exhibited by Grady Richard of Grand Chenier, LA


H 2018 All American Contest Results H All Around Points SENIOR 1. Hayden Hyman

2. Kylea Mansfield 3. Miriam Hargrove

INTERMEDIATE 1. Kalli Smith

2. Emily Deshotel 3. Brynlee Boudreaux

H Photo Contest ADULT

1. Kelly Mansfield 2. Leslie Hargrove 3. Vince Deshotel

SENIOR 1. Hayden Hyman

2. Mallory Hobson 3. Miriam Hargrove

JUNIOR 1. Luke Natali

INTERMEDIATE 1. Brynlee Boudreaux 2. Kalli Smith 3. Kinsley Sibille

H Quiz Bowl

SENIOR 1. 2.

H Sales Talk

2. Hailey Sheffield 3. Grady Richard

Miriam Hargrove, Hayden Hyman, Kylea Mansfield Ashlee Primeaux, Maeleigh Conner, Kaitlyn Johnson, Hannah Doucet

INTERMEDIATE 1. Tyleigh Canik, Mia Diagle,

Kinsley Sibille, Kiley Sibille, Kalli Smith 2. Brynlee Boudreaux, Emily & Ellen Deshotel, Audreana Richard 3. Ali Fontenot, Mason Mhire, Joe Natali, Amberlee Saltzman, Aspen Mayhew

JUNIOR 1. Grady Richard, Hailey Sheffield, Braden

2. Luke Natali, Luke Mhire

H Judging

JUNIOR 1. Grady Richard

2. Braden Smith 3. Claire Baccigolpi

SENIOR 1. Hayden Hyman

2. Kylea Mansfield 3. Miriam Hargrove

INTERMEDIATE 1. Aspen Mayhew 2. Brynlee Boudreaux 3. Audreana Richard JUNIOR 1. Luke Natali

2. Grady Richard 3. Luke Mhire

H Poster Contest ADULT

1. Kelly Mansfield 2. Leslie Hargrove 3. Vince Deshotel

1. Michael Fontenot 2. Sandra Sheffield 3. Christi Natali

SENIOR 1. Kylea Mansfields

INTERMEDIATE 1. Emily Deshotel

INTERMEDIATE 1. Kalli Smith 2. Joe Natali 3. Emily Deshotel

JUNIOR 1. Luke Natali

ADULT

2. Hayden Hyman 3. Miriam Hargove

2. Ali Fontenot 3. Brynlee Boudreax

2. Grady Richard 3. Braden Smith

SENIOR 1. Hayden Hyman

2. Miriam Hargrove 3. Destiny Doxey

JUNIOR 1. Luke Natali

2. Hailey Sheffield 3. Braden Smith

H Showmanship Champions SENIOR: Karlee Nunex INTERMEDIATE: Kalli Smith JUNIOR: Luke Mhire

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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H 2018 All American Contest Results H

Miriam Hargrove, Hayden Hyman, Kylea Mansfield

Tyleigh Canik, Mia Diagle, Kinsley Sibille, Kiley Sibille, Kalli Smith

QU I Z BOW L

H

Ashlee Primeaux, Maeleigh Conner, Kaitlyn Johnson, Hannah Doucet

Brynlee Boudreaux, Emily & Ellen Deshotel, Audreana Richard

Ali Fontenot, Mason Mhire, Joe Natali, Amberlee Saltzman, Aspen Mayhew

Grady Richard, Hailey Sheffield, Braden

28 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018

Luke Natali, Luke Mhire


H 2018 All American Contest Results H

H

Michael Fontenot, Sandra Sheffield, Christi Natali

Kylea Mansfields, Hayden Hyman, Miriam Hargove

Emily Deshotel, Ali Fontenot, Brynlee Boudreax

Luke Natali, Grady Richard, Braden Smith

H

J U D GI NG

P HO T O GR A P H Y

H

Vince Deshotel, Leslie Hargrove, Kelly Mansfield

Hayden Hyman, Mallory Hobson, Miriam Hargrove

Brynlee Boudreaux, Kalli Smith, Kinsley Sibille

Grady Richard, Braden Smith

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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H 2018 All American Contest Results H

SA L ES TA L K

H

H

P OST E R

H

Hayden Hyman, Kylea Mansfield, Miriam Hargrove

Hayden Hyman, Miriam Hargrove, Destiny Doxey

Aspen Mayhew, Brynlee Boudreaux, Audreana Richard

Kalli Smith, Joe Natali, Emily Deshotel

Luke Natali, Grady Richard, Luke Mhire

Luke Natali, Hailey Sheffield, Braden Smith

H

NJ BA DI R EC T OR S

H

Front Row (L to R): Mason Mhire, Ashlee Primeaux, Brynlee Boudreaux, Kylea Mansfield Back Row (L to R): Hayden Hyman, Joe Natali, Miriam Hargrove, Kaitlyn Johnson Not pictured: Logan Vest, Brady Harrington, Gene Natali

30 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


JOIN THE UNITED BRAFORD BREEDERS Your new UBB membership will come with a subscription to the Braford News, your source for all things Braford! I would like to become a new member of the United Braford Breeders… Annual Adult Membership ($100) I hereby make application for membership with the United Braford Breeders and agree to be governed by the bylaws of the Association. Signature _________________________________________________________ Date______________________

Annual Junior Membership ($40, $25/year thereafter) I hereby make application for membership with the United Braford Breeders and agree to be governed by the bylaws of the Association. I am eligible for junior membership until I reach the age of 22 years.

Name of Junior ___________________________________________________

Date of Birth_______________

Signature of Parent/Legal Guardian ___________________________________ Date______________________

Membership Application

Farm/Ranch Name (Adult Memberships only)________________________________________________________

Member Name _________________________________________________________________________________

Contact Person_________________________________________________________________________________

Address_______________________________________________________________________________________ Town/City_____________________________________________________________________________________ State______________________________________ Zip_________________ Country_________________________

Phone (private/business/cell)_____________________________________________________________________

Fax___________________________________________________________________________________________ Email_________________________________________________________________________________________

Website URL______________________________________________

Herdletters__________________________

Please complete and return to: United Braford Breeders P.O. Box 1177 Kingsville, Texas 78364 P: 361.516.0530 F: 361.592.8572 E: records@brafords.org

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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H All-American Auction Donors & Buyers

Many thanks to our annual fundraiser auction donors and buyers. A special thanks to Wade Granger for joining us in Texarkana as our auctioneer. Brynlee Boudreaux

Hannah Wine

Brandon Smith

Chris & Heather Green

Doucet Brafords

Wade Granger

Purdy Braford Ranch

Ashlee Primeaux

Jennifer Vest

Randy Wood

Karlee Nunez

Holmwood Grocery

Cody Sibille

Shawn Bonsall

D&D Cattle

Randy and Melissa Wood

Christi Natali

Gary Baccigalopi

Destiny Doxey

C&M Cattle

Luke Natali

Lynette Granger

A Better Creation

The Hargrove Family

Hannah Doucet

The Mayhew Family

Far Away Farm

Jayden Nunez

Logan Vest

LS Brafords

Grady Richard

Gene, Joe, & Luke Natali

Crimson Kowboy Ranch

Wayne Hebert

Tina Landry

Boudreaux and Son

Harvey Ranch

Bill Rainer Cattle Cajun Bling

32 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


H 2018 All-American Sponsors Thanks to the many sponsors and volunteers for their support of the NJBA All-American. We’re certain we’ve forgotten someone — please forgive us in advance and know that while we may have missed your name, we still greatly appreciate your contributions. Melinda and John Alexander Vision Source of Texarkana Kinder Livestock Market Five Star Farm Randy and Melissa Wood Leisa & Karl Nunez Miller Bowie Supply Co Isbell Vet Clinic Karen Potts Chris Ferguson, DDS Mhire Cattle Company Savoie Lumber Forrest and Leslie Hargrove Kenneth and Patricia Johns The Mayhew Family Mrs. Dale Foster Thunderstorm R Cattle Company Dancing Diamond Ranch Marshland Jumps Bar A Brafords CM Cattle Abear-Nunez Farms Robin and Ann Roberts Canik’s Grocery Tulane Transportation Rosenberger Site Solutions Boudreaux and Son Brafords

Harvey Ranch San Gregorio Ranch A Better Creation Alberston’s C&C Packing City of Texarkana, Arkansas Four States Fair Cooper Service Crimson Kowboy James Moser, O.D.  Dunkin’ Donuts Ellis Pottery Farm Bureau Insurance  Flowers Bakery Golden Chick-Nash Hyman Farms Joe’s Pizza ‘n Pasta Larry’s Pizza Miller Bowie Supply  NPH Brafords Pilgrim’s  Pop Pop Shop Rayburn Farms Sam’s Club Southwest Arkansas Electric REA Nunez Brahmans Weaver Livestock

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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Show Results 2018 National Braford Show, Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Judge: Terri Barber, Channing, TX

Braford Female Results:

Champion Braford Female: HB MISS HAZEL 0317 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA

Reserve Champion Braford Female: RCM 1703 SYDNEY 6463 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 CLASSIFIED 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

Reserve Champion Braford Bull: RCM 1703 STRIKER 6651 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

Summer Heifer Calves: BSH MISS DAISY 1704 exhibited by Harrington Cattle of Iowa, LA Late Spring Heifer Calves: HB MISS HAZEL 0317 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Early Spring Heifer Calves: RCM 1703 JOLENE 7305 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Junior Heifer Calves: ACC 53Z MS E867 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Early Junior Heifer Calves: TR 88X BLUE BELL E107P ET exhibited by Rhea Shields of Iowa, LA Champion Heifer Calf: HB MISS HAZEL 0317 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: GB MISS MIA exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA Winter Heifer Calves: RCM 1703 SYDNEY 6463 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Senior Heifer Calves: NPH Muscles 1054 MS.54 exhibited by Robert Mhire of Welsh, LA Champion Fall Heifer Calf: RCM 1703 SYDNEY 6463 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: NPH CAPT’S 9389 MISSY RED exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Summer Yearling Heifers: LSS Miss Major Thunder exhibited by Boudreaux and Son of Lake Charles, LA Late Spring Yearling Heifers: AG MT Dory exhibited by Amanda Lee of Folsom, LA Early Spring Yearling Heifers: RCM 9182 EMMA 6174 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Junior Yearling Heifers: HNH Muscles 1054 BABE exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Champion Yearling Heifer: HNH Muscles 1054 BABE exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: WB DC MILA 622 exhibited by Willie Danos of Iowa, LA Late Senior Yearling Females: SAVELL’S L 256/3 exhibited by Jamie Davis of Liverpool, TX Champion Senior Yearling Female: SAVELL’S L 256/3 exhibited by Jamie Davis of Liverpool, TX Reserve Champion Senior Yearling Female: Savell’s L 254/3 exhibited by Curtis Sheffield of Pearland, TX Grand Champion Braford Female: HB MISS HAZEL 0317 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Female: RCM 1703 SYDNEY 6463 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

Braford Bull Show Results:

Champion F1 Female: X Miss 4-T Coco 56 exhibited by Jaylen Tesch of Sealy, TX

Reserve Champion F1 Female: MISS DOOGEY exhibited by AbearNunez Farms of Creole, LA

Summer Bull Calves: CK Bumble Bee exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Late Spring Bull Calves: GPN MR. CM PFTW exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Early Spring Bull Calves: RCM 8105 MATLOCK 7144 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Junior Bull Calves: TR CM Quarterback 752P exhibited by Robert Mhire of Welsh, LA Early Junior Bull Calves: TR 2012 MIKE E206S ET exhibited by Sutton Shields of Iowa, LA Champion Bull Calf: TR 2012 MIKE E206S ET exhibited by Sutton Shields of Iowa, LA Reserve Champion Bull Calf: GPN MR. CM PFTW exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Winter Bull Calves: RCM 1703 STRIKER 6651 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Senior Bull Calves: AG MT MR 3D exhibited by Destiny Doxey of Lake Charles, LA Champion Fall Bull Calf: RCM 1703 STRIKER 6651 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Fall Bull Calf: Tavin exhibited by Kaitlyn Johnson of Iowa, LA

34 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018

Summer Yearling Bull Calves: RCM 8105 CHANDLER 6199 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Late Spring Yearling Bull Calves: CK Mr Lewis 4816 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Junior Yearling Bulls: DD 2300 Daddy’s Money 1601 exhibited by Clayton Owens of Hillsboro, TX Champion Yearling Bull: RCM 8105 CHANDLER 6199 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Yearling Bull: CK Mr Lewis 4816 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Two Year Old Bulls: RCM 9182 CLASSIFIED 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Senior Bull: RCM 9182 CLASSIFIED 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Senior Bull: RCM 9182 STEALTH 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 CLASSIFIED 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 1703 STRIKER 6651 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

Braford Group Classes: Produce of Dam: RCM 695 MS ROOKIE RCM exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Get of Sire: RCM 2149 DAVIDSON 9182 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Best-Six-Head: Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

National F1 Female Show:

Summer Heifer Calves: X Miss 4-T 77 exhibited by Troy Tesch of Sealy, TX Early Spring Heifer Calves: MS D&D SANDY SHORES 42/7 exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA Junior Heifer Calves: MISS AN 114 exhibited by AbearNunez Farms of Creole, LA Early Junior Heifer Calves: MISS DUBINA GOLD exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA Champion Heifer Calf: MS D&D SANDY SHORES 42/7 exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: X Miss 4-T 77 exhibited by Troy Tesch of Sealy, TX Winter Heifer Calves: Miss Bandit 700 exhibited by Cole Tesch of Sealy, TX Champion Fall Heifer Calf: Miss Bandit 700 exhibited by Cole Tesch of Sealy, TX Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: MS JS/DJF MARINGOUIN 06 exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA Summer Yearling Heifers: Mill Miss Miller exhibited by Jamie Leonards of Bell City, LA Late Spring Yearling Heifers: X Miss 4-T Coco 56 exhibited by Jaylen Tesch of Sealy, TX Early Spring Yearling Heifers: MISS 4-J 112/6 exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA Junior Yearling Heifers: MISS DOOGEY exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA Champion Yearling Heifer: X Miss 4-T Coco 56 exhibited by Jaylen Tesch of Sealy, TX Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: MISS DOOGEY exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA Late Senior Yearling Females: X Miss 4-T 295 exhibited by Cole Tesch of Sealy, TX Champion Senior Yearling Female: X Miss 4-T 295 exhibited by Cole Tesch of Sealy, TX Grand Champion F-1 Braford Female: X Miss 4-T Coco 56 exhibited by Jaylen Tesch of Sealy, TX Reserve Grand Champion F-1 Braford Female: MISS DOOGEY exhibited by Abear-Nunez Farms of Creole, LA


2018 National Braford Show

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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DRAWS LARGE CROWD IN HOUSTON The Braford breed garnered attention again this year at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo at the International Braford Sale. This year’s audience included many international guests who were in town for the World Braford Congress. They joined U.S. Braford breeders around the green chips of the Houston sale ring. The elite 12-lot Braford offering brought prominent genetics from operations across the country to the sale ring. When auctioneer Leo Casas hammered the gavel for the last time during the sale, the auction grossed $50,800. Four herd picks grossed $12,350 to average $3,080.75. Eight live-animal lots grossed $31,450 to average $2,859. To kick off the sale two five-day African safari hunts, donated by Avula Safari were auctioned off to benefit the 2018 World Braford Congress. The hunts sold for $4,000 to Mitch Vick and $3,000 to Brandon Hebert. The high-selling Lot 7, Ms Winkle, an April-born open heifer sired by SLH Mr 1216, consigned by Theriot Farms of Lake Arthur, Louisiana, sold for $3950 to Mhire Cattle Co of Welsh, Louisiana. The second high-seller was Lot 3, RCM 9182 Penny 7307, an Aprilborn open heifer sired by RCM 2149 Davidson 9182, consigned by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, Texas, and sold for $3900 to Kim Istre of Gueydan, Louisiana. The sale continued to hold strong with the third high-selling lot being a pick of the three-quarter Brahman heifer calf crop from Alleman Cattle Co. in Rayne, Louisiana, which was purchased by Thunderstorm R Cattle Company of Nacogdoches, Texas. The United Braford Breeders would like thank Danny Boudreaux and Aaron Natali for their hard work as sale coordinators. For more information about the sale, contact Hannah Wine at 540.272.1682 or hwine@brafords.org.

36 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018


UBB Annual Membership Awards Presented in Houston

Braford members and breeders from around the country gathered in Houston, Texas on the weekend of March 2-3 to conduct Braford business, honoring deserving breeders and attending Braford activities at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. Friday afternoon at the annual membership meeting at the Stock Show, attendees heard an update on 2017 Braford business from current UBB Board of Director’s President Robert Mills. Hannah Wine, UBB Executive Director reported on recent UBB activity and the importance of calf registration. Following Wine’s remarks, Mills presented the annual membership awards.

2017 PRESIDENT’S LIST – (UBB members registering 50 or more in 2017)

Alleman Cattle Company Rayne, LA — 91 head

Rock Crest Ranch Athens, TX — 88 head

2017 GOLD GROUP –

(UBB members registering more than 100 head in 2017)

Bill Rainer Union Springs, AL — 121 head

Harvey Ranch Okeechobee, FL — 102 head

RETIRING BOARD MEMBERS – Will Moncrief, FL. Jim Smith, MS, Robert Mills, TX, & Chris Herpin, LA

Robert Mills – Retiring President

Jim Smith — Retiring Director

Greenview Farms Screven, GA — 52 head

Thunderstrom R Cattle Co. Nacogdoches, TX — 51 head

THE PRESIDENT’S AWARD

(for registering the most Brafords in 2017)

Adams Ranch Fort Pierce, FL — 335 head

Following the awards portion of the membership meeting newly elected President Jim Harvey of Okeechobee, Florida, thanked outgoing directors Will Moncrief, FL; Jim Smith, MS; Robert Mills, TX; and Chris Herpin, LA. Harvey then introduced newly elected directors who will serve three years on the board, Will Moncrief, FL, Bryan Alleman, LA, Toni Meacham, WA, and Robert Mills of TX. Harvey also recognized the newly elected UBB officers, Vice President Bill Rainer of Union Springs, AL and Secretary/Treasurer Scott McCullough of Zionsville, IN.

Braford Show Heifer and Show Bull of the Year Braford exhibitors were honored for showcasing their cattle throughout the 2017-2018 show year. To qualify for these prestigious buckles, exhibitors must have accumulated the most points at the five UBB point shows—Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, Four States Fair, Louisiana State Fair, Fort Worth Stock Show and the Dixie Nationals, noting that the 2018 Show Heifer and Show Bull of the year points included points from both the 2017 and 2018 Houston Livestock.

Braford Show Female of the Year

WB DC Mila 622 Bred by: Wayne Boozer, Douglass, TX Owned and exhibited by: Ryan Danos, Iowa, LA

Braford Show Bull of the Year

RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 Bred by: Rockcrest Ranch, Athens, TX Owned and exhibited by: Rockcrest Ranch, Athens, TX

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

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Bred Braford and Composite Heifers Available Private Treaty Call Buddy Adams for Heifers (772) 201-4966

Adams Ranch Annual Bull and Heifer Auction Braford, ABEEF®, and Adams Ranch Reds Florida’s Oldest Continuous Ranch Cattle Auction November 8, 2018 Annual Field Day, November 7, 2018

Adams Ranch Reds®

ABEEF® Bulls ABEEF® Heifers

ABEEF®, ARBRA®, ARRAB®, & ARGEL® are registered trademarks that identify Adams Ranch Braford, Red Angus, and Gelbvieh cross cattle that meet criteria for a sound production animal that is free from genetic flaws. Adams Ranch is the Certifier.

Adams Ranch Braford®

Adams Ranch Office (772) 461-6321 Office Fax (772) 461-6874 P.O. Box 12909, Fort Pierce, Fla. 34979-2909 Adams Ranch website: www.adamsranch.com Call Billy Adams for Bulls (772) 370-0114

UNITED BRAFORD BREEDERS HERD NO. 1

Profile for United Braford Breeders

Braford News | Volume 33, Issue 2  

Official Publication of the United Braford Breeders Fall 2018

Braford News | Volume 33, Issue 2  

Official Publication of the United Braford Breeders Fall 2018

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