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connect: CREATIVE ARTS


WELCOME If you are creative, ambitious, and keen to make your mark, it makes a lot of sense to study Creative Arts at the University of Wollongong. It’s your entry into one of the fastest growing employment sectors in Australia—and internationally . Creative industries is where our graduates work. Their careers take them all over the world. Like you, when they came here they were passionate about their chosen art form, they wanted to develop new skills and they were looking for new ideas and inspirations. These are the immediate things we offer you: the chance to strengthen your practical skills, to immerse yourself in a dynamic creative environment, to think critically about the arts, about history, about contemporary life. Our students produce diverse, ambitious and exciting works, in everything from traditional art forms to innovative new media. You’ll spend much of your time in studios, labs and theatres, practising your artform and finding new ways of tackling creative challenges. And then we offer a whole lot more, as our graduates have found out.

Professor Amanda Lawson Executive Dean Faculty of Law, Humanities & the Arts


Five reasons to study CREATIVE ARTS

1. HANDS-ON LEARNING

3. NEW IDEAS & INSPIRATIONS

UOW offers you a dynamic and progressive education that connects hands-on studio production with critical reflection. Practice-based subjects are undertaken in tandem with theoretical ones that explore the history of your chosen field. This combination gives students an advantage after graduation when they’re working in the creative industries – they have experience in their discipline and they understand its context.

In the Creative Arts, you’ll be studying with likeminded students committed to the Arts. You’ll have the opportunity to work with students from a wide range of disciplines, building the foundations for strong friendships. These friendships will provide inspiration to your creative work and provide a professional network once you leave University.

2. CREATIVE ENVIRONMENT The UOW campus offers you the facilities you’ll need to develop your creative skills. We have specialist equipment and teaching spaces for each discipline – computer labs for Design, theatres for Performance, studios for the Visual Arts and workshop spaces for Creative Writing. All of this is located in a natural bushland setting at the UOW main campus. Our Digital Media Centre at the Innovation Campus offers state of the art teaching and technical facilities for digital filmmaking, digital photography, film and TV studio practice, editing, animation and media arts. Backstage Hope is a working rehearsal space with equipment for theatre productions, including a walk-on lighting mezzanine and sound and video control room.

4. LEARN FROM THE BEST You’ll be taught by staff who are professional writers, artists, designers, performers and directors. They know how to prepare you for the industry because they work in it. Throughout your degree, you’ll be encouraged to develop the creative and critical skills you’ll need to pursue a profession in your chosen field.

5. MAKE YOUR DEGREE SUIT YOU You will benefit from being part of a Faculty that’s recognised for its excellence and innovation. You will also be able to use electives and minor studies to tailor your degree to your interests. A degree in Technical Theatre for instance, might be supported by a minor in Media Arts or Creative Writing, while someone undertaking a degree in Visual Arts and Graphic Design might want to pick up electives in Digital Media and Professional Writing. There are opportunities here to engage with professional and cross-disciplinary subjects relevant to your degree.

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OPPORTUNITIES TO EXCEL FLEXIBLE STUDY Creativity isn’t just limited to artists. Developing a creative skill can enhance your pursuit of careers in many different industries, and not always in the ways you expect. Performance subjects give you confidence in front of an audience. A class in short story writing will teach you valuable techniques for expressing yourself clearly and concisely. Our subjects give you the edge to find extraordinary solutions to common problems, both within the workplace and in your everyday life. There’s no reason why you can’t combine our subjects with other areas of study—in fact, sometimes that’s exactly what you want to do! By taking Open Studio subjects in Creative Arts, either as elective subjects or as a Creative Arts minor study, you can learn new skills without giving up on your other interests.

ELECTIVES It’s rare to only be interested in one art form, even if you’re already working in Creative Arts. As your degree progresses, you may find you want to develop practical skills in a different discipline. All of our degree programs require you to complete elective subjects, which can be chosen from Open Studio subjects and electives within Creative Arts as well as subjects offered by other Faculties. Undertaking Open Studio subjects outside your major study area can enhance your creative practice, and provide opportunities for collaboration on interdisciplinary projects. Through Open Studio subjects, you can work within a new discipline and gain an insight into the variety of artistic approaches that Creative Arts has to offer. A Creative Arts degree doesn’t prevent you from gaining experience in other areas, and electives from other faculties can allow you to pursue a specialist path within your artistic field. A journalist might enhance their knowledge by taking an elective in Law, History or International Studies. Graphic designers might choose to expand their skill set by studying Media and Communications or Marketing. Theatre students might want to write a play or design the sound for their next production. All of our creative disciplines function within a wider cultural context, so there’s no reason why you shouldn’t complement your creative work with other areas of interest in, say, Philosophy or Languages.

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OPEN STUDIO SUBJECTS

MINOR STUDIES

Many of our subjects are available to students from any degree in the University—you don’t have to worry about having a specific ATAR, or proving you have previous experience in the field.

If a particular creative discipline is of interest to you, you can take a prescribed course of study and qualify for a minor study in that area.

These Open Studio subjects are designed to deliver creative skills and specialist cultural knowledge to artists and nonartists alike. Students from anywhere in the University can enrol in Open Studio subjects if they meet the necessary subject prerequisites. Writing a novel? Learn the basics in our Introduction to Creative Writing, then come and workshop your writing in one of our Narrative Studio subjects, and learn the skills of the trade. Interested in the theatre, but don’t want to do a degree in Performance? Develop your vocal presence or learn to build schedules and organise events working alongside theatre students, while learning how theatre productions are put together from the ground up. Pick up typographic skills in Graphic Design Studios. Learn film editing techniques through an Open Studio subject in Journalism. Learn to design a soundscape for your film, theatre production or installation, or how to turn your video footage into an experiential audiovisual environment. Benefit from the experience of award-winning photographers, poets, documentarymakers and designers, and learn new skills to enhance your work in other areas.

A minor study in any discipline in Creative Arts provides sustained training in a creative field. Although not as comprehensive as a major study, a minor can help you develop skills in a particular area. Minor studies in Creative Arts include: • • • • • • • • • •

Art History Creative Writing Design Design History Media Arts Performance Technical Theatre (stage management Visual Arts Music Audio Production

These minor studies are open to all undergraduate students at UOW, and if you decide your minor before applying to graduate, it will be recorded on your academic transcript. Whether you’re enhancing your Creative Arts degree with a second specialisation, or gaining a minor to accompany a different degree, a minor can provide valuable and exciting opportunities to learn new creative skills.

Whether you are curious about pursuing further formalised studies in Creative Arts, or simply want to learn some exciting new skills, Open Studio subjects can give you a taste of what Creative Arts has to offer.

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learn your way connect: STUDY OPTIONS

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DEGREE OVERVIEW BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS

DOUBLE DEGREES

The Bachelor of Creative Arts (BCA) focuses on creative practice and is supported by relevant history and theory subjects. You complete a major study in the discipline of your choice:

Double degree programs allow you to combine a Creative Arts degree with a full qualification in another area. This can help prepare you for a specialist career in the arts, or allow you to pursue different passions. We offer the following double degree programs:

• • • • • •

Creative Writing Graphic Design Music Theatre Visual Arts Visual Arts and Design

The opportunity to support your major area of specialisation through a minor study in a complementary area, or to challenge yourself by taking subjects that offer you new experiences beyond your major study are also available through electives and Open Studio subjects.

BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS (DEAN’S SCHOLAR)

• • •

• • • •

Bachelor of Creative Arts – Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Creative Arts – Bachelor of Commerce Bachelor of Creative Arts – Bachelor of Communication and Media Studies Bachelor of Creative Arts – Bachelor of Computer Science Bachelor of Creative Arts – Bachelor of International Studies Bachelor of Creative Arts – Bachelor of Journalism Bachelor of Creative Arts – Bachelor of Law Bachelor of Creative Arts – Bachelor of Science

The Dean’s Scholar Program is designed for high-achieving students. Dean’s Scholars complete the Bachelor of Creative Arts with a number of added benefits:

• • • •

Single Degrees: 3 years full-time study or part time equivalent Double Degrees: 4.5 years – 5.5 years fulltime study or part time equivalent

Access to an academic mentor Textbook/materials allowance Extended library access Access to the Creative Arts’ postgraduate lab Opportunity for internships, selfdirected study and special projects

DURATION

The program has a limited intake and you’ll need a minimum ATAR of 90. You may be asked to attend an interview oncampus and are encouraged to apply for an undergraduate scholarship www.uow.edu. au/about/scholarships

BACHELOR OF DIGITAL MEDIA The Bachelor of Digital Media (BDM) degree is taught jointly by UOW and TAFE Illawarra and focuses on creative media production practice. Subjects in the BDM are taught both at UOW’s main campus and the Innovation Campus in North Wollongong.

BACHELOR OF PERFORMANCE The Bachelor of Performance (BPerf) is an intensive practice-based degree that develops your skills as a highly proficient performing artist.

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MATILDA GROGAN Bachelor of Creative Arts Honours (Creative Writing) / Bachelor of Arts (English Literature)

Matilda Grogan is interested in the stories that don’t get told. With a passion for reading and writing, she decided to be the first one in her family to go to university and make a career out of it.

International Exchange to the University of Anglia in London was a highlight for Matilda. Six months of a great creative arts program complemented her studies at UOW.

“There are people out there doing it and doing it well. I could be one of them.”

She also travelled to Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Greece, the Netherlands and New York, which put things in perspective and gave her more of an insight into her writing.

“The first couple of weeks you are nervous but you get over it pretty fast and learn to embrace constructive critiques and opinions of others. You are completely surrounded by different ideas and perspectives, you’d hear everything from stories about crime and history to dragons and fantasy lands. It’s incredible to think about where these ideas come from.” “I went in most keen on poetry but the degree exposed me to contemporary styles, script writing, poetry, literary journal writing, prose fiction and so much more. It totally changed my mind on where I wanted to be—now I have a huge interest in prose fiction and editing. For me, I just saw more of a career in it and I like looking at places where culture, language, history and power intersect.”

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“My degree has shown me that writing is so much more about hard work than talent. I mean sure, you do have to have talent and inspiration, but without hard work and drive, you would never get your writing out there.”


DEGREE OPTIONS

BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS (CREATIVE WRITING) ATAR

75/90 (Dean’s Scholar)

DURATION

3 years

STARTS Autumn (February) ENTRY Admission to the Bachelor of Creative Arts is based on the HSC ATAR (or equivalent), although outstanding results in relevant subjects/areas may also be taken into account.

Writing is the art of clear and persuasive expression. Good writing makes your meaning clear and allows you to communicate with your readers, but the best writing can also redefine how people see themselves and the world around them. It’s more than just putting words on a page. It’s thinking about those words: what they mean, why you chose them and what effect they will have on your reader. From short stories to song lyrics to the words spoken by your favourite TV character, writing has a powerful effect. A novelist and a computer games writer produce vastly different end products. What they have in common is their ability to use language to shape the way people think.

LOCATION

Wollongong

UAC

754601/754610 (Dean’s Scholar)

WHAT YOU STUDY

CRICOS

001709K

A Bachelor of Creative Arts (BCA) in Creative Writing encourages you to look beyond the individual forms of creative writing, and to analyse the effects of writing. Our degree isn’t just about defining what writing is—it’s about discovering what writing can do. Our literary theory subjects help position your creative practice within a wider historical and cultural context. Practical subjects offer opportunities to workshop your writing with other students under the guidance of emerging and established writers. Lectures and seminars will allow you to explore the intersections between theory and practice, and workshops and writing exercises encourage you to develop, draft and refine your own creative work with the input of your peers. You will also be encouraged to facilitate public performance and publication of your works, both within your Creative Writing subjects and for your own creative development. Creative Writing students oversee the publication of UOW’s annual literary anthology, TIDE, which allows you to gain valuable insights into editorial and publishing practice as well as providing an opportunity for publication. Many of our students also successfully submit work to national and international literary journals during the course of their degree. This degree focuses on three key areas of creative writing practice: poetic, dramatic and narrative writing forms. But there are also opportunities to combine these areas of practice, and to explore the intersections between writing and the other creative arts. Studying within Creative Arts at UOW, you have the chance to undertake electives or studio subjects in other disciplines, work with people with different knowledge and skills, and create new and innovative work that borrows from many different forms of artistic practice.

CAREERS A degree in Creative Writing can lead to a variety of career paths, such as: • • • • • •

Novelist Biographer Media Writer Publisher Editor Copy Writer

• •

Teacher Employment in publishing, sales, literary management, literary organisations in the government or non-government sectors

All forms of communication rely on clear and persuasive expression. Some of our graduates have become well-known poets, novelists, playwrights, editors and bloggers. But any job that requires efficient communication can be improved by the kinds of skills you learn in a Creative Writing degree. Many graduates use their writing skills within professional careers in other areas including arts administration, and government and community arts organisations.

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DARA GILL BCA (visual arts & graphic design) ARTIST (ART, RESEarch, PERFORMANCE)

Dara Gill is a young artist whose work regularly crosses lines between art, research and performance. He restlessly explores new media to make his art—sculpture, photography, film, theatre and painting. He works out of his Redfern studio, an old converted shopfront. He does freelance design work to, as he says, “pay the rent”, and is participating in more and more art shows, many of which call for new work. Dara is seeing a shift in focus from collaborative to solo work. “Collaboration was initially a part of my practice, but as time goes on, I’m becoming more sure of myself and my instincts.” Despite this shift, he still finds time to work with other artists. Since 2007, he has been a part of Team MESS, a group of artists and performers who develop and perform experimental theatre. A recent work, BINGO Unit, was a combination of live theatre, TV production and improvisation that was shot around the streets of Melbourne during the 2012 Next Wave festival.

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It’s typical of the group, in that it challenges the audience to rethink ideas about theatre and media. The group started when Dara and the other members were all students at UOW. “At UOW I was mixing with performance kids a lot at the time. Between semesters, we’d put on shows. When you start out at uni, being able to bounce ideas off people is important.” “UOW supported us a lot and the lecturers gave us feedback. One of the great things about the uni was that there was no necessary notion about what the degree was supposed to do.” “I could manipulate the degree to suit my own goals,” he explains. “My teachers were very open to me running away with a project and taking it somewhere they didn’t expect.” “This was good. Uni is a time when you learn where you’re headed as an artist.”


DEGREE OPTIONS

BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS (GRAPHIC DESIGN) ATAR

75/90 (Dean’s Scholar)

DURATION

3 years

STARTS Autumn (February) ENTRY Admission to the Bachelor of Creative Arts is based on the HSC ATAR (or equivalent), although outstanding results in relevant subjects/areas may also be taken into account. LOCATION

Wollongong

UAC

754602/754610 (Dean’s Scholar)

CRICOS

001709K

Graphic design uses visual design to communicate specific information. From posters to company logos to individual websites, graphic design has a specific goal, and uses visual images to reach that goal—to make a picture, sign or advertisement worth a thousand words. With connections to both artistic and commercial applications, graphic design is goal and information oriented, using specific tools to convey a message. And, when the traditional tools are no longer adequate, graphic designers adopt and exploit old technologies and invent new ones. Graphic design is always changing, staying current and reshaping itself around technological developments.

WHAT YOU STUDY A Bachelor of Creative Arts (BCA) in Graphic Design allows you to apply contemporary design techniques across a number of conceptual and industrial applications, and offers specialist studies in a variety of areas, including illustration, typography, web design and branding. Our practical studio subjects allow you to create design works that enhance your professional portfolio, and also provide ongoing opportunities to learn new technical skills to develop and enhance your practice. These studio subjects run alongside visual and design theory subjects that demonstrate the historical and commercial contexts that shape your work. Our Graphic Design staff are experienced industry professionals. They provide you with valuable technical support and training in cutting edge digital technologies, and also encourage you to pursue industry experience to further develop your skills. Access to state-of-the-art facilities and professional support will help you create innovative design works, responding to real-world marketing and communication challenges. The course culminates in a major design project, which is exhibited alongside other students’ work in the Art and Design Graduate Show. This public exhibition showcases the practical skills that you will develop during the degree, and also provides an opportunity to demonstrate organisational, curatorial and production skills.

CAREERS A degree in graphic design can lead to a variety of career paths, including: • • • • • • • • •

Art Director Brand/Logo Designer Typesetter Publication Designer Web Designer Production Artist Graphic Designer Animator/Cartoonist Production Artist/Coordinator/Director

Graphic design is highly visible—as a graphic designer, you could provide visual content for a wide variety of clients, from retail chains to pharmaceuticals companies, film studios to government departments. Commercial opportunities in graphic design are numerous, and may reach a global audience of thousands or millions of people. But the technical and analytical skills developed in a Graphic Design degree are still applicable closer to home, in any career that requires communication with visual images in both physical and digital media.

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DEGREE OPTIONS

BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS (MUSIC) ATAR

75/90 (Dean’s Scholar)

DURATION

3 years

STARTS Autumn (February) ENTRY Admission to the Bachelor of Creative Arts is based on the HSC ATAR (or equivalent), although outstanding results in relevant subjects/areas may also be taken into account. LOCATION

Wollongong

UAC

754603/754610 (Dean’s Scholar)

CRICOS

001709K

WHAT YOU STUDY Music in the twenty-first century is many things, but whether acoustic or electroacoustic, popular or art-music, individually focused or ensemble-based, music is everywhere. The Bachelor of Creative Arts (BCA) Music major embraces the breadth of contemporary music possibilities, and seeks to provide a relevant, compelling education that equips students to work in a broad range of music-related areas. As a discipline, the BCA Music combines teaching in composition and performance with developments in electronic media, building students’ skills and expertise across three inter-related areas: studio, production and critical studies. The music studio, which in first year focuses on providing an integrated approach to aural skills, notation and music theory as well as creative exercises in composition and performance. Second year sees students focusing on the creation and understanding of new music composition and its performance in the 21st century, while third-year students undertake a major creative research project, and studies in professional practice. The audio production stream introduces students to recording, editing, and mixing techniques, applying conceptual and practical skills to the creation of sound and music works using digital audio workstations. Students may choose to study sound design, audiovisual composition and/or lighting design, recognising that in the 21st century, music stands at the intersection of technology and creativity. Students also study developments in contemporary music through music history and theory subjects. You will gain an understanding of how music is created not only within the western art music tradition, but also in popular and world musics both within Australia and internationally. Music history subjects provide the foundations for understanding the breadth of music and its influence, allowing you to position your work within a wider historical and cultural context. Music is a highly interactive area, and students are also encouraged to extend their skills and creative potential by taking minors in Media Arts and/or Technical Theatre. Our academic and technical staff have extensive experience as musicans, composer/ performers and artists, and their knowledge will help you develop your creative skills and abilities. You will also have the opportunity to collaborate with fellow students on workshops, student-initiated projects, and concerts.

CAREERS Music graduates can use their skills to pursue a variety of careers, including: • • • • •

Singer/songwriter Performer in an ensemble or band Composer for electronic and live environments Sound designer Audiovisual designer

• • • • •

DJ Music industry professional Teacher Interdisciplinary artist Creative producer

The broad range of skills developed through the BCA Music will allow you to respond innovatively and flexibly to the rapidly changing world of contemporary music. You will not only develop creative, conceptual and practical skills, but specialised technical skills and a clear grasp of how your own practice relates to the wider music community. Many careers are increasingly reliant on digital literacy and proficiency, and in combination with the analogue and conceptual skills acquired within the course, the BCA Music will lend you a competitive edge in the creative industries.

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DEGREE OPTIONS

BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS (THEATRE) ATAR

75/90 (Dean’s Scholar)

DURATION

3 years

STARTS Autumn (February) ENTRY Admission to the Bachelor of Creative Arts is based on the HSC ATAR (or equivalent), although outstanding results in relevant subjects/areas may also be taken into account. LOCATION

Wollongong

UAC

754609/754610 (Dean’s Scholar)

CRICOS

001709K

WHAT YOU STUDY A Bachelor of Creative Arts (BCA) in Theatre equips you with skills in a broad range of performance-related areas, including performance, stage management, technical production and theatre history. This degree does not provide the intensive focus of the Bachelor of Performance, but offers a wider variety of practical experience and a strong foundation in history and dramaturgy. You will gain an understanding of rehearsal and workshop methodologies, as well as learning stagecraft in both performance and technical production to make compelling theatre. Dramaturgy and theatre history subjects provide the foundations for understanding the breadth of theatre practice and its history, allowing you to position your work within a wider historical and cultural context. Our academic and technical staff have extensive experience as directors, writers, performers and designers, and their knowledge will help you develop your skills and abilities. You will also have the opportunity to collaborate with fellow students on workshops and productions.

CAREERS Theatre graduates can use their skills to pursue a variety of different careers, including: • • • • • • • • •

Director Dramaturge Lighting Designer Stage Manager Production Manager Technical Manager Teacher Arts Administrator Cultural Worker

This major combines performance skills, stagecraft, stage management, technical production, dramaturgy, history and theory. It is a flexible program that allows you to easily combine your love of theatre with other minor areas of study. Build your employability in the creative industries or education sector, by complementing your theatre major by undertaking one, or even two minors in related areas such as technical theatre, creative production, media arts or creative writing. The BCA in Theatre equips you with a range of skills that are highly valuable in careers in theatre or film, but also give scope for employment in arts administration, and government and community arts organisations.

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REBECCA EVANS BCA/BA (visual arts/history) ASSISTANT CURATOR, POWERHOUSE MUSEUM SYDNEY

Rebecca Evans loves vintage clothing and fashion. Hailing from a family of dressmakers, her appreciation for yesterday’s fashion is absolute. She studies it, wears it, makes it from original patterns and, as an Assistant Curator at Sydney’s Powerhouse Museum, works with it. “When people ask me what a curator does I liken it to a keeper in a zoo,” she says. “I Iook after the animals, show them, make sure they’re as close to perfect as possible.” She is, in fact, helping care for one of Australia’s most important collections of historical clothing. The importance of this role isn’t obvious, and it even took Rebecca by surprise. “When I first started, I thought: what am I doing looking after all of this amazing stuff? Then the stories unraveled,” she says. “They stopped being things and started being people. Objects are powerful storytellers.” Rebecca recalls one item from the family of Samuel Marsden, an influential clergyman and judge and prominent figure in Australian colonial history.

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“It was a small nightdress that belonged to his son—and it was the clothing he died in. Normally it wouldn’t be kept, but because of the exceptional circumstances, it was.” Seeing the power of these personal stories is part of what Rebecca loves about curatorship. She also appreciates what we have to learn from the past. While she was still a student at UOW, Rebecca volunteered at Tongarra museum, a very small museum of local history supported by Shellharbour City Council. She worked there for two years—in the second year on a Movable Heritage Fellowship from the Powerhouse. She credits the experience as an important foundation for her career. “You cannot go from two more extremes in terms of resources,” she says, comparing Tongarra to her current work. “It doesn’t matter where you work. Especially when you’re learning, you should reach out. Don’t write something off because you think it’s small or unglamorous. In a small museum, you’ll learn more than you expect and have freedom you wouldn’t get elsewhere.”


DEGREE OPTIONS

BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS (VISUAL ARTS) ATAR

75/90 (Dean’s Scholar)

DURATION

3 years

STARTS Autumn (February) ENTRY Admission to the Bachelor of Creative Arts is based on the HSC ATAR (or equivalent), although outstanding results in relevant subjects/areas may also be taken into account. LOCATION

Wollongong

UAC

754605/754610 (Dean’s Scholar)

CRICOS 001709K

The Visual arts program prepares students to participate in the contemporary artworld with all its diversity and challenges. You will be taught to engage as artists, as critical thinkers and as intelligent practitioners in its discourses and debates, its traditions and its latest innovations. The program includes a mix of studio experiences, from painting and film to textiles, sculpture, and digital imaging, as well as lectures and seminars that address the histories, theories and ideas of contemporary art.

WHAT YOU STUDY A Bachelor of Creative Arts (BCA) in Visual Arts will help you learn the practical skills to work as an independent arts practitioner, while developing an understanding of art history and contemporary modes of community-based artistic collaboration. Your works don’t exist in a vacuum: understanding the influences on the creation and exhibition of artworks gives depth and purpose to your own practice. Visual Arts studio subjects give you the opportunity to learn and practice artistic processes, focusing on textiles, painting and sculpture and with supplementary studies in drawing, printmaking, photography, video, digital image making, installation and curating. Alongside your studio work, you will also take subjects in visual art theory, tracing the development of contemporary visual arts practice and positioning your work within a wider artistic context. Creative Arts has a number of gallery spaces to showcase the work of students, staff, external artists and UOW’s permanent Art Collection. The opportunity to exhibit your work for a wider audience, and to organise and curate exhibitions gives you the chance to develop skills in arts administration and curatorship. At the completion of your degree, you will exhibit, along with your peers, in the Art and Design Graduate Show, one of the major annual public exhibition events within Creative Arts. In your degree, you will be taught practical and theoretical skills by practising artists and experienced visual arts scholars from a wide variety of fields. You may also choose to combine your visual arts practice with subjects from other artistic disciplines, within Creative Arts, or to collaborate with other students to develop innovative crossdisciplinary works.

CAREERS Our graduates possess the knowledge and skills to pursue a variety of career paths, including: • • • • • • • •

Art Historian / Theoretician Art Journalist Artist Arts Writer Museum Worker Photographer Printmaker Teacher

• • • • • • •

Illustrator Textile Designer Curator Exhibition Coordinator Gallery Director Arts Administrator Community Arts Worker

The Bachelor of Creative Arts in Visual Arts helps you develop your artistic practice to a professional standard. While you may choose to pursue a career as a professional artist, the analytical and visual skills developed in this degree can also help you respond to aesthetic challenges in a variety of related or even non-artistic careers.

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GLENN BARKLEY Bachelor of Creative Arts (Visual Arts and Design) curator, museum of contemporary art, sydney

When Glenn Barkley studied art at UOW, he didn’t imagine he would find a career as a curator—certainly not in one of the country’s most important galleries, Sydney’s Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA). There’s something irrepressible about art. Working as one of three curators in Australia’s eminent contemporary art gallery is a big responsibility, but there’s raw excitement in the way Glenn talks about his work at the Museum. “I’m a fan, a real fan,” he enthuses. “I can go to a gallery and tell you about the collection from the point of view of a curator, about the connections between the art, why they might be together. But there’s certainly a lot of art I love and can’t tell you why. My expectations about what art is are challenged all the time.” Reinterpreting and investigating art are key to what he does. Is a technically traditional painting contemporary art? “At the MCA, we want to expand the idea and definition of contemporary art.” He recalls one installation, a series of large colourful geometric abstractions. “It’s a fairly aloof kind of art, it doesn’t reveal itself all at once. I’d come in the afternoon, spend my break looking at it. I’d think it was a shame that no one else was there, it was such a beautiful piece of art.”

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In talking to the Visitor Services Officers—the people who help visitors around the gallery—he found he wasn’t as alone as he thought. “They told me this was actually one of the most popular rooms in the museum. Absolutely everyone was going in there. The audience, the public, is sophisticated. They’re smart. They are ready to understand and appreciate art.” Glenn says he is fortunate to work in a relatively small team where he can build close working relationships. “I’m very lucky to work with friends. There are good curators at the MCA, good registrars, a great Director.” “And the install crew at the MCA are amazing,” he says of the team responsible for physically placing the artworks in the museum space. “They’re proud of what they do, you can see it in the level of detail in their work. Many of them also work as artists, so they respect the work—they love art too.” This quality and passion is essential for success, in Glenn’s opinion. “Those artists and curators who get to the top have that belief. That’s how they get there. In my experience, anyone who gets to a high level in their field is consumed by their work.” “Passion should inform everything you do. If it doesn’t, you’re probably doing the wrong thing.”


DEGREE OPTIONS

BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS (VISUAL ARTS AND DESIGN) ATAR

75/90 (Dean’s Scholar)

DURATION

3 years

STARTS Autumn (February) ENTRY Admission to the Bachelor of Creative Arts is based on the HSC ATAR (or equivalent), although outstanding results in relevant subjects/areas may also be taken into account.

In the creation of aesthetic artefacts, visual art and graphic design are increasingly interconnected. Artists may adapt traditional media for digital display and exhibition, while graphic designers draw upon established aesthetic techniques to position their work within a wider artistic context. Visual art involves some of the oldest forms of artistic production, such as sculpture and painting. Graphic design is comparatively ‘young’, and has emerged in response to contemporary technological developments. The history and conventions of visual art can lend credibility to graphic design, while design offers new approaches to the traditional challenges of the visual arts.

LOCATION

Wollongong

UAC

754607/754610 (Dean’s Scholar)

WHAT YOU STUDY

CRICOS

001709K

A Bachelor of Creative Arts (BCA) in Visual Arts and Design combines technical skills from the areas of Visual Art and Graphic Design, while exploring the intersections of the two. You will develop practical skills in both traditional and new media, allowing you to create works that blur the boundaries between established analogue and new digital artworks. Studio subjects teach you the artistic processes that you’ll need to create art and design projects, while history and theory subjects provide a foundation for understanding the position of your work in relation to contemporary art and design practice. In the final year of the degree, it’s your choice where you focus: your major project may be in Visual Arts or Graphic Design, but will be shaped by your knowledge of how these two areas interact. A degree in Visual Arts and Design draws on the strengths of both components, but offers additional flexibility for contemporary artistic practice. You will have access to a wide variety of resources from both disciplines, including UOW’s state-of-the-art Digital Media Centre, located on the Innovation Campus. Experienced staff from Visual Arts and Graphic Design will provide you with the key skills to create works in both traditional and digital media, and you will have the opportunity to collaborate with other students across disciplines. Studio subjects in design and branding allow you to practice your skills in a professional context, and the final year of the degree involves the creation and exhibition of a major creative work as part of the Art and Design Graduate Show.

CAREERS Visual Arts and Design graduates apply their compositional and technical skills in a variety of careers, including: • • • • • • • • • • •

Animator/Cartoonist Arts Administrator Artist Brand/Logo Designer Community Arts Worker Content/Digital Curator Curator Exhibition Coordinator Gallery Director Graphic Designer Illustrator

• • • • • • • • • •

Photographer Printmaker Production Artist Production Artist/Coordinator/ Director Publication Designer Teacher Textile Designer Typesetter Web Designer

Visual Arts and Design provides exciting areas of overlap between the practice of visual artists and designers. Tools and techniques from graphic design enhance the work of contemporary artists in both new and traditional media.

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MORGAN WAY BACHELOR OF DIGITAL MEDIA director, producer, writer – wayward films

WayWard Films was born in a digital media studio at UOW. Morgan Way and Sam Doyan met in their Digital Media degree and decided they wanted to do something more. They wanted to use the supportive staff, state of the art facilities and secure environment to not only learn but launch something real—their own film production company. Initially Morgan wanted to use his degree for a career in animation but quickly found that he had a passion for directing. “Being exposed to all the different elements of digital media was such an eye opener. I was so focussed on animation at the start. I am just lucky that the degree gave me an overall perspective and now, I couldn’t imagine doing anything else. I love mixing with people, being out there, directing, doing—it’s exciting.” So from there, they put together their first feature film – a thriller, titled Travis Jenkins.

Guns, drugs, fear, violence and a desperate father out to save his daughter from falling in with some very bad people: these are the gripping themes of the feature film that was put together with the help of fellow students, digital media staff and many others. “The best things I got from my degree were all the creative connections. We have definitely used up every favour we were ever entitled to, UOW staff helped us develop the script, they gave so much of their time to get it right, established actors worked for free, the Digital Media Centre loaned us so much great equipment, students from our degree from every facet of filmmaking helped us make every element work. It was a great learning experience. There was minimal sleep when we were shooting but it was worth it.” “Regardless of the outcome of our film, we set out to put into practice what we had learned in our degree and make a feature film from start to finish. We did that and I couldn’t be more proud.” “We don’t know where we sit in the film arena yet but I can’t wait to find out.”

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DEGREE OPTIONS

BACHELOR OF DIGITAL MEDIA ATAR 75 DURATION

3 years

STARTS Autumn (February) ENTRY Admission to the Bachelor of Digital Media is based on the HSC ATAR (or equivalent), although outstanding results in relevant subjects/areas may also be taken into account. LOCATION

Wollongong

UAC

754650

CRICOS

071836A

As a discipline, digital media is focused on digital production, with a particular emphasis on creative applications of new media. The technologies that underpin digital media are rapidly evolving, and these constant changes create a vibrant environment for innovative creative practice. Digital media is not just one thing—it’s all about convergence, the way different media and technologies can influence one another. Animation, film making, computer systems: digital media stands at the intersection between technology and creativity.

WHAT YOU STUDY The Bachelor of Digital Media (BDM) is a cross-institutional program taught by UOW and TAFE Illawarra. This collaboration means that as well as a UOW degree, you will also receive a Certificate IV and Diploma from TAFE, and, depending on your subject selection, an Advanced Diploma. These qualifications reflect the high level of academic and vocational skills provided by this course of study. This degree combines practical subjects in digital media arts with an education in art theory and practice, enabling you to create innovative digital media works for a variety of contexts. TAFE subjects in animation, cinematography, editing and film/TV production give you the skills to produce creative projects for the screen, TV or online environment. You’ll also learn the historical and theoretical foundations of digital media arts, which will help position your work in a wider cultural context. The practical components of the degree are taught at the Digital Media Centre at UOW’s Innovation Campus in North Wollongong. This state-of-the-art facility provides film studios, animation and computer labs, editing suites and exhibition spaces. Your practical training will be undertaken with industry-recognised hardware and software to ensure that you are working at the cutting edge of digital media arts. And the DMC’s facilities make it easy to share and exhibit your work: in the classroom, in specialised multimedia exhibition spaces and online.

CAREERS Graduates from the Bachelor of Digital Media can pursue a number of different career paths, including: • • • • • •

Animator Cinematographer Digital Effects Editor Film Maker Online Content Producer Production Coordinator

The vocational skills you develop in the Bachelor of Digital Media allow you to respond innovatively and flexibly to the rapidly changing media environment. Whether you’re animating a website or adding digital effects to a film, you need specialised technical skills and a clear grasp of how your own practice relates to the wider industry. Many careers are increasingly reliant on digital literacy and proficiency, and the key skills you learn in this degree can be applied in any field where a digital presence is required.

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NATHAN HARRISON BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS Honours (PERFORMANCE) founder, applespiel

From drama at Smith’s Hill High School in Wollongong to performing his own show at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland, Nathan Harrison is living his dream. Three years at UOW majoring in Performance, learning from experienced teachers, being exposed to different art forms and seeing and making a huge variety of work gave him the context he needed to find his own direction. This led to the formation of his own collective of performance artists called Applespiel, devising his own work and performing in theatres and festivals all over the world. These artists also studied at UOW and were confident to take on the world of performance with the experience and knowledge they got from their degree. “I came away with a wide skill set—a real jack-of-all-trades feel. In addition to acting and performance training, I learned how to rig lights, operate sound, produce and direct. All this experience has really helped set me up as an artist capable of creating and producing my own work.”

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“One of the first things that really struck me once I started the course was the experience of the staff. These were people who had done great work in the fields I was interested in, they knew other amazing artists and could really push us in a way that would help us outside of the course. I still keep in contact with many of the staff. Since graduating I’ve continued to have an excellent creative relationship with my performance lecturer Chris Ryan, whose work with The Sydney Front and version 1.0 has totally inspired my own practice.” “I want to continue working as an artist: I’ve made great connections in the last few years, have a wonderful group of collaborators and I’m really proud of the work we’ve done. In the future I’d like to move into producing and curating, but I’ve got exciting projects lined up for the next couple of years that I can’t wait to get into.”


DEGREE OPTIONS

BACHELOR OF PERFORMANCE ATAR The Faculty does not advertise an ATAR as additional selection criteria (audition/interview) are also used.

WHAT YOU STUDY

DURATION

ACTING and PERFORMANCE

3 years

STARTS Autumn (February) ENTRY In addition to a UAC application, applicants must register directly with the Faculty by 30 October. For an audition or interview in order to demonstrate your ability to meet the criteria for the course. Please refer to the faculty website for details www.uow.edu.au/crearts/ futureundergrad Students who complete the first year of the Bachelor of Creative Arts (Theatre) to a high standard may be invited to apply for a place in the Bachelor of Performance; however, places will be strictly limited and the process highly competitive. LOCATION

Wollongong

UAC

754800

CRICOS

072568G

The Bachelor of Performance is an intensive, fully prescribed degree designed for those students committed to a professional career in the performing arts sector.

The Bachelor of Performance teaches the skills required to pursue careers in acting for theatre and performance, ranging from the traditional staging of plays to more contemporary forms of performance, including the generation of self-devised performances, and multimedia installation works. Such opportunities develop students’ entrepreneurial abilities, as well as building self-reliance and artistic confidence. The program places a strong emphasis on traditional interpretive actor training, developing skills in acting, voice, singing and movement. In introductory subjects, you acquire competencies in theatre-making with an emphasis on collaboration and ensemble practice. You’ll also study the history and theory of theatre and undertake studies in professional practice. Actors, creatives and technicians work together to produce a number of productions directed by professionals working with students throughout the degree. Creative Arts offers access to rehearsal studios and performance spaces, including the FCA Performance Space and the recently-built Backstage Hope. Our academic and technical staff have extensive experience as directors, writers, performers and designers, and their knowledge will help you develop your skills and abilities to a professional level.

CAREERS The Bachelor of Performance provides the skills required to pursue different careers, such as: • • • • •

Actor Singer Director Dramaturge Performance-maker

Graduates from the Bachelor of Performance are trained to be versatile, highly skilled and self-reliant theatre practitioners, with valuable experience in both traditional and contemporary forms of theatre and performance. Graduates may go on to work in mainstage and independent theatre; they may choose to start their own ensembles, or to create highly experimental work in areas such as puppetry, outdoor performance, theatre by and for children and young people, or in community practice.

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CREATE YOUR FUTURE connect: CREATIVE ARTS

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS BACHELOR OF CREATIVE ARTS AND BACHELOR OF DIGITAL MEDIA Applicants are selected on the basis of their ATAR (or equivalent), although outstanding results in relevant subjects may be taken into account.

BACHELOR OF PERFORMANCE As well as applying through UAC, Bachelor of Performance applicants must attend an on-campus audition/interview. These face-to-face meetings will give applicants the opportunity to demonstrate their talents and potential to benefit from the course. Bachelor of Performance applicants must submit a Registration Form, by October 30, available at www.uow.edu.au/crearts

HOW TO APPLY To apply for the BCA, BDM or BPerf degree you need to have that degree listed as a preference with the University Admission Centre (UAC). More information on this process can be found on the UAC website at www.uac.edu.au UOW also has special entry options for current Year 12 students. These include Early Admissions, Alternative Entry, Local and Regional Bonus Points and Points to UOW schemes. For more information contact UniAdvice: uniadvice@uow.edu.au

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LEARN MORE CREATIVE ARTS ENQUIRIES +61 2 4221 3996 fca-enquiries@uow.edu.au lha.uow.edu.au GENERAL ENQUIRIES www.uow.edu.au/future Within Australia: 1300 367 869 International: +61 2 4221 3218 uniadvice@uow.edu.au facebook.com/uowfuture

The University of Wollongong attempts to ensure the information contained in this publication is correct at the time of production (May 2013); however, sections may be amended without notice by the University in response to changing circumstances or for any other reason. Check with the University at the time of application/enrolment for any updated information. UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG CRICOS: 00102E


2013 UOW Creative Arts Discipline Book