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U University News Thursday, December 6, 2012

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Vol. XCXI No. 13

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A student voice of SLU since 1919

Election process pondered

Rick Majerus, 1948-2012

By WOLF HOWARD Associate News Editor

Senators considered modifications to the SGA election process in anticipation of election season during the Student Government Association’s final meeting before the end of the year. The main bill considered was identical to a bill passed at the end of the last semester, which amended the SGA constitution to bar executive board candidates from running on tickets in the annual SGA election, in addition to banning endorsements. Also on the agenda was a bill to form a task force with the intention of investigating and analyzing the election process at SLU. A ticket is a group of executive-board-hopefuls that run as a named entity with a shared platform; Limitless was the most prominent and only full ticket last year, comprise of Blake Exline, Yiqing Huang, Keilah Johnson, Vidur Sharma, Richard Joubert, Sean Worley and Beth Alberty. The group swept the election. Limitless’ highly uncontested run incited concern among SGA senators concerning the election process. Many senators thought the existence of tickets discouraged those who would otherwise run for positions, due to the intimidating power of united opposition. Others also argued that tickets encourage people to vote on the basis of who See “SGA” on Page 3

Rick Majerus coached the Billikens from 2007-2012. He died on Saturday, Dec. 1, of heart failure, in Los Angeles. In his career, he achieved over 500 victories, including a 95-69 record at SLU and an NCAA berth. Majerus’ most successful season came at Utah in the 1997-98 season, when the Utes finished as NCAA national runners-up. By DERRICK NEUNER Enterprise Editor

To many on the outside, the health of Rick Majerus seemed to be a nonfactor. The irreverent coach had a history of health scares during his career as a collegiate head coach – at Utah in 1989, he underwent heart surgery, missing most of the season; he retired from the Utes in 2003 after coaching just 20 games. But, except for a brief absence due to a leg infection in 2011, Majerus seemed to be happy and healthy as the head coach at Saint Louis University. Following the only losing season in his nearly 30 years as a head coach, the maestro Majerus guided the Billikens to the third round of the NCAA Tournament, their first trip there in over 11 years. At the post-game press conference, following a 65-61 loss to No. 5 seeded Michigan State, Majerus remarked to the gathered media that he was exhausted, tired, in need of a break, a beach and maybe a few beers. The crowd laughed. Majerus sighed. Perhaps the joke was more of a foreshadowing. On Aug. 24, Majerus announced he would be

Theology professor delivers ‘Last Lecture’ By MATT HESKAMP Staff Writer

One of the facts of life is that we do not know what is going to happen in the future, whether that is in regards to after we graduate or even years down the road. What you are committing your time to at this moment could be the very last thing you do. If you could have the security of knowing that you could do something, anything, what would you do? On Monday, Dec. 2, Tobias Winright gave his

Last Lecture speech during which he addressed some of these pressing issues. The Last Lecture Series offers Saint Louis University professors the opportunity to answer a the question: If you knew that this was the last lecture you would ever give, what would you share? Each semester, students nominate and vote on a professor to give a presentation as an answer to the question. See “Lecture” on Page 3

Kristen Miano/ News Editor

Last Lecture speaker, Tobias Winright, presents on Dec. 3

INSIDE:

Ryan Giacomino/ The University News

Curtis Wang/ The University News

NEWS

>> Meet Vijai Dixit

taking medical leave from his job as head coach and would not be coaching in the 2012-13 season. Shortly after, on Nov. 16, SLU announced he would not return to the Billikens’ sideline. Neither the school nor any of Majerus’ associates said why. The basketball community would have to find out the hard way. On Dec. 1, in a Los Angeles hospital, Rick Majerus, the larger-than-life former head coach of the Saint Louis University men’s basketball team, passed away. He was 64. According to Jon Huntsman Sr., a longtime friend of the coach, Majerus was told three months prior that he would require a heart transplant in order to survive the latest complication of his cardiac system. Because of Majerus’ extensive history of heart procedures – including a stent inserted in August 2011 – doctors concluded that he was not an eligible candidate for a transplant. He was taken off life support after his condition severely deteriorated. He is survived by his sisters, Jodi and Tracy, and dozens of friends and former players. “We join the rest of the basketball world in sending our condolences to Rick Majerus’ family and friends,” SLU director of athletics Chris May

said in a statement released by SLU. “Coach Majerus put his heart and soul into the Billiken program, and for that we will be eternally grateful. “What I will remember most about Rick’s tenure at SLU was his enduring passion to see his players excel both on and off the court,” May said. “Wins and losses meant a lot to him, but no more than to see our student-athletes succeed in the classroom. He truly embraced the term ‘student-athlete,’ and I think that will be his lasting legacy.” SLU will hold a memorial service for Majerus on Friday, Dec. 7, at 3:30 p.m. at Chaifetz Pavilion. He will be buried Saturday, Dec. 8, in his hometown of Milwaukee. Following Majerus’ passing, outpouring of support for his family and fond memories of encounters came from across the basketball community. “He treated me like I was his brother,” Denver Nuggets head coach George Karl, a former assistant of Majerus’, said. “He’s one of my best friends and I think most people in basketball See “Majerus” on Page 3

West Pine Gym renovations underway By KRISTEN MIANO News Editor

Construction on the new Center for Global Citizenship has progressed over the fall semester and is set to be finished in May of 2013. Located in the underutilized Bauman-Eberhardt building, the Center for Global Citizenship project began last year in an effort to turn the West Pine Gym into a location for students to congregate. “The idea of the Center for Global Citizenship is to get the most out of a space that hasn’t really been used on campus,” Student Government Association president Blake Exline said. “The Bauman-Eberhardt building will be renovated into a center which will really encompass a lot of different things, like international studies, the Center for Community Service and Engagement and the Cross Cultural Center.” According to Exline, the intent is to turn the building into a multi-functional space to serve several dif-

2 OPINION

John Schuler/ Photo Editor

Equipment sits behind the future Center for Global Citizenship as the consturtion continues. ferent groups on Saint Louis University’s campus. The complete building will feature new office spaces for the Cross Cultural Center, which is currently located in the Busch Student Center, and the student groups that work within the CCC. On the first floor, the bowl-style seating of the basketball court will be converted half into an atrium

4 ARTS

>> Official UNews Christmas List

for students to hang out and study in, while the other half will be an all-purpose auditorium for presentations and performances. The auditorium will have a video screen and seat a few hundred people. At this time, the hope is to conserve the original wood floor of the basketball court in an effort to preserve some of the old gym’s his-

torical significance. “The architect of the building described it as more of a ‘living room’ space on campus,” Exline said. “Other places we have on campus don’t necessarily provide that living room type space for students, so we want to create a space for that.” See “Center” on Page 3

7 SPORTS

>> Blue Men Invade Fox

>> Bills meet Mean Green

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2 NEWS

DECEMBER 6, 2012

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Let Us Introduce You: Vijai Dixit Professor teaches physics and Hindi, loves telling jokes By KRISTEN MIANO News Editor

Vijai Dixit is a professor of both physics and Hindi, two very different disciplines at first glance. Dixit, however, easily finds a connection between the two. “Both are like poetry,” he said. “I tell my students they should be good enough in math that it feels like a poem. Every word a student learns in Hindi, I have a song for. I am a great lover of poetry, and to me, everything can be a poem.” Dixit has been teaching in the physics department at Saint Louis University for the last 27 years, a job he said he obtained by chance. In 1983, he and his wife went to visit a friend who taught at Parks College. “I happened to talk to the chair of science and mathematics,” Dixit said. “We chatted for two hours and the job offer was made right then and there.” Prior to teaching at SLU, Dixit lived and worked in a multitude of different countries, including Jamaica, Belgium and Germany. His favorite place to live, however, was in Shiraz, Iran. “Maybe it was because I was young and newly married. It was a beautiful place,” Dixit said. “It was a pleasant mixture of east and west when I was there.” Along with his impressive resume of countries, Dixit also speaks a variety of languages. He speaks Hindi, French, Dutch, Urdu, a bit of German and several kinds of Indian languages. Currently, he is teaching himself Spanish. “I watch Harry Potter in Spanish with English subtitles. It’s very helpful,” Dixit said. “That’s how I learned Dutch and French while in Belgium, by watching movies with subtitles.” Dixit also incorporates this language learning technique in his Hindi classes; classes, he said, remain thankfully small. He attests he loves working at SLU, but the growing class sizes, particularly in the science departments, is something he is not a fan of. “More and more classes

THE SLU SCOOP Saturday, Dec. 1

2:27 p.m. - ACCIDENTAL INJURY

A male student cut his right hand on a broken glass while washing dishes. The student was conveyed to SLU-ER for treatment by DPSEP.

All Information Provided by Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Friday, Nov. 30

1:34 a.m. - PROPERTY DAMAGE

10:01 a.m. - STEALING OVER $500

DPSEP was contacted in reference to a broken window on the east side of the building by Res Life. Upon arrival, the RA on duty and officers found a trail of blood in the lobby, elevator and the fourth floor. The trail of blood lead to room 417. Contact was made with the student, who admitted he broke the window out of anger. The student had a 1 inch laceration on his right hand and refused medical attention. This matter will be referred to the office of Student Conduct.

A student reported that an unknown person(s) stole his bicycle by detaching the frame from the front tire. The tire was U-bolted to the bike rack. The bike was not registered with DPSEP. Kristen Miano / News Editor

in science are becoming too big, and it is a disservice to students,” Dixit said. “The teachers don’t have enough office hours and there are not enough qualified TA’s.” Dixit understands the importance of students having access to teachers in part because it was a teacher of his own that sparked his love for physics. He said that his teacher’s enthusiasm for the subject inspired his own passion in the area. “I’m the kind of guy who wants to know everything,” Dixit said. “I’ve wandered the field of physics in many directions. My basic love is in elementary particle physics, but I am getting interested in matters biological.” His love of learning is not just limited to sciences, however. For fun, he is studying Greek mythology and drawing parallels between those and Indian myths. He also has an interest and foundation in literature, something he said is fairly unique for someone of his background. “When I was growing up in India, I did not ini-

tially study music or dancing or something because they are considered ‘sissy’ topics,”Dixit said. “Right from the beginning it was science and mathematics, so it was peculiar that I did so well in literature. Most boys are not supposed to do anything in literature.” Part of the reason Dixit believes his literature studies were so successful was that his father was a professor of language and also a poet. He thinks he likely inherited his interest for literature from his father. With his focus on teaching and learning, Dixit said he does not have much free time. The little he has he spends playing with his dog, Rocco, and reading for fun otherwise., He said he has a great interest in the art of telling jokes. “I am a compulsive joketeller, and my sense of humor allows me to see the irony in my own life and in the world around me,” Dixit said. “My sense of humor has helped me survive many situations. It’s all easier if you can laugh at it.”

11:29 a.m. - STEALING OVER $500

A student reported leaving his backpack, containing personal items as well as a laptop computer, unattended. Upon his return to retrieve the backpack it was missing. The student was provided the non-emergency phone number for SLMPD to file a report with that agency.

Sunday, Dec. 2

6:57 p.m. - SEXUAL ASSAULT

DPSEP received a call from a student’s father stating that his daughter had been sexually assaulted off campus. DPSEP officers and Pro staff were dispatched to meet with the victim.

1:07 p.m. - FIRE ALARM

The smoke detector in room 406 was activated when food in a microwave burned. The smoke dissipated and the alarm was silenced.

and refused medical attention. 5:25 a.m. - FOUND PROPERTY

The desk worker for Marchetti West reported to DPSEP Communications that a student left his luggage in the lobby. DPSEP Officers took possession of the property and logged it into lost and found.

Tuesday, Dec. 4

8:47 a.m. - ELECTRICAL OUTAGE

Electrical power was lost for a few minutes.Power was also interrupted at several other buildings on the Medical School Campus.The cause of the interruption is being investigated by maintenance personnel.

Be a Responsible Billiken STOP. CALL. REPORT. 314-977-3000 witness.slu.edu dps.slu.edu

9:33 p.m. - ACCIDENTAL INJURY

3:40 p.m. - PROPERTY DAMAGE

A student advised that his body was numb after being elbowed in the head while playing basketball. EMS was contacted and responded to the location. The student reported the numbness went away

A student reported that between 2200hrs. on 11/29/12 and 0830hrs. on 11/30/12 some unknown person(s) damaged two window screens to her bedroom. Maintenance was notified.

It’s the Holiday Season at SLU

EXTENDED HOURS: DEC 3 - DEC 21 M

9AM 7PM

Kristen Miano / News Editor

An 18 ft. Christmas Tree has been set up on the stairwell of the Busch Student Center. The tree features large red and gold ornaments and a stuffed Billiken on the top in place of a star. The Christmas Tree is just one part of the many Christmas decortations both in the Student Center and around SLU.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

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9AM 7PM

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9AM 7PM

Th

9AM 7PM

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9AM 5PM

Sat

Sun

11 AM- CLOSED 3PM

The holiday season is here and the “I want!” and “I need!” has begun. Gifts bring smiles to faces but do some serious damage to bank accounts. Bring us in your unused textbooks and let’s see if we can turn them into cash for you! Who knows, they could be worth more than you think and there might be some extra left over for a little something for yourself!

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DECEMBER 6, 2012

Majerus: Beloved coach left lasting legacy of the best! My heart is heavy tonight.” Closer to home, SLU know that. I’m mad at him, students wore black on I’m angry he’s gone, there’s Sunday, Dec. 2, during a a lot of emotions going on contest of the Billikens and in my head. Most of it is Valparaiso to honor MajeI’ve got to figure out how rus’ legacy. to celebrate our friendship In an interview with The for the rest of my life even University News, Alex Jenthough he’s not going to be sen, head coach of the NBA with us.” Development League’s Boston Celtics head Canton Charge, a former coach Doc Rivers, who SLU assistant coach and played for Majerus at player of Majerus’ at Utah, Marquette, couldn’t even described his former coach remark as “one of about the a kind.” passing of “Love his coach him or I hope the things that hate him, w h e n asked on he taught and shared there is no Saturday. one that “That’s ... affect me in a better will sura tough way, whether it be how I pass his one for knowledge me,” Riv- coach or treat others. and dediers told cation to repor ters -Alex Jensen the game in Milwauof basketkee as he ball,” Jenchoked back tears. “I mean, sen said. “No one parallels he’s the one who gave me him in that category.” my name.” Jensen lamented that Loyola University ChiMajerus didn’t allow the cago coach Porter Moser, public to get to know the an assistant under Majerus more private, intimate side at SLU from 2007-10, tweetof his personality. ed, “RIP to my friend and “There are very few mentor Coach Majerus. I people who got to know learned so much about the Coach Majerus well, unforgame and life. We lost one tunately,” he said. “I don’t Continued from Page 1

Majerus coached at Marquette, Ball State, Utah, and SLU. think his legacy will have an overarching impact on a great number of people. On the other hand, those who did get to know him are grateful for that relationship. I know I am. I hope the things that he taught and shared with me affect me in a better way, whether it be how I coach or treat other people.“ Majerus’ legacy includes a record of 517-215, 12 trips to the NCAA Tournament, including finishing as na-

tional runner-up, and a 5032 record with the NBA Milwaukee Bucks. But perhaps his most lasting impression is on those he left behind. Following the loss to Michigan State, a sobbing Brian Conklin left an ode to Majerus for all to hear and see. “I couldn’t imagine playing for a better coach, a better person,” he said. “He doesn’t just teach you about basketball, it’s about life.”

Students protest outside Christmas Party

3

SGA: Bill to remove tickets voted down Continued from Page 1

Ryan Giacomino/The University News

NEWS

shares a ticket rather than individual merit. Opposition to the ban argued that tickets allow an executive board to have a unified vision and eliminating the ticket system provides no benefits to the student body. The bill passed, but former President Matt Ryan vetoed the bill before the conclusion of the 20112012 SGA General Assembly. Sen. Kunjan Patel and Senator Emeritus Jimmy Mieners presented the bill to senate. There was a lengthy discussion about the endorsements targeted by the bill. Multiple senators saw barring public endorsements coming from current executive board members as a violation of free speech. Mieners insisted that the issue was not free speech, but the application of public clout to tilt elections in favor of one candidate or another. Patel argued further that it wasn’t preventing the executive board from giving their opinions should someone ask them in a private manner. “Of course you can ask the past presidents what they think,” Patel said. “You can ask the opinion, but [the President is] not officially endorsing anyone.” Multiple senators opposed the bill on the

grounds that there wasn’t enough time to talk about the specifics of the election process and work out amendments based on more concrete study and analysis. Most senators felt that the timing was inappropriate given the fast-approaching election season. Executive board candidates will be finalized by Jan. 23, which will be the next opportunity for Senate to vote the changes in to the constitution. “I think the issues that we’re trying to talk about can be fixed through the election commissioner packet,” Sen. Dylan Jones said, though he supported the intention of the bill. Jones suggested that one way to eliminate the issue with people voting for ticket as opposed to individual candidate could be removing the ticket name from the voting screen during elections. The bill failed with 1 in favor, 16 against and 11 abstaining. Following the failure was a resolution to form a task force focused on the SGA election process. Exline, the author of the resolution, felt a wellbalanced task force would be able to provide real time analysis of the election process as it plays out next semester. The resolution passed with 1 against and 1 abstaining.

John Schuler/Photo Editor

Sen.Patel and Senater Emeritus Meiners defend their bill.

Bo Peng /Photographer

Students and faculty protest outside the Saint Louis Museum of Art on Tuesday, Dec. 4, during Lawrence Biondi, S.J.’s Christmas Party for alumni, donars and other friends of the University. Participants rang bells and held signs to express their continued no confidence in Biondi and his administration. A letter leaked from the chairmen of the Board of Trustees, Thomas Brouster, to the rest of the SLU community helped to influence the protest, among other grievences with the management of the University.

Lecture: Prof. discusses life-altering head injury Continued from Page 1

Center: Building to promote global citizenship Continued from Page 1

On the second floor, there will be a bridge that stretches across the middle of the building. There will also be an international café that will feature a variety of international foods. “The café is something we want to develop to make it as effective and useful for students as possible,” Exline said. “We will be providing a menu that will live up to the theme of global citizenship. How that will play into our food goes beyond having pita and hummus or pizza as ‘Italian’. We want to get in touch with what international food means.” According to Vice Presi-

dent of Diversity and Social Justice, Sean Worley, the Center is meant to serve as a reminder for the student body about what being a global citizen actually means. “In my opinion, a global citizen is someone who is a member not only of their immediate community, but also recognizes what their actions and behaviors can do to the global community,” Worley said. “It goes beyond saying ‘I’ve been to another country’ or ‘I have friends from other countries.’ I think it means to be intentional and mindful of the issues in the world.” Worley hopes that by putting an emphasis on

global citizenship, the SLU community will be encouraged to think of the larger issues facing the global community and not just focus on those within the “SLU bubble.” Currently, the builders are working on the concrete infrastructure and other essential components of the building, but SGA and other involved parties are beginning to think about the cosmetic decisions that need to be made. Two weeks ago, SGA held a vote for the student body to pick the furniture that will go in the finished center. “We concluded the furniture-voting process and we had quite a number of

votes on that,” Exline said. “We got some good student feedback from that.” Apart from the furniture, however, the need for student feedback has been limited. Exline said that when the time comes to pick color schemes and other visual elements, more feedback will be collected, but prior to that, students can always submit ideas and opinions to the SGA email account. “Right now it’s a lot of non-exciting stuff going on, mostly just things that are needed for the building to function, but aren’t really flashy” Exline said. “We will collect student feedback for most of the cosmetic stuff.”

“May 7th a few years back could have been my last lecture,” Winright said to start his speech. He proceeded to tell the story of how he fell during a family vacation to Ireland. Winright suffered a hairline fracture in his skull and admitted himself to the local hospital a few days later after several blistering headaches and bouts of dizziness occurred.   What Winright soon learned was that there was a sub-dermal hemorrhage and a blood clot in his brain. The doctor told Winright that his case was in need of immediate attention, and he recommended transferring to a different hospital that had neurosurgeons. Winright showed a video titled “No Quit,” to illustrate what had happened to him. In the video, a son whose father frequently told him never to quit when he was in a wrestling match turned the mantra back on his dad when he was hospitalized with a similar, but more severe case of what Winright had. “At its core wrestling has but one mandate: get up. Off the mat, off the bottom, off your back. To lie down is to lose,” the video said. “It is about strength, it is about will, and it is about where those things often come from: your family. With their help, you get up.” Winright said that he is grateful. Because of the support of his family, he had a reason to fight. They never let him stop and lie down, stay on his back and feel sorry for himself.

“Some of those who had what I had can’t walk, some can’t talk, some are dead,” Winright said. “I was not sure what would happen to me. I had never stayed overnight in a hospital before.” Winright quoted Samwise Gamgee, a character in J.R Tolkien’s ”Lord of the Rings,” to illustrate how he felt at that time: “I don’t know how to say it, but after last night I feel different. I don’t rightly know what I want: but I have something to do before the end, and it lies ahead, not in the Shire.” For Winright it was too early, there were still things that needed to be done. “To sum up how life has changed for me: I get to instead of having to. I get to live instead of having to,” Winright said. “I get to make friends. Not carnal or worldly friends, but spiritual and true friends.” Winright said that for him it did not take a village, but rather it was those he calls family, biological and not, who helped raise him. Love is the most important thing, Winright told the audience.    Winright said he was asked to write as if it were his last lecture, but the lesson he gave in his lecture was simple: love as if it were your last act on this earth, smile as if it were the last thing you do, cultivate a world of justice instead of one of hate. Winright advised us to live every day as if it were our last, because we don’t know if it really will be. He closed his speech by challenging the audience to take steps to live a life of purer love not through our words, but through our actions.


U OPINION

DECEMBER 6, 2012

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Quotes

of the week

Mike Hogan/ Opinion Editor

Christmas in college: Then and now At Christmastime, ever yone becomes a kid again — or at least, ever yone gets a little leeway for acting like a kid. Even though the Yuletide season never loses its magic, things change a bit as you grow up and head off to college. Here’s how Christmas has changed since the good old days of the editorial board’s youth, when we rode our Razor scooters five miles to school, uphill both ways. It used to be that we couldn’t wait to get up and run to the tree on Christmas morning. Many of us would wake at, say, 4 a.m., tr y to wake up our groggy parents, and inevitably be told to go to sleep for four more hours. Those four hours were the longest of the entire year. These days, most of us would pay to have four extra hours of sleep. In fact, “Extra Time” would probably top our wish lists in the place of honor once occupied by Furbies, Chia Pets, Tamagachis, skateboards, Pokémon cards, Beanie Babies and Gameboys. But as far as we know, Santa Claus cannot bend time to his will — although that is one proposed theor y as to how he manages to visit all those homes in a single night. Speaking of Santa, we tend not to leave out cookies any more. Maybe it’s just that we’re hungr y college kids, but we can usually come up with a better use for those chocolate chip morsels. That or we’re just looking out for Saint Nick’s health… he and Mrs. Claus have put on a few extra pounds in recent years. It used to be that we could bring cookies to school during the holiday season and spend a day of celebration with our friends. Oh, how things change. These days we spend the end of the semester cramming, and not our mouths with Christmas cookies. Now most schools don’t allow homemade baked goods at all; all food has to be store

bought to reduce health and safety hazards. We also used to spend a day of class, making arts and crafts as presents for our family; nowadays, if we’re making gifts for people, it’s usually an act of financial necessity. But hey, those ornaments we made in grade school were pretty good, right? Well, sometime around high school the cuteness wears off, and it comes time to get real gifts for our parents and family members. We’re all about the spirit of giving, but we practically need a different kind of spirits to stay sane in the mall the week before Christmas. Nothing, including driving classes, can prepare you for the horrors of Target’s parking lot during shopping season. And of course, being on the “Nice” list doesn’t let you buy presents for free, so many of us have had the unpleasant experience of working through the holidays. Still, days of labor somehow make a few days off that much sweeter. Yes, things have changed over the years, but some parts of Christmas are immutable. The same old movies are on TV each year; although it is disconcerting to see young Tim Allen playing Santa seconds before you see old Tim Allen in a Ford commercial. The same songs are always played, nostalgia in ever y note. And midnight Mass is still an option, but it’s a choice we make now, not something we’re forced into. Fortunately our college sleep schedules are better adapted for that sort of thing than they were when we were kids. Oh, and when we were kids, it was cold in December, though not ever yone misses that aspect. But who knows, there’s a few weeks till Christmas, so winter might come in earnest after all. Just to be safe, don’t go licking lampposts — you’re in college now, you should know better.

Christmas wish list from the UNews staff Maybe what college students want more than anything else is time. While that may be true, it won’t stop The University News staff from coming up with some backup options. You know, in case they run out of boxed Time at Walmart. Here’s the wacky wish list of the editorial board:

Some way to cross Grand without putting our lives at risk. It’s one thing when the streets are dr y, but when the ice and snow comes, that center median becomes a scar y (not to mention sloppy) place indeed. Bridge, tunnel or zipline, find us a way!

A new ‘N Sync Christmas album. They don’t have to get back together forever, just long enough to craft another catchy Christmas CD. Come on, you have to admit it gets stuck in your head.

A cup of cof fee with the entire Board of Trustees of Saint Louis University. You know, just to shoot the breeze. Relax over some joe. No worries, we’re wonderful conversationalists first, journalists second.

Hostess to resurrect itself. That or, at the ver y least, for Twinkies and Ho Hos to be produced by someone else. After the apocalypse, we’ll all be thankful for the long lifespan of the Twinkie. Or tomorrow night. Whichever comes first.

A leg lamp and a Red Ryder BB Gun. No, we won’t shoot our eyes out. We just want some nice furniture for the newsroom, and a toy firearm to blow off some steam after finals.

The Chipotle on Grand to open. It’s a two-minute walk from the newsroom. That disk tempts us from across the highway.

Visors to become fashionable again. Also, Walkmen and boomboxes. Actually, we just want it to be the 80s again, thereby enabling us to relive the glorious 90s and then invest in Apple early.

The Beatles to be revived in a hologram. They did it for Tupac, why not the Fab Four? Sounds like a recipe for success, even though the Tupac-hologram company did file for bankruptcy.

Tacocopters: a theoretical company that uses small, unmanned helicopters to deliver delicious Mexican food to your door or dorm window. We want to live in a world where this exists.

Morgan Freeman to narrate our lives. We’d practically be forced to do great things with our lives, just to live up to the magnificent thunder describing our ever y move.

The Second Coming of Christ and world peace. It seems like it will take a miracle to get us out of the mess we’ve made of the planet. Maybe the guy upstairs can beat the Mayans to the punch.

A good Super Bowl halftime show. Either pick a younger artist, or go all the way with the old folks routine and use a Beatles hologram.

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Assoc. News editor wolf howard news@unewsonline.com

assoc. arts editor maggie needham arts@unewsonline.com

fashion editor julia christensen fashion@unewsonline.com

OPINION EDITOR MICHAEL HOGAN opinion@unewsonline.com

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See Page 2.

Even though technology has made it so we don’t have to have that live experience, there’s something about our humanity that will always need it. -Philip Stanton, Blue Man Group cofounder

See Page 8.

It’s a memorable event, and usually for these events you want to dress well so when you look back on these memories you remember what you wore. -Saranya Nanda, grduating senior

See Page 10.

We have so much fun together I don’t see how this season could be anything but great. -Allison Walter, junior track athlete

See Page 12.

2012-13 EDITORIAL BOARD sports editor charles bowles sports@unewsonline.com

-Uijai Dixit, physics professor

Not to have to write any more editorials for the rest of the year. Happy Holidays!

editor-in-chief Brian boyd eic@unewsonline.com

My sense of humor allows me to see the irony in my own life and in the world around me. My sense of humor has helped me survive many situations. It’s all easier if you can laugh at it.

General manager connor berry gm@unewsonline.com account executives Rachel Cambell natalie grasso Nick Steinauer advisors laura thomson don highberger advisor@unewsonline.com the editorial board of the university news recognizes avis meyer, ph.d. as the newspaper’s faculty mentor.

“Freedom of the press—print, online and broadcast—is a basic right in a democratic society and is valuable in promoting the development of students as socially responsible persons ... The University News is a student voice, not the student voice. The views of The University News are the expressions of the students involved ... If [The University News] can represent a point of view around which discussion may develop, it serves a legitimate and needed purpose.” - From The University News’ Charter The University News is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, the Student Press Law Center, the College Media Advisers and the Missouri College Media Association, a division of the Missouri Press Association. First copy, free. Each additional copy, $1.00.


unewsonline.com

DECEMBER 6, 2012

OPINION

5

Majerus’ passion for the game offers a lesson for us all

When ‘fairness’ fails

What is left to be said? The articles and commemorations of former Head Coach R i c k Majerus beautifully articulate what a gr eat man and coach he was. Charles Bowles I was lucky enough to have the privilege of watching and covering every game of Majerus’ final year coaching. Majerus was the only reason that I knew about Saint Louis University when looking at colleges to attend. After I joined The University News, I dreamed of covering basketball games just so I could speak with the coach. When I started watching the games in November 2011, I was just a staff writer in the stands, learning from my editor. Eventually, I made it to the media room and got to witness the coach interact with his audience. Majerus sat down and made a brief statement about the game. For the rest of the press conference, he couldn’t stop with the jokes. I laughed at Majerus’ wit about the game and all manner of things on his mind; it wasn’t just basketball he had to talk about. Majerus always lightened the mood and made me laugh during these press conferences.

In my younger days, the until students in those classword fair and I had come to es could learn at the same an understanding. I thought rate of those at higher-level of fair in courses? a very That wasn’t a rhetorical g o o d question. I would love for light. someone to explain that to F a i r me. I would love to have meant in someone sit down with me school and show me when fair we did came to mean equal and our fair further, when equal came share to have such widespread of work applicability. and reIt isn’t fair that there are Wolf Howard ceived more white people than our fair black people in the MLB, grade for that work. Fair so we should get rid of the meant that if you show up MLB and have everyone first then you were the first play AAA baseball to make in line, and if I showed up things more fair. Is there late then I was the last. Fair something wrong with this was positive. Perhaps it picture? wasn’t the case that everyFairness certainly has one was happy in a fair situits place. It is not fair that a ation; those who did less student who struggles with work got worse grades, and school can’t do as well as the kids at the end of the someone who finds it easy. line had plenty to complain But by what reasonable arabout. Yet there remained gument can we say that it’s a certain justice to it: fair our job to decrease the permeant right, not equal. formance of one in order to Unfortunately, it would make up for the unfavorable seem the word fair has taksituation of another? Life en on a different definition isn’t fair and no amount of in the modern world. This artificial equalization will isn’t the only definition to ever make it so. change in my years from I’ve heard an argument grade school to now: equal, that is neatly summarized good, respectful, racist, logas “the most happiness for ical – the list goes on. the largest number.” We For instance, President should be happy to lose François Hollande of France some of our money in orrecently announced that he der to provide a home for is considering doing away all the homeless. The same with homework in elemengoes for losing some of our tary and junior high schools. food to end world hunger. Much to We should my chalower our grin there standards Unfortunately, it of living in is reasoning behind would seem the word order to the proprovide for posal. His fair has taken on a dif- those who argument? ferent definition in the have been Homework born at a creates an modern world. horrible unfair edudisadvancational entage. vironment, because those As wonderful as this idewith difficult situations at alistic view might seem, I home find it harder to do fail to see how everyone livhomework and succeed. ing equally is the most hapLet’s take a moment piness for the most people. to review the logic at play The smart will have here. In the name of all to be made dumber, the things good and equal, we athletic made slower, the must lessen the amount happy made less so, until of education everyone reeveryone is on an equal ceives in order to ensure plane. And when the syseveryone receives an equal tem unbalances itself again education. That’s fair? as it must, because even in This isn’t the first time the most selfless societies I’ve seen stupid champisome people simply peroned in the name of fairform better than others, ness and equality. In 2010, we will have to rebalance it. Evanston Township High This will continue until we School decided to remove can all progress at the same its freshman, honors-only pace, as the champions of humanities class, reserved “fair” would have it. for those students who But how is happiness givscored the highest in state en by my equality with my tests. neighbor the same as happiThis was done in orness given by pursuing my der to diversify the racial passion, challenging myself make-up of classrooms; and growing as a person? It that is, because there were isn’t. mostly white students in I can’t pursue my passion the honors-only course. So when I can only perform at although the students were the level of the lowest. I selected based on merit, not can’t grow as a person when race, those who excelled in I have to shrink to meet the school were forced to learn most stagnant of my peers. at a slower pace due to race, It’s a lesser happiness for not merit. more people: a lesser poWhy couldn’t the school tential, a lesser experience increase the challenge of for more people. Equal isn’t their lower-level courses fair.

Eventually, I started covering games, but in comparison to the preparation I knew Majerus put into his playmaking and analysis for each game, I always felt underprepared. What question could I ask him that would stand out from the rest? My mind raced with ideas and thoughts, but I was continuously too nervous to ask anything in case I embarrassed myself in front of the legend. I played basketball in high school, but Majerus had a level of knowledge that I only dreamt of possessing. It was the knowledge of Majerus’ own sports-intelligence that drove me. I strove to become a better journalist, wanting to match Majerus’ passion in my own writing. I kept trying to get better, attending press conference after press conference, listening and learning from the coach and always laughing along the way. After nearly three months, I decided to ask my first question of Majerus. It was Feb. 18, after a victory over Fordham, and I remember it well. I tentatively raised my hand. After a quick comment from the coach, asking where my editor was, I cleared my throat and started to speak. “Were you worried that they [Fordham] were going to isolate Chris Gaston in the second half against Brian [Conklin] and Rob [Loe]?” I asked. “I was, but they were

desperate to get him some production. He didn’t score a point in the first half which is a credit to our defense,” Majerus said. I finally did it. Though I felt like I had done something wrong as he didn’t follow up my question with a joke or some other side comment, I felt accomplished for simply speaking up. The season progressed and I asked more questions, relishing in every Rick Majerus press conference that he talked about basketball and other topics. It was always fun and entertaining. At the NCAA tournament, the focus of these conferences shifted to Majerus’ health. The NCAA tournament was first and only time I got to personally meet Majerus. After the victory over Memphis, Dr. Richard Chaifetz introduced me to the man himself. We briefly discussed the game, his strategy against certain Memphis players, the upcoming Michigan State game and what it was like writing for the student newspaper. I told him that I enjoyed it and that I enjoyed covering the season. That was the only time I truly interacted with Rick Majerus. After the loss to Michigan State, there was a very different tone in the press conference. Majerus looked like he had gone through a 15-round boxing match. He was a more somber Majerus than I remembered. There were jokes, but he

was visibly shaken by the end of the season and the prospect of losing graduating seniors Brian Conklin and Kyle Cassity for next year. Conklin’s own emotional breakdown showed how much Majerus impacted his life. Majerus always emphasized academics, complementing his players who gave their best efforts in their classes. He was most proud of his players not just for their on the court success, but their academic achievements. He cried not when Conklin scored 1,000 points, but when he was named an Academic AllAmerican. Although I may not have had the personal connection that others had with Coach Majerus, he still affected my life. The way he coached, cared and loved his players was truly amazing. His rapport with his team is something that other head coaches envied. Majerus sacrificed so much of himself for his team and the University. Thanks to him, more people know, or at least wonder, what a Billiken is. He was one of the last coaches who loved the game purely for the game itself. So Majerus, thank you for all you have done for me. You made me a better student of the game, you inspired me to become better writer and you made being a Billiken relevant. Without you, I would have never heard of or made it to Saint Louis University.

A step for Palestine in vain: Voting for values in U.N. On Nov. 30, as Palestinians waited in tense silence to hear results, the U.N. voted. You may h a v e s e e n the pictures of the blue c h a i r t h a t proved the upParisa Rouie grade f r o m Palestine’s former status as “permanent observer” to an “observer non-member state” in the U.N. This is a vital step toward the statehood aspirations of occupied Palestine. The prospect of any progress made many supporters of Palestinian statehood jump for joy after the long silence. It is no surprise, however, that blogs and opinion pages are not exploding with paralleled excitement. Nor is it no surprise that Google yields results few and far between when you look up “Palestine status.” This is because it is very clear to the international community that this is yet another bitter day for Palestine; a step forward, but into

quicksand. According to a New York Times blog post by author Raja Shehadeh, however, there is hope that this will bring back dignity for Palestine. As a semi-recognized state, Palestine has gained some recognition and perhaps some bragging rights, but this is not what dignity looks like for Palestine. Immediately following the U.N. vote, the state of Israel decided to build 3,000 more settlements in the West Bank and east Jerusalem, where more than 200 illegal settlements already exist, according to BBC. Believing that the Palestinian proposal in the U.N. was a violation of previous agreements, Netanyahu is retaliating. In spite of the Oslo Accords agreement to respect the partitions agreed on in 1947, Israel has abused its authority to exert pressure on Palestine and threatened Palestine not to take advantage of any of its newfound rights as non-member observer state. This, besides being an unfair and illegal (under international law) reply, is not the sort of move a peace-seeking Israel should be making. For all the others concerned with the sta-

tus of Palestine, it is undeniable that this sort of dignity is not worth having. The sort of dignity that a modern-day nation deserves is one where the threats of another nation will not undermine the nation’s very right to exist. The modern-day idea of dignity rests upon sovereignty and self-determination. If Palestine were to file complaints against Israel for, say, illegal settlements in their territories, and take its complaints to the International Criminal Court, it will risk seeing “tough repercussions,” in the language of Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman. So far, France, U.K., Switzerland and even the U.S. have been among the nations who vocalized concern, to say the least, for the actions announced by Israel. If the international community fails to be firm in its assertions against these settlements, this will reflect terribly on social justice and any assertions of advocating for human dignity. This is not, however, a matter which needs to be solved through international pressure. There has been enough and too much of international efforts to

promote and convey peace talks and negotiations. This is not another matter where international bodies need to host and accommodate what could be hostile conversation. This is not about more meddling. This is about values; just like the U.N. vote was about values. The U.S. and Canada, in voting against the Palestinian initiative for promotion of status, showed that a two-state resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is not a value they hold. In spite of its devoted support for recognizing Palestine as a state, the U.S. has shown that practicing what one preaches is not a value it holds. The U.S. has shown instead that alliances and personal interests are more valuable. Germany, on the other hand, by refusing to vote, showed that its superficial relationship with Israel is more valuable than peace in the region. And by failing to show appropriate levels of contempt for Israel’s illegal unilateral actions, the international community shall fail to demonstrate that equal rights, human dignity, peace and selfdetermination are things we value on earth.

Responding when the relatives ask: “What are you going to do with THAT major?” It’s that time of year again. Christmas lights, sugar cookies, old-school cartoons, classic songs and of course, visiting r e l a tives. W i t h family gatherMike Hogan ing season in full swing, many students can expect to undergo the annual ordeal of answering The Question. You might know it, and if you do, you probably hate it. It’s the endgame of every discussion that begins with “You were only this tall the last time I saw you!” First comes “Where are you going to school?” then “What year are you?” and then “What are you studying?” and finally, the fourth horseman of the conversation-with-distant-relations apocalypse, “What are you going to do with THAT?” Many of you may have an easy answer to that

question. Congratulations, you have my permission to be smug. But the fact of the matter is that there are many majors that don’t feed directly into predefined career paths. Likewise, some majors lead into highly competitive fields where the number of graduates far exceeds the number of jobs. Anthropologists and artists, if this scenario resonates with you, believe me, I understand. But I have a confession to make. You see, I’ve built myself an escape route from The Question. I started school at Saint Louis University with the intention of studying English literature, and by Shakespeare I’ve stuck with it right to the end. But along the way, I added an economics double major. Sure, it’s not quite the job-guaranteeing degree that easily satisfies aunts and uncles, but it sure looks shinier than English, especially to those in the business world. But if The Question proves intimidating to those with qualms over choosing a less-marketable degree,

don’t give up hope. For those willing to engage in a protracted discussion over the merits of a humanities major, here’s some free arguments. Because really, every aspiring artist loves free stuff. First let me put my English degree aside and take the economics route. A tired jibe used against English majors is that we’re all bound to become exceptionally articulate baristas at Starbucks. The data would indicate otherwise. First of all, simply having a college degree in any major significantly boosts a person’s average lifetime earning potential. The Brookings Institution estimates that, if an 18-year-old has $102,000 to invest, a college degree will on average provide far greater returns than alternative investments in the stock market, AAA corporate bonds, gold, long term Treasury bills or housing. Furthermore, data from The Wall Street Journal indicates that the average starting salaries for graduates in English, religion,

and interior design are still higher than the national median income for 15- to 24-year-olds given by the Census Bureau. Graduates in those majors can expect their income to further increase approximately 50 percent or more by midcareer, which should be enough to accommodate the debt that many students undertake. Think about that for a second. Just graduating from college, even with a less-than-highly-lucrative major, will likely put a person well above the national average in terms of both starting and lifetime income. So to say that there’s no value in studying the humanities is not only snooty, but statistically incorrect. With the business mumbo-jumbo out of the way, we can think about the intangible benefits of studying subjects that tend to elicit The Question. Sure, a graduate with a business or engineering degree will likely make significantly more money than a psychology or communication major. But there have been numer-

ous studies demonstrating that higher income, past the point of meeting basic needs, doesn’t positively affect happiness. In terms of happiness, it’s better to do something you’re passionate about than something boring that brings in big bucks. After all, your career will consume half your waking hours or more for the majority of your time on Earth. You should probably try to enjoy it. Oh, and those studies I mentioned? They were done by psychologists. With jobs. In psychology. And to step one more time back into the realm of economics, consider a college education in terms of more than just job training. Education is also a form of consumption. The materialists out there will argue that you could buy a fancy car for the price of a college education these days. But how many graduates would trade the mind-expanding experience of higher education for a Maserati? Well, maybe a few, but they’re probably studying a highearning major anyway. A

liberal arts education opens up whole worlds of culture and experience that can be enjoyed for a lifetime. Furthermore, education makes people into thoughtful and engaging citizens, and is therefore a cornerstone of democratic society. These benefits can’t easily be tallied up or explained to the uncles, but they do exist. Ultimately, college is what you make of it. An engineering degree won’t make you successful if you slack off; many an English major has made it big using skills that their degrees don’t always demonstrate. For my part, I can tell my relatives about the technical-sounding economics classes I’ve taken, but the most profound moments of learning I’ve experienced have occurred in English classes that sound, well, useless. So next time you confront The Question, smile, nod, evade, lie or best of all, refer the questioner to this article, but at the end of the day, it doesn’t matter WHAT you do with your degree. What matters is that you do it well.


unewsonline.com

6 GAMES

DECEMBER 6, 2012

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Music

unewsonline.com

DECEMBER 6, 2012

Sights and sounds for wintertime

From Middle Earth to Midtown, we’ve got what’s going down “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” Peter Jackson, director of the “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy, returns to Middle Earth with “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.” The film debuts Dec. 14, and is the first installment of three films to chronicle events leading up to the “The Lord of the Rings.” Martin Freeman stars as the titular hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, and Ian McKellen reprises his role as the wizard Gandalf the Grey.

“Wicked” This hit Broadway musical comes to St. Louis from Dec. 12 to Jan. 9. “Wicked” tells the story of Elphaba, the Wicked Witch of the West, and Glinda, the Good Witch, and their lives leading up to the classic “Wizard of Oz.” Based on the novel by Gregory McGuire and featuring music by Stephen Schwartz, this musical is the 12th-longest running show on Broadway.

December 7-9 St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: Handel’s Messiah Powell Symphony Hall Fri and Sat: 8 p.m., Sun: 3 p.m. from $35 (student tickest $10)

December 8 Mannheim Steamroller Christmas Fox Theatre 4 and 8 p.m. from $37.50

December 9 Carondelet Community Betterment Federation Christmas Concert Ivory Theatre 3 p.m. $10

December 11 105.7 The Point Ho Ho Show feat. Fun. Peabody Opera House 7 p.m. from $25

Theatre December 7-9 Batman Live! Chaifetz Arena Fri: 7 p.m.; Sat: 11, 3 and 7 p.m., Sun: 1 and 5 p.m. from $21.50

“Les Misérables” On Christmas day, the film adaptation of the classic Broadway musical “Les Misérables” comes to the big screen. Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway are part of the all-star cast directed by Tom Hooper. This musical-film intertwines the story of the ex-convict Jean Valjean in his attempts for redemption and the Paris Uprising of 1832.

“Ali’s Pretty Little Lies” by Sara Shepard “Ali’s Pretty Little Lies” by Sara Shepard is a prequel novel to the best-selling young adult series that inspired the television show “Pretty Little Liars.” This book reveals the story of protagonist Alison DiLaurentis and comes out on Jan. 2 in hardcover and e-book formats.

“Struck by Lightning” Chris Colfer of “Glee” comes into his own with this film based on his book of the same name that was published last month. As a writer, producer and star, Colfer tells the coming-of-age story of Carson Phillips, a young man who blackmails his classmates to submit to his literary magazine. “Struck by Lightning” comes out on Jan. 11.

“Kinsey and Me” by Sue Grafton Sue Grafton, author of detective novels galore, releases “Kinsey and Me” on Jan. 8. This book is a collection of short stories that revolve around the origin of the fictional character Kinsey Millhone, the star of the alphabet series books (e.g.“‘A’ is for Alibi”) for which Grafton is famous.

Fun. Fun., the band behind such hits as “We are Young” and “Some Nights,” will be at the Peabody Opera House in St. Louis on Dec. 11 at 7 p.m. as a part of their current international tour. Other tour locales in the coming months include Portland, Dallas and Las Vegas.

Blue men take over the Fabulous Fox Theatre

Until December 23 The Foreigner Repertory Theatre of St. Louis Tues: 7 p.m., Wed-Fri: 1:30 p.m., Sat: 5 p.m., Sun: 2 p.m. from $16

December 12January 6 Wicked Fox Theatre Fri: 8 p.m., Sat: 2 and 8 p.m., Sun: 1 and 6:30 p.m. from $38

Other December 9 Chanukah: Festival of Lights Missouri Botanical Garden 12-4 p.m. free

Until December 31 43rd Annual Way of Lights Christmas Display Shrine of Our Lady of the Snows daily 5-9 p.m. free

Until January 1 Gardenland Express Missouri Botanical Garden 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $5

Photo courtesy of Paul Kolnick

A Blue Man shoots toilet paper into the audience as screens and lights create a multimedia performance. theatre venues. It was worth the price of admission to see how their show would translate to the Fabulous This November, a unique Fox Theatre. However, the show entertained audiences tour obviously took into acfor two hours of nonstop abcount the caliber of theatres surdity. Blue Man Group, a in which they would be permix of circus, mime and offforming. beat concert performance, “In order to create a touris difficult to explain to ing version of our theatrical those who production, have not we knew had the opwe had a por tunity [Our goal] is al- c r e a t i v e to see their challenge show; the ways to help audi- to tackle,” group creBlue Man ates experi- ence members re- Group Coences that connect with their F o u n d e r , defy categoPhilip Stanrization. own sense of won- ton, said. M o s t “We needed well known der and discover y. to find a way for their to transform -Philip Stanton multimetheatres of dia perforall shapes mances, Blue Man Group and sizes into spaces in features three blue, bald, which the Blue Man can and nameless characters. intimately connect with the Together they take the auaudience, where the audidience on a journey that is ence can become engaged funny, intelligent and athewith the spirit of the show istically stunning. Accomand the Blue Man himself. panying the group is a live We think we have finally rock band in glow-in-thefigured it out, and hopefully dark getup. The Blue Man Group is known for their ability of See “Blue” on Page 8 seemingly destroying their By KRISTIN MCGUIRE Staff Writer

Bruno Mars: “Unorthodox Jukebox” Bruno Mars’ second album “Unorthodox Jukebox” features the singles “Locked Out of Heaven,” “Young Girls,” “Moonshine” and “When I Was Your Man.” All are already available on iTunes. The whole album will be released on Dec. 11, but can be streamed on http://www.unorthodoxjukebox.com/ until then.

A bookworm’s guide to surviving break By MAGGIE NEEDHAM Associate Arts Editor

Winter break is quickly approaching, and for me, that means one thing: books. During the semester, reading for pleasure consistently gets put on the back burner in favor of reading about French cathedrals, Anglo-Saxon England or Aristotle. My pile of books to read has been steadily growing all semester, and my goal is to read 10 of those by the time classes start up again in January. I invite you to join me in using the newfound free time that comes with the end of the semester to dive into the beauty of longform, text-based narrative. And, as an avid reader and self-proclaimed bibliophile, I’m here to recommend some books to read while cuddled in bed with some hot chocolate over break.

“The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien The first part of the movie comes out on Dec. 14. Read the book before you see it. Tolkien is the master of fantasy, and there’s nothing like a good adventure across Middle Earth to inspire you and warm your soul when stuck inside from the cold. While you’re at it, you should probably just read the entirety of “The Lord of the Rings,” but fair warning: your list might end there. It will take a while. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green Time Magazine just named John Green’s latest the best book of 2012, beating out the likes of J.K. Rowling and Zadie Smith with his beautiful and witty story of two teenagers with cancer. Not to be mistaken as a

“cancer book,” which the protagonist Hazel Lancaster classifies as full of clichés and unfounded optimism, this story’s hopefulness comes from its rawness and honesty. “The Casual Vacancy” by J.K. Rowling Speaking of J.K. Rowling, her first non-Potter book came out a few months ago, and I’m betting you didn’t get the chance to read all 503 pages yet. Heavy in both weight and subject matter, “The Casual Vacancy” is the exact opposite of “Harry Potter.” This book is not for everyone, but those interested in seeing what the writer who shaped our generation of readers can do outside of Hogwarts should give this a chance.

See “Books” on Page 8

SAB to bring Frank Warren to campus

Alex McDougall/Oregon Daily Emerald

Frank Warren of PostSecret will put on an event on January 28 at 7 p.m. in the Wool Ballroom presented by the Student Activity Board. Tickets will be availble beginning December 10 in the Student Involvement Center. Two tickets are available per SLU ID, and doors open at 6:30 p.m. PostSecret is an ongoing community mail art project consisting of secrets mailed to Warren on post cards. For more information visit www. facebook.com/SLUSAB and www.postsecret.com.


8 ARTS

DECEMBER 6, 2012

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Film ‘Silver Linings’ strikes comedic gold Many of their scenes together and much of their banter are infused with such manic energy that it Pat Solitano is just trying is hard to tell if they should to get his life back. kiss or hit each other. The Upon walking in on his chemistry between Cooper wife with another man, Pat and Lawrence clicks beauti(Bradley Cooper) had a fully. breakdown – a symptom of Lawrence continues to his bipolar disorder – and impress, tackling challengassaulted his wife’s lover. ing roles with acting chops When his mother Dolores beyond her years. Here, (Jacki Weaver) pulls him she’s tough as nails, but the out of a mental hospital, sympathy Lawrence gives Pat sets out to use his newas her anti-social façade befound optimism, embodied gins to peel away is devasby the refrain “Excelsior!” tating. to win his wife back. “I’m Tommy’s whore So begins “Silver Linwidow,” she tells a police ings Playbook,” the new officer. “Minus the whore screwball comedy from part, sometimes.” David O. Russell (“I Heart Cooper has never been Huckabees,” “The Fighter,” better, and who thought he “Three Kings”). Pat moves had anything so composed back home with his parents and risk-taking, as his perin Philadelphia and enters formance as Pat, in him? therapy. He meets a woman Pat Jr. and Pat Sr. have little named Tiffany (Jennifer to bond over, save football. Lawrence) with a dark past In one scene, Pat Sr. (the of her own. She promises legendary Robert De Niro to help Pat reconnect with at his best in years) gives a his wife, so long as he does tearful confession to Pat Jr. something for her. for having spent more time In the meantime, Pat’s with Pat Jr.’s brother than mother tries to ease her with him. Pat Sr. struggles son back into his life while with how to deal with a bipothe rampant lar son. De fandom and Niro’s persuperstitions formance of his father is honest make that [‘Silver Linings and indictadjustment never more diffiPlaybook’] man- ing, glancing cult. over the Pat Sr. is a diehard ages to be painfully d a r k e r Eagles fan, funny, affirming parts. A n d arranging his remote the goodness and that’s what m a k e s controls to face the beauty of humanity. “ S i l v e r Linings” proper way such a reto keep the markable Eagles “jucomedy. juice” going. It manThis “OCD ages to be painfully funny, behavior,” as Pat Jr. calls affirming the goodness and it, provoked Pat Sr. to start beauty of humanity without so many fights at the sport taking many, if any, shortstadium that he has been cuts. banned for life. His camera floats from In one scene, Pat wakes face to face, almost improhis parents up at 4 a.m. to visationally, granting closecomplain about “A Farewell ups to moments of pleasure to Arms.” and of pain in equal mea“You’re rooting for this sure. guy to survive the war Some viewers have comand get with the woman plained that “Silver Linings” he loves,” Pat pleads. The takes the easy way out. For protagonist does, but then as bold and challenging as Hemmingway tacks on a it is at times, the film does darker ending. The world is seem to wrap up tidily and dark the way it is. Why can’t conventionally. someone write a book with However, the happy a happy ending, Pat comending can only be happy plains. to people involved. WithRelationships are the out giving too much away, key to “Silver Linings Playnothing truly remarkable book,” and the relationships is achieved, only something between Pat and Tiffany deeply significant to Rusand Pat Jr. and Pat Sr. are sell’s island of misfit toys. what make “Silver Linings” The world is dark the way stand out. it is, and as Pat Jr. muses Pat and Tiffany are miswhy can’t someone write a fits among misfits, but they happy ending? seem to get each other. By T.J. KEELEY Managing Editor

Wrap up the year with a few SLU shows As the semester ends, the Arts department has final performances By ALANAH NANTELL Arts Editor

While the rest of campus may be slowing down as the semester ends, the Fine and Performing Arts Department is not! Come show some support for the SLU community and check out some of the last performances of the year before heading home for break. Studio Art McNamee Gallery Reception and Exhibit December 7 4 - 7 p.m. The McNamee Gallery, located in Samuel Cupples house, will be reopening as a teaching gallery for the Studio Art department here at SLU. To celebrate this opening, both students and faculty involved with the department will be displaying their work in a free exhibit. Reception is to follow. Music String Orchestra December 6

7:30 p.m. The 40-person string orchestra made up of students, faculty and community members will be performing a recital in the Xavier Theatre this day. They will be playing classics like Bach and Vivaldi and some holiday tunes to get in the spirit. Student Recital December 7 3 p.m. There will be a student recital in St. Xavier College Church to showcase student talent at the end of the semester. String Quartets and the Guitar Ensemble December 7 7:30 p.m. The string quartet will perform music by Schubert as well as an arrangement of The Eurthymics’ “Sweet Dreams.” The Guitar Ensemble will perform a wide variety of classical pieces, along with some Miles Davis and Star Wars. These groups will perform their final recital of the semes-

ter at St. Xavier College Church. University Choirs December 9 6:30 p.m. Both the University Chorale and the Saint Louis University Mastersingers will perform at St. Xavier College Church in between the 4:30 and 9 p.m. masses. Saint Louis University Jazz Ensmbles December 10 7:30 p.m. The two combos and big band will perform selections ranging from Stevie Wonder to Duke Ellington. Their performance will take place in the University Theatre in Xavier Hall. Theatre 1 Acts: A Selection of One-Act Plays December 8 8 p.m. The theatre department is performing a collection of five one-act plays. These one-acts are the final project for students enrolled in

Theatre 456, which focuses on teaching students how to direct. Everything from the lighting to the set design and acting is managed by students. The performances will be in the Xavier Studio Theatre. Make sure to get there early, because this performance has a tendancy to sell out! Spring Auditions December 8-9 The theatre department will be holding auditions for the spring performances of the musical “25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” and the ‘classic drama’ “Three Sisters.” To sign up to audition, see the call board outside of the Theatre Production Office in Xavier 109. Everyone is welcome! Contact John Lamb at lambjc@slu.edu for more information. All of the above events are free and open to the public. Information courtesty of John Lamb and Robert Hughes.

Books: While relaxing on break, pick up a few good reads Continued from Page 7

“The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald Even though the release of this film adaptation was pushed from its original Christmas release date to summer 2013, the original novel never wavers in its haunting metaphors and commentary on social classes. And if that sounds like too much literary analysis for your winter break, I promise this classic is neither long nor difficult to read. Plus, who doesn’t appreciciate a good Gatsby party?

“Bossypants” by Tina Fey Tina Fey is always hilarious, and this collection of witty anecdotes and smart observations is no exception. Recounting stories from childhood and college to her first forays into comedy with “Saturday Night Live and “30 Rock,” this book will leave you laughing out loud. “Divergent” and “Insurgent” by Veronica Roth The “Divergent” series is here to fulfill that dystopian hunger that’s been brewing

inside all of us ever since we finished “The Hunger Games.” In this futuristic Chicago-based world, society is split into five factions, each oriented around a specific value: Candor (honesty), Abnegation (selflessness), Dauntless (courage), Amity (peace), and Erudite (knowledge). The protagonist, Beatrice Prior, must decide if she wants to betray her family by switching to the faction in which she feels she truly belongs. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbur y Let’s return to the classics of the dystopian novel.

In honor and memory of the author who refused to be boxed into one genre, my last recommendation is by Ray Bradbury, who died this past summer. “Fahrenheit 451” presents a futuristic America in which books are outlawed and burned by firemen. If you’re one of the few who did not have to read this book in high school, pick it up now and commemorate the life of one of the most celebrated authors of the twentieth century. Those should be able to fill your time if you’re not too busy tracking Santa and hibernating.

Blue: Three man group brings interactive show to St. Louis Continued from Page 7

we will accomplish our goal, which is always to help audience members reconnect with their own sense of wonder and discovery, with their own sense of what is possible in their lives.” These changes involved increased audience interaction, where the Blue Men would wander into the house picking on helpless audience members, interactive dance parties and

bigger screens to give the whole audience an orchestra quality view. Blue Man Group stars three expressionless men, played in turn by Kalen Allmandinger, Shane Andries, James Marlowe, Patrick Newton, Russell Rinker and Chris Smith. It is enigmatic how these men remain entirely expressionless throughout the show that revolves around so much improvisation and audience interaction.

The greatest aspect of the Blue Man Group is that the humor is universal, and guests of any age will appreciate the performance. “A lot of what we do is colorful, and kids enjoy it, and adults are entertained by it, whether they get the idea behind it or not,” Stanton said. Bringing anyone from younger siblings, older grandparents, or even a date seems entirely safe. Audience members will come away from the theater

Happy Holidays!

With Love, The 2012 UNews Editorial Board

with more than just sore cheeks from laughter. “It’s all about the connection,” Stanton said. “We… wanted to make a statement about how important the live experience is. Even though technology has made it so that we don’t have to have that live experience, there’s something about our humanity that will always need it.” For more information visit http://www.blueman. com.


U FASHION

STL STYLE

Fashion Happenings Ivanka Trump Fine Jewelry Trunk Show Dec. 6 - 8 Elleard Heffern Fine Jewelers 101 S. Hanley Road Clayton, Mo. This week view a glamorous collection of Ivanka Trump’s Fine Jewelry at Elleard Heffern Fine Jewelers. The trunk show will feature her newest collections including: Belle Epoque, a nod to Parisian styles from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Lao Tong, an emerald infused Chinese-influenced story and Gilded Cage, which includes conventional American designs with bright gemstones.

Holiday RAWk Dec. 9 Plush 3224 Locust St. 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free Shop some of the finest gifts from local artists including designer clothing and jewelry, visual art, furniture, home goods and creative services and munch on a scrumptious brunch and sip holiday cocktails.

Rebecca Minkoff Personal Appearance Dec. 12 Saks Fifth Avenue in Plaza Frontenac Mall 5:30 - 9 p.m. The famed women’s fashion designer will be visiting Saks Fifth Avenue to showcase her newest handbag collection as well as the most recent additions to her ready-to-wear line.

Love fashion? Calling all style-savvy students! Come write for us. Email fashion@ unewsonline.com for more information.

DECEMBER 6, 2012

unewsonline.com

‘Underneath it All’ features corsets, skirt forms and skivvies By DEIRDRE KERINS Staff Writer

Can history be relayed through underwear? The Missouri History Museum’s exhibit “Underneath It All” certainly promotes such a notion. The display of corsets, undergarments, bras and cages interspersed on mannequins around the room provide visual documentations of changing fashions from the 1700s to the present. The exhibit opens with two mannequins side by side, one wearing a corset, underskirt, long stockings

and chemise. In contrast the other mannequin displays a risqué underwear and bra set from Victoria’s Secret. The plaque below the mannequins poses the question to guests regarding the evolution of women’s independence in relation to the ideal silhouette of the time and the undergarments used to achieve them. Each decade commands its own platform where mannequins showcase the undergarments of the time on one and the fashionable dress on another. With the two mannequins next

to each other, visitors see the shape created by the “torture” devices that people believed to be necessary items to wear. Relevant to fashion and history buffs, the exhibit is a simple idea with a definite impact. It presents a bare-bones history of female attire and female attitude from the 1700s, and explains, among other things, why most women wear what they do. Pre-French Revolution, the upper-middle class of Europe cembraced See “Museum” on Page 10

Deirdre Kerins / Staff Writer

A corset displayed at the Missouri History Museum.

Dressing for holiday events, meals By RITA WINIECKI Staff Writer

Peppermint cookies sprinkled with crushed candy canes sit on a festive plate while hot cocoa simmers on the front burner. Lights twinkle on the fresh-cut Christmas tree, and your mom frantically asks you to clean the upstairs bathroom for the third time even though you’re not expecting any guests. Yes, it’s the holiday season, and while you’ve spent copious amounts of time and energy finding the perfect gifts for all the special people in your life, you’ve forgotten to figure what you’re wearing for the special occasion. Determine the feel of the occasion Families celebrate winter holidays differently. Some are very formal while others lounge around in comfy clothes all day. A foolproof fashion philosophy is that a person should always dress like she has someplace important to be. It’s easy to feel better about the impending

holiday awkwardness — because someone always asks during dinner what you can do with that degree — if confident in your appearance. If nothing else, it’s one less thing to worry about. Holiday gentlemen If your mother has stuck you in a suit, don’t worry. You can still add elements to personalize your holiday outfit and have everyone swoon over how really, really ridiculously goodlooking you are at your winter events. The big colors this year are burgundy and cranberry, and they pair nicely with a suit in shirt form with a deep, forest green, subtly patterned tie. If you’re not forced to wear a suit, breathe easy. Start with a tweed vest or a pullover half-zip or halfbutton sweater and pair with a plaid or chambray button-down shirt; green, dark red and deep blue can add festive, wintery tones. For pants, wear a pair of khakis (sans cargo pockets), corduroys or chinos in either navy, dark gray, olive green or khaki.

Discounts, gifts ideas with beauty products By ANNE KEPPLER Staff Reporter

Stumped for gift ideas for friends, family or coworkers for the holidays? Well lucky for you, the world of cosmetic products has it covered. You can give the gift of beauty this season without leaving your apartment or dorm room by shopping online and enjoying the buyer’s perks offered by online retailers. While beauty boxes are commonly discounted, Sephora’s “Shop it, Gift it, Ship it for free” sweetens the already sweet deals for makeup junkies and beauty fiends by, obviously, offering free shipping. A perfect gift under $50 available on Sephora.com is the bareMineral Simply Irresistible 9-Piece Collection For Eyes, Lips, & Cheeks. It has everything a girl needs to create a gorgeous look perfect for holiday parties and includes the tools necessary to create the look. This collection’s value is $156 dollars, but is available for a limited time for only $49. Another great gift idea that any gal would love is tarte’s Girl Meets Gloss 5-Piece Maracuja Gloss Collector’s Set. This limited edition is only available online for $36 with a retail value of $105 and includes five luxurious shades that look great with every skin tone. Wearers can layer the different shades of glosses to create a customizable look. What’s even better is that tarte’s glosses are made with the all-natural ingredient maracuja, which hydrates while giving the appearance of fuller lips. With five separate glosses, gal pals can throw one in their makeup bags, one in their clutches, and keep one in their cars for a beauty touchup anywhere. Who knows, they may be so impressed by the gift that they

give one back. That would be a happily received re-gift. Many deals, like the latter above, are available only online. If uncomfortable with buying before trying, go into Sephora at the local mall and try out the products. If you like them, then proceed with your online order and enjoy the free shipping. A lesser-known website that has more beauty gifts is Hautelook.com. Hautelook was acquired by Nordstrom in March 2011, according to hautelook.com, and has all the brands that you would find in store and more for up to 75 percent off retail. Hautelook is not only limited to beauty; it has deals on women’s, men’s and kid’s fashions as well. Buying on Hautelook makes it easy to get the designer gifts for those on your Christmas list without breaking the bank. By saving money on gifts for others you can even pick up something for yourself. This week’s beauty events on Hautelook include brands Too Faced, stilia, Pur Minerals, CHI and many more. Make sure to check it out before they disappear and don’t forgot to browse the other designer events to put the finishing touches on your holiday apparel. You do need to sign up to become a member of Hautelook, but it is free and only takes a valid email. If you invite your friends, you get $10 to use towards any purchase, according to Hautelook.com. All this shopping still sounding exhausting? If you are looking for a place that does all the work for you, look no further than Birchbox.com. Like Hautelook, you must sign up for Birchbox, the monthly subscription service. Birchbox delivers “hand-picked beauty and See “Beauty” on Page 10

Noah Berman / Contributor

Student John Chambers shows a suit is not necessary to create a look ready for holiday events. Oxford shoes in brown or dark gray, depending on the rest of your outfit, finish the look nicely. For an unexpected touch, try Clarks Desert boots. If you do not have either of these options, then

go ahead and wear your Sperrys, but make sure they aren’t too dirty or scuffed up. There’s nothing worse than a fantastic outfit ruined by dirty shoes. Festive females

Figure out your focal point piece. A dress or a skirt with a decadent print, which are in this season, are appropriate for many types See “Holiday” on Page 10

Travel style: Bringing the classiness back to ‘first class’ Oh, the holidays. The smell of grandma’s cookies baking in the oven and the sound of family fighting over what to watch on TV— but before all that, we Robbie Barnhart p a c k our suitcases, trot down the jet bridge and maybe, just maybe, if the weather is fine and we aren’t connecting through O’Hare, we might make it on time.The airport is a marvelous place, prime for people watching and fashion — or lack thereof— judging. Unfortunately, the posh traveling of the highways in the sky has transformed into nothing more than a sweaty subway line. The burden of travel is increasingly stressful, especially with the grumpy human interactions all along the way. The gate agent becomes agitated when you disrupt her from filing her nails and the electronic kiosk from which you are attempting to print your boarding pass is broken. After throwing them your bags for inspection, TSA workers check you over and steal your lotion, because Bath & Body Works is clearly an underground weapons manufacturer. After the gate has been changed seven times in three different terminals, you want to stab someone with your stilettos. Finally, the flight is ready to board and you line up like cattle, herded to your destination with the teenager wearing sweatpants sitting next to you. Point being: flying sucks. But you don’t have to dress down for the occasion. Here are some tips to make sure that your trip home is comfortable, effi-

cient and fashionable. First, you don’t need the kitchen sink, so leave it at home. As tempting as it is to take one extra pair of jeans or three more shirts, you only need to bring the essentials. I’m just as guilty as you are and have been known to stuff just one more pair of shoes into my carry-on. But this becomes problematic for a quick jaunt across the termina.l. The lighter the load, the happier your shoulders will be and the more relaxed your body, contorted into already small seats, will be. Know what is permitted and what is not permitted on board. Did you forget that your manicure set was in your purse? It will be confiscated, because small, pointy metal objects aren’t allowed. And how horrible (and expensive!) would it be if your Big Sexy Hair hairspray were taken and used by some TSA worker? Big bags are in right now, but your Louis Vuitton duffel might be larger than the space beneath the seat in front of you. Don’t count on the overhead bin either, because they fill up quickly. Look at the airline’s website for carry-on dimensions and policies. Consider your destination and check the forecast. It might be suitable weather for a light jacket in St. Louis when you leave, but it could be snowing in Denver. Do you have to change terminals? Stilettos might not be the best choice for hoofing it across the airport. At the very least, have a pair of flats or slippers for running concourse to concourse. Wear something presentable and striking for the journey home. No one wants to be suited up for a 12-hour travel day, but the Homer Simpson pajama pants are an eyesore to the rest of your fellow travelers. You never know when you’ll get the unexpected upgrade to first class; it might

be because of your style. Use common sense when applying fragrance. While perfumes are often great accessories, no one wants to sit next to a seatmate for three hours who has marinated themselves in cheap cologne. If you need more motivation to dress nicely, know that even the flight staff is trying to up the style-ante. Delta Air Lines is attempting to revitalize the fashionforward era of flying. The flight attendant uniform of a red dress and trench coat, designed by Richard Tyler, is a fabulous addition to their wardrobe — there is even a pink coat available for breast cancer awareness month, as noted by Delta’s blog. I spoke with a flight attendant several months ago and she was thrilled to wear the uniform proudly. The line came out in 2009, revamping the pantsuit and dress; the men’s collection is equally as striking, the lines clean and trim. The uniform highlights figures while allowing cabin crew to work freely. Almost forty years ago, when my Gram took her family back east to Rhode Island, she made my mom and aunts’ outfits and dressed up herself. The long trip from Montana was hellish and tiring with three children. Their flights had multiple stops and connections along the way, and even a complete airport change in New York. The fact of the matter is that your one-hour flight to Chicago may not seem like a huge event, but travel is an opportunity to meet all sorts of people. We have it much easier than in years past, despite strengthened securities and what seem to be longer delays. Have faith in the system that safely carries you from point A to point B. And for all you travelers, I wish you nothing but blue skies and tailwinds!


unewsonline.com

10 FASHION

Museum exhibit showcases undergarments Continued from Page 9

the corsets, which have steel-like rods that parallel the woman’s body, were designed to create a tiny waist by pushing the chest upwards into a “fleshy shelf” (the description of a woman’s breasts during the period). Behind the two corsets, two diagrams depict the natural placement of a woman’s organs and a comparison of the arrangement of her organ’s after wearing a corset consistently. Doctors theorized that corsets caused women’s health problems involving back pain, difficulty breathing and gastrointestinal issues. However, they apparently never advised women to stop wearing these contraptions. In addition, women wore multiple layers, increasing the size of their hips. The general rule of thumb of the day stated that the wider the woman’s hip, the more money her husband made.The 1800s brought about a focus on sleek, straight-lined dresses evoking the imagery of Greek architecture and clothing with higher waists and lower necklines creating an empire waist shape. The Industrial Revolution’s mass production of cloths and textiles lowered prices, allowing women from the working class to purchase them. This period also introduced the dreaded shoulder pad and puffy sleeves, which consistently reoccurs throughout fashion history.The “cage crinoline,” or hoop skirt, begins to emerge with upper society women and filtering down through the classes as the century progresses. The “cages,” created with

spring steel, eliminated the need for women to wear numerous layers in order to imitate hips and a large bottom, but were often criticized and satirized.The “s”shaped silhouette created by the corsets and cages with accentuated bottoms continued into the 1900s, leading up until the beginning of World War I. With most of Europe in turmoil and steel rations in effect, the spring steel cage vanished from women’s fashion, and turned towards a sleeker and more cylindrical silhouette as the women’s suffrage movement championed for equality. The notion of equality among the genders continued into the “Roaring Twenties” as youthful, active girls shortened their hemlines, discarded their long sleeves, and aimed for a “boyish” figure. As the world slipped into Depression and then World War II, corsets turned into separate bras and slips. These separate pieces were fashioned with nylon, a more comfortable and breathable material. Women’s clothing focused on small waists, large and pointed breasts (push-up bras hit the markets during this time), and long, lean legs. Pin-up girls, like Marilyn Monroe, became the fashion icons of the era. Peace, love and clothing freedom became the prevalent word during the 60s and 70s. Underwear reflected the wild prints and acidic colors people wore, and girdles were rendered obsolete due to the appearance of the mini skirt in women’s wardrobes. Clothes reflected a relaxed and carefree attitude;

high waists with the naval showing, flat chests and long skinny legs graced the covers of fashion magazines. The 1980s and 1990s recognized the large amounts of women entering the workforce; thus, fashion reflected the serious, masculine environment in which clothes were to be worn. Silhouettes found bigger shoulder pads, tailored jackets and knee-length skirts, creating a “square” figure for women. Under the serious clothes, however, lingerie showcased a woman’s figure with padded push-up bras, following the trends on television dramas’ leading female characters and singers like Madonna and Cher. Around this time, the sports bra introduced comfort and mobility in undergarments for women while they engaged in physical activities. Luckily, the big shoulder pad trend subsided and a tall, thinner silhouette with a large chest and big backside emerged, thanks to celebrities like Jennifer Lopez and Kim Kardashian. As shown by the exhibit, seeing the “beautiful” silhouette and the lengths each woman went through to achieve the shape of the silhouette reveals attributes of the society and environments in which the clothes were created, giving insight into public perception of the time. The Exhibit “Underneath It All” runs through Jan. 27, 2013 at the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park. Daily hours are 10 a.m. to 5p.m. and on Tuesday 10a.m. to 8p.m. Admission is free.

DECEMBER 6, 2012

Styling outfits for the cap and gown look By JULIA CHRISTENSEN Fashion Editor

Asking others what they’re wearing to an event is a common, understandable action. With December being the mid-year graduation month, however, asking friends only applies if they’re graduating then, too. With the grand finale of college careers on the horizon, what is one to wear? For graduates, the dress code seems quite obvious: one wears whatever cap, gown and tassel was presented in the plasticwrapped, graduation packet. Underneath the gown, however, the real conundrum waits, lurking, allowing opportunities for blunders. In the simplest of terms, ladies will be appropriately dressed in semi-formal skirts, dresses or slacks. While that weeds out some of the average closet, a few “don’ts” narrow things down. Dress or skirt hem length should be the same or shorter than — without being too short — the length of the graduation robe. A hem that is an inch or two longer than the robe looks disproportionate and distracting. If covering your shins is a concern, opt for slacks instead. While nice sweaters are fine for the males in attendance, a tie knot and shirt collar peeks out past a graduation robe neckline in the most dapper and profes-

Holiday: Outfits built to survive photos, dinners, parties

sional way. Before deciding on wearing the suit jacket, think about your temperature comfort levels and remember you may already be wearing an undershirt, a collared shirt and a graduation gown. While a suit jacket creates a cleaner look, no one wants to perspire enough to make their cap slip off. Set-to-graduate student Saranya Nanda was particular about finding her graduation attire and decided on an Ann Taylor LOFT dress and Steve Madden peep-toes. She described the event as falling some-

I was thinking about what I was going to wear a month before graduation. -Ashly Ruf, senior

where between business casual and semi-formal attire and noted for all graduates, “no jeans. Put a pair of slacks on.” “Something that wasn’t too short or gaudy,” she said of her criteria during the dress hunt. Nanda said she found the fingertip rule appropriate for hemlines at this event, which states anything higher than one’s fingertips when pressed against the thigh is simply too short. Fellow student and neargraduate Ashly Ruf said she, like Nanda and pre-

sumably many others, also opted for a dress and heels. “The heel is medium, mostly because I do not want to fall of the stage,” Ruf said in an email interview, mentioning a valid concern for any graduates. Whether it’s stilettos or wedges — or even male dress shoes, for that matter — shoes should be wearable, as the walk to pick up the diploma tends to be a graduate’s moment in the spotlight and camera lens. For those deeply concerned about footwear disasters, opt for Mary Jane or T-strap style heels (anything that can’t simply be “walked out of”) and invest in anti-slip pads, which stick to the bottom of shoes to add traction. “I was thinking about what I was going to wear a month before graduation,” Ruf said. “Personally, this is a moment when you can show the professors, family and friends that you have matured into an adult and attire is just one way to emphasize that point.” Ruf said her dress, which she already owned, “is a little over the top for graduation” and that she will tone it down with a cardigan and belt — a trick that works with many going-out frocks that need to take the “it” factor down. “It’s a memorable event, and usually for these events you want to dress well so when you look back on these memories you remember what you wore,” Nanda said.

Beauty: Gifts for everyone

Continued from Page 9

Noah Berman / Contributor

John Chambers (above), a business student, models a proper male holiday outfit complete with layered sweater and button-up. A skirt in a brocade print (below) pairs nicely with a red blouse and black nylons for a festive look.

Noah Berman / Contributor

are holiday mainstays for a reason. One of the big trends seen on the Fall 2012 Readyto-Wear runways, included by lines from fashion powerhouses Dolce & Gabbana and Balmain, was sumptuous brocade. Judging by the Spring 2013 Ready-to-Wear lines of Karen Walker, Prabal Gurung and Helmut Lang, it looks like the trend is going to stick around for a while, meaning those family photos won’t be dated too quickly. Arguably the most festive brocades are a metallic pop against a contrasting color or a subtle black-onblack pattern. Different skirt options are available at J. Crew, ZARA, ASOS, Forever21 and Urban Outfitters. Try pairing a black skirt with sheer, back-seam tights, metallic heels and a bright red blouse for a festive Christmas outfit. If you’re rocking the metallic brocade— a great New Year’s Eve option— pair with opaque black tights, black suede wedges and a simple black tank with ruffle or pintuck details for a fashion-forward look. Both skirt options can be topped off with a winterwhite blazer for final touch. If brocade isn’t your thing, red plaid tulip or peplum skirts can be dressed up similarly and look great with a cream v-neck sweater, black opaque tights and black suede wedges for a sassy holiday look. A sequin or sparkly skirt can also be subbed-in for a more flirty, fashionable look— but remember not to go too overboard with the sparkles and keep your top relatively simple by sticking to one solid color. If you’re more of a dress girl, the same basic tips for outfit pairings remain the same with brocade, plaid and sparkly dresses. Take these guidelines as a roadmap for your holiday outfit. You can choose to incorporate entire outfits or just elements. Make it your own so you can effectively express yourself through fashion during the season of photographs and of being with people you haven’t seen since last December.

Anne Keppler/Staff Writer

Birchbox is available in three, six, or 12 month subscriptions. Continued from Page 9

lifestyle samples, delivered to your door for $10 a month,” according to birchbox.com. With free shipping on the monthly boxes, Birchbox is a cost-efficient way to give a lasting gift. You can gift Birchbox in three-, six-or 12-month prepaid subscriptions, and both female and male versions are available— albeit, the male Birchbox is more expensive and contains different types of products. This is the perfect gift that keeps on giving. Re-

cipients will be one of the first consumers to try new products from beauty all stars such as benefit, tarte, stila, smashbox cosmetics, essie, philosophy, Kiehl’s, Kerastase Paris and more, according to birchbox.com. Sephora, Hautelook and Birchbox give you all the tools to you need to look great and gift great. Make sure to take advantage of the holiday discounts and free shipping to make your gift giving as smooth as possible while keeping your change purse as full as your friends’ cosmetic pouches.


U SPORTS

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Billikens leave Mean Green feeling blue By BRIAN HAENCHEN Staff Writer

WHO TO

CHEER

Greg McElroy

New York Jets QB

John Schuler / Photo Editor

Mike McCall Jr. stares down a North Texas defender in the first half. McCall scored eight points in a 67-63 victory.

Courtesy of the USA Today

McElroy came in for an under-performing Sanchez to lead the Jets to a thrilling 7-6 victory over the Cardinals. He blew the lid off MetLife Stadium, going 5-7 for 29 yards.

WHAT TO

JEER Kentucky Basketball

DECEMBER 6, 2012

It wasn’t easy, but SLU managed to win consecutive games for the first time this season, defeating North Texas, 67-63. The victory improved the Billikens to 5-3 on the year and 3-1 at Chaifetz Arena. Roger Franklin hit a pair of free throws to tie the score at 61 with 49 seconds left, but Jordair Jett responded for the Billikens, cutting through the defense for an easy lay-in to put the Bills ahead for good. Jett and senior forward Cody Ellis each finished with 17 points for the Billikens, who hit 20 of 25 free

throws, including four crucial ones from Ellis down the stretch to ice the victory for SLU. North Texas guard Chris Jones led all scorers with 21 points along with seven rebounds and seven assists. Forward Tony Mitchell registered 14 of his 18 points in the first half. He was silenced after the break, however, managing just five shots. While he was forced to sit out after picking up his fourth foul at the 10:35 mark, there was little attempt to get him the ball when he returned. The Billikens appeared to seize control in the first half, using a 17-2 run to build a 10-point lead midway through, but their of-

The top five moments of 2012 Looking back at a semester of success and sorrow By TONY TRAINA Associate Sports Editor CHARLES BOWLES Sports Editor

Courtesy of Billiken Media Relations

Oct. 27, 2012 Courtesy of Sports Illustrated

The Wildcats took the biggest tumble in AP top-25 history, falling amongst the unranked after losing to Baylor and Notre Dame last week. If that wasn’t enough, Memes galore floated among the Indiana fans, celebrating the anniversary of Christian Watford’s ESPY winning shot.

WHO TO

FEAR David Beckham

Courtesy of Billiken Media Relations

After a mere five years of existence, the crosscountry team made quite a name for itself. Head coach Jon Bell guided the team to its most successful season yet. Margo Richardson, who claimed a fourthplace finish in the Atlantic 10 Conference championship, led the women’s team. The team’s efforts led to a fourth-place finish in the A-10 Conference, the women’s team’s best finish in since 2010. The men’s squad finished 11th overall, but saw two strong individual performances from Tim Zellmer and Michael Scolarici, who finished 12th and 15th respectively in the A-10 Conference championships.

Nov. 9, 2012 In an attempt to revive the fledgling women’s basketball program, SLU athletic director Chris May hired Lisa Stone to lead the program into a new era. Stone brings 25 years of head coaching experience to St. Louis. She was hired in May after Shimmy Gray Miller’s contract was not renewed. While SLU lost to Missouri in Stone’s debut, they were down by only three at the half, and Coach Stone saw positives to draw from her team’s performance. Since then, SLU has won four of their past five games, marked by a hard-nosed defensive style of play, giving up no more than 49 points in the victories.

John Schuler / Photo Editor

Nov. 11, 2012 Courtesy of Reuters

What will this international man of mystery do next? The H&M underwear model has already captured the hearts of England, America and everyone’s favorite Spice Girl. The man embodies the fantasies of every man, woman and child this side of Mercury.

By TONY TRAINA Associate Sports Editor

John Schuler / Photo Editor

The men’s soccer team returned to its former glory and claimed the Atlantic 10 conference title, defeating Virginia Commonwealth University in the title game 3-0. The match was won even without SLU’s leading goal-scorer, Robbie Kristo, who was out with a foot injury. It was the team’s second A-10 Conference title, after winning the title in 2009. Kingsley Bryce was named tournament MVP, scoring a goal in all three tournament matches. Head coach Mike McGinty was named A-10 Coach of the Year and the Bills went on to compete in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2009.

Dec. 2, 2012 It was clear from tip-off that the Billikens were playing for a little more than a regular win Sunday afternoon. SLU grinded out a 62-49 victory over Valparaiso that former coach Rick Majerus would have been proud of, but the game was a sidebar. The Bills won this one for former coach, Majerus, who passed away less than 24 hours before the opening tip. “Coach dedicated his life to ball, so I can’t think of any better way [to pay tribute to him] than to play the way we did tonight. The guys all had great energy to get a win for him,” Dwayne Evans said. Evans led the team with 17 points.

Go to unewsonline.com for a full recap of Wednesday’s game

Breaking down the BCS battles Orange Bowl: No. 15 Northern Illinois vs. No. 12 Florida State, Jan. 1

Aug. 18, 2012 Tragedy rocked the Saint Louis University community just before school started for the Fall 2012 semester. Megan Boken, a former SLU volleyball player, was killed on Aug. 18 after she was the target of a failed robbery. She was 23 at the time of her death. Boken was in St. Louis for the student-alumni volleyball game and job interviews. She graduated from Saint Louis University in 2011 with a degree in marketing. Boken played on teams that won the Atlantic 10 Conference title in 2008 and the regular season title in 2008 and 2009.

fense went ice cold, failing to register a field goal over the final eight minutes of the half. North Texas took advantage, closing the half on a 15-5 run en route to a 36-34 halftime lead. Cory Remekun registered three blocks for SLU, pushing his career total to 88 and moving him one ahead of former Billiken Matt Baniak for sixth most blocks by a SLU player. The Billikens will have a 10-day break before University of Tennessee-Martin invades Chaifetz Arena on Saturday, Dec. 15. Tip-off is slated for 7 p.m.

Fret n o t , B C S bashers--a Cinderella candidate has arrived to the ball. Brian Boyd T h e Nor thern Illinois Huskies snuck into the Orange Bowl, finishing in the top 16 of the final BCS standings behind a 12-1 record. Florida State lands here by virtue of being the Atlantic Coast Conference champion, finishing the regular season with an 11-2 record. The Seminoles, led by the seventh-best scoring defense in the country, will be favored heavily over the Huskies. However, NIU has a puncher’s chance with quarterback Jordan Lynch under center. Lynch emerged as a Tim Tebow-lite, throwing for 24 touchdowns and rushing for another 19. In the process, he set the record for most rushing yards by a quarterback in a single season. Lynch may be the mid-major Superman, but FSU will have kryptonite flowing through their veins. Look for FSU’s defensive line to overpower NIU and pressure the elusive Lynch. Seminole quarterback E.J. Manuel will have a field day against an average NIU secondary, giving FSU a 38-17 blowout win. Rose Bowl: Wisconsin vs. No. 6 Stanford, Jan. 1 Don’t be fooled by Wisconsin’s 8-5 record. They’re a solid, hard-nosed team whose five losses came by a grand total of 19 points. The Badgers got off to a slow start while replacing their starting quarterback and the bulk of their offensive line, but came together when it mattered, stomping Nebraska 70-31 to win the Big Ten Championship. Stanford surprised a few by winning the Pac-12, knocking off Oregon and USC in the process. They’ve been able to exceed preseason expectations with a stingy defense and a mid-season quarterback change. If you’re looking for physical, old-school football, this is your game. Stanford’s thirdranked rushing defense will try to stuff Wisconsin running back Montee Ball, the nation’s third-leading rusher. If Stanford can shut down Wisconsin like they did Oregon, they’ll cruise to a victory. The Cardinal offense and running back Stefan Taylor will scrap together enough points for a 24-17 Stanford victory. Sugar Bowl: No. 21 Louisville vs. No. 3 Florida, Jan. 2 Meet the Florida Gators, a team with a supermodel defense and an offense only a mother could love. The Gators’ offense ranks 105th in the country in total yards per game, yet still came a fumble away from an undefeated regular

Emily Diehl / Multimedia Director

See “BCS” on Page 12


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DECEMBER 6, 2012

Track team running toward the indoor season By CHARLES BOWLES Sports Editor

Even after an exhausting cross-country season, head coach Jon Bell keeps his momentum as he shifts his focus to the Saint Louis University track team. The team opens their indoor track season in Carbondale, Ill., on Saturday, Dec. 8. The teams many key contributors from last season return this season. “It’s always a little bit nerve-wracking leading up to the first meet because you haven’t raced, jumped or thrown in a while and want to start out at a good place,” junior Allison Walter said. On the women’s side, Margo Richardson and Naya Owusu return to the track team for their junior season on the team. Richardson qualified last season for the NCAA preliminary rounds in the 1,500-meter and the

5,000-meter. Owusu returns, after claiming the women’s high jump Atlantic 10 Conference title. Another key returner is Walter, who qualified for the A-10 finals in the 400-meter last season. Walter was a part of the academic all-conference team last season. Though the women’s side returns with many key contributors from last year, Brittney Cloudy, their most decorated athlete from last season, graduated. Cloudy claimed eight A-10 titles during her illustrious track career. She was named A-10 Field Performer of the Year last season. On the men’s side, one of the key returners is Sean Canavin. Canavin advanced to the 800-meter A-10 Conference finals last year. Michael Scolarici and Tim Zellmer also return this season, looking to follow up on their success from the cross-country season. Scolarici and Zellmer

look to translate their success from the cross-country team to the track team. Zellmer finished 12th in the 8K in the A-10 championship for cross-country, while Scolarici finished 15th. The men’s team is without Dahmar Smiles and Brian Holdmeyer this year. Smiles qualified for the NCAA West preliminaries in the 110-meter hurdles last season. Holdmeyer had all-conference honors, finishing second in the 10,000-meter race last track and field season. “I know a lot of us are really looking forward to the first meet,” Walter said. “I think this season is going to be exceptional. We have so much fun together, I don’t see how this season could be anything but great.” The team has many returning runners and seems to be ready for the upcoming indoor track and field season.

Photo courtesy of Billiken Media Relations

Ashley Roach and Mallory Duggar running the 400-meter during the inaugural Billiken Invitational last season.

Swimming and diving pleased with first invite’s results By DJ BARGER Staff Writer

Photo courtesy of Billiken Media Relations

Junior Taylor Streid swimming the backstroke during the Missouri Invitational. Streid raced in the 200 backstroke.

The Billiken men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams competed in an invitational at University of Missouri-Columbia last weekend. Overall, the men’s team placed sixth out of seven teams and the women’s team placed seventh out of nine. The top women’s team performer was sophomore Morgan Peterson. Peterson came in 11th place in the 400-yard individual medley and eighth in the 100-yard butterfly. Her time for the butterfly was 55.72, which was the best time for a female swimmer at SLU. On the men’s team, the leading performer was sophomore Patrick May. May competed in six individual events and five relays. He posted personal bests in several of his

events. His times for the 100-yard backstroke and 100-yard freestyle are currently the best times in the Atlantic 10 Conference. “My performance far exceeded my expectations. I swam very well at the Mizzou invitational, posting personal bests for my college career,” May said of his performance. “Our team performed right where they should’ve for a mid-season, three-dayrest meet. We were pretty competitive with Lindenwood and Missouri S&T. Not very many had big swims over the weekend, but people were still swimming quick,” May said of the team’s showing as a whole, adding, “This mid-season taper meet is generally used as a way to see where our stroke or racing techniques can be improved.” Junior Taylor Rogers, who took part in six individual events and four relays,

relished the chance to compete against a larger number of squads from other universities. “We have several dual meets in a season, but it’s nice to have bigger invites like the one this past weekend because it’s good practice for our A-10 Conference meet,” he said. Competing in the invitational were swimmers from the University of Missouri, University of California at Davis, Boise State University, UNLV, Florida International University, Drury University, Lindenwood University, Clemson University, Missouri University of Science and Technology and North Dakota. The next meet for the swimming and diving teams will be held Jan. 12 in Indianapolis. The Billikens will face Indiana University, Purdue University at Indianpolis and Western Illinois in a double dual meet.

Walking in a Winter Sports Wonderland Looking for something to do this Winter Break? St. Louis is the place to be, from skating to Chaifetz Arena basketball Friday, Dec. 7 Maplewood Christmas Tree Walk

Friday, Dec. 21 Women’s Basketball vs. Drake

Head out to Maplewood Saturday, Dec. 7 to enjoy free romantic carriage rides, hot chocolate and the annual lighting of the Christmas tree. Get your exercise walking through historic Maplewood, enjoying the quintessential sights, sounds and smells of Christmas.

Head coach Lisa Stone returns to where it all began. In her first Division I head coaching position at Drake, Stone compiled a 64-27 record. She’ll lead the revamped Billikens into Des Moines in hopes of winning one more game on her old stomping grounds.

Friday, Dec. 28 Men’s Basketball vs. SIUE

Monday, Dec. 31 Men’s Basketball vs. New Mexico

Southern Illinois-Edwardsville will make the short trip across the Mississippi River to play at Chaifetz after Christmas. The Cougars will prove a pesky matchup for the Billikens in a potential trap game before a big-time game on New Year’s Eve.

The Billikens will look to avenge a heartbreaking 64-60 loss on New Year’s Eve last year, as they welcome the Lobos to St. Louis this time around. In addition, the matchup gives the Billikens an opportunity to flex some Atlantic 10 muscle against the Mountain West, a fellow mid-major conference that always wreaks havoc in March.

Tuesday, Jan. 7 NCAA National Championship Game

Thursday, Jan. 10 Men’s Basketball vs. Massachusetts

Grab some Tostitos and enjoy this matchup between two powerhouses of college football, as the resurrected Notre Dame Fighting Irish joins the Alabama Crimson Tide for a defensive slugfest in Miami.

The men’s basketball team opens what promises to be an raucous Atlantic 10 season against sleeper Massachusetts at Chaifetz Arena. The Billikens will have to compete night-in and night-out from here until March if they want to return to the NCAA Tournament.

Saturday, Jan. 12 Women’s Basketball vs. VCU

Saturday, Jan. 12 Track Indoor Open at Illinois

Soon after the men take to the court, the women will open their Atlantic 10 season against newcomers Virginia Commonwealth University. The 4-4 Billikens will be looking to finish higher than ninth in the conference, which they have not done since 2005.

The indoor track season gets into full swing over Christmas Break, capped off by a trip to Champaign, Ill. for the Indoor Open

Saturday, Jan. 12 Swimming and Diving at IUPUI

Steinberg Ice Skating Rink, Forest Park

Like the track squads, Patrick May and company will head to the renowned Natatorium in Indianapolis to take on IUPUI and Western Illinois in a double dual meet.

What’s a St. Louis Christmas without a trip to Steinberg Skating Rink? Grab your old figure skating blades (don’t be embarrassed) and head to Forest Park for some pirouettes and lutz jumps. Enjoy some hot chocolate while the Zamboni cleans the rink, and you’ll find yourself accompanied by every high school couple this side of the Mississippi.

STLC Frosbite Series - Every Saturday at Forest Park Looking to lose those Holiday pounds over break? Head to Forest Park every Saturday to catch the Frostbite Series, a weekly compilation of walks and races of varying lengths for novices and the experienced runner.

Stern’s kingdom sinking in the sand Under Commissioner David Stern, the NBA has evolved into America’s third m o s t popular professional sports league, behind the NFL a n d M L B . T h e Alex Kozich NBA has greatly expanded their reach into foreign countries, most aggressively in China, and the league has added 10 new teams since Stern took over. More recently, he has instituted a player dress code and just this summer addressed the problem of flopping by instituting a series of fines and warnings for players found flopping. There is no dispute that under Stern the NBA has increased its stature and fan base and expanded its reach throughout the world. Not everything has been so great, however, in Emperor Stern’s kingdom. On Nov. 29, the San Antonio Spurs played the Miami Heat on TNT. No big deal, right? It was just a Thursday night regular season game in November. Except for one minor detail: Greg Popovich, coach of the Spurs, sent home the Spurs’ four best players, Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and Danny Green, to get rest before their game against Western Conference rival Memphis Grizzlies on Dec. 1. Upon hearing the news, David Stern sent out a stronglyworded message that apologized for the Spurs’ actions and threatened that “significant sanctions” would be forthcoming; those significant sanctions came in the form of a $250,000 fine. Many sportswriters have weighed in on both sides of this controversy; however, the main issue is that Stern is instructing a team on how to play its members while giving them a schedule that forces an old team like the Spurs to rest its stars. This game was the fourth game in five nights for the Spurs, who were finishing up their second long road trip of the young season. Meanwhile, the Heat, a decidedly younger team, was playing its third game in two weeks. After the game, ESPN personality Skip Bayless declared that the NBA was setting the Spurs up to fail because the NBA can’t market the style of play that defines the Spurs. There is evidence to support this argument, considering the Spurs did this same thing twice last season, once in February and again in April without any backlash. In addition, the four finals that the Spurs have played in the last 20 years have been some of the lowest-rated during the Stern era. There is also the fact that many teams tank at the end of the season to try and get more pingpong balls in the draft lottery and no one says anything about that. These points are interesting counter-arguments to Stern’s main argument that the Spurs did a disservice to the fans at the game by sending home their stars. I am 100 percent convinced that there were less than 20 people who came just to see the Spurs play that game. The fans that show up to Heat games don’t go to see anyone else beside LeBron James and Dwayne Wade. No one went to the game solely to see a team whose best player is nicknamed Tim “The Big Fundamental” Duncan. On Nov. 30, during the Lakers-Nuggets game on ESPN, commentator Jeff Van Gundy weighed in, saying that if the NBA really cared about putting the See “Stern” on Page 13


DECEMBER 6, 2012

BCS: Titans clash for coveted championship Continued from Page 11

season record. Only a defense forged from steel and soaked in liquid anger could offset an offense that putrid. Luckily, only Florida State has cracked the 20-point mark against the Gators. Louisville earns a BCS spot as Big East champions. In recent years (last year notwithstanding), the Big East BCS representative has been more of a sacrificial lamb than opponent. On paper, Louisville seems to be the former. Their defense has been so-so, and their offense has slipped as of late. However, they still won 10 games and have one of the most clutch performers in the country leading the way, Teddy Bridgewater. The quarterback became a Louisville legend after guiding the Cardinals to a conference championship win over Rutgers, playing with a broken wrist and severely sprained ankle. Florida is expected to walk over the Cardinals, and justifiably so. However, keep this in mind: Louisville is playing with house money. Remember Utah and Alabama a few years back? It’s a similar scenario. Alabama came out flat after missing out on the national championship game, and Utah made them pay. Louisville isn’t quite there yet, however. The Gators will be tested, but ultimately they will prevail, 24-21. Fiesta Bowl: No. 5 Kansas State vs. No. 4 Oregon This bowl should be renamed “The Disappointment Bowl.” Three weeks back, K-State and Oregon were primed to square off for the national championship. Both saw their title dreams crushed on the same weekend. The matchup pits two teams with polar opposite styles, but similar substance. On one side, you have the Ducks. Their Ferrari

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of an offense and up-tempo style leaves their opponents grabbing for jersey and gasping for air. On the other stands KSU, with an offense more like a 1966 Corvette: equally powerful, equally sexy, but a product of yesteryear. Oregon quarterback Marcus Mariota and running back Kenjon Barner can score in the blink of an eye. Kansas State, led by quarterback Colin Klein, can score quickly as well, but they like to punch you in the mouth before doing so. In the end, it will come down to defense. Each squad has had their ability to stop the ball overshadowed by their ability to move it, but both Oregon and KSU have quietly put together solid defenses. Three weeks ago, I would have trusted in the wizardry of Wildcats head coach Bill Snyder to defeat the 1985 Chicago Bears. After seeing KSU shredded by Baylor, I cringe at the thought of them trying to stop Oregon. The Ducks run away with this one (literally), 52-31. BCS National Championship: No. 2 Alabama vs. No. 1 Notre Dame Here’s a sample of things I never thought would write for public consumption: “Justin Bieber releases heavy metal album,” “Nicholas Cage should do more movies,” “Actual key to happiness found in Montana Arby’s bathroom.” Until I actually wrote it, “No. 1 Notre Dame” was on that list. I just could not conceive the possibility of Notre Dame rising from the ashes and returning to the college football mountaintop. Every single time the Irish appeared to be back, they went bust. They didn’t just go bust; they imploded in epic fashion, a flame-riddled disaster straight out of a cheesy action movie (probably featuring Nicholas Cage). After the sixth time or so, I became skeptical of Notre

Dame. My cynicism continued this season. After they crushed Oklahoma on the road, I thought to myself, “Just give it a few weeks. They’ll inexplicably lose in triple overtime to Wake Forest on a reverse fake punt fumblerooski.”As the wins piled up, my condescending smile began to fade. Is Notre Dame… dare I say…good? Then the Pittsburgh game happened. All the breaks and calls which had seemingly gone against Notre Dame for the past 24 years broke their way. The luck of the Irish had returned. It’s going to take more than luck to overcome Alabama, college football’s resident juggernaut. Tide head coach Nick Saban doesn’t simply field good football teams. He assembles units of indestructible football warriors, trained to disintegrate lesser foes. All joking aside, Alabama’s teams in recent years have been scary. Top to bottom, this team could be the best in the country, but there are chinks in the armor. The two teams are eerily similar in multiple meaningful statistics. They’re both ranked within 15 spots of each other in the following: yards allowed per game, points allowed per game, rush defense, total offense and red-zone defense. Neither Alabama nor Notre Dame has given opposing offenses an inch. On offense, Alabama seems to have the edge, scoring more points per game and boasting a more balanced attack. This game will come down to whichever team can produce big passing plays. Both teams will try to run and stop the run; it is their respective bread and butter. Given Alabama’s more effective passing attack, they will win their third national championship in four years, cementing their dynasty status. In a battle of the two most storied programs in college football history, Alabama wins, 27-24.

Stern: The emperor’s new clothes Continued from Page 12

best product on the floor for nationally-televised games, they wouldn’t make teams play the day before such games so that each team was rested and ready to play. With this decision, Stern showed that although he says he cares about the fans and their experience, he really is only concerned with money and his own power to control the teams in his league. This isn’t the only recent major decision that has had NBA fans questioning what Stern was doing. Last year, the Lakers, Hornets and Rockets worked out a threeteam trade that would have sent Chris Paul to the Los Angeles Lakers, Pau Ga-

sol to Houston and Lamar Odom, Kevin Martin, Luis Scola, Goran Dragic and a first-round pick to New Orleans. The NBA, which owned the Hornets at the time, blocked the trade for what they claimed were “basketball” reasons. Most people agree that it was because some owners were upset that the Lakers were about to acquire another star player, which is what the new salary cap was supposed to prevent. The Hornets eventually traded Paul to the Clippers for the oft-injured Eric Gordon, Chris Kaman and his expiring contract, AlFarouq Amino and a firstround pick. Apparently the league decided that for “basketball” reasons they would

accept the far less appealing deal for the Hornets, who subsequently won the No. 1 pick in the draft right after the new owner, a friend of Stern, officially took over the team. There is no doubt Stern has done wonders for the league. He has shaped the league into a global brand and brought in a lot of money for the league. However, these two recent major decisions, along with some other blemishes that include four lockouts, stealing the Seattle Supersonics from Seattle and the Tim Donaghy scandal, have shown that he has overstayed his welcome and should have stepped down years ago. February 2014 can’t come soon enough.

Excellence Awards 2013 Arts & Sciences Excellence Awards

Excellence in Undergraduate and Graduate Teaching Awards Excellence in Undergraduate and Graduate Mentoring Awards Excellence in Adjunct Teaching Award Arts and Sciences Staff Excellence Award Faculty from the College of Arts & Sciences as well as undergraduates with majors in the College and graduate students pursuing an advanced degree are encouraged to submit nominations for the College's Annual Excellence Awards. One full-time professor in each of the College divisions (humanities, sciences, social sciences) will be chosen for an Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award. An Excellence in Undergraduate Mentoring Award will be given to one full-time faculty member from the College. An Excellence in Graduate Teaching and an Excellence in Graduate Mentoring will be awarded to a faculty member in Graduate Education. An Excellence in Adjunct Teaching Award and an Arts and Sciences Staff Excellence Award are also being offered this year. Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to submit nominations for the Staff Excellence Award.


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DECEMBER 6, 2012

This fall, first year students are participating in twenty-five First-Year Interest Groups (FIGs). A FIG is a small group of students taking two to three courses together and living together in a residential Learning Community. Course sizes within the FIGs range from small with only FIG students enrolled, to larger courses that involve other students. A residential learning community houses a group of students on one or more floors of a residence hall with an academic unit tie (e.g. health sciences, honors, business) or a common interest (e.g. arts, diversity and unity). We would like to thank the instructors that have been involved in teaching the FIG courses this fall semester. Their involvement is critical to the success of the program. If any FIG instructor name was inadvertently left off, then please accept our deepest regrets and feel free to contact Greg Lucsko, FIGs Coordinator, at glucsko@slu.edu. Fall 2012 FIG Instructors Martha Allen, Nevin Aspinwall, Bradley Bailey, Scott Berman, Lauren Bolland, James Bowen, Robert Boyle, Steven Buckner, Christopher Collins, Shelly Combs, Patrick Cousins, Lindsay Dencker, Timothy Dooley, Elizabeth Foreman, Daniel Freeman, Roger Gonzalez, Patricia Gregory, Anna Hanavan, Kami Hancock, Steven Hawkes-Teeples, J.A.W. Hellmann, Kelly Herbolich, Josh Hutchison, Lisa Israel, David Jackson, Jonathan Jacobs, Christine Keller, Virginia Kettenbach, Kristin Kiddoo, Charles Kirkpatrick, Belden Lane, Michelle Lorenzini, Greg Lucsko, Jeanne Melton, Janella Moy, J.J. Mueller, Donna Nonnenkamp, Janet O'Hallaron, Emmanuel Pretila, Corin Pursell, Clyde Ragland, Nirina Randrianarivony, Irma Ruebling, Andrew Russell, Laurie Russell, Daniel Schlafly, Alexa Serfis, Nicholas Smith, Daria Sokic-Lazic, Elena Bray Speth, Tiffany Sweeney, George Terzis, Cecil Thomas, Brigid Welch, Nina Westhus, Jeffrey Wickes Beginning fall 2007, SLU expanded the number of learning communities and implemented the FIG program. FIGs tend to be a fall only experience while learning communities are for the full academic year. This year 717 students are participating in LCs and from that number 395 students are participating in FIGs. You can learn more about SLU’s learning communities program by visiting www.slu.edu/lc


No. 13 (Dec. 6, 2012)