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ANNUAL REPORT 2011 CHITTAGONG HILL TRACTS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

Promotion of Development in the Chittagong Hill Tracts

European Union


Annual Report 2011

United Nations Development Programme – Bangladesh Promotion of Development and Confidence Building in Chittagong Hill Tracts

Copyright Š 2012 UNDP

Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility (CHTDF)


Annual Report 2011

Prepared by Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility (CHTDF) UNDP, Bangladesh IDB Bhaban (7th Floor), E/8-A Rokeya Sharani Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka – 1207 Writing Faruque Ahmed Editorial Team Julianna Hyjek, Roslina Johari Layout & Graphic Design Lara Salam Photography Cover photo credits (from left to right)

Photos 1, 3, 5: © Safina Ilias Photo 2: © Zia Hasan Photo 4: © UNDP Bangladesh This publication is available online at www.chtdf.org

UNDP partners with people at all levels of society to help build nations that can withstand crisis, and drive and sustain the kind of growth that improves the quality of life for everyone. On the ground in 177 countries and territories, we offer global perspective and local insight to help empower lives and build resilient nations. UNDP embarked on its journey in Bangladesh in 1973. Since its inception, UNDP and its partners in the country have accomplished key results in the areas of governance, poverty reduction, climate change and disaster resilience, as well as achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). UNDP is engaged with various government agencies and partners to strive towards a common goal of the economic and social development of Bangladesh. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the United Nations, including UNDP, or their Member States.


MESSAGE UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME Eight years have passed since the Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility (CHTDF) began its work of ensuring access to basic services for the people of the CHT, developing capacity and building confidence of the CHT institutions at the national, regional and local levels. As part of the wider effort of the Government of Bangladesh (GoB) to implement the CHT Peace Accord and to ensure human development in the Hill Tracts, CHTDF has made a valuable contribution to the process of successful peace building andin improving the socio-economic conditions of the resident communities. The unique UNDP multi-sectoral and area based approach was successfully followed by CHTDF and many of the thematic areas that UNDP is engaged in were addressed. CHTDF has been assisting the government in transferring and balancing decentralized power from the national level to the Hill District Councils (HDC), specialized institutions of local governance in charge of implementing the peace accord and providing public services. Consequently, for the first time in over a decade, the HDCs are now managing CHTDF-funded projects on health, education and livelihood as well as many more of the core 33 functions agreed in the CHT Peace Accord. In 2011 alone, HDCs managed $7.2M in service delivery. In addition, more than 3,200 communities were supported with strengthening social cohesiveness through the establishment of Para Development Committees (PDC). The grants provided by CHTDF resulted in increased capacities of communities to manage their own development projects and in availing technical services from line departments. This has contributed to an increase in assets among 87 per cent of the targeted communities. The delivery of essential services has produced tangible results. In education the net enrolment in 2011 reached around 90 per cent (as compared to 49% in 2009) and gross enrolment reached 95 per cent (as compared to 82% in 2009). The community based health services which were delivered to an under-served population of 500,000 contributed to the reduction in mortality and morbidity associated with preventable causes. In agriculture, a suitable strategy for the CHT was developed and the geographical coverage was increased, with approximately 328 hectares of land, covering 62 communities, benefiting from five irrigation schemes. The cross-cutting themes of women’s empowerment and environmental protection were pursued in all of the CHTDF activities. My sincere thanks are due to the Government of Bangladesh for its continuing long-standing partnership with UNDP. I would also like to appreciate the support from our donors – the European Union (EU), Government of Canada (CIDA), Government of Denmark (DANIDA) and Government of Australia (AusAID). I congratulate the CHTDF team for their dedication and the progress made so far and I look forward to further successes in the near future. Neal Walker UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative Bangladesh

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MESSAGE European Union

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION During a long partnership with Bangladesh since 1973, the European Union (EU) has been providing supports for addressing major development issues in Bangladesh. I am very happy to learn that long continuation of support for the peace process and development in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) is registering good impact since 2003 under the initiatives of the CHT Development Facility (CHTDF). Despite of various difficulties, CHTDF has completed its eight years of support to the CHT through financial assistance from European Union and other donors. This has been possible due to effective partnership and cooperation among the European Union, the Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tract Affairs (MoCHTA), UNDP and other donors and implementing partners. The HDCs have successfully managed increasing activities and budget allocation for interventions on education, health, agriculture and women empowerment. Their capacities were enhanced with regards to planning and budgeting, tracking delivery and reporting with better transparency, fair recruitment and procurement processes. Such enhanced capacity will not only support the HDCs in better management of the subjects transferred to the HDC, but will make a stronger case for the transfer of the remaining subjects to the HDCs as per the CHT Peace Accord. CHTDF supported 1,686 Women Managed Projects (WMP) through economic opportunities packaged with capacity development and advocacy programs. A total of 22 CHT women leaders were appointed Women Peacemakers. Their role as mediators in social arbitration and conflict management contributed to the CHT peace building. Women leadership was promoted and sustained through meaningful participation in various development management committees. Of the 1,000 CHSW established by CHTDF, 14 were elected as Union Parishads Councilors in 2011 elections demonstrating the impact of CHTDF supported service delivery on women’s political empowerment. The European Union has extended further support to CHTDF for implementation of a new project ‘Supporting Local Development in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT)’ from the beginning of the year 2011. This will increase the capacity of the CHT institutions to deliver services and to support community development, empowering local organizations and communities and enhancing their capacity to manage their own development. Although CHTDF has contributed a lot in creating an enabling environment for the diverse people of the CHT and its institutions, further improvement is required for successful implementation of the CHT Peace Accord. More dialogue is necessary with different stakeholders on various issues for the betterment of the CHT and the country as a whole. I hope and believe that with the support of different stakeholders CHTDF will be able to build more solid confidence for implementation of the Peace Accord effectively. The European Union is interested in providing further support for the peace and development in CHT. William Hanna Ambassador Head of Delegation

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MESSAGE MINISTRY OF CHITTAGONG HILL TRACTS AFFAIRS It is my pleasure to continue support to the Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility (CHTDF) of UNDP for implementing the project "Promotion of Development and Confidence Building in CHT". The project has provided support to the people of the CHT covering 20 Upazilas out of 25 in the CHT through undertaking various development activities including building capacity of the CHT institutions and building confidence among different stakeholders with a view to contributing to implement the CHT Peace Accord signed in 1997. CHTDF has assisted MoCHTA and the CHT Institutions in addressing key policy and legal issues related to implementation of the development provisions of the CHT Peace Accord. This mainly includes linkages amongst the CHT specific governance institutions, local government bodies, MOCHTA and relevant line ministries. The HDCs have achieved closer linkages with stakeholders at the district level and below. Through the implementation of LOA activities, they are staffed with offices at the Upazila level, which are taking part in development coordination meetings at both Union and Upazila levels. HDCs also have better coordination at the district level with transferred line departments and various NGOs working in different sectors. Besides technical and logistic support by CHTDF to the Land Commission and Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) Task Force in implementation of the CHT Peace Accord, the unique approach of CHTDF has helped in strengthening linkage and cooperation amongst CHTDF institutions, GoB line departments and UNDP, which is benefiting the people of the CHT region. I strongly believe that the Annual Report 2011 will be a comprehensive source of information for all stakeholders on the activities with results achieved and will encourage all to extend more cooperation and support. I congratulate UNDP, CHTDF staffs, the CHT people and donors for the successful completion of activities planned in 2011 and wish CHTDF all the best. Dipankar Talukdar State Minister Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs

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MESSAGE CHITTAGONG HILL TRACTS REGIONAL COUNCIL It is my pleasure to acknowledge that the CHT Development Facility (CHTDF) has successfully completed eight years of the project ‘Promotion of Development and Confidence Building in the Chittagong Hill Tracts’. With the continuous support of CHTDF, three Hill District Councils have increased their capacity for shouldering more responsibilities for providing support to areas of agriculture, education, health and other required services available with different government and other agencies. The CHTDF has contributed to bring positive development in the lives of the CHT people by giving emphasis on socio-economic aspects, institutional capacity building, health services, education and agricultural. It has raised awareness to some extent among the CHT people for improving their own conditions. The community producers including men and women of the CHT have been trained on different skills on alternative income generating activities, basic entrepreneurship, marketing extension, agro product processing & value addition, etc. I wish CHTDF more success in continuing its supports and in taking initiatives for strengthening capacities of the CHT institutions for moving forward the development agenda in the region. Jyotirindra Bodhipriya Larma Chairman Chittagong Hill Tracts Regional Council

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MESSAGE RANGAMATI HILL DISTRICT COUNCIL I am very delighted to learn that the CHT Development Facility (CHTDF) has completed its 8th year of a long and strong partnership in undertaking various development activities in the CHT including basic services viz. health care facilities, basic education to children, and other community level initiatives for the betterment of the CHT people. CHTDF provided technical and financial assistance to the three Hill District Councils to fulfill their different services. In 2011, Community-based health services were delivered to an under-served population of 500,000 across 15 Upazilas through a network of about 1,000 CHSWs who are supported by 16 mobile medical teams, operating 80 weekly satellite clinics and a referral system of emergency patients. In 2011 the community people of the CHT became more aware and skilled through participation in different training activities, workshops, meetings and exchange/learning visits. PDCs and PNDGs have benefited and they are supporting the community activities in a more effective manner. A total of 600 local teachers with required language and cultural backgrounds were deployed in 300 schools under the HDCs and were trained on child-friendly teaching-learning methods which helped ensuring retention and increase quality education. In 2011, net children enrolment reached to 90% as compared to 49% in 2009 and gross enrolment of 95% as compared to 82% in 2009. In 2011, CHTDF has further strengthened the extension services from line departments through different technical trainings held by 182 community-based service providers (livestock and poultry workers). A total of 28 solar-based vaccine preservation facilities were established for complete cold chain in remote places. These will increase the socio-economic status of the CHT people. I hope that CHTDF will cover the rest of the un-served areas very soon for extending development supports. I would like to convey my sincere thanks to CHTDF, donors and the CHT communities for extending their support and cooperation. Rangamati Hill District Council is committed to continue cooperation with CHTDF. Nikhil Kumar Chakma Chairman Rangamati Hill District Council

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MESSAGE BANDARBAN HILL DISTRICT COUNCIL I am really happy to acknowledge contribution of the CHT Development Facility (CHTDF) for implementation of its activities successfully in 2011 and accelerating the process of building confidence and socio economic development of CHT people. Remarkable results have been achieved in 2011 through implementation of CHTDF activities. Capacity of Para Development Committees (PDCs) has been enhanced further and they are managing community related development activities through having more access to different services available with Government and Non-government agencies. The Quick Impact Fund (QIF) support has been extended to establish PDCs and PNDGs through which community people planned and implemented various development activities. Through providing health support, CHTDF has contributed to reduced mortality and morbidity associated with preventable causes. I am happy to learn that through the active role of the HDCs, health infrastructures are being improved in 25 Upazilas including the district headquarters. For enhancing and expansion of quality education it is required to register CHTDF supported schools at the earliest time. In this regard, local CHT institutions need to take more initiatives with the relevant Government institutions through CHTDF support. A total of 1,686 women managed projects have been supported by CHTDF through creating economic opportunities and developing capacity in gender equality. Also 40 CHT women have been selected as Women Peacemakers. They have contributed to the CHT peace building by playing a role as mediators in social arbitration and conflict management. Women’s leadership has been promoted through participation in different committees and forums for development. I am confident that more positive changes in livelihoods of the CHT people will take place from the unique partnership amongst the UNDP and the CHT institutions. It is very important to continue necessary support for smooth implementation of CHTDF initiatives from all concerned stakeholders. The Bandarban Hill District Council is fully committed to extend all supports to CHTDF in implementing development initiatives for improving lives of the CHT people. Kyaw Shwe Hla Chairman Bandarban Hill District Council

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MESSAGE KHAGRACHARI HILL DISTRICT COUNCIL I am very pleased to learn that CHTDF is publishing its Annual Report 2011 after successfully completing eight years of interventions. This annual report records the success and the difficulties faced by CHTDF in achieving worthy goal, and serves as an important source of information for all stakeholders inspiring all concerned to come forward. The use of ICT within the HDCs has been expanded further for capacity building of the CHT institutions. The websites are in use and the installation of LAN systems has improved internal communications. The coordination and linkage amongst HDCs and central government institutions have been enhanced through participation in the Technical Advisory Committees and other forums. Continuous support from CHTDF will definitely accelerate the government objective of establishing peace and harmony in the CHT. CHTDF has created excellent scope of access to schooling for over 20,000 children in the under-served areas who previously had no/less educational facilities. This was possible because of establishing new schools and supporting non-functioning community-managed schools by CHTDF. Technical and financial assistance have been provided to 300 primary schools in the three HDCs. In 132 of these schools, children from different ethnic groups were able to have access to education in their mother tongue as agreed with the CHT Peace Accord and were prepared to have their education mainstreamed to the national curriculum where the medium of instruction is Bengali. The Khagrachhari Hill District Council (KHDC) feel proud of extending continuous support to various development activities undertaken by CHTDF for sustainable growth in areas of social, political, economic, cultural, educational and fundamental rights of the citizens especially the ethnic communities of the CHT. I would like to extend my strong support and commitment to continue and expand CHTDF activities for more positive results for the CHT people. I am fully impressed with the tireless commitment to establish a more peaceful society in the CHT. I convey my sincere thanks to all concerned especially to staff members of CHTDF and HDCs, donors and other stakeholders for their hard work and commitment towards bringing positive changes in lives of the CHT people . Kujendra Lal Tripura Chairman Khagrachhari Hill District Council

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FOREWORD The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) Peace Accord is a major political achievement for Bangladesh. As the cornerstone of a successful peace building process, it opened up new development opportunities to the people of the CHT who were previously excluded from the mainstream of development due to conflict and violence. The Accord recognized the need to establish CHT level government institutions - the Regional Council and the three Hill District Councils - and it was agreed to transfer a number of competencies to these institutions. Following the signing of the Accord, the CHT people entered an era of relative calm, after decades of instability in the area. In this context, the Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility (CHTDF), which is managed by UNDP in partnership with the Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts (MoCHTA), supports development and confidence building. Despite the inherent challenges in a uniquely complex environment, CHTDF has produced concrete results and has generated hope for the transformation of their lives among CHT residents. In 2011, the momentum for the implementation of the Peace Accord has grown and the CHT Development Facility supported its partners in achieving progress in this respect. Although HDCs are not yet fully empowered and the agreed upon subjects not all transferred, their capacities are developing under the current government. The momentum was galvanized towards the end of the year with the Cultural Diversity Festival organized by the Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs (MoCHTA) with support from the CHT Development Facility. The Festival was attended by the honourable Prime Minister of the Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh who reiterated her commitment to implement the CHT Accord and attention to CHT issues. CHTDF has also made a commendable contribution to development on the ground in the CHT though the steady provision of services to remote and disadvantaged communities. In 2011, community-based health services were delivered to an under-served population of 489,171 across 15 Upazilas, through a network of approximately 1,000 Community Health Service Workers (CHSWs) who are supported by 16 mobile medical teams, operating 80 weekly satellite clinics. Moreover, 600 local teachers were deployed in 300 CHTDF-supported schools under HDCs and trained on child-friendly teaching-learning methods which helped ensure retention and increase quality education. The progress made to achieve food security is particularly impressive. Through 510 Farmer Field Schools, 12,675 farmers increased their knowledge on improved agricultural practices in 2011. Yields have increased by 37% as a result. The rice banks supported by CHTDF contributed to a decrease of the food deficit period from 2.6 months in 2008 to 1.8 months in 2011 for 98,824 individuals living in areas where the rice banks are functional.

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These achievements would not have been possible without the support of our current and former international partners, namely the European Union (EU), UNDP, Australia (AusAID), Canada (CIDA), Denmark (DANIDA), Norway, the United States of America (USAID) and Japan. This international support was complemented by the partnerships established with CHT institutions, national organizations and the Government of Bangladesh. As the Director of the Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility and Secretary of the Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs – CHTDF’s sponsoring Ministry - we are pleased to present CHTDF’s achievements in this Annual Report and we look forward to ensuring the continued full support for implementing the Peace Accord and the sustainability of CHTDF’s interventions.

Naba Bikram Kishore Tripura Secretary in-charge Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs Government of Bangladesh

Henrik Fredborg Larsen Director Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility UNDP Bangladesh

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LIST OF ACRONYMS ADP ANC ARI AusAID BARI BDT BHDC CEP CF CHSW CHT CHTAE CHTDB CHTDF CHTRC CHTWON CIDA CSBA DAE DANIDA DFC DG DoF DPE EC EmOC EPI EU FFS GMS GoB HDC HNPSDP ICT IGA IT KHDC

Agriculture Development Project Ante Natal Care Acute Respiratory Infection Australian Agency for International Development Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute Bangladesh Taka Bandarban Hill District Council Community Empowerment Project Community Facilitator Community Health Services Worker Chittagong Hill Tracts Award of Excellence in the Chittagong Hill Tracts Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Board Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility Chittagong Hill Tracts Regional Council Chittagong Hill Tracts Women Organizations Network Canadian International Development Agency Community Based Skill Birth Attendant Department of Agriculture Extension Danish International Development Agency (Government of Denmark) District Facilitation Committee Director General Department of Fisheries Directorate of Primary Education European Commission Emergency Obstetric Care Expanded Program on Immunization European Union Farmers Field School General Management Service (cost) Government of Bangladesh Hill District Council Health, Nutrition and Population Sector Development Program Information and Communication Technology Income Generating Activity Information Technology Khagrachhari Hill District Council

LCG LED LoA M&E MG MLE MoCHTA MoHFW MoPME MoU MPCC NGO NSC PDC PEDP PMR PNDG PNGO PTA QIF RC RCC RHDC SBA SC SDP SMC TAC ToR ToT UNDP UnFC UNV UP UPC USAID USD UzAC UzST VSO

Local Consultative Group Local Economic Development Letter of Agreement Monitoring and Evaluation Mothers Group Mother-tongue based Multi-Lingual Education Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs Ministry of Health and Family Welfare Ministry of Primary and Mass Education Memorandum of Understanding Multi Purpose Community Center Non-Government Organization National Steering Committee Para Development Committee Primary Education Development Program Planning, Monitoring and Reporting Para Nari Development Group Partner Non-Government Organization Parents Teachers Association Quick Impact Fund Regional Council Regional Coordination Committee Rangamati Hill District Council Skilled Birth Attendant Satellite Clinic School Development Plan School Management Committee Technical Advisory Committee Terms of Reference Training of Trainers United Nations Development Programme Union Facilitation Committee United Nations Volunteer Union Parishad Upazila Coordinator United States Agency for International Development United States Dollar Upazila Advisory Committee Upazila Support Team Volunteer Service Organization

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CONTENTS

Messages Foreword List of Acronyms Executive Summary Chapter 1. Introduction Chapter 2. Key Achievements and Outputs 2.1 Policy Advocacy & Confidence Building 2.2 Capacity Development 2.3 Gender Equity 2.4 Health 2.5 Education 2.6 Agriculture & Food Security 2.7 Community Empowerment 2.8 Economic Development 2.9 Knowledge Management Chapter 3. CHTDF Management Chapter 4. Lessons Learned & Way Forward Annex

i ix xi 1 4 8 8 11 15 18 23 27 31 36 41 42 45 47


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility (CHTDF) of UNDP has completed eight years of implementation of a variety of initiatives to promote development and confidence building in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT). In 2011, CHT institutions were strengthened through capacity building activities and cooperation was encouraged among different stakeholders with a view to contribute to the full implementation of the CHT Peace Accord signed in 2007. Local services were delivered in 20 Upazilas to support communities and to empower them to manage their own development. 2011’s major achievements are highlighted below.

stakeholders of the institution the opportunity to participate in the assessment and making the leaders of the institutions accountable to stakeholders. HDC capacities were enhanced in planning and budgeting, tracking delivery, reporting, fair recruitment, procurement processes and information technology. The enhanced capacities will not only support the HDCs in better management of the subjects transferred to them, it will also make a stronger case for the transfer of the remaining subjects to the HDCs as agreed in the CHT Peace Accord.

On a national level, greater understanding on the CHT Peace Accord and on cultural diversity in Bangladesh was generated through the Cultural Diversity Festival 2011, organized by the Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs (MoCHTA) and supported by CHTDF. The presence of the Honorable Prime Minister of the Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh at the Festival opening ceremony demonstrated the Government’s continuing attention to the CHT issues. It provided fresh momentum for Accord Implementation and set several politically significant events and dialogues in motion.

3. Gender Equality

The strengthened position of HDCs was reflected in their successful management of interventions on education, health, agriculture and food security, and women empowerment. They 1. Policy Advocacy and Confidence Building managed the increase in budget allocation for interventions from $4.2m in 2010 to US $7.2m. The HDCs also achieved closer linkages with CHTDF’s policy advocacy and confidence building initiatives built trust stakeholders at the district level and below. They have better and confidence among CHT communities and institutions. The capacity coordination at the district level with transferred line departments and of the Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts (MoCHTA) was enhanced for the NGOs working in the corresponding sectors. first time in the lifespan of the CHTDF, MoCHTA has been taking leadership and ownership of inter-ministerial coordination and The capacity of traditional leaders were enhanced through establishing policy-related initiatives leading to more effective advocacy, and operating Multipurpose Community Centers (MPCC) at the community inter-governmental coordination and enhanced clarity on CHT issues. level, which are primarily used to keep all official documents and paperwork The traditional CHT institutions were also uplifted and a cultural revival related to revenue collection and land registration. Previously, these of CHT was encouraged by supporting traditional events such as the documents were kept by headmen individually at the village level. Rajpunnyah.

2. Capacity Development CHTDF has introduced new strategies to enhance the institutional capacity of CHT institutions. These included providing capacity development grants to CHT institutions, MDG acceleration and involving technical advisorycommittees to ensure a harmonized process for strategy development in different sectors. Institutional capacity assessments were carried out for HDCs and Circles and will be continued for all CHT institutions. The process of self-assessment has enhanced the ownership of the institutions as regards the institutional capacity development plan while giving direct

CHTDF is committed to promoting gender equality and women empowerment in CHT. CHTDF supported 1,686 women managed projects providing economic opportunities and developing women's capacity. A total of 64 vomen volunteers were placed in the 3 HDCs and various partner organisations. The work of the women volunteers in the different organisations enhanced women's involvement in development activities and in managing resources. The Women as Peacemakers Scheme of CHTDF selected 22 CHT women as Women Peacemakers. Their role as mediators in social arbitration and conflict management has been contributing to peace building in the CHT. Women’s leadership was promoted and sustained through participation in various development management committees. In the election for Union Parishads, 15 women were elected as Councillors, all of whom had a background as CHTDF Community Health Service Workers (CHSWs), demonstrating the impact of CHTDF supported service delivery on women’s political empowerment.

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Finally, HDCs drafted their gender mainstreaming policy and A positive step towards sustainability of the education activities is observations suggest that there is a genuine interest in ensuring this reflected in the government education officials' greater understanding gender policy is thoroughly applied. and commitment to education in the CHT. There was a joint initiative between MoCHTA, HDCs and Government line departments in supporting the registration of community schools. The CHT education 4. Health Services system has been further strengthened through the provision of grants for implementation of School Development Plans (SDP), raising CHTDF has played a key role in increasing access to quality primary health care in remote and hard to reach areas of the CHT and in community awareness and mobilizing community resources. enhancing community based services. In 2011, community-based health services were delivered to an under-served population of 489,171 across 15 Upazilas, through a network of approximately 1,000 CHSWs who are supported by 16 mobile medical teams, operating 80 weekly satellite clinics, and a referral system of emergency patients. A total of 591 emergency cases were referred to Upazila and/or District health complexes from the remotest areas. The CHT people have also become more aware of health issues particularly on child health and primary healthcare. All of these initiatives contributed to reduced mortality and morbidity associated with preventable causes. In 6 Upazilas where CHTDF had managed satellite clinics/mobile teams directly in 2010, the responsibility of management was transferred to partner NGOs. Sustaining the delivery of health services for the people of the remotest parts of CHT remains a key challenge for the Facility. Hence, through MoCHTA, a proposal for expanding and sustaining community based health services under the Health, Population and Nutrition Sector Development Program (HPNSDP) was submitted to the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

6. Agriculture Extension and Food Security CHTDF aims to improve food security in the CHT by providing opportunities for farmers to increase yield, diversify sources of income and by protecting communities from food scarcity. The Farmer Field Schools (FFS), a concept of integrated farm management (introduced in CHT in 2010), gives farmers the opportunity to acquire better skills, express their needs and access services from government institutions. Through 510 Farmer Field Schools, 12,675 farmers increased their knowledge on improved agricultural practices in 2011. Yields have increased by 37% as a result. The CHTDF supported rice banks contributed to an increase of 0.8 months of the food secure period for 98,824 inhabitants of rice bank communities across the CHT in comparison to the usual 2.6 months of lean period each year. Community members improved the functioning of rice banks following the training they received.

In addition, CHTDF strengthened the extension services from line departments through different technical trainings. For example, CHTDF opened access to schooling for 20,000 children of under-served technical trainings were held by 182 community-based service providers areas with previously none or limited schooling facilities by establishing (livestock and poultry workers). Vaccination campaigns were introduced new schools as well as by supporting non-functioning and are contributing to a decrease in livestock mortality. Not only was community-managed schools. In 132 of these schools, with CHTDF awareness raised on the importance of livestock vaccination but 9,453 support, children were able to access education in their mother tongue animals were also vaccinated, 474 animals were de-wormed and 28 as agreed in the CHT Peace Accord and were prepared for having their solar-based vaccine preservation facilities were established for full cold chain in remote places. education mainstreamed to the national curriculum.

5. Education Services

2011’s results can be seen by the data in the net enrolment of around 90 per cent (which constitutes a 16% increase since 2010) and gross enrolment of 95 per cent. Absenteeism is at the lowest level with attendance rate at 94% in 132 supported schools where MLE (Multi-Lingual Education) has been introduced. Nearly 600 local teachers were deployed in 300 CHTDF run schools under the HDCs and trained on child-friendly teaching-learning methods which helped ensure retention and increase quality education. Almost all of the students of project supported schools have access to safe drinking water facilities.

7. Community Empowerment More than 3,200 communities, comprising of the poorest people in the CHT were supported for social and economic development with a view of strengthening self-reliance within Para Development Committees (PDCs), training of local NGOs, training on project planning, organization and financial management and managing local development projects including income generating activities. PDC and Para Nari Development Groups (PNDGs) members are implementing their projects in a better

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way, holding monthly meetings regularly, taking decisions in a participatory way and maintaining social harmony through communication with communities. Grants provided from CHTDF resulted in increased capacities of communities to manage their own development projects and in the availing of technical services from line departments. This contributed to an increase in assets for 87% of targeted communities.

Information on activities and results was uploaded on UNDP’s and CHTDF’s websites. Visibility was ensured through the production and dissemination of various promotional items.

2011 provided the scope for gathering lessons learned, which will be described in this report and for reflection on the future direction of CHTDF. The sustainability of CHTDF’s development activities remains a key challenge. Sustainability will rely on the implementation of the The overall process of capacity building of PDCs has empowered its CHT Peace Accord. Therefore, the main concern is to ensure the members to step forward and play a larger role in their communities. implementation of the Accord and to build confidence among CHT communities to promote peace and communal harmony. A major achievement at the community level is the development of the regular practice of saving amongst the community people. Cumulative savings mobilized by the community in three hill districts was USD 610,081 in 2011, registering a 25% increase since 2010.

8. Economic Development The purpose of the economic development component of CHTDF is to increase local economic development opportunities by supporting local small enterprises, strengthening linkages with financial and training institutions and diversifying income generating opportunities. A total of 8,300 individuals were trained on income generating activities and marketing. Weaver groups were reformed and provided with training. The introduced Awards of Excellence acted as an encouragement for community people to improve their products. With improved business skills and marketing, more income generating activities were stimulated in 2011. Improvement and construction of market infrastructure and collection points at 9 locations in three hill districts benefited 16,080 CHT people, including 5,202 traders who are now able to run their businesses at night and in the rainy season, which in turn resulted in higher incomes and better services. The strategies developed to link the CHT communities to financial service providers resulted in better access to financial services provided by microfinance NGOs and banks.

9. Knowledge Management CHTDF has a dedicated knowledge management component to raise awareness and build knowledge on the CHT and activities of CHTDF through developing and disseminating knowledge products. In 2011, 48 issues of weekly newsletters were circulated with updates on CHTDF, which were later converted to monthly newsletters jointly published with MoCHTA beginning October 2011.

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1

INTRODUCTION

Peace and Development in the Chittagong Hill Tracts The Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) is home to 11 indigenous/tribal groups and Bengalis. Twenty five years of conflict have left many of its 1.5 million inhabitants in conditions of extreme poverty. Tensions over the delegation of authority to local government bodies, land scarcity and tenure, resource access, and divergence in ethno-demographics remain a challenge to sustainable development. The lack of economic opportunity has resulted in poverty and high unemployment levels. Given the physical remoteness, cultural and linguistic differences, as well as limited livelihood options, the CHT population finds itself somehow detached from the mainstream and lacking in access to resources, services and infrastructure to their needs.

Alongside the central and decentralized local government systems, CHT also practices a traditional system of administration based on customs and practices of CHT communities. There are three administrative Circles (Mong, Chakma and Bomang) each with their own Chief or Raja. The administrative areas of the Chiefs broadly correspond to the decentralized local government administrative areas of Khagrachhari, Rangamati and Bandarban. The Circle Chiefs are advisers to their relevant HDC and are also engaged in other formal Government networks.

Household Characteristics

In terms of ethnographic makeup of the CHT, 77 per cent of the paras (village) are inhabited by only one or more indigenous/tribal communities, 16 per cent paras are inhabited by only the Bengalis and the rest are mixed paras. Socio-Economic Baseline Survey (2009). The population of CHT is young, with 58 per cent of the population below As a region, the CHT has distinctive administrative, ethnographic and the age bracket of 24 years. socio-economic features in comparison to other parts of Bangladesh. Poverty in CHT is higher than rural Bangladesh. 75 per cent of the CHT CHT’s distinctive government administrative system works via (1) households are living below the lower poverty line (< UDS 12 per General Administrative System (2) Decentralized Local Government person per month) and 86 per cent below the upper poverty line System and (3) Traditional Administrative System. (<USD 15 per person per month). The general administrative system is a part of the central government Based on the Direct Calorie Intake (DCI), about 62 per cent of the and in CHT includes the Office of the Deputy Commissioner, Upazila households, irrespective of ethnicity, are living below the absolute Parishad, Union Parishad and Pourasova (Municipality). poverty line (below 2,122 Kcal) while 36 per cent are defined as hard core poor (below 1,850 kcal). A decentralized local government system is also in effect, where the responsibilities for the management of public services is delegated to Food security remains an issue for the CHT, particularly from June to the Regional Council and the three Hill District Councils (HDC). As per August when the food harvests are limited due to various factors such Hill District Council Acts of 1989 (as amended after the 1997 CHT as extreme weather conditions and pest attacks. Accord) a total of 33 subjects are expected to be transferred from the Ministries to each of the three Hill District Councils. Of these, over half have already been transferred, including health and education. The Hill Agriculture and Land Use District Councils with their own funds or funds from the Government may formulate and implement development plans on the subjects and Depending on the topographic condition, the share of agriculture in the departments transferred to them. The concerned Ministries, Divisions or gross product of CHT ranges from 27 per cent to 41 per cent. CHT agriculture, Departments are expected to implement all development work through in a broad sense, comprises of crops, livestock, poultry, fisheries and the HDCs undertaken by the Government at the national level on subjects horticulture. transferred to the HDCs. Due to the steep, rugged terrain and rainfall pattern, agricultural production The Ministry of CHT Affairs (MoCHTA) is responsible for overseeing all is extremely difficult. Plough cultivation is the primary occupation of 10 activities of CHT and approves the staffing for the Regional Council and per cent of the CHT population with another 7.5 per cent practicing Jum cultivation - a local form of “shifting” or “rotational” slash and burn system the three Hill District Councils. of cultivation. Jum is a form of subsistence farming although some cash crops are produced and sold in small quantities.

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Despite having approximately 3 million acres of land, CHT is one of the Background to the CHT Development Facility most land scarce regions of Bangladesh in terms of availability of land for cultivation. Plough cultivation is extremely difficult except in flat valley (CHTDF) bottoms. Out of an estimated 364,000 acres of available cultivable land, The CHT Peace Accord signed in December 1997 between the Government 27 per cent is used for Jum, 20 per cent is under plough cultivation, 18 per of Bangladesh and the Jana Sanghati Samiti (JSS) is recognized as a cent is set aside for homesteads and 35 per cent is used for plantations. significant political achievement, raising high expectations for a successful peace building process and development opportunities for the CHT.

Education

UNDP has played a leading coordinating and facilitating role in promoting sustainable, locally appropriate socio-economic development in the The level of literacy is generally low in CHT. According to the Socio-Economic region. In 2003, UNDP responded to the needs for support to peace and Baseline Survey (2009), 53.9 per cent of the CHT people and 47.4 per cent development with an official Preparatory Assistance Project, culminating of Bengalis have had no formal schooling. 7.8 per cent of CHT population in a USD 50 million, a 5-year program was signed with the Government completed primary education and 2.4 per cent completed secondary of Bangladesh in late 2005: ‘Promotion and Development of Confidence education. Building in CHT’. The difficult terrain in the CHT complicates access to education in the CHT. The dropout rate of students is very high with 65 per cent of the households reporting discontinuation of the children’s education before completion of primary school and 19 per cent dropout rate after the primary level.

In 2008, UNDP undertook a strategic review of the program to identify the major achievements and opportunities for the future. In response to the review and recognizing the valuable contribution of the program to peace and development of CHT, the Government of Bangladesh reaffirmed their commitment to the program and approved in 2009 a continuation to September 2013 with an increased budget to USD Health 160.5 million. CHTDF has current financial contributions from the Although the type, size and number of Government health facilities per European Union (EU), Government of Canada (CIDA), Government of Denmark (DANIDA), Government of Australia (AusAID) and UNDP. household in the CHT follows the same national standards as in the Previous donors included Embassy of Japan, Norwegian Ministry of plains, these standards do not adequately meet the geographical and Foreign Affairs and the United State Agency for International environmental challenges of CHT. Development (USAID). The terrain is rough, communities are scattered and road infrastructure is often poor. Poor transportation infrastructure leads is a barrier to access health facilities. Furthermore, many health facilities are poorly maintained and often lack basic facilities and equipment for testing and diagnosis.

UNDP works closely with MoCHTA, CHT Regional Council, three HDCs, traditional institutions of three Circle Chiefs, International, National and CHT based NGOs, Civil Society Organizations, local leaders and representatives of the community based organizations. UNDP’s program for the Promotion of Development and Confidence Building in CHT through CHTDF, works for the overall development of opportunities for all Malaria, diarrohea and acute respiratory tract infections are the most people and communities residing in CHT. common diseases in CHT area and Malaria is a major health issue. Both the maternal and child mortality is higher than the national average. This is attributed to the high number of births at home without the help Purpose of a skilled birth attendant. There is also a lack of knowledge on child CHT Development Facility (CHTDF) is multi-sectoral and works for the immunization and the importance of Ante and Post Natal Care. overall development of all peoples in the CHT. The Facility supports the According to the Bangladesh Expanded Program of Immunizations (EPI) Government of Bangladesh, CHT institutions, and local communities in Coverage Evaluation Survey, valid full immunization coverage in CHT is the implementation of the CHT Peace Accord and to enable the CHT only 61 per cent. EPI program has not met its targets in the hard to institutions and their constituent communities to pursue accelerated, reach areas. sustainable socio-economic development and regional poverty reduction, based on the principles of self reliance, local participation, and decentralized development.

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Objectives The objectives of the program are as follows: • • • • • •

Capacities of ofCHT institutions, including MoCHTA, Capacities CHT institutions, including MoCHTA, RegionalRegional Council, Council, HillCouncils, District Councils, and traditional institutions three Hillthree District and traditional institutions of three of three Chiefs, are enhanced; CircleCircle Chiefs, are enhanced; Economic opportunities smalllocal local enterprises, women, Economic opportunitiesfor for small enterprises, women, youth youth and farmers are improved; and farmers are improved; Literacy increasedthrough through improved to a Literacyisis increased improved access to access a strengthened strengthened education system to the local context; education system adapted to theadapted local context; Health conditions areare improved Health conditions improvedthrough throughstrengthened strengthenedhealth health system outreach andand localized service systemsupporting supportingcommunity community outreach localized service delivery; delivery; LocalLocal communities empowered their capacities communitiesare are empowered andand their capacities to manageto manage their own development are enhanced; their own development are enhanced; Facilitating confidence building as asa pillar Facilitating confidence building a pillartotosustainable sustainable peace peace and anddevelopment developmentInInthe theCHT. CHT.Additionally, Additionally,CHTDF CHTDFhad hadadopted adopted the following cross-cutting principles of genderofequality, the following cross-cutting principles genderknowledge equality, management. knowledge management.

The direct beneficiaries of the initiatives are twofold: local communities and local institutions concerned with or mandated for development. The indirect beneficiaries include NGOs, private sector and government line department technical staff. All of these beneficiaries benefit from the increase in development opportunities in CHT and from the expansion of their roles and responsibilities in this process.

Intervention Area CHTDF is working in 20 Upazilas in the three hill districts. In Rangamati, it has been working in Rangamati Sadar, Bilaichhari, Barkal, Jurachhari, Baghichhari and Rajasthali. In Bandarban, it has been working in Bandarban Sadar, Thanchi, Ruma, Rowangchari and Lama. In Khagrachhari, it has been working in Khagrachhari Sadar, Panchari, Matiranga, Laxmichhari and Mahalchhari. Newly selected Upazilas include Longadu and Kaptai in Rangamati, Alikadam in Bandarban, and Dighinala in Khagrachhari. The remaining five Upazilas, which could not be included previously due to security and access, will be covered in 2012. These Upazilas are: Kawkhali, Manikchhari, Naikongchhari, Naniachar and Ramgar.

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2

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS AND OUTPUTS

This section delves into the main areas of CHTDF’s contribution to development and peace building in the CHT. Each section begins with the scope and coverage strategy, activities and outputs attained in 2011 from each of seven clusters.

2.1

POLICY ADVOCACY & CONFIDENCE BUILDING

SCOPE AND COVERAGE

2.2

The overall objective of the policy advocacy and confidence building initiative is to facilitate a process for building mutual trust and confidence among the communities, the CHT institutions, the government and the people of Bangladesh. The purpose of this initiative is to provide the CHT communities with an opportunity for socio-economic development in an environment of peace and stability. To meet these ends, the main strategies in 2011 were: • •

Provide opportunities for better consensus and trust among communities; Promote appreciation of cultural diversity and the richness of the CHT culture; Provide social and economic opportunities for development; Promote gender mainstreaming and responsiveness.

and to resolve social issues. The roles and responsibilities of the traditional systems were later specified in the CHT Regulation Act in 1900. Since then, three Circle Chiefs have been collecting annual tax and managing the social and administrative issues. But this traditional system has been neglected over the past decade, which had a negative impact on the CHT customary land and traditional justice administration. To encourage a cultural revival, CHTDF supported the organization of the Rajpunnyah, which allowed traditional leaders to meet with representatives of local government and civil society.

Supporting the traditional administrative system, whereby local people gain access to their cultural and land rights, is perceived to promote peace and to build confidence in the CHT region. Events such as the CHTDF facilitated several forums to discuss policy issues on CHT develop- Rajpunnyah provide an opportunity for the people to consult the ment as well as advocacy to donors for further support to CHT and initiat- traditional leaders (Headman, Karbari) on the land management system ed activities to promote appreciation of cultural diversity. and the revenue generation capacity. Such support encourages an uplift of traditional institutions. • •

ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS Traditional Rajpunnyah Festivals Supported

© Safina Ilias/UNDP Bangladesh

CHTDF supported MoCHTA to organize the first high profile visit to CHT (Bandarban) to discuss CHT related issues to be included in the national Rajpunnyah (annual tax collection system), the most important traditional system in the CHT, was introduced during the British colonial period to collect the Jum Tax from the Jumia, to maintain land ownership

Policy Dialogue for Prioritizing Development Needs of the CHT CHTDF supported MoCHTA to organize the first high profile visit to CHT (Bandarban) to discuss CHT related issues to be included in the national Five Year Plan. The resulting workshop documented and shared issues with the Government Planning Commission, to be used in preparing the next Five Year

Bohmong Circle Chief, Raja Aung Shwe Prue Chaudhury, collecting gifts and taxes for Bohmong Rajpunyah

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Plan of the Bangladesh. MoCHTA involved all relevant stakeholders from HDCs, RCs, Circle Chiefs, NGOs, government line departments, Parliamentary Standing Committee and Planning Commission. This was the first time that an event brought all of the key CHT stakeholders together, including more than 200 participants from the three hill districts, with a view to developing a plan for the region.

and male representatives from CHT communities, traditional leaders, government and independent institutions from the CHT participated. The unique bespoke pilot course helped to build capacity of the community leaders.

National Cultural Diversity Festival

© Safina Ilias/UNDP Bangladesh

© Safina Ilias/UNDP Bangladesh

The Cultural Diversity Festival 2011 was held in Dhaka from 4 - 9 December jointly by the Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs (MoCHTA) and CHTDF. It was the fifth edition of an annual event that CHTDF started in 2007 with the main objective to create awareness about the ethnic and cultural diversity in Bangladesh. The festival showcased the performance of 330 artists from 19 different ethnic communities from both the plain land and the hill tracts. In addition to shows and performances, the festival consisted of a handicraft fair and an art exhibition. The stalls displayed traditional fabrics, foods, jewelry, paintings and other products that promoted the work of ethnic entrepreneurs. The Prime Minister of the Government of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh was the festival’s Chief Guest this year. In her inauguration speech, the Prime Minister reiterated the government’s firm commitment to implement the CHT Peace Accord. The Festival was the first major CHT-related event where the Prime Minister publicly committed her Strenghtened Leadership of Community Government to full implementation of the CHT Accord. It provided a Leaders platform for national dialogue on CHT issues. The participation of key CHTDF facilitated a course on “Developing Leadership Qualities of government and local leaders at the festival contributed to creating a more Community Leaders of the CHT Region” where a diverse group of female conducive environment at the national level to engage in resolving the long-standing issues faced by ethnic minorities in the CHT. Participants discuss the next 5 Years Development Plan in the CHT at a workshop held in Bandarban

Honorable State Minister, Mr. Dipankar Talukder and Honorable Minister of Communications and Railways, Mr. Obaidul Kader along with other officials visiting the stalls at “Cultural Diversity Festival 2011”

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Š Safina Ilias/UNDP Bangladesh

Honorable Prime Minister, Sheikh Hasina delivers an inspiring inaugural speech at the 5th Cultural Diversity festival held in Dhaka

The festival was extensively covered by the local and national media. All relevant stakeholders, including representatives from central and local government institutions, civil society organizations and CHT communities were engaged in the national debate on the issues of terminology linked to indigenous/tribal peoples, which was heightened by the festival. It provided the CHT communities and the CHT Peace Accord with greater exposure and recognition.

ministries, and to put the specific demands and needs for development and service delivery in the CHT. TACs on education and agriculture are actively involved in the design of CHT specific sector strategies. TAC meetings allowed MoCHTA, RC and HDCs to take the lead in strategy development and planning, hence in support of the Peace Accord implementation. The inaugural TAC meeting on Decentralization/Local Governance Institutions saw another turning point in the decentralization process for CHT. CHTDF has drafted a proposal for a new funding mechanism where the funds MoCHTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ICT System Improved would flow from HDCs to Unions and Upazila Parishads. It will continue to CHTDF has provided ICT and logistical support to MoCHTA to improve its work closely with MoCHTA for further follow up actions with the relevant information and communications technology system, which enhanced Local Government Divisions. capacity of MoCHTA to accelerate the process of establishing digital Bangladesh. CHTDF also assisted MoCHTA in developing a new website. It has been developed with a standard Open Source Content Management System (CMS), which is widely used by various national and international organizations. The website has since been operational and updated by MoCHTA.

Technical Advisory Committee Formation and Meeting Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) on agriculture, health and education continued their work with the involvement of key stakeholders from the relevant line ministries, Planning Commission, local government, development partners and CHTDF. In addition, in 2011, the TAC on local governance was formed. The TAC meetings were held according to TAC requirements and provided excellent opportunities for CHT institutions to interact with relevant

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2.2

CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT

SCOPE AND COVERAGE The capacity development component of CHTDF aims to enhance the capacity of CHT institutions viz. HDCs, RCs, MoCHTA and traditional leaders to implement the Peace Accord, deliver quality services and support community development. In doing so, it aspires to increase the ownership and sustainability of the CHT development program by providing opportunities to CHT institutions to manage project implementation including monitoring of activities and management of project funds. In order to improve the institutional capacity of CHT institutions, CHTDF focuses on strengthening CHT institutional framework as stated in the Peace Accord, coordinating among CHT institutions, developing human resources for CHT institutions and enhancing their capacity for covering remote areas. CHTDF has introduced the following three new strategies in 2011:

ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS Harmonization of Laws of HDCs and Local Government Institutions As part of capacity building and policy support to MoCHTA, a workshop was organized on Harmonization of Laws of the Hill District Councils (HDCs) and other Local Government Institutions to identify a coordination mechanism amongst HDCs and other local government institutions to minimize overlaps and conflicts and to maximize synergies. However, overlapping issues and policy gaps were identified and necessary reforms and suggestions were compiled in the workshop. The concerned two ministries have agreed to work together for policy reform. The findings and suggestions from the workshop facilitated the drafting of rules and acts for local development in the CHT. CHTDF and government partners have agreed that a delivery modality between HDCs, Union and Upazila Parishads for the implementation of the project can pave the way for a formal governance framework.

(1) CHTDF provides capacity development grants to the CHT institutions to support implementation of institutional multi-year capacity development plans. It has supported the institutions in conducting self-assessments CHTDF will continue to provide technical assistance to Local Government and preparing capacity development plans. Institutions and utilize all available channels with the Government and LCG Working Groups to push for practical harmonization reforms. (2) CHTDF has introduced the strategic intervention of MDG acceleration in order to support development actors in linking results oriented development planning to the MDGs. Capacity Assessment of CHT Institutions

Š Safina Ilias/UNDP Bangladesh

(3) CHTDF has supported MoCHTA, RC and HDCs in initiating development of CHT sector policy strategy. Technical advisory committees are actively involved in the process of strategy development. Guidelines have beendeveloped in order to ensure a harmonized process for strategy development in different sectors.

Inter-Ministerial meetings with Local Government Rural, Development and Cooperatives Ministry brought about an important turning point in capacity building of CHT institutions. An agreement was made to conduct capacity assessments across CHT institutions. MoCHTA, RC, HDCs have already completed their institutional capacity assessment. A total of 12

Workshop on the Harmonization of Laws of the HDCs and other Local Government Institutions held in Rangamati, September 2011

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consultation meetings, attended by 153 participants, were conducted in disputes in the CHT. As a result, implementation of RC activities was HDCs for designing the framework of Capacity Assessments. HDC staffs, strengthened. With improved knowledge, RC members and staff are civil society, line department staff and district based staff contributed to better able to ensure implementation of rights. the process of completing capacity assessments. The process created an opportunity for direct stakeholders of the institutions to participate and to make the leaders of the institutions accountable to stakeholders. The wide circulation of the capacity assessment reports and the public reporting ensured transparency. Committees were formed to follow up on the progress made in implementing the capacity development plans.

Strengthening the CHT Regional Council The CHT Regional Council utilized capacity development support to strengthen its Information Resource Center (IRC), which provided services to an average of 150 visitors in 2011. The IRC gives access to GIS maps of CHT, documents and reports related to CHT natural resource management, information regarding CHT governance, UN documentation and information on NGOs. It contains a directory of CHT based professionals and technical specialists.

© Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tract Affairs, Government of Bangladesh

In addition, in order to strengthen its staff capacity, RC recruited a Social Welfare Officer and an Advocacy Officer and organized a number of training sessions and events to improve RC staff skills and knowledge. A training-cum-retreat was also arranged in Cox’s Bazar for RC staff and RC members which improved knowledge on CHT rules and regulations. With the support from CHTDF, RC organized a seminar on constitutional recognition of indigenous/tribal people, development processes and land

Strengthening Hill District Councils Capacity of HDCs was enhanced with regards to planning and budgeting, tracking delivery, reporting, fair recruitment and procurement processes through a series of training sessions. This has not only supported HDCs in better management of the subjects transferred to them, but also made a stronger base for the transfer of the remaining subjects to HDCs as agreed in the CHT Peace Accord. In 2011, HDCs have successfully managed activities and budget allocation for interventions from $4.2 million in 2010 to US $7.2 million. HDCs utilized the grants received in line with the institutional capacity development plans. The approach of having institutions leading the design and implementation of their own organizational capacity development plans appears to have been successful. The plans are not “blue-print” but include the organizations’ own priorities, activities and achieved results. CHTDF facilitated exchange visits between organizations for sharing experiences and good practices. Some examples of capacity development interventions undertaken by the HDCs in 2011 are described below: (a) Establishment of NGO Coordination Units A permanent desk on NGO Affairs was established within HDCs resulting in enhanced coordination and cooperation among NGOs and HDCs. A reporting system was initiated and implemented. Over 90% of CHTDF partner NGOs submitted their bi-monthly reports and over 80% of partner NGOs attended NGO coordination meetings. Representatives from RC and the DC offices, GoB departments including the Social Welfare Department participated in meetings. Such participation has contributed to improving coordination among the concerned authorities for effective NGO coordination. NGOs and stakeholders consulted the updated information management systems. (b) IT Capacity of HDCs Strengthened The Information Technology Units (ITUs) were strengthened in all the HDCs and websites of the institutions were improved. Staff from the three HDCs as well as local women volunteers received training on basic computer skills. It resulted in acquisition of new skills, which made HDC communications more effective. Follow-up sessions were conducted a month after the training.

Signing ceremony of the transfer of Youth Development Directorate Office to Khagrachari Hill District Council.

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Rangamati HDC focused on establishing and systematizing IT for wider dissemination of regular development activities. The website is used for publicizing information on news and events. HDC members and staff were also provided with official email accounts.

Capacity Development Support to Traditional Leaders

Capacity assessments were carried out in two circle offices, the Mong Circle and the Chakma Circle. Circles and CHTDF agreed that the signed LOAs (c) Project Implementation Management Guidelines would include provisions for the hiring of Finance and Implementation In line with their mandates, HDCs are implementing development projects Officers in order to ensure adequate capacity in managing capacity developin the CHT not only with implementing partners of CHTDF but also with ment grants and in reporting. other international organizations. A challenge in managing these projects is that often it brings additional non-government staff into the HDC In addition, multipurpose community centers were constructed, furnished organizations who are unaware of government rules, and whose project and connected to electricity to assist traditional leaders to carry out their management processes differ from regular government rules. In order to responsibilities. They are being primarily used to keep all official documents have all staff (government and LOA staff) informed of the project and paperwork relating to revenue collection and land registration and to management process, HDCs prepared their own project implementation serve as a meeting place for traditional leaders. The previous system of guidelines. These guidelines refer whenever possible to government rules keeping documents by headmen individually at villages has been replaced and include in exceptional cases project specific rules. These are prepared by the use of MPCCs. with the objective to be used for management of all development projects from international organizations.

CHT Specific Sector Strategies

The Project Implementation Manual is implemented by HDCs to assist in: (a) ensuring accountability and transparency of project implementation, The distinct features of the CHT in terms of geographical conditions, ethnic (b) developing an effective monitoring and reporting system, and (c) and cultural diversity and governance, require CHT-specific sector strategies. Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) on Education, Health, Agriculture providing guidance on all kinds of development projects. and decentralized/local governance institutions provided a platform for (d) Citizen Charter bringing all relevant actors (national and regional) together and to Khagrachari and Rangamati HDCs organized workshops on the support development of sector strategies. The design of sector strategies development of the Citizen Charter with the participation of different has been initiated on education and agriculture. CHTDF played an groups to cover all relevant sectors by the Citizen Charter. As a result of important role in designing strategies to ensure that the principles of the the workshop, the Citizen Charter was developed and subsequently Peace Accord are followed and to strengthen integration of different sector strategies. uploaded to HDC websites. (e) Operational Support A Finance Associate and an Office Assistant were recruited for each of the 3 HDCs. Their recruitment resulted in a smoother operation of accounts and other financial activities.

Targeting Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

CHTDF supported HDCs, Upazila Parishads and Union Parishads on MDG localization and acceleration. A concept paper was developed after reviewing experiences on MDG localization and acceleration in different Capacity Development through Volunteers countries. This was followed by workshops where participants from UN volunteers Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO) volunteers and local CHTDF, HDCs and RC were oriented on MDG assessment and targeting. volunteers (under HDC contract) were jointly engaged in capacity HDCs also organized workshops on MDG localization and acceleration, development support to CHT institutions. Volunteers provided capacity which has contributed to increase awareness among stakeholders on development support to HDCs, Circle Offices and local NGOs in diverse areas MDGs, develop a sense of MDG ownership by different stakeholders and such as management, IT, documentation and organizational development. define a MDG monitoring and evaluation plan. Staffs working at the Khagrachari HDC were provided with English language training conducted by international UNVs and VSO volunteers.

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For the MDG localization process, thematic task force groups were formed at the district level, indicators were selected in the CHT context for the assigned MDGs, a plan of action to collect and analyze information was designed and sources of information were identified. Government district development coordination committees have accepted to have development plans based on evidence, and applying the MDGs for development planning, monitoring and evaluation. The mapping of MDG achievements at District and Upazila level took place and it was agreed that bottlenecks would be identified for selected MDGs.

Anniversary of the CHT Peace Accord Observed The 14th anniversary of the CHT Peace Accord was observed through rallies, processions, seminars and public gatherings throughout the country. A press conference and a public meeting on the present status of implementation of the Peace Accord were organized in Dhaka, Chittagong, Rangamati and Bandarban with participation of ethnic group representatives, national political leaders, human rights activists, academics and journalists. These events raised awareness on the CHT Peace Accord and on the importance of its full implementation.

CASE STUDY: The Benefits of a Multi Purpose Community Center

ŠCharu Bikash Chakma/UNDP Bangladesh

The Multi Purpose Community Center (MPCC) of Maischari is one of 3 MPCCs constructed with CHTDF support at the first phase in 3 Upazilas under the Khagrachhari District. It is very near to Maischari Union market. The location for the MPCC was decided in consultation with all headmen of Mohalchhari Upazila. The headmen association supported the construction of the MPCC by providing land, accommodation for the contractor staff and caretaker during construction time. They also helped the contractor in bringing timber and other materials from the remote areas. An Executive Committee for MPCC has been leading and managing the overall development of the MPCC and it took all the decisions related to MPCC. They are able to easily organize any big gathering /event in the center. The communities are using the MPCC for many purposes. The headmen association and the Karbaries conduct their monthly meeting in this center. The local and national NGOs conduct trainings in the MPCC by paying rent to the committee. The Satellite Clinic Management Committee carries out its clinic activities at the MPCC free of rent.

Health awareness activities taking place at the Maischari Multi Purpose Community Center in Khagrachari

MPCC is playing a vital role in encouraging social cohesion. The community people organize social events (marriage ceremonies, festivals, etc) in the center. The headmen, Karbari and other local communities are greatly benefiting from this center. They have requested CHTDF to build another house in the district level to carry out their activities.

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2.3

GENDER EQUITY

SCOPE AND COVERAGE CHTDF adopts a dual-track approach in promoting gender equity, empowerment and addressing gender issues in CHT. Gender is considered to be both a cross-cutting development issue and an intervention in its own right.

ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS

Opportunities were created for 64 local female graduates to volunteer with CHT institutions and organizations cooperating with CHTDF. The women volunteers attended a learning and experience sharing workshop and annual UNV retreat. They also participated in exchange visits in Cox’s Bazar district including visit to refugee camps. Through these exchange visits, they learnt about various biodiversity conservation projects, grassroots level monitoring, project implementation and poverty alleviation activities.

©Jhuma Dewan/UNDP Bangladesh

The women volunteers are contributing to development sectors through working with CHT institutions and local organizations, and their work is highly appreciated. They are also enhancing their own skills and improving their leadership capacities. 17 women volunteers got better jobs and/or an academic offer following their placements. They have created a network among themselves and played a leading role in organizing various events (e.g. celebrating International Volunteers Day) and promoted volunteerism for peace and development in the CHT.

©UNDP Bangladesh/2011

Women Participation in Development Activities

Inception workshop was organized for women peacemakers where their capacity enhancement needs was identified

Capacity of Women Peacemakers in the CHT The CHT Women as Peacemakers scheme was initiated by CHTDF in 2010 aiming at mainstreaming the ideas and needs of women of the CHT in development and peace building processes through teaching them about negotiation, peace building, advocacy and political affairs. A total of 22 women from various ethnic groups and local Bengali communities from the CHT were selected as potential women peacemakers. An inception workshop was organized for the selected women and identified their capacity enhancement needs. Training sessions were then organized for the women peacemakers.

Women peacemakers presenting self drawn pictures on conflict at their surroundings in a training session for peacemakers in CHT

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The training participants have been followed up and it was observed that the women are applying the acquired knowledge in their daily life and workplace. Most of the women peacemakers revealed that they have applied mediation skills during social arbitration and tips on effective public speaking when needed. Many of the women peacemakers are involved in mainstream politics, some have become Upazila women vice-chairmen, some are Union Parishad members and others are community activists.

Women Organizations Network in the CHT

Formulation of Gender Mainstreaming Policy CHTDF assisted HDCs in drafting the Gender Mainstreaming Policy based on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and on national legislation. The policy is in line with the Bangladesh Constitution and the National Women Development Policy. It relates to mainstreaming women’s participation in socio-economic development and advancing both men and women in local government institutions. Consultation workshops were organized to share and receive feedback on the draft gender policy.

Grant support was provided to the CHT Women Organizations Network (CHTWON) through the HDCs to strengthen advocacy and networking amongst women networks. CHTWON is a peer pressure network that carried out initiatives towards advocacy on women’s rights and elimination of discrimination against women in the CHT. It took a lead role in organizing several advocacy events on the elimination of discriminatory laws. These activities contributed to increase the recognition of women, particularly in rural areas. Through initiatives like exposure visits, members of CHTWON became more committed to advocacy, especially for the women in hard to reach areas inhabited by the smallest ethnic communities. The network managed to strengthen the capacity of comparatively weak and smaller organizations under its umbrella. As a result of the engagement of CHTWON, the women organizations decided that they would work in close collaboration with each other regarding gender based violence in the CHT to avoid duplication of activities and unnecessary use of resources when ensuring effective services to victims affected by gender based violence. CHTWON’s activities have also contributed to sensitization on women’s rights in CHT.

Gender Equity and Women Empowerment Assessments CHTDF conducted workshops, focus group discussions and a questionnaire survey to assess the improvement in gender equity and women empowerment achieved through the community empowerment initiatives in the three hill districts. 126 women leaders of different Para Nari Development Groups (PNDGs) from various ethnic groups participated in these workshops. The assessment was useful in providing an overview of the achievements of CHTDF in relation to gender equality and women’s empowerment. It was found that through the PNDGs, women have increased opportunities to gain skills in project management, achieved greater access to information and the market and have more economic opportunities and are participating more in decision making processes.

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CASE STUDY: CHTWON Evolves As Peer Pressure Network in CHT

Before formation of CHTWON, local organizations lacked unity and there was no practice of information sharing. Currently, CHTWON members are aware of various sources of useful information available to them such as memberships of different women networks around the world, submitCHTWON Central Secretariat in Rangamati ting proposals for funds, etc. Communication among CHTWON members from different districts has been improved. The 22 weakest member Since 2010, CHTWON works as a transformed and independent organizations received organizational capacity enhancement support network in which special committees are taking the lead role in including access to a computer facility. its operations and management. Most of the organizations are now regularly contributing to the monthly membership fees, CHTWON received funds from CHTDF through the Hill District Councils for which ensure the sustainability of the network. New committees implementing Promotion of Women Empowerment and Rights (POWER) have been formed, secretariat is established & functional, Project, which created an opportunity for collaboration with local meetings are held regularly and communication among government institutions on gender mainstreaming. members has grown.

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

Š Rangabi Tanchangya/UNDP Bangladesh

The Chittagong Hill Tracts Women Organizations Network (CHTWON) is a registered network in CHT which engages 48 women organizations of the three hill districts under a common umbrella for ensuring women rights and gender equity since 2008. The aim of the network is to ensure coordination and communication among promising local organizations working towards women empowerment and gender equality in CHT. Most of the members of CHTWON use the network as a platform through which they can solve problems collectively. CHTWON is also useful as it allows well established and advanced local organizations to help new and small organizations to grow and to develop their initiatives.

17


2.4

HEALTH

SCOPE AND COVERAGE

CHTDF continued to adopt a transition strategy for the provision of health services for the population living in the remote areas. This includes improving the system of Community Health Service Workers (CHSW), linking them to Satellite Clinics through the use of mobile medical teams and road and water-based transport services for emergency cases.

Access to improved health services in remote areas of CHT are made available through CHTDF’s health component

© Safina Ilias /UNDP Bangladesh

The objective of the health component of CHTDF is to increase people’s access to quality health care through sustaining and expanding the provision of medical services to the communities and enhancing the capacity of health workers and institutions in CHT. The longer term strategy adopted by CHTDF is aimed at supporting the Government of Bangladesh in its efforts to develop and implement a health plan suitable for CHT.

18 Community Skilled Birth Attendants (CSBA) were operational and assisted in over 94 births in 2011. A total of 32,181 ante-natal care (ANC) services were provided and 167,566 children under-5 years were treated. CHSWs remain the backbone of the health component as they provided 80% of these ANC services.

The implementation of the health component continued with the active participation of HDCs through Letters of Agreement (LoA) signed between the UNDP and HDCs. These LoAs support the implementation of the community based health program in CHT. In accordance with the LoAs, the HDCs are responsible for the recruitment, training, remuneration and supervision of the CHSWs as well as establishing medicine stores 954 CHSWs were operational in the field and provided primary healthcare services including the RDT tests for malaria at the village level. In and the safe disposal of medicine. addition, 80 satellite clinics were functioning and were found to be well accepted by the communities including the most remote areas. In 6 Upazilas where CHTDF managed satellite clinics/mobile teams directly, ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS the responsibility of management was transferred to partner NGOs. The satellite clinics management committees were reformed in 25% clinics and the members received training. Access to Improved Health Services People of the CHT, particularly where government health services are inadequate or not available, are able to receive health services through CHTDF, and their health problems were addressed by the CHSWs and satellite clinics.

© Chandan Robert Rebeiro/UNDP Bangladesh

CHTDF’s health component benefited a population of 489,171 from 103,418 households in un-served or under-served areas across 15 Upazilas. In 2011, 527,078 patient cases were treated, of which, 57% were women. 68% of these patients sought medical treatment from CHSWs while 32% were served by Satellite Clinics. In 2011, more than 11,000 malaria cases were diagnosed and treated by both CHSWs and SCs. The number of malaria cases gradually decreased from 12.8% (2006) to just 2.1%(2011), reflecting a positive decline in the incidence of malaria in the CHT (Table-1).

CHTDF mobile medical team in a training session for mothers

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

18


GRAPH-1

GENDER ANALYSIS OF PATIENT CASES TREATED BY CHSW’S & SATELLITE CLINICS IN 2011

527,058

SATELLITE CLINICS CHSWs

168,244

226,776

59,520

108,724

167,256

191,558

300,282

358,814

TOTAL

Female

Male

All

Table- 1: Annual Patient cases treated (2006 - 2011) YEAR

Total case treated

Malaria Cases treated No.

% of total case treated

42,389

5,460

12.8

2007

136,028

16,648

12.2

2008

205,028

15,105

7.4

2009

42,389

5,460

12.8

2010

136,028

16,648

12.2

2011

205,028

15,105

7.4

Table- 2: ANC service provided and children treated in 2011 Service Providers Satellite clinics CHSWs Total

Children under 5yrs treated

Community Skilled Birth Attendants (CSBAs) work in the most remote areas of the CHT to ensure safe delivery for expecting mothers

©UNDP Bangladesh

2006

ANC service provided

No.

%

No.

%

33,746

20.14

7,772

24.15

133,820

79.86

24,409

75.85

6

100.00

32,181

100.00

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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Health Awareness of Community

transportation facility is available in all the project area. The boat ambulance provides access to referral emergency care to patients living in Awareness on health issues particularly on child health and primary remote areas with no access to road networks. healthcare has been raised through observing national and international health related events, such as the World Health Day where people of different ages and occupations participated. Strengthening Capacity of Health Providers Through CHSWs and satellite clinics, including communities in the most remote areas of the CHT were aware of the health services available to them. 739,250 people had gathered health related knowledge in 54,704 sessions through CHSWs and health promoters of satellite clinics. Health seeking behavior of local communities in the CHT has been improved and more people have searched for treatment for common ailments. The attendance for ante and post-natal services has steadily increased and women have been following up on the vaccination for their children.

Emergency Patients Referral System CHTDF strengthened the linkage of satellite clinics and the network of CHSWs with government health facilities and other specialist medical services. This was accomplished through establishing an effective and efficient referral system. The Emergency Patients Referral Guidelines developed on the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s referral system are also being followed by Female CHSWs and mobile medical teams in referring patients to Government health facilities. The emergency referral system of the satellite clinics worked smoothly and improved throughout the year. In 2011, 591 emergency cases were referred to Upazila health complexes or district hospitals from the CHT districts.

CHTDF continued to strengthen the capacities of CHSWs who received regular training on primary healthcare techniques and, to a lesser extent, on secondary care. A series of seven-day refresher trainings were also organized in the 3 hill districts where 1,044 CHSWs participated in 53 batches. The CHSWs also improved their knowledge and skills by working closely with the staff of mobile clinic teams and satellite clinics located to their nearest assigned paras/villages. By conducting training sessions including refreshers, CHTDF ensured that the quality of healthcare provided to the CHT was continually improved and that CHSWs were able to provide proper health services to the community people.

Health Studies Conducted

A number of studies were conducted that provided an analysis of the needs and impact of the health project. A needs assessment of health services was undertaken attended by 278 participants. A health infrastructure needs assessment and review of health facilities were undertaken with the participation of doctors, development workers, CS office, UH&FPO and RMO. Events were held to evaluate CSBA activities to assess knowledge on delivery, identify field based problems and improving coordination with government line departments. These studies have contributed in capturing the challenges and best practices encountered Speed boat ambulances were procured in 2011 for referral of patients. in the implementation of the health initiative, which can be used as the These ambulances are stationed at various points of Kaptai Lake, so basis for defining a suitable health policy for CHT.

Capacity of HDCs and Partner Organizations

ŠUNDP Bangladesh

Technical support was provided by CHTDF to HDCs and partner NGOs to

Celebrating World Health Day 2011

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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Capacity of HDCs and Partner Organizations

health staff and NGO staff. In order to achieve program coordination at the Upazila level, district health coordination meetings were organized where monthly activities and achievements were reviewed. Quarterly review meetings on health project activities were also held in districts. levels. Several meetings were held to discuss plans on infrastructure support.

Technical support was provided by CHTDF to HDCs and partner NGOs to manage community based health services. A series of different training sessions were organized for staff members of the HDCs and partner organizations. Training sessions covered topics such as GIS, Health Management Information Systems (HMIS), satellite clinic management,and logistic management Medicine management systems was These meetings improved coordination in health service delivery at all introduced in 2011 and reporting files were updated. levels and established linkages among different agencies. They avoided duplication of efforts and ensured well coordinated teamwork. Key The technical support provided to HDC staff strengthened their capacities agreements and decisions were made during the meetings and knowlto manage the health program. The management of satellite clinics edge was shared and updated. improved the mobile teams which were better able to manage mobile clinics and ensure service delivery. CHTDF strengthened the capacity of health service providers and HDCs so that they can provide proper health Establishing Health, Nutrition and services to the communities. Planning system is in place for all HDCs, which monitor the health activities and conduct regular monthly and Population (HNP) Working Group quarterly meetings with all stakeholders. The Tribal Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) Working Group was established and they have been making preparatory steps towards a CHT The training sessions on GIS enabled government staff to analyze the health plan which have gradually been prioritized for action by the Minisdataset using the ArcGIS software. Health reporting is compiled regularly, try of Health and Family Welfare and are included in the Health, Nutrition monthly data is analyzed and findings channelled back into implementa- and Population Sector Development Program (HNPSDP) for approval. tion adjustments where needed. All HMIS Officers in the HDCs manage the database independently. They initiated an informal linkage with the A health proposal from HDCs was submitted to MOHFW for inclusion in Female civil surgeon offices and Deputy Director of Family Planning offices to the HPNSDP (2012- 2016). In response, MOHFW included a separate share monthly data on malaria, ARI and Diarrhea, contraceptive accep- budget line called 'Tribal Health in the CHT' under the Operational Plan tors rate, etc. on Essential Services Delivery under the HNPSDP. A health technical workshop on the formulation of a common implementation policy for health initiatives was held where 28 participants (21 men, 7 women) from the three HDCs actively participated. This technical workshop on development of operation manual and common policy resulted in the formulation of uniform reporting formats. Medical supply to treat common diseases was extended to HDCs and provided to the Medical Store Assistant. Expanding the medicine supply has resulted in the treatment of 23,314 patients in 5 Upazilas.

Improving Coordination of Health Service Delivery A coordinated approach for delivering health services has increased efficiency and avoided duplication of efforts. A coordination mechanism was established and planning at the Upazila or Union levels strengthened. Monthly and quarterly meetings were organized in the three HDCs with the participation of civil surgeons, CHTDF representatives, HDC

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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CASE STUDY: A Successful Ending to a Complicated Delivery Twenty five year old Thiuma Marma lives in the Grokhyong Para under Allekyoung Union of Rowangchori Upazila in Bandarban where her family income is derived from Jhum cultivation. Throughout her pregnancy, she was assessed by a CHTDF Community Based Skilled Birth Attendant (CSBA) where she received ante-natal care. However, serious complications developed during the delivery. The CSBA used her judgment and quickly referred Thiuma to a hospital in Sadar for hospitalization as an emergency patient. Thiuma received emergency referral support from the joint health initiative of the Bandarban HDC and CHTDF through a partner NGO . ŠUNDP Bangladesh

As Thiumaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s condition grew more critical, and the delivery had developed further complications along with signs of fetal distress, the attending CSBA urgently requested the District Medical Officer (DMO) of Bandarban HDC to assist with the delivery. The DMO responded swiftly and coordinated assistance to Thiuma by liaising with all the relevant personnel and focused in particular on finding an anesthetist. That evening, Dr. Aung Tha Loo and his team delivered a healthy boy after an emergency caesarian. Despite the constraints in infrastructure and the risk-benefit considerations that were taken, the health team managed to save the lives of both mother and child.

Thuima Marma and her newborn son

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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2.5

EDUCATION

SCOPE AND COVERAGE The objective of the education component of CHTDF is to establish and promote access to quality primary education in the CHT. Effective lobbying for policy change at all levels to support the strengthening of basic education provision in the CHT continues to be a priority. One of the project strategies is to strengthen community based schools and link them to government systems, and to generally improve community involvement in school management. The following strategies have been implemented: • • Improving Improvingaccess accesstotoeducation education through the construction of new school buildings, improvingimproving the quality school of buildings, increasing school buildings, theofquality school buildings, numbers increasing of teachersnumbers and theiroftraining; teachers and their training; • • Improving Improvingquality qualityofofeducation educationthereby therebyenhancing enhancingchildren’s children’s learning, reducing repetition and drop-out learning, reducing repetition and drop-out rates; rates; • Improving relevance by using languages of local ethnic • Improving relevance by using languages of local ethnic communicommunities and culturally sensitive curriculum; ties and curriculum;strengthening knowledge and • culturally Improvingsensitive management, • Improving management, strengthening knowledgesystem, and capacity capacity of regional and district education and improving planning and management of School Management of regional and district education system, and improving planning and Committees (SMCs) and Mother Groups (MGs) effective management of School Management Committees (SMCs)forand Mother service Groups (MGs) fordelivery; effectiveand service delivery; and • Supporting government • Supporting governmenttotofulfill fulfillits itseducational educationalcommitments commitments theengagement CHT and engagement in policy based advocacy basedexperience. on field to the CHTtoand in policy advocacy on field experience.

were discussed in Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) meetings where relaxation of the school registration process was agreed upon by Ministry of Chittagong Hill Tracts Affairs (MoCHTA), Ministry of Primary and Mass Education (MoPME) and Directorate of Primary Education (DPE) officials. MoCHTA agreed to issue an official letter to MoPME for an immediate amendment of the school registration circular considering special character of the CHT districts. Such an amendment has allowed inspection to schools by Upazila Education Officer (UEO) instead of a mandatory inspection by District Primary Education Officer (DPEO). It has also reduced the minimum required population size (700) for a school catchment area.

Access to Education CHTDF made substantial contributions in providing access to education for 20,000 children in 300 remote schools across 12 Upazilas. Various factors contributed to this - improvements in infrastructure, increasing the number of trained teachers, and better community involvement through SMCs, MGs and PTAs.

© Sukheswar Chakma/UNDP Bangladesh

The improvement in education infrastructure increased access to schools for students living in remote areas of CHT. Previously non-functional schools are now operational by CHTDF with assistance from the HDCs. Eleven school hostels across the 3 districts are operated by HDCs and the CHT Development Board. Grant support has been extended for school CHTDF has been supporting pre-primary and primary education in 12 construction, renovation, registration and for the formulation of developUpazilas of the CHT. The implementation strategies include building up ment plans. In terms of personnel, 581 teachers were financially supportthe capacity of the Hill District Councils to effectively manage primary ed by CHTDF in 2011. education in the CHT and to be able to sustain results in the post project period. The HDCs are responsible for the recruitment, remuneration, training and supervision of teachers as well as for the provision of grants to school management committees (SMCs) for the renovation and construction of school building/classrooms and the implementation of school development plans (SDPs). In addition, HDCs are putting emphasis on school registration for sustainability. A parallel objective, which corresponds to the overall CHDF objective, is to empower these institutions in conformity with the provision of the CHT Peace Accord.

ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS Policy Driven Advocacy A major policy achievement for the Education component of CHTDF is better understanding of, and commitment to, education issues of the CHT among key GoB education officials. As a result, school registration issues

The improvement in educational infrastructure increased access to schools for students in remote areas of CHT

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

23


GRAPH-2

ENROLMENT OF STUDENTS IN THE CHTDF SUPPORTED SCHOOLS (2009-2011)

BOYS

9,286

10,623

8,110

9,095

3,913

4,328

8,241

17,205

TOTAL

19,909

GIRLS

2009

2010

2011

Higher enrolment in schools remains a positive trend in CHT supported The application of child-centered methodologies and Multi Lingual schools. Enrollment increased 16% from last year. With a net enrollment Education correlates to an increase in student enrolment, reduction in rate of 90%, CHTDF is on track towards achieving the target of reaching drop-out rates and improvements in the quality of education. the national average (2008: 97.8%) of gross enrollment. Additionally, 100% of students CHTDF supported schools have access to safe drinking water facilities. The sanitation coverage is about 82% of project schools. Š Chandan Robert Rebeiro/UNDP Bangladesh

Quality of Education The application of a child-centered methodology is a unique feature of CHTDF supported schools. In 2011, teachers used at least one form of child-centered methodology in 65% of CHTDF supported schools. 3,490 teachers (Male-2,252, Female-1,238) received bi-monthly refreshers training on child-friendly methodology. The introduction of mother-tongue based MLE (Multi Lingual Education) in pre-primary levels is another feature of CHTDF supported schools. 44% of schools utilised MLE materials in their curriculum. CHTDF supported schools with a MLE curriculum maintained an attendance rate of 94%. Results show that MLE is beneficial for early childhood development. Moreover, introducing Bangla as a medium of instruction for children during their early stages of primary education has been shown to help in their transition to higher education levels.

Child-centric education in the Multi Lingual Schools supported by CHTDF

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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Teaching Guidelines and Manual Development A Workshop on “Basic Teacher Guide Content Development” was organized with the participation of local government officials and teachers to review, share, and receive feedback on the draft Basic Teachers Guide. This document provided guidelines on teaching approaches and ways to incorporate Multi-Lingual Education (MLE) strategies in non MLE schools. In addition, validation workshops were held on the Refresher Training Guide, Monitoring and Mentoring Manual and Head Teachers Manual with the participation of local government officials, LNGO staff and head teachers to share and receive feedback. These workshops continually reinforce and improve teaching techniques and ensure quality education.

workshops, participants shared their challenges, experiences and offered recommendations for future action plans. Community attachment to schools was significantly enhanced and communities have developed a sense of ownership of schools.

Strengthening Education Systems Increased community ownership, active participation of SMCs and MGs (Mother Groups) in developing School Development Plans (SDP), raising community awareness and mobilizing community resources to promote access to quality education have helped in strengthening the education system. 300 schools received SDP grants through the SMCs, which were successfully utilized. Transparency was ensured by publicly displaying the grants allocated to each school.

International Days Observed

© Snaha Kumar Chakma /UNDP Bangladesh

© Sukheswar Chakma/UNDP Bangladesh

SMCs and MGs were very active in organizing meetings to discuss the International commemorative days were observed throughout the year progress of the SDP, teacher attendance and sanitation facilities in schools. with active support from CHTDF. International Mother Language Day was They helped NGOs in organizing community awareness events to persuade observed in February. International Literacy Day was also observed in community leaders and parents to enrol their children in school. The capacity September at district and Upazila level by the HDCs with the theme “Literacy of both SMCs and MGs was further strengthened through regular refresher and Peace”. Child Rights Day was observed in November at the three districts, training support, which helped them in managing school affairs effectively. which generated additional benefits of fostering relationship with government departments. Through the observance of International Days and the associated events in CHT, awareness was raised at all levels on issues related to education and rights of people including youths.

Durhatchara Non Govt. School Managing Committee meets with project staff in Jurachari Upazila of Rangamati International Literacy Day 2011 observed in CHT

Lesson and Experience Sharing Meetings and workshops for sharing lessons and experience were organized at Upazila level with participation of local government authorities, local leaders, NGO, CHTDF, Dstrict Education Experts, local leaders, teachers and SMC representatives (School Management Committees). During the

The training and mentoring sessions along with adequate teaching-learning materials provided by CHTDF have strengthened teacher capacities, ensuring quality education. This process has also improved coordination between HDCs, GoB line departments and civil society groups.

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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CASE STUDY: Mothers Group Strengthened Management of Lamba Para School Lamba Para School was established in 2002 at the Kayang Ghat Union under the remote Mahalchhari Upazila in Khagrachari. Prior to 2002, majority of the children did not have access to education. The Upazila and Union Parishad are only accessible on foot from the Para and the nearest school is 4km away.

However, this changed after formation of Mothers Group (MG) and Parents Teachers Association (PTA), which were supported by CHTDF. As part of community mobilization and empowerment, Zabarang Kalyan Samity (ZKS), provided training to the MG in organizing regular meetings, maintaining documentation and taking initiatives for school activities.

©Zabarang Kalyan Samity

In 2010, the school was selected for BECHT (Basic Education for Chittagong Hill Tracts) under the project activities. The School Management Committee members were unclear about their roles and responsibilities and were not actively participating in school activities and improvements.

Regular Mothers Group meeting to ensure quality education

As a result, more and better school activities took place. Enrolment and attendance in school improved tremendously. MG also took greater care in ensuring a hygienic school environment for the 83 students.

©Zabarang Kalyan Samity

The chairperson of MG, Ms. Chandralata Chakma, stated as “We never thought of being involved in the school activities, but MG has created an opportunity for women to contribute to school activities”.

Mothers Group member Chandralata Chakma helping a student wash his hands

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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2.6

AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY

SCOPE AND COVERAGE The purpose of the agriculture and food security initiative of CHTDF is to improve food security in the CHT by providing agriculture extension services to farmers in remote hill areas and through establishing Farmer Field School (FFS) to train farmers on modern cultivation techniques, increasing productivity and profitability.

ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS Farmers Field Schools Enhance Agricultural Skills and Knowledge

A total of 18 CHT Master Trainers of the 3 HDCs participated in a training of trainers (ToT) on new FFS modules, and they transmitted the new knowledge to Field School Facilitators in the Season Long Learning Venues. Representatives from CHTDF, GoB, HDCs and PNGOs were also trained on the FFS concept, its implementation process and monitoring. As a result, GoB representatives are now better able to monitor FFS and to provide the schools with necessary support. In addition, 976 PDC executives were also oriented on the FFS concept and their roles and responsibilities regarding FFS implementation at Union level. Farmers presented their acquired skills and knowledge during Farmer Field Days organized with the participation of 2,326 community members who were eager to learn about new agricultural technologies. They are now getting benefits from the FFS learning which also helped them to take right decisions.

@ Safina Ilias/UNDP Bangladesh

The program of Farmers Field Schools (FFS), a concept of integrated farm management introduced in the CHT in the last quarter of 2010, gives The Field School Facilitators have become skilled as community level local farmers the opportunity to acquire better skills, express their needs and facilitators who are able to ensure the delivery of improved agricultural access services from government institutions. practices and methods. They have clear understanding on FFS implementation and monitoring process. After receiving the training, field In 2011, 510 FFS were established and are functioning with the assistance level coordination and implementation of FFS activities have been of 510 field school facilitators (FSF) who were trained in a practical learning significantly improved. Field School Facilitators (FSFs) have also become by doing approach which involved field visits to the PDCs. About 8,240 FSF able to perform their regular tasks. PDCs and FSFs are being guided by sessions were conducted this year with an average attendance of 25-27 PNGOs Officials and CHTDF staff effectively. The PDC executives are now farmers per session. The sessions covered various topics related to well aware of FFS implementation process which supports to execute the agriculture, livestock and fisheries, food and nutrition. The facilitators also FFS activities at community level. FFS and ADP Grants of the PDCs are now conducted regular resource mappings, needs assessments and base line being smoothly implemented with the support of the PDC executives. surveys. More coordinated efforts in the PDCs have been evolved after orientation. Community Facilitators from PNGOs and CHTDF are well aware of how to coordinate their activities with FFSs.

Celebrating Farmers Field Day with the local beneficiaries in Matiranga, Khagrachari

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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Developing Community Livestock Workers

@ Safina Ilias/UNDP Bangladesh

Livestock is a sub-sector with potential opportunities for income and livelihood for the communities in CHT. But it had been remained untapped due to inadequate extension services and lack of necessary inputs including vaccination. So, for supporting GoB extension/outreach services, 90 Community Poultry Workers (CPW) and 92 Community Livestock Workers (CLW) were trained by DLS as outreach workers. The CLWs and CPWs are now active in their communities and ensuring livestock vaccination. Linkages were developed with the GoB Department of Livestock Services and pharmaceutical companies and entrepreneurship skills were developed among CPWs and CLWs.

Through Farmer Field Schools, CHTDF helps farmers learn and experiment with new farming techniques such as hand pollination

Improved Functioning of Rice Banks in the Communities

ŠUNDP Bangladesh

The rice banks established prior to 2011 have been running smoothly and operating according to the established guidelines. In addition, 559 rice banks have been established in 2011 totaling 1,228 rice banks functioning in CHT. A total of 1520 community members (Femaleâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;572, Maleâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;948) received training on pest free rice store management, rice preservation techniques and rice bank management. As a result, community members have improved rice banks operation and are maintaining records adequately and properly.

Livestock Vaccination and De-worming at Community Level Community awareness on the importance of cattle vaccination and de-worming was raised through holding 77 campaigns on vaccinations and de-worming in all districts of CHT at Union level in collaboration with the Department of Livestock Services. Such campaigns built awareness among the CHT community people on vaccination and de worming, helped disseminating information and established good linkage amongst GoB line department and community people. Community people actively participated in campaigns to vaccinate and de-worm their cattle and poultry. Such campaigns played a vital role to prevent diseases of cattle, goat and poultry which kept the animal sound, and contributed to decrease economic loss and increasing production. They also became aware of importance of vaccination and de-worming, source of vaccines, preventing mortality rate of poultry & livestock. Networking

Rice Banks help store pest-free rice for the community to use during leaner periods of the year

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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were established where different types of vegetables were grown by utilizing water hyacinths. These vegetable plots have increased possibility of cultivating vegetables by the Kaptai lakeshore inhabitants for household About 4,003 community people (Male-2,000, Female-2,003) became consumption and income generating activities. The farmers who earlier aware of importance of livestock vaccination and de-worming. A total of used water hyacinths as floating beds are now utilizing the biomass of 9,453 animals were vaccinated and 474 were de-wormed and made free water hyacinths after harvesting vegetables in their fruits garden which from Anthrax, Black Quarter, Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD), duck plague, also enhanced environment friendly technique. It has also reduced the use of chemical fertilizer gradually. Pigeon, pox etc.

has also been strengthened amongst community members and service providers including government livestock departments.

Government Research Plots

ŠUNDP Bangladesh

ŠZhantu Chakma/UNDP Bangladesh

There was very limited intervention on adaptive research on Jum crops. Due attention was not given to improve the CHT specific upland rice varieties. Although Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI) has invented 47 rice varieties, most of them are suitable for plain areas. So, The Department of Agricultural Extension (DAE) has tried to establish demonstration plots on a few drought resistant varieties to see the yield in upland. A new variety called Narika (a drought resistant variety of Uganda) has been brought by the Government of Bangladesh and tested in different locations. For investigating the performance of the rice varieties in the CHT context, the HDCs have involved 3 researchers from DAE and BARI to carryout the research with CHTDF support. They have set different trial plots like Narika rice variety with improved cultural practices, local and BRRI rice varieties Vaccination by Community Livestock Workers in Dighinala Upazilla helps with improved & traditional method and other vegetables like Rock Melon communities rear healthy livestock in mixed Jum in separate land. Three research papers have been produced by the 3 HDCs with the key recommendation that better management can Floating Vegetable Plots increase the yield of local rice varieties in Jum field. The researches found Due to the limited area of cultivable land in Rangamati, CHTDF has that Narika yield is good, and the local varieties with improved cultural introduced floating vegetable plots for the first time in the CHT in 2010 in management can give better production. cooperation with the HDC. This year, 244 new floating vegetable plots

Floating vegetable plots introduced by CHTDF in cooperation with HDCs has become one of the notable components under Community Empowerment

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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Government Learning Plots

departments, and they are operating and maintaining the solar based refrigerators CHTDF has provided kit boxes to the trained CLWs, which Fourteen mixed fruits gardens (average size of 3 acres) were established include: Cool Box, Scissor, Forceps, Scalpel with blade, Needle, Vaccinator, in suitable places of 3 hill districts with support from Horticulture Centers Tincture Iodine, Bag, Umbrella, Cap, T-Shirt, Torch Light, Suturing thread of DAE by involving the community people with the objectives of developing ball, Traucar & canula etc. It has helped the Community Livestock Workers model orchard encourage the CHT farmers in developing mixed fruit orchard (CLWs) in the CHT to develop themselves as the local service providers. and ensure quality mother plant and stock plant on different fruit trees. These have enhanced livestock vaccination, de-worming and animal primary health care services. The demonstration plots have been implemented by individual farmers at different PDC areas in 3 hill districts. The garden owners have contributed The intervention has created easy access by Community Poultry Worker their land, labor, cost of fencing, etc. It contains high quality saplings of (CPW) and Community Livestock Worker (CLW) to refrigerator as collection mango, litchi, malta, mandarin, jackfruit, pumelo, cashew nut, sapota, point, CPW and CLW ensured vaccines to cattle among the community lemon, guava, jujube, latkan, hog plum, coffee, banana, papaya, pineapple level, community people are able to save their cattle from diseases and etc. turmeric, ginger, papaya & seasonal vegetables also planted as inter CPWs and CLWs got alternative Income Generating opportunities. crops in the garden. The community people observed plantation techniques during plantation of saplings. Upazila GoB Agriculture Officer and UFSO provided necessary supports. This has helped ensuring quality planting Technical Advisory Committee (Agriculture) materials, increasing fruits production, establishing nursery at Upazila level, creating employment opportunity, diversification of the professional Meeting skill, and exchange of skill, knowledge and experience among the The meting of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) on agriculture was community. successfully held on 24 Oct in Khagrachhari. Before the meeting, the TAC members from MoCHTA, Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Fisheries and Livestock, DG Offices (Agriculture, Livestock, and Fisheries), the CHT Implementation of Area Based Projects Regional Council, Hill District Councils visited the field activities and they Electricity fluctuation is the common phenomena in hill districts and all appreciated CHTDF contribution to the development of CHT. sometimes disruption continues for 2-3 days. So, the Department of Livestock Services in the CHT faced difficulties in maintaining quality of vaccines for livestock. Some vaccines need to be preserved in a certain temperature but vaccines quality deteriorates due to frequent interruption in power supply. Such deterioration contributed to mortality of livestock in CHT in the past. The cold chain is one of the interesting and appropriate interventions from CHTDF to support the Department of Livestock Services (DLS) in developing the cold chain for livestock vaccine preservation across CHT. The cold chain is the system of transporting and storing vaccines with temperature of 35째F (2째C) to 45째F (8째C). It starts operation when vaccines are manufactured, moved through to the distribution center and ended with the local immunization providers. As a part of cold chain development, 28 solar refrigerators were installed at Upazila/Union level of 3 HDCs for improving livestock vaccination facilities. Immediately after installation of the solar based refrigerator for livestock vaccine preservation, contracted companies have provided one day training to the 28 concerned staffs (Veterinary Field Assistant-VFA, Dresser) of Upazila livestock office on handling and maintenance of solar refrigerator. All the trained persons were from the government line

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2.7

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT

SCOPE AND COVERAGE The community empowerment program of CHTDF aims at empowering the CHT communities in managing their affairs for improving socio-economic well-being with the focus on provision of training and technical assistance for communities to acquire business development skills to build sustainable income generating activities. The heart of the development vision and strategy for the CHT is the small-scale self-reliant development at community level. As such, priority is given to activities that empower the people and enable them to take charge of their own development. The training opportunities aim to improve employment rates, stimulate small enterprise, strengthen producer association networks, improve product quality, enhance brand image for the CHT products, extend business linkages and improve market access and other infrastructure. A process of raising consciousness among the people about opportunities, rights and responsibilities in assuming pro-active development roles is included.

QIF enables communities to implement their plans of small scale development initiatives. It also introduces the skills for sourcing and managing resources from other public and private contributors and investors, thereby initiating a self-reliant approach of community-managed resource generation. PDCs operate savings scheme to generate fund as well.

ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS Enhancing Entrepreneurial Skills of PDCs and PNDGs

Training activities were undertaken for Para Development Committees (PDCs) and Para Nari Development Groups (PNDGs) to enable them to serve their communities more effectively. Regular training was imparted on marketing extension and management. The government line departments were involved in technical training where PDCs and PNGOs technical officers received training. GoB representatives were also present during trainings CHTDF organizes communities into CHT local institutions called Para on the FFS concept. This resulted in strengthening coordination mechanisms Development Committees (PDCs) and Para Nari Development Groups with the government. (PNDGs) through which the communities are able to identify their problems and needs. They have also enhanced capacity to resolve issues and PDCs and PNDGs are now more aware of their roles and responsibilities. implement small scale projects at the community level by which they They are better able to identify marketing strategies and to market their build linkages with service providers. The process of community empower- products more efficiently. Community entrepreneurs are gradually becomment is supported by a wide range of partners and facilitators. CHTDF ing more confident of business and seeking additional opportunities. PDCs ensures such support through fielding frontline workers including NGOs, were able to use income from one agricultural activity to invest in another community facilitators and para technicians. It also involves local and business. For instance, the surplus earnings from the fish cultivation project traditional leaders to become more active development agents, primarily in the Dighal Churi PDC of the Aima Chara Union were invested in 2 acres as facilitators of the empowerment process. Support committees (Union of land to be used for mixed fruit gardening. Their capacity to develop and Facilitation Committee and Upazila Advisory Committee) are established implement individual action plans has been strengthened. A training of both at Union and Upazila level that are playing watchdog role at trainers (TOT) module on organizational development for PDCs was also community level. The program mobilizes the traditional leaders, local developed. government institutions and GoB line authorities to ensure the necessary technical supports through which the communities are able to make stronger linkage with the service providers for enabling environment of Gender Sensitization the outreach governance services in CHT. Gender sensitization trainings were organized for PDC members at Union The program enables a broad sharing of development experience among the communities of CHT. This starts from identifying development practices already working well in the CHT and adopting those by others. It gradually enables communities to visit development efforts of each other to assist both technically and organizationally and serves as a means of expanding the program.

level where a total of 1,341 participants (female-644, male-697) attended. The objective was to increase awareness on the importance of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s participation in community development activities. The participants learned about roles of men and women in their society in addition to importance of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s participation in community development activities.

CHTDF provides catalytic funding for small project development through a continuation and expansion of the Quick Impact Fund (QIF). While the

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ŠChandan Robert Rebeiro/UNDP Bangladesh

Gender sensitization training in the field

Capacities of PNGOs

A positive change at community level has been observed through holding these meetings. A total of 3,258 Para Development Committees (PDCs) Overall coordination of activities of the different partner NGOs (PNGOs) and 1,686 Para Nari Development Groups (PNDGs) are active in community was strengthened through holding workshop on NGO coordination. empowerment initiatives. Members of PDC and PNDG are implementing Training session on marketing extension and management has been their projects in a better way. They are holding monthly meeting regularly organized for staffs of PNGOs. The training aimed at enhancing bargaining where decisions are being taken in a participatory approach. Documents and marketing skills of rural producers and to expand their knowledge on are being updated on regular basis. They are maintaining communication product analysis, market assessment and strategy selection. amongst communities and social harmony as well.

ŠChandan Robert Rebeiro/UNDP Bangladesh

Training of trainers (TOT) on entrepreneurship was organized for 20 PNGO staff members (Female-2, Male-18) and a TOT was organized on agro-product processing and value addition where 26 staffs (female- 05, male- 21) participated. Following this training, 73 PNGO staffs (female- 08, male65) were also trained on marketing extension and management of agro-product processing. The training sessions improved the capacities of PNGOs, and staffs are now better able to understand PDC product assessment, product analysis, market assessment and are equipped to develop action plan. They gained knowledge and skills on post harvest handling. They are now better able to facilitate similar types of training sessions in their communities.

Monthly Meeting of PDCs and PNDGs Para Development Committees (PDCs) and Para Nari Development Groups (PNDGs) are now better aware of their roles and responsibilities in undertaking activities. These have been possible due to active participation in regular monthly meetings. PDCs held 35,806 meetings during the reporting period (with male 59%, female 41%) and PNDG held 17,339 meetings. They shared progress of activities, updated documents, prepared future plan and solved their problems.

Para Nari Development Group (PNDG) monitoring progress of women-managed projects

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District, Upazila and Union level Coordination Meeting District Cluster Coordination Meeting (DCCM) with participation of PNGOs and district cluster members has created an excellent forum for sharing progress of CHTDF activities and reviews problems critically. They contributed to chalk-out solutions for further improvement and smoother implementation of CHTDF initiatives. Bi-monthly UzST meeting and quarterly UzAC meetings were held with active participation of staffs from GoB, PNGOs and CHTDF where different GoB line agencies facilitated and provided supports. UnFC monthly meetings were also conducted on regular basis where UnFC, PNGOs and community people participated. The UnFC meetings served as a forum for selection of communities for interventions, giving approval of new projects and monitoring on-going activities. UnFC members held discussion on QIF-PDC, QIF-PNDG, FFS-ADP, Rice Bank project related activities, fund receiving & utilization status and they agreed to provide support for smooth implementation the activities for community people. They ensured accountability and transparency of fund receiving and withdrawal by PDCs and PNDGs and follow up of utilization.

Information on Service Available Disseminated to Communities Information dissemination workshops were organized at union level where community people participated. Representatives from Government and non-Government service providing institutions participated in the workshops. A total of 4,837 persons participated (2489 male and 2348 female) which includes PDCs & PNDGs members, Union Facilitation Committee (UnFC) members, traditional leaders, various NGOs officials, representatives of different banks and relevant GoB officials. Presentations were made on the services available with respective departments/agencies, where the participants were oriented on the services available even at union levels, linkages were strengthened among community people and service providers through face-to-face interaction. They are becoming more aware of various services and facilities offered by the GoB and NGOs agencies. This also built confidence among the community people to have easy access to services.

trainings, which have enabled PDCs and PNDGs to run their activities in a more effective manner. They have also strengthened their linkage among extension service providers. Trained participants shared their learning with community people in regular monthly meetings of PDCs and PNDGs. The community people received technical knowledge and implementation skill in their practical life and helped them in smooth functioning of project activities including income generation.

Financial Management Practices Improved in the Communities Members of PDCs and PNDGs received financial management and basic bookkeeping training held at Upazila level where 8,518 participants (Male-4,673, Female- 3,845) were trained up. They have shared their knowledge with other members of PDCs and PNDGs to replicate. Now, the community people know clearly about the financial management process and the way of updating all financial registers. The trained participants were able to properly maintain records and documents in PDCs and PNDGs. About 88% communities maintained their cash books and 87% maintained savings register properly, and 63% maintained newly introduced general ledger.

Capacity of PNGO Staff Enhanced by Refresher Training on CEP Improvement PNGO staff capacity has been further developed through organizing 3 days refresher basic training on CEP (Community Empowerment Project), its process, role of stakeholder involvement in program implementation and role of PNGO staff in community mobilization and facilitation. A total of 377 staff (Male-260, Female-117) of PDCs and PNDGs attended refresher training sessions on the CEP and enhanced their understanding on basic concept, importance of involvement and role of stakeholder in program implementation and on the role of PNGOs in community mobilization and facilitation. Entrepreneurship training for PDC members and producers was organized to enhance knowledge on cost benefit analysis, business start-up and management and marketing. Trained participants developed action plans for smooth implementation of program and monitoring to keep ongoing activities in right track. PNGO staffs are now better able to conduct day to day activities at the field level more confidently.

Technical Trainings on Livestock Rearing, Fisheries and Agriculture Technical trainings on livestock rearing, fisheries and agriculture have been provided by the Govt. line departments at community level. A total of 22,030 community people (PDC-14,713, PNDG-7,317) received the CHTDF Annual Report 2011

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Community Capital Mobilized through Regular Savings Practice A savings mentality has been developed among the community people and they mobilized savings on regular basis and deposited money to respective bank accounts regularly. As a result, cumulative savings mobilized by the community in three hill districts was USD 610,081 in 2011 while it was USD 489,084 in 2010 registering an increase by 25%. Such increase was found highest in Bandarban (33.44%) followed by Rangamati (22%) and Khagrachhari (21%). The following graph shows the comparison of cumulative saving mobilization in 2010 and 2011 by district. District wise savings mobilized by CHT community (in USD)

GRAPH-3

610,081

GRAPH-1

Up to 2010

ŠSafina Ilias/UNDP Bangladesh

Khagrachhari

246,480

201,962

186,374

489,084

Bandarban

154,309

177,227

132,813

Up to 2011

Rangamati

Institutional Systems of PDCs and PNDGs Enhanced by Practicing Rules The community people became aware of preparing various rules and guidelines for smooth implementation of their activities through participation in different training sessions, orientations and meetings. Different rules/guidelines including Para Development Plan, Fund Management Guideline, General Ledger, Project Management Rules, Meeting Management Rules, Savings Management Rules, etc have been followed by communities themselves with support from community facilitators (CFs). About 84% communities have their Para Development Plan and they were carrying out their activities accordingly. Fund management rules have been developed in 82% communities which support them to manage funds efficiently. About 92% communities have developed project management rules that helped managing projects in an efficient way and 93% have developed savings management rules that supported saving of bigger amount and to grow saving mentality among the community people. About 92% community developed their meeting management rules which supported them to conduct regular meetings properly and effectively. Also 63% community maintained general ledger, and gradually it will be done at all the communities.

Total

Women entrepreneurs even in remote areas have developed a regular savings practice through their interaction with the PNDGs

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Observation of National and International Days

Joint Monitoring Visit Organized to Support Community

In 2011 CHTDF facilitated observation of 6 national and international days, which include International Mother Language Day, International Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, National Independence Day, World Environment Day, World Indigenous Peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Day and National Victory Day. About 176 such events were observed at Union and Upazila levels, where about 12,000 community people have participated along with Union Parishad representatives, traditional leaders, and Upazila administration. Open discussions, sapling distributions, colorful rallies, cultural programs, drawing/quiz competition among the students and traditional sports were organized during these events. The importance of such days was highlighted along with the discussion on themes of days for 2011.

Several monitoring visits were conducted at different levels. The Para Development Committees (PDCs) played key role in overseeing different activities at community level starting from beneficiary selection to implementation. Similarly, Union Facilitation Committees (UnFC) members conducted 380 periodic monitoring visits to see the progress of activities at field level and provided necessary guidance/advice to the communities. UzAC and UzST also jointly organized quarterly meetings to review progress of the initiatives within the Upazila. They conducted 35 monitoring visits to communities to oversee field level activities and provide guidance/support to communities. Besides, government line departments, NGO staffs and CHTDF staffs visited fields and provided necessary support.

The participant especially the community people became aware of different days. For example, on the occasion of world environment day saplings were also distributed and issues of climate change including effect and roles and responsibilities of peoples were discussed for necessary measures. Awareness created among community people had driven them to play advocacy role through motivating other community people for tree plantation. Similarly, observation of the World Indigenous Peoples Day has created opportunity for different communities to gather, interact and discuss on their rights, which has increased diversity among them. People are being sensitized on different issues and rights of women and their roles. Interaction and institutional linkage is being strengthened amongst communities and other stakeholders especially with local leaders and government officials even at Union and Upazila levels through joint celebration of different national days.

Learning Enhanced through Exchange Visit A total of 15 exchange visits were conducted within the CHT where 196 people have been oriented including project staff, GoB officers and community people. It helped participants to observer ongoing activities implemented in other areas and exchange learning. These visits have evolved a strong base for the stakeholders and GoB service providers. The participants gained idea on FFS approach, implementation and other activities of communities for replication in their communities/working areas. As a result of these visits community people are getting support for solving technical problems with a view to better implementation of the activities.

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2.8

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The purpose of the economic development initiative is to increase opportunities for local economic development by supporting small local enterprises, youth employment and livelihood improvement. ŠRipon Chakma, EDFO-SAS

SCOPE AND COVERAGE The Community Empowerment Program formulates and implements relevant, practical and effective local economic development strategies. This strategy aims to increase the household income through diversified options. It also enhances quality improvements of products, which in turn promotes its marketability. CHTDF also strengthens the linkage between communities and service providers such as financial institutions and vocational schools to help them capitalize on economic opportunities of agricultural businesses.

ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS Skills Developed on Agro Product Processing and Alternative Income Options

ŠKhandakar Azizur Rahman/UNDP Bangladesh

In addition to the trainings on entrepreneurship skills, technical training sessions were implemented on mushroom cultivation and honey bee keeping with a view to providing PDCs and PNDGs members with an alternative source of income. The training on mushroom cultivation and processing was attended by 870 people (female - 412, male - 458) and the training on honey been keeping had 433 participants (female-131, male- 302). In addition, 823 PDCs and PNDGs members attended trainings on agro-products (turmeric, banana, pineapple, ginger) processing and value addition. GoB line departments provided technical training on livestock rearing, agriculture and fisheries.

Banana production is preferred as an income generating activity by many CHT communities

Participants were able to reduce damage/wastage and are able to improve their products by applying post harvest handling techniques. The trainings also strengthened the linkages between service providers and community and between community people As a result of the technical support and training provided by CHTDF, honey bee keeping has become a popular income generating activity in CHT. The PDCs are making a profit from bee keeping projects. For instance, the Charikhong PDC has earned BDT 12,000 from selling 20 Kg of honey. Some participants of the training on mushroom cultivation have taken the initiative to start mushroom businesses in their local communities.

CHT Award of Excellence The second Chittagong Hill Tracts Award of Excellence event to promote the CHT producers and artisans was held in March 2011. The event was organised to give incentives to producers to improve the quality of their products and to promote the brand image of the CHT products. A total of 387 products from the three hill districts competed of which 75 products were pre-selected and finally 15 products were selected for best quality and 5 products were for Awards of Excellence. The judges used criteria based on creative innovation, the CHT heritage and marketing.

CHT Award of Excellence is a means of branding and promoting CHT products

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Agro Product Fairs

Weaver Groups Reformed and Trained

Twenty Agro-Product Fairs were organized at Upazila level in three districts where 1,113 individuals including representatives from the GoB and local government institutions. The fairs focused on presenting the variety of the CHT agro-products and on building linkages between producers and buyers. The majority of the stalls at the fairs were run by local women.

Workshops to reform weaver groups were organized at district level with the objective to re-organize weaver groups to include other interested and potential weavers. Separate workshops were also organized for weavers and input traders to establish business linkages and to discuss yarn quality.

The Agro-Product Fairs gave the opportunity for participating producers to exchange opinions and experiences and to receive valuable lessons on techniques and technology viz. high yielding varieties of crops, vegetables and fruits, sources of quality seeds and other improved cultivation techniques.

The workshops served to increase the coverage of the weaver community in the surrounding areas and to expand the involvement of businessmen, producers and buyers from different ethnic communities. Input traders were found committed to providing the weavers a high quality yarn after workshops.

In addition, three types of technical training sessions were organized for weaver group members in 2011 with a view to diversifying existing In addition to the display of fruits and vegetables, technical sessions and production range, to use new materials and to diversify weaving products. demonstrations on new agriculture techniques conducted by experts The first type related to value addition, quality control, costing and pricing from line departments and NGOs. The Department of Agricultural Exten- whereby representatives from weaver groups learned about value addition sion (DAE) demonstrated the techniques of soil testing to producers. and its economic benefits, quality control, cost minimization techniques, HDCs demonstrated laying and broody hen management and artificial use of new materials and price setting. The second training was on accounts pollination techniques. The private sector was also involved in the Fair, and book keeping. The third type of training for weaver groups was on with seed companies and agricultural tools and machinery traders marketing and branding. A total of 125 weaver group members participated in the trainings. offering discounts on certain agricultural equipment.

Weaver group members are now well informed about the opportunities for marketing their products and of the benefits of improving product quality. More group savings bank accounts were initiated and the linkages between stakeholders increased alongside enhanced participatory decision making practices. Weaver Groups continue to hold regular meetings.

ŠUNDP Bangladesh

Strengthening Linkage amongst Financial Service Providers and Entrepreneurs

Agro Product Fair organized in three Hill District Councils in collaboration with Zabarang Kalyan Samity (ZKS) on July 2011 at Dighinala, Khagrachari

Linkage building workshops were organized throughout the year with the participation of producers, PDCs, PNDGs and financial service providers in the three hill districts. The workshops aimed to enhance community access to financial products such as loans, investments and savings accounts. Financial service providers from both the public and private sector attended the workshops. The main focus of the workshops was availability and challenges of providing financial services at the community level. One workshop was targeted at weavers with a view to assisting them in finding suitable sources of capital financing and to establish linkages with micro-finance institutions.

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Financial service providers agreed to cooperate with producers in the process of community loan acquisition. Weaver groups learnt about micro-finance credit access and have opened bank accounts in order to get access to loans. Local organizations decided to include project beneficiaries (particularly weavers) in their micro credit program or to continue with their credit program, when applicable. Also some local NGOs extended their marketing support for weaver groups. As a result, linkages have been developed and community people are now better able to access the financial services provided by microfinance NGOs and commercial banks.

Renovation and Construction of Market Infrastructure

ŠKya Swe Prue Marma/UNDP Bangladesh

Like other services, the access to marketing facilities is quite challenging for the CHT communities than any other parts of Bangladesh. Poor market infrastructures affect the producer community to get fair price for their produces. Based on the findings of the need assessment, construction of market-shed, pathways, stairways, drainage system, toilet facilities were provided in 5 markets and 4 market collection points were established under three hill districts. Market collection points are being managed by nearby market and adjacent community leaders led by the Bazar Chowdhory (appointed position by Bazar Fund of HDCs). These Youth Skill Developed for Employment facilities allowed the producers and traders to run their business even at Generation night and in rainy season without any difficulties. This has accelerated better bargain, increased income, and better services for the communiIn collaboration with three Hill District Councils, 13 unemployed youth ty/consumers. The number of traders has also increased where around (Male-8, Female-5) have been trained on different skills development 16,080 community people and 5,202 traders are enjoying access to areas like tailoring & dress making (41 persons), motor car driving (35 market facilities. persons), automobile technician (35 persons), mobile phone technician (19 persons), motor car driving & auto mobile (20 persons). Participants have also been provided with necessary inputs like sewing machine, tool box, driving license, etc. so that they can start earning either through self employment or being employed by any other organizations based on their technical skills.

Market shed at Dighinala Bazar, after renovations as part of market infrastructure improvements through HDCs

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CASE STUDY: SHIBRANI–BECAME A SELF RELIANT HONEY BEE KEEPER Shibrani Tripura lives in Horidayal Para of Khagrachari Sadar Upazila. She is a widow and her family is one of the poorest in the village. She worked in Jum cultivation but this was not sufficient to meet the financial needs of her family.

At the beginning, Shibrani used to sell honey only in her area but once her production increased, she began selling honey to buyers in Khagrachari. She has been able to save and plans to expand her business and encouraged other villagers to engage in honey bee keeping.

When Shibrani began bee keeping, there were not many people involved in the business and due to lack of quality honey supply in the local market demand for honey was high. At the beginning she faced technical problems but she solved them with the assistance of a partner NGO. Her income has gradually increased and she used her savings to expand the business to 3 honey bee boxes. She earned about Tk. 5,000 in 2011. She also attended a refresher training which helped her to overcome technical problems including collection of queen bees.

©Pulak Chakma/UNDP Bangladesh

Shibrani is an active member of a PDC. In 2009 she was selected by PDC to participate in the training on Honey Bee Keeping supported by CHTDF. She received a bee keeping box and other materials during the training and was highly motivated. She thought that bee keeping could be a potential source of additional earning for her family.

Shibrani, a successful honey bee keeper in Khagrachari

CASE STUDY: BIPULA–INCREASING FAMILY INCOME THROUGH MUSHROOM CULTIVATION Bipula Tanchangya is a member of PDC lives in Rajasthali Upazila of Rangamati District. Her husband, Samiran Tanchangya works in the local government hospital. They have 3 children and were facing difficulties to meet increasing family expenses. Bipula wanted to do something to improve her family’s economic situation as her husband’s income was not sufficient.

In July 2011 she received training on mushroom cultivation from a partner NGO of CHTDF. She also received a loan of Tk. 3,000 (USD $40) from a Headman of her PDC. Using this loan, she started mushroom cultivation with 50 spawns (mushroom seed/packet). She transformed these spawns to straw mushroom packet to increase production. Bipula was able to get a good harvest (15kgs in one month) from her mushroom packets. By selling mushroom at the price of Tk. 200/Kg, she was able to earn Tk. 2,100.

©UNDP Bangladesh

She was encouraged by her initial success and became interested in mushroom cultivation as a source of family income. She plans to establish a new mushroom shade and expand her small business for more contribution to her family income. She is now confident about her success in future.

Bipula Tanchangya helps increase her family income through mushroom cultivation one of the economic development interventions

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CASE STUDY: MAHESHWAR CHAKMA TRANSFORMED HIS SMALL TEA STALL INTO A GROCERY SHOP

©Shantanu Barua/UNDP Bangladesh

Maheshwar Chakma, a 43 year old farmer, lives in a remote village in Bandukbhanga Union. He was the only earning member of his 5 member family and they all lived on a small income from a tea stall in his village. He was not able to support his family and had to take loans of Tk 70,000 from different NGOs. He was facing difficulties in repaying his loan installments.

Maheshwar and Bharati Chakma with their own grocery shop at Charikhang PDC Bandukvangya, Rangamati

As a member of a Para Development Committee, he participated in a three-day training on Basic Entrepreneurship Development in 2009. As a result he became more aware and confident which led him to pursue his dream to establish a shop. In 2011, his wife Bharati Chakma received the same training. Through using skills and knowledge acquired from the training, they expanded the tea stall, which gradually has become a small grocery shop. Within a short time, they began to see profits out of this business. “I received training and my wife also received it. Now we know the correct buying and selling techniques. I go to the district town to purchase goods for sale in our business. On an average our monthly sales proceeds is about Tk 150,000 from which we get a profit of Tk.16,000 to 18,000 per month. This is possible because we work together. My wife also runs the business when I am away”. Maheshwar also set up a 20 watt solar panel from which he earned Tk 50 per day by recharging mobile phones. He has almost repaid his loans after covering all his family’s expenses including the education expenses of his children. Maheshwar and Bharati want to expand their shop and make its roof resistant to heavy rainfall. He has also a plan to take flexible loan for that purpose. They are more confident than the past and also become influential persons in his village. Now he is playing role in social decision making process.

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2.9

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

SCOPE AND COVERAGE

Websites Developed Restructured and Updated

The objective of the knowledge management is to raise awareness and build knowledge on the CHT area and CHTDF activities. For this purpose, CHTDF develops and disseminates knowledge products comprising of CHTDF widely disseminated information on its activities and results on the advocacy, training, communications and education materials. websites of UNDP Country Office and CHTDF. Relevant updated information about CHTDF and CHT were uploaded, which included events, activities, CHT development issues, case studies, jobs and procurement opportunities. The website also contained a photo gallery, photo stories and relevant web ACTIVITIES AND OUTPUTS links.

Oraganizational Development Module A training module on organizational development for PDCs was developed and used during Training of Trainers provided to project staff who in turn trained PDC members. Besides, three concept papers were prepared on MDG Localization and Institutional Capacity Assessment Development Coordination Committee, which helped to clarify concepts and definitions.

CHTDF Newsletter Dissemination

Photographs are an important component of CHTDF’s visibility activities. In 2011, the internal CHTDF photo database was restructured to provide easy access to photos and images to be used in various promotional items and reports. The database mainly contains photographs of official visits to the CHT including visits of the MoCHTA Secretary and GoB officials. The visibility of the CHT culture in wider society was increased through the production and dissemination of promotional items including banners, festoons, posters and leaflets as well as production of a booklet on cultural diversity.

The newsletter, “The Thursday Letter”, was prepared weekly and contained updates on CHTDF activities undertaken each week with results. This newsletter was distributed electronically every Thursday to all project staff, UNDP Country Office senior management, other project managers, and to key CHTDF donors. There were 48 issues published during 2011. However, replacing this weekly newsletter, the monthly newsletter “CHT Development News” has been jointly published by MoCHTA and CHTDF from October 2011 and distributed widely to donors, government partners and other stakeholders in both electronic and hard copies. It features news from CHT and CHTDF.

http://www.chtdf.org/

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3

CHTDF MANAGEMENT

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), through Chittagong Hill Tracts Development Facility (CHTDF), is directly responsible for managing the interventions under the UNDP direct execution modality. As such, UNDP assumes the role of the executing agency, and CHTDF assumes the role of the implementing agency.

Technical Advisory Committees

The activities are managed by CHTDF through its offices in Dhaka and Rangamati with two sub-offices in Bandarban and Khagrachhari. The main tasks for the Dhaka office lie with the long term strategy, program and policy development, donor relations, implementation oversight, and liaison with the UNDP Country Office management. The Rangamati office is fully responsible for the field implementation, which includes operational activities such as financial administration, human resources, logistics, coordination, procurement and disbursements.

The Technical Advisory Committees (TACs) are constituted in order to provide technical assistance to the NSC and to make recommendations on matters relating to design and delivery of sectoral components. TACs have been established for Health, Education and Agriculture. These committees are chaired by the MoCHTA Secretary and comprise members from national and international organizations having technical expertise in the relevant fields, UN agencies, representatives of Regional Council and HDCs. The Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) for Decentralization/ Local Government Institutions to the National Steering Committee was also constituted with the Joint Secretary (Development), MoCHTA as the Chair, CHTDF representative as the Member-Secretary, and other members from Local Govt, Division, GED of the Planning Commission, Regional Council HDCs and EU. The TOR of TAC has been developed. The 1st meeting of this TAC was held on October 12, 2011 to discuss the project components including expected results, cross-cutting issues, present progress and planned activities of this component for 2012 and 2013 were also explained.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE

Director

The Secretary of MoCHTA acts as the national counterpart to the Director of CHTDF. The Director of CHTDF and the Secretary of MoCHTA meet on a regular basis to discuss issues relevant to implementation.

National Steering Committee

The Director of CHTDF has the authority to run the interventions on a day to day basis on behalf of the UNDP and is responsible for the day to day management and making decisions. The Director’s prime responsibility is to ensure that CHTDF produces the results specified in the project document, within the specified time frame and to the required standard of quality. The Director also has delegated authority for the operational aspects of CHTDF viz. administration, finance, human resources and procurement.

The NSC is responsible for overall policy guidance and advice to CHTDF. In order to ensure UNDP accountability, NSC takes decisions that ensure management for development results, best value for money, fairness, integrity and transparency. The NSC also plays a critical role in UNDP commissioned project evaluations assuring the evaluation process and products, and using evaluations for performance improvement, accountability and learning. The NSC plays the roles of ‘Executive’, ‘Senior Supplier’ and ‘Senior Beneficiary’. The Chairman of the NSC is Minister/State Minister/ Senior Management Team Deputy Minister of MoCHTA. The wider membership of the NSC includes re presentatives from other Ministries, the CHT Institutions, and the Donor The Director is supported by the Chiefs of Policies and Confidence Building, Service Delivery, Implementation and Operations in the Senior Managecommunity as Observers. The NSC meets at least once a year. ment Team (SMT). The SMT meets on a monthly basis to review project delivery, monitor the achievement of results, identify project risks and issues and take management decisions as appropriate. It also meets with Project Assurance the middle management (Cluster Leaders and District Managers) once a Project Assurance is the responsibility of each NSC member. The project month to review program operations and discuss delivery issues. The SMT assurance role supports the NSC by carrying out objective and independent is supported by a Project Management Specialist. project oversight and monitoring functions. This role ensures that project management milestones are met and in accordance with the Project Document and agreed Annual Work Plan.

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

42


CHTDF PROJECT MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE National Steering Committee Senior Beneficiary (MoCHTA)

Executive (UNDP)

Project Assurance/Programme Officer (Reporting to UNDP CO)

Senior Supplier (UNDP and Donors)

Techinical Advisory Commitees

Director (reporting to UNDP CD) Team Leader Planning, Monitoring and Reporting

Technical Specialists

Chief Community Empowerment

Chief Policy

Chief Service Delivery

Planning, Monitoring and Reporting To address the need for central planning, monitoring and reporting functions in view of increasing size and complexity of CHTDF, a Planning, Monitoring and Reporting (PMR) Unit has been functioning under the direct supervision of the Director. Additionally, there are designated monitoring and reporting focal persons for each of all components based in the field. They are reportable directly to the relevant Cluster Leader, with a matrix line to the PMR Unit.

IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS UNDP works with a range of different implementing partners including UN and Government agencies (through Letters of Agreement), NGOs and Private Companies (through Service Contract Modalities) and Community Based Organizations (through Memorandum of Understanding and grant modalities). Local governance institutions at Regional, District, Upazila and Union levels, ensure transparency and accountability in decision making.

Regional Coordination Committee The Regional Coordination Committee (RCC) is to be convened at least once in every 4 months, which consists of: Chairman of the Regional

Chief Implementation

Chief Operations

Council (as Chairperson), RC Chief Executive Officer (Member Secretary), representative/focal point of MoCHTA, 3 Chairpersons of the Hill District Councils, 3 Circle Chiefs, RC member from each district, 1 women RC member, representative of CHTDB, representative of the Association of the Union Parishad Chairman, representative of Headmen’s Association, 2 representatives of civil society/women’s/business community, Divisional Forest Officers (3), Superintendents of Police (3) (as observers only), 2 representatives of CHTDF, and 3 Deputy Commissioners of the hill districts. The RCC provides strategic guidance to CHTDF.

District Project Facilitation Committee The District Project Facilitation Committee (DPFC) is convened on a quarterly basis and consists of: Hill District Council Chairman (as Chairperson), HDC Chief Executive Officer (Member Secretary), Deputy Commissioner or his/her representative, 3 HDC Section in Charge, 1 HDC Member, 2 representatives of the Regional Council, concerned Circle Chief/representative, 4 representatives of the line departments of the Government, representative of UP Chairman Association, representative of Headmen’s Association, representative of Women’s Association, 2 representatives of the civil society and private sector and 3 representatives of CHTDF. The DPFC is responsible for the selection of pilot Upazilas and for the oversight and monitoring of field operations.

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

43


Upazila Advisory Committee

Para Nari Development Group (PNDG)

The Upazila Advisory Committee (UzAC) is convened on a quarterly basis and consists of: Elected Upazila Chairman as Chairperson, elected Vice Chairman (as Vice Chairperson), Upazila Nirbahi Officer (as Member Secretary), NGO coordinator for CHTDF program in the Upazila, representatives of the Headman’s Association, representatives of local entrepreneurs/craftsmen, 1-3 opinion/civil society leaders, representatives of women’s organizations, all line departments based in the Upazila and CHTDF staff working in the Upazila.

The Para Nari (women) Development Group is formed with the women of the Para. One female from each household of the Para is a member of the PNDG and all the members elect 3-4 group leaders who receive training on various aspects from CHTDF. The PNDGs members are also members of the PDC and they meet once a month.

The UzAC is responsible for involving all concerned stakeholders in CHTDF activities and for ensuring transparency in the selection of intervention locations and beneficiaries, and quality in the provision of technical support for the implementation of CHTDF activities. The Upazila Support Team which is comprised of technical staff from various Government line departments, and specialist staff from UN agencies and local NGOs, provides technical support to the UzAC.

Union Facilitation Committee The Union Facilitation Committee (UnFC) is convened on a monthly basis, or more frequently as required and consists of: Union Parishad (UP) Chairman (as Chairperson), 2 Community Facilitators (one to serve as Member Secretary), 1 UP Ward Member, 1 Women Ward Member, 2 representatives of Headmen’s Association, 2 representatives of Para Development Committees (PDCs), 1 local entrepreneur/craftsman, 1 school/college teacher, 1 opinion leader and 1 CHTDF staff member. The UnFC is responsible for the selection of Para (communities) and for review and approval of small projects submitted by the Para Development Committees (PDCs).

Para Development Committee The Para Development Committees (PDCs) are the lowest tier of governance. The PDCs are elected by the respective community people, and consists of 1/3 women, 1/3 vulnerable households in the community (as defined by the community), and 1/3 from the remainder of the community. The PDCs mobilize the community for the design and implementation of community projects and are directly responsible for the management of the community bank account and for the proper utilization of grant and community contributions. The PDCs meet monthly to consult with and involve the wider community people in all aspects of local development activity, facilitating participatory planning, budgeting and monitoring.

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

44


4

LESSONS LEARNED AND WAY FORWARD

Policy Advocacy and Confidence Building

Gender

The sustainability of CHTDFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development activities will rely on the implementation of the CHT Peace Accord. Therefore, the main concern is to ensure the implementation of the Accord and to build confidence among CHT communities to promote peace and communal harmony.

HDCs are attempting to promote gender equality through various interventions but they lack systematic approaches/ skills in mainstreaming gender within institutions. A Gender Mainstreaming Policy with detailed guidelines will make them better able to address gender issues. Nonetheless, the lack of elected and accountable representatives to express interest in gender mainstreaming proactively has made effective coordination among HDCs more difficult.

Confidence building activities need to be conducted by civil society. CHTDF will strengthen efforts in designing or adapting a civil society institution or facility to take over enhanced advocacy and confidence building activities. It will also continue working on promoting the building of consensus amongst key stakeholders linked to the implementation of the Peace Accord and to building peace in the CHT. The organisation of high profile events will be encouraged as the 2011 Cultural Diversity Festival demonstrated that these events can drive policy issues forward and generate momentum on addressing the obstacles to Peace Accord implementation.

Capacity Development More capacity building interventions need to be introduced in the areas of coordination, planning, monitoring and policy making to ensure that local partners (local government, NGOs and communities) are able to implement development activities on their own. Over the years the budget allocation for activities through LOAs has been increased significantly. The budget for LOA allocation for HDCs has increased from USD 4.2 m in 2010 to USD 7.2 m in 2011. This reflects the CHTDF strategy of building capacity of CHT institutions and gradually transferring more responsibilities to them. Eventually, it is expected that this will lead to a situation where institutions can take full control of development interventions. However, a review of government rules is required in order to decide on modalities for future development interventions and to make sure that government guidelines are being followed. The coordination between Union and Upazila Parishads, government line departments, HDCs and RC remains a challenge. Linkages have been established for coordination of project activities but more needs to be done for establishing the same level of coordination on overall CHT and development issues. CHT elections remain high on the agenda for CHTDF to provide policy support. CHTDF will advocate more for transparency and accountability in the RC and the HDCS. Acceptance of the need for decentralization among line departments and local government institutions (such as Union and Upazila Parishad) might be the first step in getting greater interest from these institutions in the empowerment of HDCs and RC.

Health The health information system was updated as a result of an improved understanding of data storage systems at grass roots level and the ameliorated monthly data formats. HDCs and NGOs staffs were technically supported by CHTDF and their performance has gradually improved in the management of health service delivery. The challenge is to continue delivering health services to the CHT people, particularly to those living in remote areas without relying on CHTDF assistance. HDCs have submitted a proposal to the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) through MoCHTA seeking to sustain and expand community based health services under the Health, Population and Nutrition Sector Development Program (HPNSDP).

Education More work is necessary to ensure that the requirements for school registration are relaxed. There is some scope for the CHTDF education activities to complement or to be aligned with PEDP-III, under PEDP-III Mainstreaming Inclusive Education component. In this context, CHTDF would support HDCs and MoCHTA to explore opportunities with MoPME for greater alignment with PEDP-III. School Management Committees (SMCs), Mothers Groups (MGs) and Parent Teachers Associations (PTAs) were found very active in most of the 300 project schools. This has resulted in better school management, quality teaching and improved governance. Training on child-friendly teaching-learning methods has helped retention and increase quality education.

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

45


Available child-friendly materials were also found very effective for maintaining quality by practicing activity based child-centered methodology in intensively supported schools that reduced the risks of mingling children of different age-groups. Recruitment of teachers within the community not only reduced the language barriers but also improved school hours by addressing the late arrival and early departure tendency. Classroom materials, teaching aids in the mother-languages of 11 ethnic groups and other materials developed may easily be replicated in other schools. Although teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; leadership and management capacity have been enhanced, they have limited opportunities for continuous professional development. Most of the teachers expressed that they struggle with teaching English and Mathematics effectively.

Finally, it is a challenge to keep in regular touch with program activities especially with those undertaken in some of the Upazilas of Rangamati and Khagrachari where political unrest exists. Proper record keeping is also a challenging task for PDC members who are not literate or less literate. Due to seasonal workload and Jum harvest, the attendance ratio of PDCs/PNDGs is low in regular meetings and awareness sessions. Drop out of PNGOs staff, particularly community facilitators and Technical Officers for Agriculture, has delayed the smooth implementation of planned activities. Ensuring technical support by Government line departments particularly in the remotest areas is also difficult. These are challenges which are consistently proven to be difficult to surmount.

The sustainability of the education component of CHTDF is closely linked to the implementation of the CHT Peace Accord and its provisions for education as a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;transferred subjectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Capacity building of different actors (e.g. community, HDCs and local civil society groups) is required to ensure sustainability. The issue of CHTDF exit and future sustainability of schools was shared with the community people particularly SMCs and MGs and this enabled them to plan ahead. In many schools SMCs and MGs are insisting on school registration to ensure salary support for teachers after withdrawal of CHTDF support.

Community Empowerment, Food Security and Economic Development Information dissemination workshops with PDCs and PNDGs can enhance the community capacity to explore services and resources from different service providers. Linkages amongst line departments and community people have improved because of the involvement of the Government Officers. Regular monitoring visits and appropriate guidance played a key role in supporting grassroots level activities and encouraged community members to implement CHTDF activities. The agro- product fair was successful in strengthening collaboration between Upazila administration, local government bodies, government line departments and community people. The Farmer Field Schools (FFS) facilitated by Field School Facilitators (FSFs) played an important role in training and skill development of farmers. However, the input supply (mushroom spawn, bee box etc.) chain needs to be strengthened to achieve better results. Community funds are being increased through mobilizing savings regularly by the community. Awareness raising sessions have accelerated this process. A better outcome might be achieved for the community if community members reinvest their savings in a group approach.

CHTDF Annual Report 2011

46


ANNEX

47


Annex-0 Financial Summary of CHTDF (January-December 2011)

Annex for Annual Report 2011 of CHTDF

 SL

Cluster / Component

1

Capacity Development

2

Confidence Building

3

Gender

4

Scholarships

5

Natural Resources Management

6

Community Empowerment

2,857,057

7

Economic Development

1,089,751

8

Health

4,164,605

9

Education

2,110,952

10

Agriculture and Food Security

5,890,945

11

Knowledge Management

12

Supporting Local Development

13

Technical Assistance Grand total

Delivery in 2011 (US$) 1,357,844 83,188 194,476 15,596 3,199

54,902 5,419,064 165,422 23,407,001

48


Annex-1.1 Training Conducted in 2011 (Community Empowerment) SL

Organization Participated PDCs, PNDGs

Duration (day) 1

Total 390

Male 204

Female 186

PDC & PNDGs Members

PDCs, PNDGs

1

1,641

847

794

PDCs members, community People

PDCs

2

74

45

29

Members of PDCs

PDCs

2

613

367

246

Community People

PDCs, PNDGs

1

3,936

1,856

2,080

PNGOs staff

PNGOs and CHTDF

3

475

337

138

EC Members of PDCs

PDCs

2

1,401

727

674

Training on PNDG management to PNDG members in new communities Training on financial management and basic bookkeeping to PDC and PNDG members Technical training for PDCs by GoB line departments

EC members of PNDGs

PNDGs

2

470

9

461

PDCs & PNDGs Members

PDCs, PNDGs

2

5,298

2,817

2,481

PDCs & PNDGs members were able to manage their financial register as per guidelines,

PDCs Members

PDCs

1

14,713

8,289

6,424

Technical training for PNDGs by GoB line departments

PNDGs Members

PNDGs

1

6,601

583

6,018

Community people built capacity to explain the modern farming/cultivation system, became more aware of different project i.e. cow rearing, poultry rearing, fish cultivation and participating Women members capacitated to explain the improved technology on cultivation and implemented projects as per learning.

1

Training on gender for members of esta blished PDCs

2

Training on gender for PDC members in old PDCs Training on organization development for members of established PDCs Training on organization development for members of old/ expanded PDCs Technical trainings for established PDCs by GoB line departments

3

4

5

6 7

8

9

10

11

Participants (No.)

Beneficiaries / participants Community People

Training

Refresher training on CEP Basic to Upazila based project staffs Training on PDC management to PDC members in new communities

Outcomes Participants learned about roles of men and women in the society and importance of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s participation in community development activities. Community people and women members became able to explain causes and importance of productive, reproductive and social roles. Improved organizational behavior, developed code of conduct, improved communication with line departments. Participants got clear understanding on organizational development and importance, they were encouraged to develop their own PDCs. Participants gained technical knowledge and skills to implement relevant projects. Effective linkage between service providers and community people strengthened. Community facilitators and Upazila level PNGOs Officials got orientation on CE&ED Clusterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities and understood the Program activities. PDC/PNDGs members were able to explain PDC management based on rules & regulation. They were carrying out their assigned duties and responsibilities as per guidelines. PDCs/PNDGs were being run well in accordance with CE&ED related guidelines. PNDGs members carried out their assigned duties and responsibilities as per guidelines

49


Annex-1.2 Training Conducted in 2011 (Agriculture and Food Security) SL

Training

Beneficiaries / participants

1

Training for Upazila GoB officers on FFS concept, FFS implementation and monitoring

Officials of Upazila GoB line depts.

2

Training for district and Upazila based staffs of CHTDF, HDCs and PNGOs on FFS concept, implementation process and monitoring Orientation for Community Facilitators on FFS concept, implementation process and roles of CF linked with FFS Orientation for PDC executives on FFS concepts & approaches, their roles and responsibilities on FFS implementation Training for PDC members on pest free rice bank management Training on location specific fruits and crops for PNGO technical officers Refreshers training for PNGOs technical officers on pest free rice bank management

Staffs of District & Upazila, CHTDF, HDC & PNGOs.

3

4

5 6 7

Agriculture Extension, Livestock Service and Fisheries departments CHTDF, UNDP, PNGOs, HDCs

Duration (day)

Participants (No.)

3

Total 71

3

Outcomes

Male 68

Female 3

77

65

12

Staffs of CHTDF, HDC and PNGOs were able to monitor and follow up the FFS activity in a more coordinated way with clear understanding on the FFS approach.

Officials of GoB line departments oriented on FFS concept and its implementation process, they became able to monitor FFS and provide necessary support, admitted that FFS is an effective approach for farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learning.

Community Facilitators of PNGOs

PNGOs

1

382

240

142

Community facilitators clearly understood on FFS approach, their role, project coordination mechanism, strong linkages built, implemented FFS in better coordinated way.

PDCs Members

PDCs

1

1,009

561

448

PDCs executive members were able to support FFS/FSF with clear understanding on FFS approach, coordinated efforts strengthened.

PDCs & PNDGs Members

PDCs, PNDGs

2

1,672

1,030

642

PNGOs Technical Officers (Agriculture), Technical OfficersAgriculture, PNGOs

PNGOs

3

473

301

172

PNGOs

2

20

15

5

PDC members clearly understood rice store operation without pests, developed awareness on managing rice bank and became able to run in a better way, kept record properly. PNGOs Technical Officers (Agriculture) gained technological knowledge on production of fruits and management; they conducted similar training more confidently at PDC level. PNGO Technical Officers (Agriculture) gained hands on experience & knowledge on pest free rice store/bank management; they conducted similar training more confidently at PDC level.

HDCs

6

35

18

17

7

182

142

40

3

20

20

0

8

Training for master trainers on rest of the FFS modules

HDCs master trainers

9

Skill development training for CLWs (Community Livestock Workers) Training for PNGO technical officers on livestock rearing

CLWs

10

Organization Participated

PNGOs Technical Officers

  PNGOs

Master trainers trained on Jum cultivation including trial plot set up, fruit tree management, pond preparation, food and nutrition; they conducted similar training at FSF SLL. CLWs oriented on rearing livestock, linkage developed with DLS and medicines companies, entrepreneurship developed. Technical Officers oriented on livestock rearing in CHT context, they properly supported community livestock rearing projects.

50


Annex-1.3 Training conducted in 2011 (Economic Development)

1

Training for weavers on diversified product development

Weavers

2

Training on group management for the weavers groups

Weavers

PNGOs

2

49

0

49

3

Training on Accounts & Book keeping for the weaver group Training on mushroom cultivation & processing to the PDC & PNDGs members Training on honey bee keeping, processing and marketing to the PDC members Training on agro product for PDC members / producers

Weavers

PNGOs

3

76

3

73

PDCs & PNDGs Members

PDCs & PNDGs

4

919

479

440

5

457

314

143

3

847

528

319

4

5

6

Training

Beneficiaries / participants

PDCs and PNDGs Members

PDCs, PNDGs

PDCs & PNDGs Members

Duration (day) 5

Total 150

Participants (No.) Male

Organization Participated PNGOs

SL

Female

Outcomes

4

146

Weaver group members got skill to diversify existing production range, learned dress measurement and using new materials, sewing cloth, and undertaken new projects. Weavers groups were orientated on best practices of group management; developed management rules and practiced in all groups. Weaver groups were oriented on financial management practices, introduced format for record keeping. Community people became self employed, income options increased through mushroom production & marketing. Community people were trained and self employed, income options increased through honey production and marketing. Participants got clear ideas on value chains of products, improved post harvest handling techniques, became capable to reduce wastage and add value and getting reasonable price in local market. Community people became aware of marketing extension and management; got clear idea on price variation, enhanced knowledge on marketing extension. Weaver group members learned aspects of marketing and branding, well informed about the opportunities for marketing and improving quality for adding value. Knowledge enhanced on business idea selection, benefit cost analysis, starting business and management, were introduced with MFIs for properly apply for loan.

7

Training on marketing extension & management for producers

PDCs members

PDCs

4

1,055

638

417

8

Training on marketing and branding for weaver group members

Weaver groups members

4

50

2

48

9

Entrepreneurship training to PDCs members / producers

PDCs members

Tagalog, KMKS, Khagrachari, Bichitola and Haridayal para Bunan Dol PDCs

4

23

23

0

51


Annex-1.4 Training conducted in 2011 (Capacity Development) SL

Training

1

Training on monitoring and evaluation Training on report and case study writing Training on Computer MS Office Basic computer Training

2 3 4 5 6 7

Training on CHT related rules and regulations Training on delegation of financial power Training on capacity assessment

Beneficiaries / participants Local volunteers and staffs

Outcomes

Participants (No.)

KHDC, Mong Circle, PNGOs

Duration (day) 1

Total 13

Male 5

Female 8

Local volunteers and staffs

KHDC, Mong Circle, PNGOs

1

14

4

12

Participants learned preparing monthly report properly.

KHDC, local volunteers, students and youths BHDC staffs, LOA staffs and local volunteers RC Officers and staffs

KHDC, PNGOs

45

60

35

25

BHDC

1

28

14

14

RC

1

45

40

5

RC Officers and staffs

RC

1

39

35

4

Participants learned to operate MS Office, created income generating for youths. Participants acquired computer skills, became able to do daily activities and reporting properly, Officers and staff gathered knowledge of CHT rules and regulations. Knowledge improved, operational activities of RC strengthened.

DMs, PMRO, UC, DCEO, UNV, Administrative officers, EO, program officer, associates, IUNVs, CD, CEP cluster staffs, IUNVs, PMRO of HDC, DMs and Ucs

RC, HDCs, CHTDF

1

38

32

6

Participants understood institutional capacity assessment methodology.

CHTDF and HDCs

1

29

22

7

Participants were oriented on MDG Localization and Acceleration, shared recommendations and suggestions on the thematic task groups and MDG indicators Staffs and focal persons under LoA implementation got skill on financial management issues and expenditure reports. Participants clearly understood the process of using PIM.

Organization Participated

8

Orientation on MDG localization and acceleration

9

ToT on Financial Management

BHDC and LoA based staffs

BHDC

1

30

12

18

10

Training on using project implementation manual (PIM)

KHDC Officials, VSO volunteer and IUNV

KHDC, VSO,UNDP

1

11

11

0

Participants prepared monitoring tools and applied at field level.

52


Annex-1.5 Training Conducted in 2011 (Health) SL

Training

1

Technical support to HDC & NGOs health management system

2

Training on satellite clinic management

3

Training on M&E

4

Malaria training for health staff

5 6

Logistic Management training Training on GIS

7

Basic training

8

Beneficiaries / participants MOs, Nurse, Lab. Technician, Health Promoter, Pharmacist, District & project coordinator, CHSW Trainer MOs, Nurse, Lab. Technician, Health Promoter, Pharmacist, District & project coordinator, CHSW Trainer MOs, Nurse, Lab. Technician, Health Promoter, Pharmacist, District & project coordinator, CHSW, Supervisors Medical Officers, Lab Technicians

Organization Participated

Duration (day)

Total

HDC, NGOs, CHTDF

1

64

RHDC, NGOs

2

RHDC, NGOs

Participants (No.) Male

Female

Outcomes

47

17

Mobile teams became able to manage mobile clinic in better way to provide services, gathered knowledge and updated on malaria diagnosis and treatment.

42

27

15

Participants got ability to manage satellite clinic effectively following prescribed guidelines.

2

70

20

50

Participants became able to perform responsibilities and to submit report and documents.

NGOs, HDC

2

10

8

2

Staffs of Govt. and NGOs

KHDC, NGOs

2

25

21

4

Government and NGO worker and CHTDF staff Newly recruited staff

ALL HDC, CHTDF, RC

5

24

22

2

Participants got experience and efficient on updated malaria diagnosis and treatment. Medicine management system was introduced and the reporting files were updated. Learned GIS application, stated proper use of CHTDF database.

RHDC

2 months

22

Refresher training for CHSW

CHSWs

RHDC

6

344

9

Leadership training

CHSWs

RHDC

5

49

49

10

Refresher training for CSBA

Community CSBAs

KHDC

3

6

6

22

0

344

Participants learnt about primary healthcare, treating communicable diseases (malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea) and safe delivery, strengthened referral process of emergency patients. Participants gathered updated primary healthcare knowledge (e.g. malaria diagnosis and pneumonia treatment). Improved skills and capacity in conducting meeting, workshop CSBA gathered delivery related knowledge and practical experience.

53


Annex-1.6 Training Conducted in 2011 (Education) SL

Training

1

Refreshers training for teachers

2

Training on roles and responsibilities of SMC & MG

3

Orientation on Supervision and Mentoring (M&E & MLE) Orientation for District and Upazila level Primary Education Officers

4

Beneficiaries / participants School teachers

Organization Participated

Participants (No.) Male Female

Duration (day)

Total

Schools, NGOs

2

3,707

2,525

1,272

SMC and MG members

NGPS, GPS, RNGPS

2

1,994

1,318

676

Staffs from HDCs, GoB and LNGOs.

HDC, GoB, LNGOs

4&6

47

43

4

To orient district and Upazila level primary education officers on education project

LG, NG, NGO, CHTDF

1 day

49

42

7

Outcomes Developed clear concepts and became confident of teaching, difficulties solved, planned regular teaching and lesson and followed, seating arrangement developed, cultural events practiced. SMC and MG members understood their roles and responsibilities, become aware of need of sustainability of their schools. Got ideas on M&E and MLE fundamentals, mentoring and supervision, teaching quality enhanced, Participants got clear ideas on CHTDF education project and its implementation

54


Annex-2.1: Workshops/Meetings Organized in 2011 (Community Empowerment and Economic Development) SL

Workshop/ meeting

Objective

Beneficiaries / participants

1

Monthly PDC meeting

PDC members

2

Monthly PNDG meeting

PNDG members

PNDGs

3

Workshop for PNDG groups for Sharing experiences of Project Implementation (Upazila Based) Annual Work Plan (AWP) sharing workshop at district and Upazila level Monthly UnFC meeting

Sharing progress of activities, updating documents, solving problems Raising awareness of roles and responsibilities, sharing progress of activities, updating documents, solving problems. Sharing experience on project implementation by PNDGs, way-out for performance improvement.

Organization participated PDCs

Community people, government officials, local government representatives

Orientation on AWP for staffs and stakeholders, support needed, implementation modalities for proper planning for smooth operation Selection of communities for intervention, sharing progress, resolve problems, approving small projects by PDCs, involving stakeholders.

4

5

Participants (No.)

Duration (day) 1

Total 201328

Male 113261

Female 88067

1

143,161

19,121

124,040

Community savings were collected regularly. QIF withdrawn plan has been developed.

PNDGs, PDCs, Upazila/Union Parishad

1/2

428

72

356

Problems and challenges were discussed, understood success and limitation, found ways to improve self-sufficiency

Project staff, UzAC / UnFC members, LG, GO & NGO.

CHTDF, PNGOs, HDCs, LG, GO & NGO.

2

663

561

102

UnFC Members, NGOs, LG, CHTDF, community people.

UnFC, PNGOs, PDCs,

1

10,947

7,708

3,239

All concerned obtained clear and common understanding of all activities, implementation modalities, developed detailed Upazila plan, UnFC members become aware of activities, provided support required, community selected for rice bank and ADP grants, approved community projects. Coordination and linkage increased. Finalized community selection under periurban, rice bank and ADP grants and FFS. Monitoring visit to be conducted by UzAC at PDC level, ensured coordination. Finalized training plan for community, ensured technical support to PDCs, ensured coordination, community selected for Rice bank, ADP and FFS.

6

Quarterly UzAC meeting

Finalizing selection of communities for intervention, sharing progress, resolving problems, facilitating support for communities.

UzAC Members, NGOs, LG & CHTDF

Upazila Parishad, UnFC and PNGOs

1

1,692

1,318

374

7

Bi-monthly UzST meeting

Sharing progress of activities, coordination of technical supports for PDCs.

UzST Members, NGOs, NG, LG

Union/ Upazila Parishad, Upazila, PNGOs.

1

1,506

1,178

328

Key agreements/ decisions Developed QIF withdrawn plan

55


Duration (day) 1

Total 2,030

Male 1,603

Female 427

Project staff, District Cluster members, NGOs & CHTDF.

CHTDF, PNGOs, HDCs.

1

1,190

1,050

140

Integrating Upazila level technical officersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; findings observations on technical support for communities and ensuring technical services by line departments Coordinating progress of NGO Activities and evaluation

Staff from NG, NGOs & CHTDF

PNGOs, CHTDF

1

172

144

28

Staffs from LG, NG, NGO, CHTDF, HDCs, Women Volunteers

HDCs, DC Office, Social Welfare Dept., NGOs

1

48

43

5

Establishing linkage between service providers and community people

PDC & PNDG members

Union Parishad, Line departments (agriculture, livestock, etc.), PDC

1

4,837

2,489

2,348

GoB line depts. & NGO shared their services to beneficiaries, linkage among PDC members and Service provider strengthened

Discussing on agriculture and food security project, tailoring the national agriculture policy in the CHT context.

MoCHTA, MOFL, MOA, BARC, CHTDF.

CHT/GoB

1

16

14

2

Decided to include issues of CHT specific Agriculture strategy would be major agenda in next TAC meeting. Established better more coordination.

Workshop/ meeting

Objective

Beneficiaries / participants

8

Upazila Coordination Meeting with concerned staff

Sharing progress, sorting problems with solutions, plans for smooth implementation and further improvement

Staffs of Project, NGOs & CHTDF

9

District Cluster Coordination Meeting (DCCM)

Sharing progress and problems, chalking-out solutions, planning for smooth implementation and further improvement.

10

Monthly district coordination meetings (DTCM) of technical staffs

11

Bi-monthly Meeting of District NGO Activities Supervision and Evaluation Committee Information dissemination workshop with service providers and service recipients Six monthly meeting of TACAgriculture

12

13

Participants (No.)

Organization participated CHTDF, PNGOs, HDCs

SL

Key agreements/ decisions Shared progresses, discussed problems/ difficulties, chalked out solutions, planned for future, established well coordination. Shared progresses, discussed, problems/ difficulties faced, chalked out solutions, prepared plans for completing all planned activities on time. As per 2011 plan, all activities are to be delivered timely.

Ensured coordination, evaluated NGO activities.

56


Annex-2.2 Workshops/meetings organized in 2011 (Agriculture and Food Security) SL

Workshop/ meeting

Objective

1

Workshops on reviewing training modules used for PDCs by GoB line departments Monthly District Coordination Meeting (DTCM) of technical staffs

Reviewing existing training modules used by GoB line departments at PDC level for further development

2

3

Cool Chain Development Workshop

Integrating Upazila level technical officersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; findings observations on technical support for communities and ensuring technical services by line departments. Sharing initiatives taken on support to Cold Chain development and vaccinator promotion in the CHT for livestock vaccination.

Beneficiaries / participants Staffs of NG, NGOs & CHTDF

Organization participated DAE, DLS, DOF, PNGOs PDCs, PNDGs.

NG, NGOs & CHTDF

GoB line departs, Tech. officer, private sector, company, UFC, UZAC, CPW, CLW

Participants (No.) Male Female

Duration (day) 1

Total 69

58

11

Decided to increase training duration, follow up plan on training, common module is required to provide training and modify training materials.

All Partners NGOs

1

393

262

131

Decided that all activities of 2011 Plan would be delivered within timeline.

UFC, UzAC, CPW, CLW

1

58

49

9

Key agreements/ decisions

DLS agreed to maintain strong coordination with Local service providers to establish well functioning cold chain for live stock vaccination. Outline done on establish functional cold chain for enhancing community level service providers for animal primary health care.

57


Annex-2.3: Workshops/meetings organized in 2011 (Economic Development)

Total 770

437

333

Weaver groups, MFIs, Banks, BRDB.

1

90

7

83

Weaver group members

Weaver groups

1

488

86

402

Establishing sustainable business relation between input traders and weavers

Weaver group members and input traders

Weaver group

1

92

9

83

Facilitating interaction between producers & service providers, sharing information on modern technologies. Sharing progress of AFSP activities, coordinating technical support for the FFSs

Community people, GO, LG,

PDCs, PNDGs, Union / Upazila Parishad, HDCs CHTDF, PNGO, HDC, GoB line departments

1

1816

720

1096

1

96

86

10

1

98

26

72

Feedback provided, decided to include more producers through wide circulation, to simplify application format to encourage more participation.

1

549

289

260

Exchanged experience and ideas on entrepreneurship. Identified major constraints and clarification on obtaining expected result is. Confidence level increased.

Workshop/ meeting

Objective

Beneficiaries / participants

1

Linkage workshop between financial service providers & producers/ entrepreneurs Linkage workshop between weaver group members & Financial Service Provider at district level Workshop on reformation of existing weaver group at district level

Facilitating linkage between producers, financial service providers for making financial services available. Assisting weavers in finding suitable source of capital, establishing linkage between weavers and MFIs.

PDC members, staffs of MFIs and banks, Weaver group members

Defining objective, vision & mission of weaver groups. Encouraging wide participation of community people.

4

Linkage workshop between weavers and inputs traders at districts level. 30 participants per workshop

5

Agro product Fair at Upazila level in three hill districts.

6

Monthly district coordination meeting (DTCM) of technical staff

7

Bi-monthly Upazila FSF coordination meeting

8

Follow up workshop with CHT Award of Excellence (CHTAE) participants

9

Follow up workshops with trained entrepreneurs

2

3

Sharing progress of AFSP activities, coordinate technical support for the FSFs Sharing Judgesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; feedback on product for CHTAE, sharing learning of program to encourage product quality, improving market and linkage. Sharing status of trained entrepreneurs and exploring types of support required to improve business.

Project staff, line departments

Project staff, Field School Facilitators, line departments

Organization participated PDCs, MFIs, Banks.

Participants (No.) Male Female

Duration (day) 1

SL

Producer/artisans and entrepreneurs of three hill districts

CHTDF, HDC, GoB line departments NGO, CHTDF, PDCs

Trained PDC and PNDG members

PDCs, PNDGs.

Key agreements/ decisions Functional linkage built, producers/ entrepreneurs are aware of constraints and opportunities, identified services accessible for targeted clients. Financial service providers agreed to extend their existing facilities for weaver group. Weavers learnt about financial support. Agreed to extend support to each others. Enhanced linkage, liaison and communication. Agreed to: include more weavers and increasing community coverage, involve different skilled persons in the group, collect savings and open joint bank account, holding regular meeting and sharing of skills. Built good rapport between weaver group and input traders. Participants became aware and learned about the quality aspects of yarns, suggested for solving problem of quality of yarn. Input traders committed to provide quality yarn. Participants exchanged experiences, exhibited variety of products, learned about improved technology, soil tested free of cost, trader offered 20% discount on agricultural tools and equipment. Discussed technical issues on agriculture, livestock and fishery, identified field problems with solutions, enhanced skills of technical officers of PNGOs and able to provide technical supports to communities. FSFs became updated on FFS related issues, discussed problem faced at FFS levels with solution and supports.

58


Annex-2.4: Workshops/meetings organized in 2011 (Education) SL

Workshop/ meeting

Objective

Beneficiaries/ participants

1

Workshop on basic teachers guide for district education officers and teachers. Workshop on refreshers training guide

Sharing draft teachers guide and receive feedback from participants. Identifying and prioritizing appropriate themes for proposed refresher training guide. Sharing draft head teacher training manual and receiving feedbacks from participants. Orientation on basics of advocacy

LG, Teacher

2

3

Workshop on head teachers training manual

4

Advocacy workshop

5

Language committee meeting on multilingual education and teaching learning materials Upazila program coordination meeting

6

Organization participated HDCs, School

Participants (No.)

Duration (day) 1

Total 16

Male 11

Female 5

Key agreements/ decisions Feedback received on draft teachers guide for further modification

LG, NGO, CHTDF, Teacher

HDCs, Carl Bro, ASHIKA, CHTDF, School

1

26

20

6

Appropriate themes for refresher training guide identified and prioritized

LG, NGO, CHTDF, Teacher

HDCs, Carl Bro, ASHIKA, CHTDF, School

1

15

14

1

Feedbacks received on head teacher training manual.

CHTDF, NGO, etc.

CHTDF, NGO, etc.

2

25

18

7

Reviewing MLE materials for child friendly education

Language committee members, CHTDF, NGO, etc.

Language committee members, CHTDF, NGO, etc.

1

16

16

0

Participants got clear ideas about basics of advocacy and identified some advocacy issues. Decided to review MLE materials for child friendly education.

UEO/TO/UPC/CF/ UC and district representatives.

UEO/HDC/CHTDF/ LNGO

1

1,110

897

213

Agreed to report regularly, share updates of joint visits.

DEE, DPC, LTL, UPC, EFS, TO, SE, EO, MO, LV etc.

RHDC, LNGOs, CHTDF etc.

1

476

379

63

Decided for school registration, supply construction, materials, holding joint visits. Decided to collect monthly report collection, construction, teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attendance. Decided to review progress of decisions, activities implementation of SMC, MG and PTA materials

7

District coordination meeting

Strengthening coordination with line dept, LNGO, CHTDF and others Coordination with direct stakeholders of program

8

Teachers coordination meeting

Supporting teachers in school management

HT, TOs, EFS, CF, UPC, District representatives

RHDC, Schools, LNGO, CHTDF etc.

1

2,631

2,230

401

9

Stakeholder meeting (SMC, PT)

SMC and MG executive members of LNGOs

SMC and MG executive members of LNGOs

1

300 School SMC,MG, PTA groups

300 School SMC,PTA groups

300 School MG, PTA groups

10

Stakeholder meeting (GoB, Union/ Upazila Parishad)

Meeting regularly by all SMCs (monthly), MGs (bimonthly) and PTA (quarterly) to ensure smooth implementation of activities Progress sharing, advocacy, strengthening coordination among stakeholders

DPE, HDCs, CHTDF, LNGOs, SMC, Upazila Parishod

1

361

308

53

Progress shared, advocacy and coordination among stakeholders strengthened

11

Learning Sharing Workshop

DPEO, HDC, Councilors, CHTDF, UEO, Educationist, Dev. Activities, President of SMC, Head Teachers SMC, HT, Upz Chairman, Union chairman, Headman, UEO, URC, SMC,PTA, MG, Staffs etc.

HDCs, DPE, LNGOs, CHTDF etc.

2

352

306

46

Lessons learned shared and recommendation made.

Learning sharing, direction for activities sharing and recommendations for better performance

59


Annex-2.5: Workshops/Meetings Organized in 2011 (Health) SL

Workshop/ meeting

Objective

1

District monthly meeting

Coordination with PNGO, HDC, health authorities. CHTDF

2

District health coordination meeting

3

Health coordination meeting

Program coordination with other partners and analysis of monthly activity Updating health activities of CHTDF and technical training of HDC and CHTDF staffs, and the CSBA training

4

District monthly meeting with health authorities and NGOs

5

Quarterly progress review meeting

6

Quarterly coordination meeting

Coordination with all health partners

7

Upazila monthly meeting

Coordination with health authorities & NGOs

Increased linkage with district health authorities and stakeholders, sharing updates, reviewing laps & gaps. Reviewing project implementation status, joint health service delivery, avoiding duplication.

Beneficiaries / participants Representatives of PNGO, HDCs

Organization participated Representative of PNGO, HDC, CHTDF, CS, UH&FPOs

CHSW supervisor, NGO partners, DMO, UC, DHF, DM, CEO, Member

Duration (day)

Participants (No.)

Key agreements/ decisions

1

Total 249

Male 90

Female 159

KHDC, ALAAM, HAMARI, UNDP, Zabarang

1

105

75

30

Staffs of CHTDF, HDCs & NGOs

CHTDF, HDCs & NGOs

1

30

22

8

Civil Surgeon, DDFP, LG, CHTDF representative from district & Upazila, HDC health staff, NGOs.

NG, HDC, CHTDF, NGOs, MoH

1

140

108

31

MoH, CHTDF, PNGOs, District & staff, public representatives & Community leaders, HDC health staff and CHSW representatives Doctors and development workers

NG, HDC, CHTDF, NGOs, SCMC and MoH

1

165

119

46

Progress shared, Infrastructure support formal delivery would be made by Honorable MP.

CS office, UH & FPO, RMO, NGO KHDC

1

50

42

8

Dept. of health, Family Planning, RHDC & Hill Flower.

1

2,453

454

1,999

Health partners decided to work under leadership of HDC. Reporting to be improved through coordination. Decided to make patient referral more effective, timely and complete reporting, treatment of common diseases and ANC-PNC.

NG(UH&FPO), NGO & RHDC (CHSWs, supervisors & Store Assistant)

Decided to ensure better coordination & cooperation, to do performance analysis to monitor progress. Analysis done on activity & achievement, prepared meeting calendar, team work & coordination. Agreed to conduct GIS training and informing the higher authority about CSBA training, discussed the draft budget for joint initiatives in 15 Upazila. Decided to joint field visits, Increasing supportive supervision of CHSWs.

60


Beneficiaries / participants Doctors and development workers

Organization participated CS office, UH &FPO, RMO

Orientation of ArcGIS software and enabling the participants to analyze the project dataset using the ArcGIS at CHT region

All staff from 3 HDCs and CHTDFHealth

Understanding project management cycle and improving skills of monitoring and evaluation process Disseminating AIDS/HIV latest information and advocacy at district level Updating on the CHTDF health component and the status of the HDCs health proposal

SL

Workshop/ meeting

Objective

8

Meeting on infrastructure

Prioritizing the need for ensuring health facilities

9

Workshop on GIS

10

Workshop on project management and evaluation

11

Seminar on world AIDS day 2011

12

TAC-Health Meeting

Duration (day)

Participants (No.)

Key agreements/ decisions

1

Total 35

Male 25

Female 10

CHTDF, KHDC,RHDC and BHDC

5

20

18

2

KHDC health staffs and NGO officials

KHDC, NGOs

1

41

30

11

Enhanced self monitoring of project.

Staff of health department and district offices

Civil surgeon office, DC office, SP officer, Smiling Sun, FPAB, KHDC, NGOs, IMAM Shamity

1

150

50

100

HIV information disseminated

Representatives of MoCHTA, MOHFW, CHTRC, CHTDF, HDCs, UNICEF

MoCHTA, MOHFW, CHTRC, HDCs, UNICEF & CHTDF.

1

26

20

6

KHDC would address priority needs and review need assessment Agreed to use ArcGIS software to analyze projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dataset by districts, workgroup on GIS was formed.

Discussed health component status and HDCs health proposal

61


Annex-2.6: Workshops/Meetings Organized in 2011 (Capacity Development) SL 1 2

3 4

5

6

Workshop/ meeting Orientation on MDG localization Workshop on MDG localization and Acceleration Workshop on capacity development Workshop on self assessment on KHDC capacity building Capacity assessment scoping/ consultation meeting HDCs capacity assessment

7

Capacity assessment report finding sharing

8

NGO coordination workshop Bi-Monthly meeting of district NGO activities supervision & evaluation committee

9

Objective

Beneficiaries / participants

Organization participated

Duration (day)

Total

Participants (No.) Male

Female

Key agreements/ decisions

Giving basic orientation Orientation on MDG localization and acceleration, forming thematic task force Giving orientation

CHTDF staff, HDC and CHT RC staff and VSO GoB Officials, NGOs staffs, KHDC Officials and CHTDF Officials, Chairman, councilors, Journalists, academics, civil society, women leaders CHTDF staff, HDC and CHT RC staff and VSO

CHTDF staff, HDC and CHT RC staff and VSO

1&2

39

28

11

KHDC, CHTDF, BARI, DLO, CS, DAE, DRRO, DSW, DFO, Department of Fishery, BRDB, DPHE, Family Planning Dept, Primary Education Dept, Secondary Education Dept, NGOs CHTDF staff, HDC and CHT RC staff and VSO

1

240

208

31

1

40

28

12

Participants oriented on capacity development

Developing plan for KHDC capacity development

KHDC Key Officials, staffs and LOA component heads

KHDC, CHTDF

1

14

13

1

Decided to prepare a draft report for sharing.

To design CA framework

Officials of Govt., CHTDF, HDC, LNGOs, Elected/Traditional Leaders, Civil Society, HDC Chairman & Councilors, Media people. Officials of HDCs, Line departments, transferred line department officials

Govt., CHTDF, HDC, LNGOs, Civil Society, HDCs, Medias.

1

214

170

44

HDCs, Line Departments, DPHE, Shilpakola Academy, Bazar Fund, Kudra Nrighostir Culture Institutions, Cooperative and Public Library, NGOs, Civil Society. HDC, line departments and CHTDF

1

153

136

17

1

70

58

12

Oriented on concept and objectives of institutional CA, Finalized core issues, developed worksheet, share ideas for design of CA framework. Filled up worksheet questionnaires on core issues, drafted capacity assessment findings report. Feedbacks on CA received and discussed.

1&2

48

43

5

Identifying Capacity development priority needs and strategy Sharing capacity assessment report and getting feedbacks Coordination in a better way Coordinating and reviewing progress of NGO activities

10

Progress monitoring and feedback meeting (local volunteers)

Monitoring local volunteers progress

11

District NGO coordination meeting

Established better coordination with all working NGO in the district.

Chairman, councilors, HDC key staff, line departments, CD team NGOs

All NGOs working in Rangamati district

Representatives from NGOs, RHDC officials

RHDC, DC Office, NGOs, Govt. depts.

1

88

79

9

Local Volunteers (10), National Volunteers (4), CEO, Chairman, DM, Component Head, CEP District Officer, AAO,IUNV, Planning Officer, PNGO Desk, Grants Management Officer NGOs, line Dept, ADM of DC officer, BHDC officials and staff

Local and National Volunteers under Gender Component Fund/CEP

1

24

5

19

NGOs, line Dept, ADM of DC officer, BHDC

1

45

32

13

Participants oriented on MDG Localization Thematic Task Force formed.

Shared Information, strengthen coordination. NGOs agreed to submit report before 7 days of Meeting Date, HDC would coordinate visit of NGOs, NGOs would submit Profile before next meeting, well coordination and holding regular meeting. Volunteersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; concerns shared, addressed daily issues of volunteers, became able to track progress, shared exposure visit, Meeting would be organized more regularly

62


SL

Workshop/ meeting

Objective

Beneficiaries / participants

Organization participated

12

Workshop on agriculture assessment of Khagrachhari District Workshop meeting on project implementation manual of KHDC lead by IUNV Workshop on reporting and monitoring system of KHDC lead by IUNV Workshop on KHDC capacity building and service activities plan Seminar on constitutional recognition of indigenous peoples, development process and land dispute problem and its solutions. Workshop on Citizen Charter

Assessing agriculture situation and analyze SWOT

District Departmentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Heads of Agriculture, Horticulture, BARI, Livestock, Fisheries and NGOs representatives

Preparing a manual

18

Organization development sharing meeting

19

Preparation of CHTRC Citizen Charter

13

14

15

16

17

Duration (day)

Total

Male

Female

Department of Agriculture extension, Livestock, Fishery, BARI, Horticulture, NGOs (TUS, KMKS, ALO) and UNDP

1

12

11

1

Agreed to make a five year agriculture plan.

KHDC Officials, VSO volunteer and IUNV

KHDC, VSO,UNDP

2

12

12

-

IUNV would take lead and component heads to help in finalizing manual.

Preparing an M&E system

KHDC Officials, VSO volunteer and IUNV

KHDC, VSO,UNDP

1

10

9

1

IUNV would take lead and component heads to help in finalizing M&E system.

Preparing a capacity building and service delivery plan

KHDC Officials, VSO volunteer and IUNV

KHDC, VSO,UNDP

1

12

12

0

Decided to organize follow-up meeting. Plan prepared.

Identifying issues, solving land dispute and starting development process of CHT

Civil society representatives, Journalist, Lawyer, Educationalist, NGOs, Cultural Activist, Traditional Leaders

NGOs, HDCs, RC, Journalist association, Circle office, Civil Society.

1

82

60

22

Identified issues, made recommendations made for overcoming land dispute problems, way out for the development process done.

Developing citizen charter for every service departments

All KHDC transferred departments heads

1

22

20

2

All departments head set a date of submitting their citizen charter within timeline.

Sharing draft OD study, finalizing HDCs organogram and participatory planning Identifying citizen charter of CHTRC

Chairman, Councilor, CEO, CHTDF and CD team

Agriculture Extension, Health, Education, Livestock, Fishery, BISIC, Kudra Nrighoshtir Cultural Institute, Family Planning, Public Library, Shilpakala Academy, Social Welfare, Co-operative, Bazar Fund and Horticulture. BHDC and CHTDF

1

9

7

2

HDC has given feedbacks on the study report, planned for the next action.

NGOs, HDCs, RC, Journalist association, Circle office, Civil Society.

1

59

52

7

RC Citizen charter drafted.

Civil society representatives, Journalist, Lawyer, Educationalist, NGO representative, Cultural Activist, Traditional Leaders

Participants (No.)

Key agreements/ decisions

63


Annex-2.7: Workshops/Meetings Organized in 2011 (Gender) SL 1

Workshop/ meeting Yearly retreat and learning sharing workshop of CHT Volunteers

Objective Increasing linkages and information sharing spirit, gathered more knowledge on volunteerism, capturing changes in performance after training.

Beneficiaries / participants

Organization participated

IUNV, NUNVs, local volunteers,

CHTDF, HDCs, PNGOs (CIPD, TAUNGYA, HIMAWANTI, GRAUS, TAZINGDON, KMKS, TUS, EKATA, AKS)

Duration (day)

Total

Participants (No.) Male

Female

Key agreements/ decisions

1

48

1

47

Linkages improved enthusiasm for learning & healthy competition enhanced leadership skills improved, gathered more knowledge on volunteerism.

64


Annex-3 Knowledge Products and Study Reports Completed in 2011 SL

Cluster/Component

Knowledge Product/ Study

Objective

Completion Month

No. of copies disseminated

Outcomes

Training Module on Organizational Development for PDCs Concept Paper on MDG Localization Concept Paper on Institutional Capacity Assessment Concept Paper on Development Coordination Committee Training Module on CEP Basic

To provide ToT to the project staffs to make them capable to impart training to PDCs

Jan

To provide orientation training on CEP Basic to project staffs

April

Result Assessment Study of Agriculture and Food Security Project Training Module on Pest Free Rice Store/Bank Management Training Module on Locations Specific Fruits Cultivation Quarterly Newsletter

To assess the results of the Agriculture and Food Security Project (AFSP)

Sep

To provide technical information for PDCs

June

To provide technical information for the PDCs

June

To share KHDC development

June

To share about KHDC and Khagrachhari district

June

A draft report was prepared.

To share about activities and achievements

June

A draft report was prepared.

1

CE&ED and KM

2

CE&ED and KM

3

CE&ED and KM

4

CE&ED and KM

6

CE&ED

7

CE&ED

8

AFS

9

AFS

10

CD

11

CD

13

CD

The brief Description of KHDC KHDC Annual Report

14

CD

Quarterly News letter

To share KHDC development

Sep

15

CD

Citizen Charter

To share about KHDC services

Sep

16

CD

KHDC website

Sep

17

CD

Quarterly Newsletter

To share about Khagrachhari District and KHDC activities To share about KHDC development

Dec

1000

Published quarterly newsletter regularly;

18

CD

The Brief on KHDC

To share about KHDC

Dec

1000

Distribute to the stakeholders

19

CD

Annual Report 2010

Dec

20

CD

Annual Calendar 2012

21

CD

To share about Khagrachhari District and KHDC activities To know about Khagrachhari district tourist places and its activities To introduce the farmers about new technology on horticulture in hilly areas

To orient/clarify about MDG Localization

March

To orient/clarify about Institutional Capacity Assessment

March

To orient/clarify about Development Coordination Committee

March

Dec

40

Following the module, staff members provided training to the PDCs.

Soft copy

Concerned people acquired knowledge on MDG Localization. Concerned people acquired knowledge on institutional capacity assessment.

Soft copy

Concerned people acquired knowledge on development coordination.

Soft copy

20 Soft Copy 30 30 1,000

1000 1 1

1000 2500

Core facilitators are able to provide training to the respective project staffs of PNGOs at Upazila level efficiently by using the training module Overall progress of the Project is possible to measure with log frame indicators. PNGO-Technical Officers (Agriculture) are able to conduct training by using the training manual profoundly. PNGO-Technical Officers (Agriculture) are able to conduct training by using the training manual profoundly. Published quarterly Newsletter regularly.

Published quarterly news letter regularly. Citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; charter helps to get information about KHDC. Updated information are available about KHDC

Distribute to the stakeholders Distribute to the stakeholders

Modern Technology Dec Distribute to the Farmers for Horticulture in Hilly 5000 Areas(1st Part) *Note: AFS=Agriculture and Food Security; CD=Capacity Development; CE&ED=Community Empowerment and Economic Development, KM=Knowledge Management;

65


Annex for Annual Report 2011 of CHTDF Annex-4.1 LoAs Coordinated in 2011 (CE&zz ED) SL

Implementing Institution

1

Rangamati HDC

2

Bandarban HDC

Purpose of LOA To implement Community Empowerment and Economic Development Program Activities involving RHDC as key stakeholder Same as above

3

Khagrachhari HDC

Same as above

12,39,092

LOA amount (US$) amended LOA 12,39,092

10,84,943

10,84,943

962,416

962,416

LOA amount (US$)

Annex-4.2 LoAs Coordinated in 2011 (Education) SL

LOA Amount (BDT)

LOA Amount Amended

1

Rangamati HDC

Implementing Institution

Implementation of education component of CHTDF in collaboration with HDC

Purpose of LOA

32,522,708

Not Applicable

2

Bandarban HDC

Same as above

33,236,807

Not Applicable

3

Khagrachhari HDC

Same as above

31,937,071

Not Applicable

Annex-4.3 LoAs Coordinated in 2011 (Health) SL

1,054,012

LOA amount (US$) Amended 98,283

Same as above

629,490

62,982

Same as above

651,924

70,953

Implementing Institution

Purpose of LOA

1

Rangamati HDC

Strengthening capacity of HDC to manage health program

8

Bandarban HDC

12

Khagrachhari HDC

LOA amount (US$)

Annex-4.4 LoAs Coordinated in 2011 (Capacity Development) SL 1

Implementing Institution Rangamati HDC

Purpose of LOA Strengthen Capacities of HDCs for decentralized service delivery  Same as above

LOA amount (in BDT)

LOA amount (in BDT) amended

8,727,022

4,732,623

2

Khagrachhari HDC

7,080,824

5,058,298

3

Bandarban HDC

Same as above

6,613,249

4,594,423

4

CHT Regional Council

Same as above

5,500,200

6,250,200

66


Annex -5.1 Grants Provided in 2011 (Community Empowerment and Economic Development) SL

Project/Initiative

Location/Place

Organization/ Community Benefited 559 PDCs

Total Grants (USD) 1,057,461

Beneficiary household (No.) 16,750

1

Rice Bank Grants

20 Upazilas of 3 Hill Districts

2

ADP Grants

20 Upazilas of 3 Hill Districts

484 PDCs & PNDGs

1,690,407

16498

3

FFS input grants

20 Upazilas of 3 Hill Districts

510 FFSs

16,619

11,220

4

QIF Grants to Periurban communities

11 Upazilas of 3 Hill Districts

403 PDCs & PNDGs

1,765,105

18,788

5

QIF Grants to Old PDCs

7 Upazilas of 3 Hill Districts

24 PDCs & PNDGs

35,896

998

6

Grants for Weaver Groups

6 Upazilas in 3 Hill Districts

16 Weaver Groups

43,214

461

7

Area Based Infrastructure Grants

25 Upazilas of 3 Hill Districts

CHT Community

248,946

1557

Key Results Contributed to ensure access to food particularly for the vulnerable and to reduce food insecurity. Small scale agriculture related projects undertaken by PDCs and PNDGs enhanced generation of income and assets Farmer Field School members were able to establish learning plots on agriculture, livestock and fisheries. Small scale community projects undertaken by PDCs and PNDGs on income generating and social issues accelerated integrated development at community level. Small scale community projects undertaken by PDCs and PNDGs on income generating and social issues accelerated integrated development at community level. Small scale weaving related projects undertaken by weaver groups generated income and assets. Community people and traders, suppliers, government line departments have access to markets, irrigation facilities and solar based refrigerators.

67


5.2 Grants Provided in 2011 (Capacity Development) SL 1 2 3

Project/Initiative

Location/Place

Electrification and furniture for new MPCC Electrification and furniture for new MPCC Electrification and furniture for new MPCC

6 Upazila of Rangamati district (Barkal, Naniarchar, Kawkhali, Kaptai, Baghaichari. Rajasthali6) 4 Upazila of Bandarban district (Lama, Alikadam, Thanchi, Naikhyangchari) 5 Upazila of Khagrachhari district (Laxmichari, Manikchari, Ramgarh, Matiranga, Panchari)

Organization/ Community Benefited Traditional leaders

Total Grants (USD)

Beneficiaries (No.)

Key Results

19,943

Stakeholders of Upazilas

Traditional leaders

13,295

Same as above

MPCCs are equipped with required furniture and electricity facilities. Same as above

Traditional leaders

16,619

Same as above

Same as above

5.3 Grants Provided in 2011 (Gender) SL

Project/Initiative

Location/Place

1

Promotion of Women Empowerment and Rights (POWER)

Organization/ Community Benefited Chittagong Hill Tracts Women organizations Network (CHTWON)

3 Hill Districts

Total Grants (USD) 30,000

Beneficiaries (No.) 48 women organizations (both male and female headed local organizations in the CHT. The marginalized/ oppressed section mostly women whose rights are being violated.

Key Results Weaker 19 women organizations of the CHT received IT support (laptops), and linkage & networks with others were enhanced. Advocacy actions have been widely initiated on women rights across the CHT. Common rights on land issues, equal wage rate, and social security of women including marriage registration were claimed collectively and arbitration process has been properly chalked out.

Annex 6.1- Partnership with NGOs in 2011 (Health) SL

District

1

Rangamati

2

Bandarban

3

Khagrachhari

4

Rangamati

5

Bandarban

6

Khagrachhari

NGOs (No.)

Upazilas covered (No.)

1

6

1

5

1

4

1

6

1

5

1

4

Services rendered

Outputs

Contract amount (USD)

Mobilized community

SCMC strengthened

54,536

Same as above

Same as above

42,642

Same as above

Same as above

47,299

Provided satellite clinic services through mobile clinics

Communicable diseases controlled, maternal and child mortality reduced.

311,638

Same as above

Same as above

233,405

Same as above

Same as above

195,202

68


Annex 6.2 Partnerships with NGOs in 2011 (CE&ED) Sl

District

NGOs (No.)

Upazilas covered (No.)

Services rendered

Outputs

Total contract (USD)

21,224 meetings of PDCs & PNDGs, 513 UnFC meeting, 32 UzAC, meeting and 42 UzST meeting Organized, 198 monitoring visit by UnFCUzAC/UzST held, different trainings to PDC and PNDG members provided, various workshops organized.

985,962

18,556 PDC-PNDG meeting, 275 UnFC meeting, 19 UzAC, meeting and 16 UzST meeting organized, 92 monitoring visit by UnFC-UzAC/UzST held, different trainings provided to PDC and PNDG members, various workshops organized. 17,522 PDC-PNDG meeting, 351 UnFC meeting, 24 UzAC, meeting and 35 UzST meeting organized, 125 monitoring visit by UnFC-UzAC/UzST held, different trainings provided to PDC and PNDG members, various workshops organized.

645,320

1

Rangamati

5

8

2

Bandarban

4

6

Organized communities, facilitated meetings of PDC, PNDG & UnFC, provided training and other backstopping support to communities, assisted in providing grants to communities and in accessing services from line departments, monitored PDC and PNDG activities, assisted in establishing Farmers Field School and rice banks, etc. Same as above

3

Khagrachhari

4

6

Same as above

613,370

69


Annex 6.3- Partnership with NGOs in 2011 (Education)

1

District Rangamati

NGOs (No.) 1

Upazilas covered (No.) 4

2

Bandarban

1

4

Same as above

3

Khagrachhari

1

4

Same as above

SL

Services rendered Formed SMCs, Assessed SMCs and MGs, trained SMCs & MGs, Facilitated regular SMC, MG, PTA meetings, Supported development and implementation of SDP, organized dialogue, prepared database on school registration status, developed tools and guidelines for Quarterly Monitoring of SMCs and MGs.

Outputs SMC, MG & PTA formed/reformed in 25 schools, 60 SMCs status assessed, 1000 SMC & MG members trained, 720 SMC members of GPS & RNGPS trained; Refreshers training organized for 500 SMC & MG members, Regular meetings in 160 schools facilitated, SDP developed, reviewed and implemented in 100 schools, 200 community awareness meetings organized, 5 dialogue meetings organized, school registration database and relevant monitoring tools and guidelines developed. 60 SMCs status assessed, 720 SMC members of GPS & RNGPS trained, Refreshers training organized for 500 SMC & MG members, regular meetings in 160 schools facilitated, SDP developed, reviewed and implemented in 100 schools, 200 community awareness meetings and 5 dialogue meetings organized, school registration database and relevant monitoring tools and guidelines developed. 60 SMCs status assessed, 1000 SMC & MG members trained, 720 SMC members of GPS & RNGPS trained, refreshers training organized for 500 SMC & MG members, regular meetings in 160 schools facilitated, SDP developed, reviewed and implemented in 100 schools, 200 community awareness meetings and 5 dialogue meetings organized, school registration database and relevant monitoring tools and guidelines developed.

Total contract (USD) 10,685,050

6,500,201

9,766,850

70


Dhaka Office IDB Bhaban, 7th Floor Agargaon, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka, 1207, Bangladesh Rangamati Field Office Rajbari Road, Rangamati-4500 Bandarban Sub Office House- 149, Ward- 5, Don Bosco High School Road Bandarban Sadar,Bandarban-4600 Khagrachari Sub Office Plot- 82, Milanpur Khagrachari Sadar, Khagrachari-4400


UNDP Annual Report 2011: CHTDF