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INSTITUTE FOR COLLABORATION ON HEALTH, INTERVENTION, AND POLICY

ANNUAL REPORT

FY 21


Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy

Annual Report FY21

July 1, 2020 - June 30, 2021

Prepared by: Grace Morris, MA Deborah Cornman, PhD AnnMarie White Amy Gorin, PhD

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The mission of UConn’s Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP) is to bring together

individuals with diverse scientific, clinical, and methodological expertise and support their evolution into collaborative investigators who conduct innovative interdisciplinary research that impacts public health and well-being.

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MISSION STATEMENT page

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DIRECTOR’S UPDATE

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04

GROWING RESEARCH

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Core Services, Seed Grants, and Fellowships

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INCHIP SCIENCE

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32

page

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RECOGNIZING EXCELLENCE

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page

48

page

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Looking Back, Moving Forward

New Collaborations and Affiliates InCHIP Awards

LECTURE SERIES INCHIP CENTERS & RESEARCH INTEREST GROUPS (RIGs) APPENDIX I

InCHIP Organizational Chart

APPENDIX II

InCHIP-Managed Grants

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DIRECTOR’S UPDATE Dear Colleagues, FY21 has been a challenging year. The evolving pandemic and continued social injustice and political unrest threaten our individual and collective well-being. We have had to adapt our research, teaching, and clinical practices, while simultaneously juggling childcare, educational, and financial disruptions, and managing our concerns for the health of ourselves and our loved ones. It has not been easy. Reflecting on InCHIP’s Progress This was a year of reflection at InCHIP. In preparing our five-year review, we looked back on the Institute’s accomplishments. Since 2015, we have strategically expanded our scientific footprint, bringing on three centers (Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, UConn Center for mHealth and Social Media, and Collaboratory on School and Child Health), and developing eight research interest groups to foster interdisciplinary collaboration. We’ve grown our existing and emerging strengths in key health domains (e.g., food policy and obesity, HIV prevention, child health, substance use, emotional well-being), cross-cutting issues (e.g., intersectionality, self-regulation, health equity, social drivers of health), and methodologies (e.g., communitybased participatory research, digital health, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials). And we have expanded our services by investing in our research development and grants management teams, offering health researchers high quality assistance from the initial formation of an idea to pre- and postaward for funded projects. These collective efforts have proven to be good investments: InCHIP’s external grant portfolio increased by 50% during this period, now totaling $86.1 million, and InCHIP PIs are increasingly

recognized as national and international social and behavioral science leaders in their fields. Looking Forward to InCHIP’s Future Guided by our newly stated vision and values, we charted a path forward with a focused strategic plan centered on: 1) supporting researchers positioned to tackle complex health problems; 2) providing equitable and inclusive lifetransformative research experiences for students and career-transformative experiences for faculty and staff; and 3) disseminating research findings, interventions, methodologies, and scientific expertise to a wide range of audiences. In FY22, we will continue to support strong science that combats pressing public health issues, while balancing our focus between research development and grants management. And we will continue to actively seek partnerships with other campus and community entities with complementary missions; our work with UConn Health’s Health Disparities Institute on their Health Equity Summit this summer is a good example of the power of collaboration.

Principal Investigators Cancer Aging

Gun Violence Prevention eHealth/ mHealth

Interprofessional Healthcare HIV

Obesity

Mind-Body Health

InCHIP Research Interest Groups

Director’s Update

Affiliates

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FY22 will be a year of transition as we navigate the return to campus while still retaining the significant online presence that afforded us greater reach and flexibility. Our team is changing, too. We are welcoming our inaugural InCHIP Faculty Leadership Fellow – Stacey Brown, PhD (Public Health Sciences) – while saying goodbye to our valued team member Steve Jagielo (Director of Administration and Business Services) who is moving on to a wonderful opportunity outside of UConn. We wish them both well in their new roles.

this year. In FY22, I will continue support gender and racial equity, evidence-based strategies, and practical solutions. The pandemic presents us with a critical window to examine longstanding practices in academia and explore how best to teach, learn, research, and grow. Working together at InCHIP and across the university, we can seize this opportunity to create an equitable, inclusive, and innovative research environment.

No doubt, the next few months will be filled with COVID disruptions and challenges to worklife balance. With variants looming, vaccine hesitancy high, and science communication struggling to keep pace, interdisciplinary research informed by social and behavioral science offers tremendous promise. But to reach our full potential, we need to ensure a diverse workforce. The disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on women faculty and faculty of color is a threat to us all, as are existing gender- and race-based salary inequities, and policies that have long favored able-bodied individuals.

Director, InCHIP Professor, Psychological Sciences

As InCHIP Director, one of my responsibilities is to advocate for health researchers at UConn, and COVID-related issues were front and center in the numerous university committees I served on

The Gorin-Stacey family at one of their many meals shared at home during the pandemic. 5

Director’s Update

Warm regards,


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InCHIP VISION ISION

& VALUE STATEMENTS

To improve the health and well-being of individuals, organizations, and communities in Connecticut and beyond by supporting innovative and high-impact interdisciplinary research.

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ALUES

COLLABORATION & INTERDISCIPLINARITY:

Health and well-being – multifaced concepts driven in large part by social factors – can best be addressed through innovative interdisciplinary research. InCHIP values and fosters collaborations with academics, communities, policy makers, and other key stakeholders from around the world to develop innovative, impactful solutions to complex health issues.

DEVELOPMENT & GROWTH:

InCHIP invests in UConn researchers across the continuum of their careers to accelerate their success, with particular focus on mentoring and developing junior investigators as well as women and investigators from underrepresented backgrounds, as they strive toward independent research careers.

DIVERSITY, EQUITY, & INCLUSION:

InCHIP believes that a diversity of backgrounds, cultures, and experiences is essential to the development of solutions to our increasingly diverse, complex, and interconnected world. In addition to fostering the development of behavioral and social science investigators from diverse backgrounds, InCHIP is committed to examining, articulating, and addressing the social drivers of health inequity, including the impact of systemic racism on health, processes, and institutions, and working in partnership with underrepresented communities to improve their health and wellbeing.

HEALTH AS A FUNDAMENTAL HUMAN RIGHT:

InCHIP holds that every person, regardless of their age, gender, racial/ethnic background, socioeconomic status, religion, nationality, disability, or any other status, has the right to live a healthy life. Central to InCHIP’s work is the intrinsic value of human health and well-being.

IMPACT & COMMUNICATION:

Due to its implications for the betterment of human well-being, health research requires dissemination practices that go beyond those of traditional academic scholarship. InCHIP supports the dissemination of research findings and health messages through diverse outlets that reach the public, healthcare providers, policymakers, and other key stakeholders. InCHIP counteracts misinformation by informing, educating, and raising awareness of issues related to its mission and vision.

INNOVATION & CREATIVITY:

Scientific breakthroughs require new approaches and shifts in current research and healthcare paradigms. InCHIP fosters creative interdisciplinary solutions to complex health problems through the use of novel approaches, concepts, and methodologies, and through the development of new interventions.

RESEARCH ETHICS & INTEGRITY:

InCHIP is committed to holding research to the highest standards of practice with minimal risk of adverse or harmful consequences and a larger vision for the potential outcome of research for society. InCHIP believes that research should be reliable, reproducible, and ethically grounded. Director’s Update

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REFLECTING on 2015-2021

As part of our 5-Year Institute Review and strategic planning process, we looked back on InCHIP’s progress since FY15. Notable growth areas include the number of faculty supported, the breadth of departments and units we work with, our external grant portfolio, and the corresponding increase in graduate student funding.

# of pre-tenured InCHIP Principal Investigators

FY15

10

FY21

# of InCHIP Principal Investigators

FY15

46

# of home departments, schools, colleges of InCHIP Principal Investigators

FY15

16

FY21

Distribution of InCHIP Grants by PI’s Home Unit

FY21

131

FY21

30

+88%

Director’s Update

+185%

InCHIP supports investigators from across the university at all stages of their careers.

Allied Health Sciences 26.1%

Pharmacy Practice 2.5 %

Psychological Sciences 23.5%

Kinesiology 1.7%

Human Development & Family Sciences 15.9 %

Nursing 1.7%

InCHIP 12.6%

Nutritional Sciences 1.7%

Agricultural & Resource Economics 7.6%

Communication Sciences 0.8%

Anthropology 2.5 %

Geography 0.8%

Educational Psychology 2.5 %

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+180%

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SINCE FY15, INCHIP’S EXTERNAL GRANT PORTFOLIO HAS INCREASED BY OVER

50%

NOW TOTALING

$86.1 MILLION IN ACTIVE GRANTS 15

Total Costs Per Year Expended on External InCHIP Grants



41

In Millions

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New Awards in FY21

9

6 Direct Costs 

3 Indirect Costs

0

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

2019 2020 2021

Graduate Student Funding 2015-2021 $1.2M

Graduate student support provided through InCHIP grants increased by over 50% from FY15 to FY21

$1.0M $800K $600K $400K $200K

FY15

FY16

FY17

FY18

FY19

FY20

FY21

Director’s Update

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HIV Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity

InCHIP AREAS OF STRENGTH

SelfRegulation and Emotional Well-Being

Social Drivers of Health

Substance Use InCHIP creates and supports health research that informs scientific knowledge, practice, and policies. Over 100 faculty PIs research a range of health domains. Here are a few examples showcasing the breadth of InCHIP research.

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Director’s Update

Research Methods


Several InCHIP PIs design interventions to promote HIV prevention in both domestic and global contexts. This work includes interventions for sexual minority individuals in the southeast United States, mother-daughter dyads in Africa, and exploration of issues such as stigma and adherence.

InCHIP PIs are exploring questions related to obesity and associated behaviors such as the efficacy of peer-based weight loss maintenance approaches, how to leverage digital health interventions, and how to address cancer and cardiovascular disorders through exercise. The Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity contributes to national discussions on food security, food marketing, school wellness, and weight stigma.

InCHIP supports an active porfolio of research examining self-regulation and health outcomes, including the impact of yoga and mindfulness-based approaches and strategies to improve emotional well-being in school settings.

Many InCHIP PIs prioritize research on the social underpinnings of health such as racism and discrimination and environmental determinants of health outcomes.

Several InCHIP PIs focus on alcohol and opioid use within vulnerable populations, such as individuals living with HIV, sexual minorities, and emerging adults. Investigators also examine the biological mechanisms that underlie chronic pain, an experience that often coincides with substance use disorders.

In addition to conducting research on explicit health domains, InCHIP PIs focus on the development of innovative methodologies to synthesize, examine, and address the incredibly complex factors that contribute to human health. Director’s Update

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LOOKING FORWARD:

STRATEGIC GOALS SUPPORT HEALTH RESEARCH

Goal 1: Facilitate and support researchers who are

positioned to nimbly tackle complex health problems.

Goal 2: Provide equitable and inclusive life-

PROVIDE transformative research experiences for students and TRANSFORMATIVE career-transformative experiences for faculty and EXPERIENCES InCHIP staff through mentorship, training, and research opportunities.

Goal 3: Serve as a research engine for UConn

DISSEMINATE RESEARCH FINDINGS

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and Connecticut by disseminating scientific findings, novel interventions and methodologies, health communications and messages, and scientific expertise to academic audiences, external organizations, policy makers, government officials, and the general public.

Director’s Update


GROWING RESEARCH

InCHIP supports the development of health-related research at UConn. This takes several forms, such as providing seed funding to faculty exploring a novel research area, forming new interdisciplinary teams, identifying funding mechanisms and potential collaborators, handling investigators’ pre- and post-award grant needs, and working with investigators to hone their grant writing skills.

Growing Research

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InCHIP’s

CORE SERVICES What are InCHIP’s Research Development Services?

InCHIP’s Research Development Specialist (RDS), Grace Morris, MA, supports UConn researchers through programmatic and direct service-based approaches. Much of that support entails meeting with researchers to define their needs as they transform their research ideas into fundable projects and proposals.

Many external funding opportunities require pilot data to prove project feasibility. InCHIP has an annual Seed Grant Program that can support such research.

InCHIP offers feedback and support to researchers as they transform their idea into a research project. Services include the Grant Proposal Incubator (GPI) and the Community Engagement Studio.

Research Development Services are available to all InCHIP-affiliated investigators across the University. The move to a virtual setting in FY21 allowed for an increase in tailored one-on-one support across campuses: Morris worked with faculty from 16 departments, including seven faculty starting their careers at UConn.

$80K

Awarded in Seed Grants during FY21

COLLECT PILOT DATA

REFINE A QUESTION

DEVELOP AN IDEA

BUILD A TEAM

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New Faculty Research Collaborations brokered during FY21

It all starts with an idea. InCHIP supports research from idea formation through project completion.

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Growing GrowingResearch Research

InCHIP Research Development Services can work with faculty to identify UConn-based investigators and community partners who have the expertise and experience needed to complete a project. New teams can apply for a Rolling Seed Grant to get their team started.


InCHIP's Grant Management Team provides Pre-Award Services to faculty, including assistance with budgets, form submission, just-in-time information, and more.

InCHIP offers grant writing training to faculty through the NIH R-Series Boot Camp. Training is available to grad students via Seth Kalichman’s course on NIH grant writing.

131

7

Grant submissions during FY21

Faculty participants in the FY21 Bootcamp

WRITE A GRANT

SUBMIT A GRANT

RECEIVE FEEDBACK

FIND FUNDING

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119

Individualized funding searches completed during FY21

InCHIP Research Development Services can also help faculty identify External Funding Opportunities for their research.

MANAGE A GRANT Grants managed during FY21

Prior to submission, InCHIP can organize an internal review of a grant proposal or can arrange and fund an External Grant Review.

If a grant is awarded, InCHIP’s Grant Management Team provides Post-Award Services including account set-up, travel, purchasing, and human resources.

GrowingResearch Research Growing

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SEED GRANTS

FUND NOVEL RESEARCH ACROSS UCONN Every year, InCHIP hosts seed grant competitions for faculty at UConn Storrs, UConn Health, and the regional campuses. These grants fund innovative pilot work that will directly support a future external grant application in the area of human health. This past year, InCHIP sponsored two cycles of awards (one during the fall semester and a second one in the spring), funding a total of five new projects. The projects address a diverse range of health-related issues, including COVID-19, child maltreatment, and the mental health needs of sexual and gender minority youth.

FY21 Seed Grant Awardees: Tania Huedo-Medina, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) “Cross-Cultural Determinants of the COVID-19 Pandemic Effects on Alcohol Use: The U.S. vs. Spain” Prior to being awarded a Faculty Seed Grant, HuedoMedina received an InCHIP Rolling Seed Grant to build her interdisciplinary research team. Amy Hunter, PhD, MPH (Public Health Sciences) and Nkiruka Atuegwu, PhD (Medicine) “Predicting Child Maltreatment using Emergency Department Data: Pre-Processing and Data Exploration” Gio Iacono, PhD (Social Work) and Lynne Alexander (Connecticut TransAdvocacy Coalition) “Tuned In! — A Mindfulness-Based Affirmative Program to Virtually Address the Mental Health Needs of Sexual and Gender Minority Youth” Wanli Xu, PhD, RN (Nursing) “Interplay of Gut Microbiome, Immune Responses, and Self-Reported Reactions to COVID-19 Vaccination” Gee Su Yang, PhD, RN (Nursing) “Linking the Gut Microbiome, Lifestyle Habits, and Musculoskeletal Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors on Aromatase Inhibitors”

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Growing Research

$80K Awarded in FY21


NEW SUMMER FELLOWSHIP

PROGRAM PROVIDES SUPPORT TO INVESTIGATORS SUBMITTING EXTERNAL GRANTS InCHIP launched a new program for UConn faculty in FY21 aimed at encouraging new investigators – those who have not been awarded external funding of more than $100,000 in total costs per year – to submit grant proposals for external funding. Faculty selected as fellows were invited to participate in mentoring and grant writing training during the spring semester and received a $2,500 summer stipend. Applications for summer 2022 are due in December 2021.

2021 Stipend Awardees: Kari Adamsons, PhD (Associate Professor, HDFS) Funding Agency: NIH (NIDA) Title: “Pathways of Intergenerational Transmission of Substance Use Behaviors From Parents to Adolescent Children” Cristina Colón-Semenza, PhD (Assistant Professor, Kinesiology) Funding Agency: National Community Care Corps Title: “Peer Coaching to Improve Quality of Life in Latinx Individuals Living with Parkinson’s Disease” Jacob Earp, PhD (Assistant Professor, Kinesiology) Funding Agency: Emovi Title: “Validity of the KneeKG During Common Risk Factor Assessments in Adolescents” Oh Sung Kwon, PhD (Assistant Professor, Kinesiology) Funding Agency: Robert E. Leet and Clara Guthrie Patterson Trust Mentored Research Award: Clinical, Health Services and Policy Research Title: “Effects of Nicotinamide Riboside Supplementation on Mobility and Cognitive Performance in Frail Older Adults”

Rachel Tambling, PhD, LMFT (Associate Professor, HDFS) Funding Agency: AAMFT Research & Education Foundation Title: “Perceptions of Teletherapy: Promotive Factors and Barriers to Treatment Seeking” Anna Tarakanova, PhD (Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering) Funding Agency: National Academy of Medicine Title: “Deconstructing Aging in Elastin Through a Multiscale Approach” Gee Su Yang, PhD, RN (Assistant Professor, Nursing) Funding Agency: Breast Cancer Alliance Title: “Uncovering the Role of Gut Microbiome in Aromatase Inhibitor-Associated Musculoskeletal Pain and Bone Health” Na Zhang, PhD (Assistant Professor, HDFS) Funding Agency: NIH (NIMH) Title: “A Digital Mindfulness-Informed Parenting Intervention for High-Risk Divorced Families”

Ryan Talbert, PhD (Assistant Professor, Sociology) Funding Agency: NIH (NICHD) Title: “Hate Groups and Health Inequities: The Impact of Ku Klux Klan Activity on Infant and Maternal Health”

Growing Research

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INCHIP SCIENCE How do we emotionally thrive and ensure well-being in a challenging environment, create solutions to achieve health equity, decrease vaccine hesitancy during a pandemic, and prevent elder abuse in long-term care homes? InCHIP investigators, including many new faculty affiliates, are tackling these questions and more through their research.

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InCHIP Science


TEAM TO ADVANCE TRANSDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH ON

EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING

Understanding the role emotional well-being plays in mindbody interventions — both as an important outcome and as a potential mechanism in improving mental and physical health — is the focus of a new NIH U24 project led by Crystal Park, PhD (Psychological Sciences), Sandra Chafouleas, PhD (Educational Psychology/CSCH), and Fumiko Hoeft, MD, PhD (Psychological Sciences/BIRC).

T

he trio, introduced to each other through InCHIP, received a 4-year, $2.4 million grant to develop a research

Sandra Chafouleas, PhD Educational Psychology

network to identify the essential components of emotional wellbeing, establish an emotional well-being measure toolkit, and identify mechanisms to inform mind-body interventions. NCCIH (National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health), NICHD (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development), OBSSR (Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research), and ODP (Office of Disease Prevention) funded this U24, and it is one of six networks awarded funding through this opportunity. According to the NIH, these networks collectively will “advance the field by facilitating transdisciplinary research in the

Fumiko Hoeft, MD, PhD Psychological Sciences

social, behavioral, psychological, biological, and neurological sciences.” The team has complementary areas of expertise: Park is a mind-body health psychologist whose research examines stress, coping, and integrative approaches such as yoga; Chafouleas is a school psychologist who focuses on intergenerational studies of well-being measurement and intervention; and Hoeft is a cognitive neuroscientist, who brings expertise in functional MRI and the neural basis of emotional regulation. Together, through their newly formed M3EWB Network, they hope to build consensus around the measurement and mechanisms of emotional well-being in mind-body health.

Crystal Park, PhD Psychological Sciences

InCHIP Science

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INCHIP PARTNERS WITH HEALTH DISPARITIES INSTITUTE TO DEVISE

INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO ACHIEVE HEALTH EQUITY

The UConn Health Disparities Institute (HDI), directed by Wizdom Powell, PhD, MPH (Psychiatry), hosted its first “Summit on the State of Health Equity Among Boys and Men of Color” in June 2021. The well-attended virtual Summit offered solution-driven, interactive, and high-powered sessions that employed arts-based approaches along with intergenerational dialogues designed to amplify the voices of young people. The goal of the Summit was to serve as a catalyst for public discourse and action to advance health equity, racial justice, and systemic change for radical healing among boys and men of color.

A

InCHIP Ideas Labs are intensive, interactive, and free-thinking environments. A diverse group of participants from various scientific disciplines and backgrounds meets in a (virtual) room to tackle highly complex problems. Participants are immersed in a collaborative thinking process to construct innovative interdisciplinary approaches that move from sparks of ideas to collaborative proposals to action.

s part of the week-long Summit, InCHIP partnered with HDI to run an Ideas Lab to support attendees in developing actionable solutions related to the Summit’s themes: behavioral health, trauma, incarceration and justice, and HIV/AIDS. Ideas Lab participants were asked to tackle two questions: (1) What would equitable systems where boys and men of color thrive look like?, and (2) How can we get there using research, practice, and/ or policy innovation and harnessing the collective creative energy of a multi-sector, multi-disciplinary team? Over 40 people participated in the Ideas Lab, including researchers from UConn and academic institutions across the country; staff from local and national community-based organizations; and local, state, and federal government employees. Ideas Lab participants continued working

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InCHIP Science

​​

together during the summer of 2021 to develop proposals for research-based, programmatic, or policy-based solutions with guidance from the group of highly skilled mentors (see below): Stephanie Cook, DrPH (New York University) Kimberly Dodge-Kafka, PhD (UConn) Tiffany Donelson, MPH (Connecticut Health Foundation) Dustin Duncan, ScD (Columbia University) Rick Gibbons, PhD (UConn) Sean Joe, PhD, MSW (Washington University in St. Louis) Jayson Jones, LMSW (New York University) Daphne Watkins, PhD (University of Michigan)


INCHIP SUPPORTS INNOVATIVE RESEARCH ON THE

SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL ASPECTS OF COVID-19

Recognizing the central role of the social and behavioral sciences in the battle against COVID-19, InCHIP mobilized resources to support COVID-19 research beginning in March 2020 and continuing through FY21. InCHIP played a major role in many UConn initiatives including sponsoring a Rapid Response Funding Program that funded 20 pilot projects allowing UConn faculty and graduate students from multiple schools and campuses to capture time-sensitive data on the social and behavioral health aspects of COVID-19.

COVID-19 in Focus: A Series of InCHIP Panel Discussions

In the fall of 2020, many of the awardees presented their preliminary findings at InCHIP’s well-attended virtual series. Panel held on October 8, 2020: “Becoming an Adult during a Public Health Crisis: COVID-19’s Impact on Emerging Adults” “The Impact of COVID-19 on Young Adults: Coping with Anxiety During the Early Months of the Pandemic” Team: Beth Russell, PhD*(Co-PI, HDFS), Crystal Park, PhD (Co-PI, Psychological Sciences), Michael Fendrich, PhD (Co-PI, Social Work), Morica Hutchison, MA (Graduate Student, HDFS), Jessica Becker Rica, MSW (Research Assistant, Social Work)

“The LGBTQ+ COVID-related RElationships and Wellbeing (CREW) Study” Team: Eva Lefkowitz, PhD* (PI, HDFS), Samantha Lawrence, MA (Graduate Student, HDFS), Yuan Zhang, MA (Graduate Student, HDFS), Alyssa Clark, MS (Graduate Student, HDFS), Tracy L. Walters, MA (Graduate Student, HDFS), Rachael Farina, MA (Graduate Student, HDFS), Veronica Hanna-Walker (Graduate Student, HDFS) “Evaluating UConn Student Well-Being in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: Preliminary Findings” Team: Saraswathi Bellur, PhD* (Co-PI, Communication), Rebecca Acabchuk, PhD (Co-PI, InCHIP), Emily Hennessy, PhD (Co-PI, InCHIP), Leslie Snyder, PhD (Communication), Deborah Cornman, PhD (InCHIP), Linda Pescatello, PhD (Kinesiology), Crystal Park, PhD (Psychological Sciences), Blair Johnson, PhD (Psychological Sciences), Keith Bellizzi, PhD, MPH

InCHIP Science

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(HDFS), David Ouimette, MA (Executive Director, Office of First Year Programs & Learning Communities), MJ Raleigh, PhD (Interim Co-Leader of Mental Health Services), Gregory Champion, MA (Program Assistant, Honors Programming & Events Office), Madeleine Aseltine (Undergraduate), Isha Walawalkar (Graduate Student, Public Health Sciences), Kaleigh Ligus, MA (Graduate Student, HDFS), Emily Fritzson (Graduate Student, HDFS) “Disruptions in the Medical Management and Care of College Students with Pre-Existing Mental Health Conditions During the COVID-19 Pandemic” Team: Kaleigh Ligus, MA* (Graduate Student, HDFS), Keith Bellizzi, PhD, MPH (PI, HDFS), Emily Fritzson (Graduate Student, HDFS) “Healthy and Safe: Building a Culture of Positive Behavior During a Pandemic” Team: Eleanor Daugherty, EdD* (Associate Vice President for Student Affairs, Dean of Students), Joseph Briody (Interim Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs & Director of Student Activities), Jenn Longa, MA (Assistant Dean of Students for Victim Support Services & Bystander Initiatives), Hans Rhynhart, MS (Associate Vice President of Public Safety, Chief of Police) Panel held on October 22, 2020: “Fear, Threat, and Information Sources: Messaging and Communication During the COVID-19 Pandemic” “Persuasion and Messaging in the Age of COVID-19: An Experimental Study of U.S. Adults Identifying Effective Messaging Strategies for Infection Prevention Behaviors” Team: Marcella Boynton, PhD* (Co-PI, UNC School of Medicine, General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Howard Tennen, PhD (Co-PI, Public Health Sciences), Ross O’Hara, PhD (Co-I, Persistence Plus), Joseph Lee, PhD, MPH (Co-I, East Carolina University, Health Education and Promotion) “The Pandemic Journaling Project: Design, Aims, Future Directions” Team: Sarah Willen, PhD, MPH* (PI, Anthropology), Katherine Mason, PhD (Brown University, Anthropology) “Examining Attributions of Blame Associated with the COVID-19 Pandemic in the State of Connecticut” Team: Christine Gilbert, MA* (Co-I, Graduate Student, Communication), Kenneth Lachlan, PhD (Co-PI, Communication), Stephen Stifano, PhD (Co-PI, Communication)

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InCHIP Science

“Assessing the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Resulting Behavior Changes in Response to COVID-19 Among Connecticut Residents” Team: Stacey Brown, PhD* (Co-PI, Public Health Sciences), Toan Ha, MD, DrPH (Co-PI, University of Pittsburgh, Infectious Diseases and Microbiology), Stephen Schensul, PhD (Co-I, Public Health Sciences), Judy Lewis, MPhil (Co-I, Public Health Sciences) Panel held on October 29, 2020: “Differential Burdens: The Impact of COVID-19 on Vulnerable and At-Risk Populations” “COVID-19 and Retail Grocery Shopping: Preliminary Insights from a Broad-Based Consumer Survey” Team: Yiru Wang, PhD* (SUNY Oswego, Marketing), Xiang Chen, PhD (Co-PI, Geography), Debarchana Ghosh, PhD (Co-PI, Geography), Marlene Schwartz, PhD (Co-PI, HDFS/Rudd), Ran Xu, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) “Cumulative Pandemic-Related Adversity Moderates Change in Affective Symptoms from Pregnancy to Early Motherhood in a Primarily Hispanic, LowIncome Sample” Team: Damion Grasso, PhD* (PI, Psychiatry/Pediatrics), Miranda Marris (Research Coordinator, Undergraduate), Family Adaptation & Resilience Research (FARR) Program


Panel held on November 12, 2020: “Pandemic Parenting: Understanding the Effects of COVID-19 on Child Caregivers” “Healthy Transmission of Coping During COVID-19: The Impact of Emotional Characteristics on Caregiver and Child Response” Team: Olivia Derella* (PI, Graduate Student, Psychological Sciences), Jeffrey Burke, PhD (Co-PI, Psychological Sciences), Emilie Butler (Graduate Student, Psychological Sciences) “Impact of COVID-19 on Primary Caregivers of Children With and Without Developmental Disabilities” Team: Emily Iovino* (Co-PI, Postdoc, Educational Psychology), Sandra Chafouleas, PhD (PI, Educational Psychology) “An Exploratory Study on the Effects of COVID-19 and Associated Social and Economic Changes on Children and Their Families in ResourceConstrained Settings in Sub-Saharan Africa” Team: Lisa Butler*, PhD, MPH (Co-PI, InCHIP), Phelgona Otieno, MBChB, MPH (Co-PI, Kenya Medical Research Institute), Leonie Marinovich (Consultant) *Indicates team member making presentation. “Older Adults’ Depression, Anxiety, and Social Support in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic” Team: Kevin Manning, PhD* (Co-PI, Psychiatry), David Steffens, MD, MHS (Co-PI, Psychiatry), Lihong Wang, MD, PhD (Co-I, Psychiatry), Grace Chan, PhD (Co-I, Psychiatry), Rong Wu, PhD (Co-I, Connecticut Convergence Institute’s Biostatistics Center) “Stayin’ Alive: Using the Health Belief Model to Understand Persons’ of Color Intentions to Wear Masks During the COVID-19 Pandemic” Team: Katrina Webber* (Co-PI, Graduate Student, Communication), Sara Stifano, PhD (CoPI, Communication), Shardé Davis, PhD (Co-PI, Communication), Stephen Stifano, PhD (Co-PI, Communication) “Gun Violence, the COVID-19 Pandemic, and Community Health” Team: Blair Johnson, PhD* (Co-PI, Psychological Sciences), Mary Bernstein, PhD (Co-PI, Sociology), Kun Chen, PhD (Co-I, Statistics), Emily Hennessy, PhD (Psychological Sciences), Rebecca Acabchuk, PhD (Psychological Sciences)

PROJECT OUTCOMES

These pilot projects led to several publications, additional grant funding, and an international online project.

Peer-Reviewed Publications: Boynton, M. H., O’Hara, R. E., Tennen, H., & Lee, J. (2021, January). The impact of public health organization and political figure message sources on reactions to Coronavirus prevention messages. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 60(1), 136–138. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2020.08.001 Lawrence, S. E., Walters, T. L., Clark, A. N., Zhang, Y., Hanna-Walker, V. R., Farina, R. E., & Lefkowitz, E. S. (in press). LGBTQ+ college students’ engagement in COVID-protective and COVID-risk behaviors. Emerging Adulthood. Ligus, K., Fritzson, E., Hennessy, E. A., Acabchuk, R. L., and Bellizzi, K. (2021, March). Disruptions in the management and care of university students with preexisting mental health conditions during

InCHIP Science

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the COVID-19 pandemic. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 11(3)3, 802–807 https://doi.org/10.1093/ tbm/ibab020 Park, C. L., Russell, B. S., Fendrich, M., FinkelsteinFox, L., & Hutchison, M., Becker, J. (2020, August). Americans’ COVID-19 stress, coping, and adherence to CDC guidelines. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 35, 2296–2303. https://doi.org/10.1007/ s11606-020-05898-9 Wang, Y., Xu, R., Schwartz, M., Ghosh, D., & Chen, X. (2020, September). COVID-19 and retail grocery management: Insights from a broad-based consumer survey. IEEE Engineering Management Review, 48(3), 202-211. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMR.2020.3011054

Online Briefs / Publications: Chafouleas, S. M. & Iovino, E. A. (2020, July). Initial Impact of COVID-19 on the Well-being of Caregivers of Children With and Without Disabilities. Storrs, CT: UConn Collaboratory on School and Child Health. http://csch.uconn.edu/. Ha, T., Schensul, S., Lewis, J., & Brown, S. (2020, May). Early Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes, Anxiety, and Behavioral Adaptations of Connecticut Residents to COVID-19. medRxiv. https://doi.org/10.11 01/2020.05.18.20082073 Iovino, E. A., Chafouleas, S. M., Bunyea, A., & Perry, H. Y. (2020, August). Caregiver Voices: The Initial Impact of COVID-19 on Caregivers of Children With and Without Disabilities. Storrs, CT: UConn Collaboratory on School and Child Health. http://csch. uconn.edu/ Perry, H. Y., Iovino, E. A., Caemmerer, J., & Chafouleas, S. M. (2021, February). Impact of COVID-19 on Caregivers of Children With and Without Disabilities: A Six-Month Follow-Up. Storrs, CT: UConn Collaboratory on School and Child Health. http://csch.uconn.edu/

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Additional Funding: Eva Lefkowitz, PhD (HDFS) was awarded a one-year College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Strategic Plan Academic Themes Research Grant for $44,515 to study “Risk and Protective Factors for LGBTQ+ College Students’ Health and Well-Being During Semesters and Academic Breaks.” Her collaborators on this study are Amanda Denes, PhD (Communication) and Lisa Eaton, PhD (HDFS). Damion Grasso, PhD (Psychiatry/Pediatrics) and Margaret Briggs-Gowan, PhD (Psychiatry) received a 4-year, $3.1 million R01 grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHHD) to study pandemic-related experiences and stress among 2,000 women and their partners who were in the final two trimesters of pregnancy during the COVID-19 pandemic. The fundamental scientific premise of the proposed study, “Impact of Perinatal Pandemic-Related Stress on the Early Caregiving Environment, Infant Functioning, DNA Methylation, and Telomere Length,” is that perinatal stress, enhanced by an unprecedented pandemic, is linked to caregiver posttraumatic stress and emotion dysregulation, which in turn shapes the early caregiving environment influences on infant stress reactivity and dysregulation through biobehavioral processes, including DNA methylation and cellular aging.


The Pandemic Journaling Project:

InCHIP is one of numerous departments, schools, centers, and programs at UConn, Brown University, and Trinity College that have provided funding to help develop and sustain The Pandemic Journaling Project. This project, initially created by Sarah Willen, PhD, MPH (Anthropology) and Katherine Mason, PhD (Brown University, Anthropology), now involves a large interdisciplinary team of faculty and students from several universities around the country. The Pandemic Journaling Project is an online, anonymous journaling platform that provides users with the opportunity to record their thoughts, feelings, and experiences once a week during the pandemic and “create a record for the future.” It allows ordinary people to “have their voices heard and their experiences remembered.” Research has shown that journaling, or engaging in expressive documentation of one’s experiences, can have positive mental health effects, so participating may help some people cope with these incredibly challenging times. Individuals can provide journal entries using just a smartphone (no computer is needed), and they can provide their entries in the form of written text, audio clips (recorded on their phone), or photos. The interface is fully bilingual in English and Spanish, but participants can create journal entries in any language. Importantly, everyone’s entries are saved, resulting

Sarah Willen, PhD Anthropology in an extensive digital archive that researchers can use, now and in the future, to help understand what people are going through and how they deal with stressful situations such as pandemics, and to examine how those experiences differ across individuals, communities, and countries. This project is creating a record of the pandemic as experienced by people from diverse backgrounds around the world. To date, over 1,500 users from more than 45 countries have taken part in the project, contributing over 17,000 entries in total. Willen and Mason indicated they intend to continue the project until the World Health Organization declares that the pandemic is over. At that time, all of the entries will be provided to The Qualitative Data Repository at Syracuse University, where researchers will be given the opportunity to study the data for a period of 25 years, after which the journal entries will become public domain.

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NEW FACULTY

,

AFFILIATES

InCHIP proudly welcomed 22 new faculty affiliates from 11 different academic departments in FY21. Nkiruka Atuegwu, PhD Assistant Professor, Medicine Research Interests: Predictive modeling for risk of tobacco and e-cigarette use and addiction. Jacqueline Caemmerer, PhD Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology Research Interests: Supporting children’s academic achievement. Caitlin Caspi, PhD Associate Professor, Allied Health Sciences and Director of Food Security Initiatives, Rudd Center Research Interests: Evaluate policies and interventions that address diet-related health disparities and work to improve population health. Eileen Carter, PhD Assistant Professor, Nursing Research Interests: Dissemination and implementation science and behavior change particularly in the context of infection prevention and antibiotic stewardship. Kimberly Chaney, PhD Assistant Professor, Psychological Sciences Research Interests: Factors that influence prejudice and stigma, and how prejudice and stigma impact health, performance, and behavior. Rachel Cohen, PhD Associate Professor, HDFS Research Interests: Biological, relational, and environmental factors influencing the development of children, and the creation, evaluation, and improvement of intervention programs for families with infants and toddlers.

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Cristina Colón-Semenza, PhD Assistant Professor, Kinesiology Research Interests: Motivation for exercise and physical activity, with an emphasis on patients living with neurological conditions (such as Parkinson’s Disease). Kelsi Carolan, PhD Assistant Professor, Social Work Research Interests: Examining how systemic inequities degrade quality of life in the context of chronic and/or progressive disease and disability. Shayna Cunningham, PhD Assistant Professor, Public Health Sciences Research Interests: Social ecological framework applied to maternal child health, and chronic disease. Brooke Davey, MD Assistant Professor, Pediatrics Research Interests: Pediatric cardiology and congenital heart disease. Ido Davidesco, PhD Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology Research Interests: Applications of neuroscience and psychology to STEM education. Natasha Frederick, MD, MPH Assistant Professor, Pediatrics Research Interests: Cancer survivorship and the improvement of clinician-patient communication. Neal Glaviano, PhD Assistant Professor, Kinesiology Research Interests: Self-reported disability, altered physical activity, and neuromuscular dysfunction in individuals with patellofemoral pain.


Amy Hunter, PhD Assistant Professor, Public Health Sciences Research Interests: Child maltreatment prevention, and interventions to improve detection in clinical settings. Gio Iacono, PhD Assistant Professor, Social Work Research Interests: Clinical and community mental health, integrated health and behavioral health, and interventions that promote equity, inclusion, and diversity. Jolaade Kalinowski, EdD Assistant Professor, HDFS Research Interests: Role of chronic stress in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduction in Black women, who are often neglected in clinical research and disproportionately burdened by CVD disparities. Megan O’Grady, PhD Assistant Professor, Public Health Sciences Research Interests: Developing and implementing sciencebased improvements in the addiction treatment system of care. Karen Kemp-Prosterman, DDS Assistant Professor, Dental Medicine Research Interests: Pediatric dentistry. Jane Pryma, PhD Assistant Professor, Sociology Research Interests: Pain, disability, and the institutionalization of health-based rights. Ryan Talbert, PhD Assistant Professor, Sociology Research Interests: Health disparities, the social psychology of race and ethnicity, and punishment and inequality. Gee Su Yang, PhD Assistant Professor, Nursing Research Interests: Biobehavioral mechanisms of pain and other comorbid symptoms (anxiety, depression, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and sleep disturbances), and developing tailored treatment strategies to reduce or eliminate symptom burden and improve health outcomes for cancer patients. Na Zhang, PhD Assistant Professor, HDFS Research Interests: Parent and child mental health, with particular emphasis on trauma response.

SPOTLIGHT ON EILON CASPI

Eilon Caspi, PhD Assistant Research Professor, InCHIP Eilon Caspi, PhD is a gerontologist at InCHIP. His research focuses on enhancing the quality of care, quality of life, and safety of people living with dementia in long-term care homes. Dr. Caspi has a new book coming out in August entitled “Understanding and Preventing Harmful Interactions Between Residents with Dementia.” Based on his own research along with an extensive review of the research literature, Dr. Caspi’s book provides psychosocial strategies that care professionals can use to prevent distressing and harmful resident-toresident interactions in care homes. Learn more about Dr. Caspi here. InCHIP Science

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NEW AWARDS

IN FY21

InCHIP PIs were awarded 41 new external grants in FY21, increasing UConn’s grant portfolio by $16.4 million ($13.4 million in direct costs and $3.0 million in indirect costs). This research spans a wide range of health domains and tackles some of the most pressing problems in the world today, from COVID-19 to substance use, HIV, cancer prevention, and weight management. Brief descriptions of new external grants funded in FY21 are provided below, and a full list of newly awarded and active grants at InCHIP can be found in Appendix II. can be found in Appendix II.

HIV PREVENTION Lisa Eaton, PhD (HDFS) received $2.9 million from National Institutes of Health-National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIH-NIDA) to examine stigma and substance use as barriers to PrEP linkage, uptake, adherence, and persistence among Black men who have sex with men. Michael Copenhaver, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) was awarded $947k from NIH-NIDA to optimize HIV prevention approaches among people with opioid dependence. Lisa Butler, PhD, PhD, MPH (InCHIP) received two new awards from MERCK totaling $600k – one focusing on innovative HIV prevention products in Sub-Saharan African communities and the other examining perceptions about COVID-19 vaccines among health care providers and other high-risk groups in the U.S. and Canada. 27

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Shrestha Joins Strong Contingent of HIV Researchers Roman Shrestha, PhD, MPH (Allied Health Sciences) joined UConn in January 2021 and brought several funded projects to InCHIP, including awards from NIH-NIDA to examine integrated rapid access to an HIV prevention program for people who inject drugs, as well as a K01 training award in mHealth prevention for men who have sex with men (MSM). He also has a $1.3 million award from NIH’s Fogarty International Center to develop and test an mHealth application to enhance the HIV prevention cascade in Malaysian MSM and is working with investigators at Fordham University on their NIH grant to understand ethical concerns about participation in such programs. Shrestha is also working with investigators at Yale University on an NIH project to improve HIV testing and PrEP for transgender women via mHealth approaches.


FOOD POLICY AND NUTRITION Tatiana Andreyeva, PhD (Agricultural and Resource Economics/ Rudd) received three new awards in FY21, one from the Connecticut Department of Public Health/CDC to improve nutrition standards in early childhood education settings and two from the American Heart Association to evaluate food taxation policies and practices. Caitlin Caspi, ScD (Allied Health Sciences/Rudd) joined the Rudd Center this year from University of Minnesota and brought three awards with her – a $1.6 million NIH grant examining the impact of minimum wage increases on obesity and diet-related outcomes, a second NIH award testing a multi-component intervention within the hunger relief network to improve diet among adults with food insecurity, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation subaward with Duke University validating a nutrition ranking system for food pantries. Marlene Schwartz, PhD (HDFS/Rudd) received continuations from Horizon Foundation and Partnership for a Healthier America to extend her work aimed at improving nutrition in Howard County, MD and in childcare centers. She also received two new grants from the Connecticut Department of Education/ USDA to evaluate Connecticut school districts’ wellness policies and the state’s summer food service program. Kristen Cooksey Stowers, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) received funding from United Way to continue her work with Invest Health’s Hartford team, where she is leading a resident survey on food habits in Hartford’s North End. Kim Gans, PhD, MPH (HDFS) received a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) award to understand and increase water availability and accessibility in family childcare homes to both improve young children’s water intake and reduce sugary beverage intake.

MINDFULNESS AND WELL BEING Crystal Park, PhD (Psychological Sciences), Sandra Chafouleas, PhD (Educational Psychology/CSCH), and Fumiko Hoeft, MD, PhD (Psychological Sciences) received $2.4 million from NIH-National Center for Complementary Integrative Health to develop a research network to advance the study of mechanisms underlying mind-body interventions and the measurement of emotional well-being. Rebecca Acabchuk, PhD (InCHIP) received a grant from the Mind & Life Institute to examine the feasibility and acceptability of integrating mindfulness programs in schools. InCHIP Science

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AGING Rick Gibbons, PhD (Psychological Sciences) received a supplement to his NIH-National Cancer Institute grant to continue his work on the contextual and health behavior effects of epigenetic aging among African Americans. Susan Glenney, PhD (KINE) received funding from the PatientCentered Outcomes Research Institute to continue developing 3D team care for cognitively vulnerable older adults. Leslie Snyder, PhD (Communication) is collaborating with colleagues at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center on an NIH-funded project entitled, “MsFLASH: Living a Healthy Menopause.”

SUBSTANCE USE Emily Hennessy, PhD (InCHIP) received a K01 from NIHNational Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to explore how social identity, social networks, and recovery capital influence substance use in emerging adults. Seth Kalichman, PhD (Psychological Sciences) is working with University of California, Los Angeles on an NIH-funded project examining the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-based mHealth intervention targeting the use of medication for opioid use disorder. Nathaniel Rickles, PhD, BCPP (Pharmacy) received funding from the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services to develop academic detailing for opioid safety in Connecticut.

WEIGHT STIGMA Leah Lessard, PhD (HDFS) received two awards for her work on weight stigma – one from the Society for Research on Child Development to harness peer influence as a mechanism to reduce weight-based peer victimization in adolescents and one from the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues to reduce weight stigma through a social-norm-based intervention. 29

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RELIGION AND HEALTH Crystal Park, PhD (Psychological Sciences) received two awards to continue her research on religion, meaning making, and health outcomes. The first, from the Issachar Fund/Templeton Religion Trust, explores how the balance of scientific and religious influences on meaning systems influences understanding and adaptive behavior. The second, from Biola University/Templeton, looks at the interplay among gratitude to God, favorable and adverse life circumstances, and religiousness.

mHEALTH Sherry Pagoto, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) received a renewal of her NIH K24 award to provide mentoring in mHealth and social networking interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease risk. She was also funded by the NIH-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to test the feasibility of integrating mobile and social network elements into a weight-loss intervention. Pagoto received two subawards from NIH – one with investigators from Rutgers University to extend their Facebook intervention for youngonset melanoma patients and families, and the other with Klein Buendel to engage mothers through social media on the topic of teen indoor tanning.

EDUCATION Lisa Sanetti, PhD (Educational Psychology/InCHIP) was awarded $1.05 million from the U.S. Department of Education to provide interdisciplinary, advanced training to UConn graduate students in how to better meet the needs of students with disabilities who have high-intensity needs.

PARENTING Rachel Cohen, PhD (HDFS) received a Perigee Foundation grant with Portland State University to conduct a national study of parent experiences with technology-enabled family support services. InCHIP Science

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RECOGNIZING EXCELLENCE

Each year, InCHIP shines a light on faculty and graduate students making significant research contributions. Nominated by their peers and university leaders, InCHIP Awardees represent some of the best and brightest at UConn.

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Recognizing Excellence


FISHER FELLOWSHIP

AWARDED TO ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES GRADUATE STUDENT

Colleen Mistler, MS Allied Health Sciences

The Jeffrey D. Fisher Health Behavior Change Research Fellowship was created in 2019 to celebrate the career of Jeff Fisher, PhD, the founding Director of the Institue for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP). During Fisher’s tenure as Director, InCHIP grew from a small group of HIV researchers in the Department of Psychological Sciences to a university-wide, interdisciplinary institute of faculty and graduate students focused on a broad array of health-related research. The fellowship honors Fisher’s legacy at UConn while advancing the research of graduate students working on dissertations in the health behavior field. Each spring, the Fisher Fellowship awards a $2,000 stipend to a promising graduate student embarking on their dissertation research.

methods. Her dissertation adviser is InCHIP Affiliate Michael Copenhaver, PhD (Allied Health Sciences). While in the health promotion sciences doctoral program at UConn, Mistler has played a key role in multiple NIH-funded research efforts focused on HIV prevention among marginalized populations of opioid users in the United States. Mistler has also taken a leadership role in mentoring new graduate students, serving on graduate student committees, and producing publications and presentations.

In FY21, faculty reviewers selected Colleen Mistler, MS (Allied Health Sciences) to receive the Fisher Fellowship for her dissertation work focused on identifying and tailoring innovative strategies to optimize PrEP-focused HIV prevention Recognizing Excellence

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INCHIP PROVIDES NEW EXCELLENCE AWARD

FOR RESEARCH ON RACIAL/ETHNIC HEALTH DISPARITIES

InCHIP Excellence Awards are given annually to recognize the outstanding work of InCHIP faculty affiliates. Reflecting InCHIP’s continued commitment to combating racism and systemic inequities, a new award was added this year: the Excellence Award for Research on Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities and Health Outcomes of Racism. The following FY21 awardees each received $500 in research funds:

Junior Faculty Research Excellence Award

Community-Engaged Health Research Excellence Award

Angela Bermudez Millan, PhD, MPH

Marlene Schwartz, PhD

(Public Health Sciences) recently received an NIH R21 grant to examine whether food insecurity is a risk factor for the development of diabetes in Latinas. Informed by her background in public health and nutritional sciences, Bermudez Millan is conducting important formative work to understand how the monthly cycling of food insecurity is associated with dietary intake and quality, mental distress, and diabetes risk markers in Latinas of childbearing age. Bermudez Millan is an exceptionally skilled collaborator who has been an active member of the InCHIP community for several years, including participating in InCHIP’s grant writing training.

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Recognizing Excellence

(HDFS/Rudd Center) is a leading expert in the areas of childhood nutrition, obesity, and food insecurity. She has dedicated her extraordinarily productive career to supporting health equity by improving the nutrition environment among communities in Connecticut and across the nation. Both within K-12 schools and the charitable food system, Schwartz has worked with community partners and critical stakeholders to create innovative, evidence-based, practical tools that are used to implement changes at the local, state, and national levels. Schwartz serves as a model for how to conduct community-engaged research that is scientifically rigorous, widely disseminated across the discipline and the public, and impactful on local communities and policy.


Excellence Award for Research on Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities and Health Outcomes of Racism Kristen Cooksey Stowers, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) joined the UConn community in 2016, with an established interest in structural racism in the food system. Cooksey Stowers’ principal area of research focuses on reducing inequities in diet-related health outcomes by improving food environments through sustainable policy solutions. Her current research aims to achieve a better understanding of food swamps and health inequities via community-based participatory research projects in the North Hartford Promise (NHP) Zone. In 2020, Cooksey Stowers was awarded a USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture grant to assess home food environments in NHP food swamps. She is also collaborating on an InCHIP Rolling Seed Grant to Develop Interdisciplinary Research Teams to create a multidisciplinary plan to evaluate the impact of the Healthy Hartford Hub on improving racial disparities in food shopping habits and consumption, and a Community-Engaged Seed Grant to develop a psychometrically sound food swamp audit tool. As noted by one of her nominators, Cooksey Stowers has “clearly made significant research contributions in the area of racial and ethnic health disparities, health equity, and structural racism.”

Excellence in Faculty Mentoring Award Seth Kalichman, PhD (Psychological Sciences) has provided extensive mentorship throughout his career to graduate students and junior faculty building careers in HIV prevention and care. His closest collaborator, Lisa Eaton, PhD (HDFS), now a full professor and extremely successful researcher, began her career as a graduate student working in Kalichman’s lab. Together with Eaton, they have mentored several junior faculty working in areas related to HIV. For the past two years, Kalichman has directed InCHIP’s NIH R-Series Bootcamp, where he has led faculty through the process of writing their first NIH research grant. Through this program, in addition to formal didactic instruction, Kalichman has provided extensive feedback on proposal drafts and offered insight into navigating the NIH review process.

Recognizing Excellence

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InCHIP Lecture Series 2020-2021

The InCHIP Lecture Series was conducted virtually this past year and covered a diversity of topics, ranging from discrimination against people with disabilities to racial health inequities, HIV prevention, firearm injuries, cardiovascular health disparities, and affirmative consent. The presentations were engaging, informative, and extremely wellattended, averaging 50 participants per lecture.

O

ne of the highlights was a stimulating presentation on October 26 by Rhea Boyd, MD, MPH (211 San Diego, California Children’s Trust) on the relationship between structural racism and racial health inequities and the need for researchers to do a better job of identifying the link between them. The fall semester concluded with a panel discussion with Leo Wilton, PhD, MPH (Binghamton University) and Joseph Tucker, MD, PhD (University of North Carolina) on December 3 in recognition of World AIDS Day, which focused on HIV-related health inequities and creative methods for engaging communities in HIV prevention.

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Lecture Series

On February 11, Megan Ranney, MD, MPH (Brown University) provided a brief but alarming overview of the epidemiology of firearm deaths in the U.S., discussed the value of using a public health framework for action, and presented examples of how to apply that framework for actionable behavior both inside and outside the clinic setting. In her thoughtprovoking presentation on March 25, Lisa Bowleg, MA, PhD (The George Washington University) discussed the limits of traditional theories of health behavior that focus on the individual and emphasized the importance of structural approaches to health inequity research that take intersectionality into account. In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, the Lecture Series concluded on April 8 with a presentation by Kristen Jozkowski, PhD (Indiana University) that focused on the realities of how consent for sex actually occurs on college campuses, the role of gender norms, and the importance of promoting affirmative sexuality in order for affirmative consent to be successful. The full list of 2020-21 InCHIP lectures can be found on the next page as well as on the InCHIP website. In addition, these lectures are available to view on InCHIP’s YouTube page.


Fall 2020

C. Debra Furr-Holden, PhD (Michigan State University) “Community-Engaged Research Examining Behavioral Health Equity”

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Lecture Attendees in FY21

Deborah Carr, PhD (Boston University) “Interpersonal and Institutional Discrimination among U.S. Adults with Disability” Rhea Boyd, MD, MPH (211 San Diego, California Children’s Trust) “On Racism: Raising the Bar to Publish on Racial Health Inequities” Dustin T. Duncan, ScD (Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health) “Black Gay and Bisexual Men and HIV Disparities: The N2 Cohort Study” Leo Wilton, PhD, MPH (Binghamton University) Joseph Tucker, MD, PhD (University of North Carolina School of Medicine) AIDS Panel Discussion in Recognition of World AIDS Day: “HIV Prevention in a Global Context” Moderated by Lisa Eaton, PhD (HDFS) and Seth Kalichman, PhD (Psychological Sciences)

Spring 2021

Megan L. Ranney, MD, MPH, FACEP (Brown University) “Addressing Firearm Injury as a Public Health Problem” Tiffany M. Powell-Wiley, MD, MPH (National Institutes of Health) “Biobehavioral Approaches to Address Cardiovascular Health Disparities”

The FY21 InCHIP Lecture Series was made possible with support from the Office of the Vice President of Research and through generous sponsorship provided by the following UConn Schools, Departments, and Programs: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Allied Health Sciences Biomedical Engineering Department College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Department of Communication Department of Statistics Human Development and Family Sciences Global Affairs Neag School of Education School of Business School of Law School of Medicine School of Nursing Student Health and Wellness (SHaW)

Lisa Bowleg, MA, PhD (The George Washington University) “‘As A Black Man, I Got 99 Problems and I Sure Ain’t Thinking About HIV at the End of the Day’: Conceptualizing Stress and Resilience Intersectionally and Critically” Kristen Jozkowski, PhD (Indiana University School of Public Health) “The Need for Affirmative Sexuality in the Era of Affirmative Consent” Lecture Series

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InCHIP TEAM

Amy Gorin, PhD Director

Michelle Bates

Grants and Contract Assistant 1

Niva Ranjeet

Financial Assistant 1

Deborah Cornman, PhD Associate Director

Josh Hardin

Computer Tech Support Consultant 1

Melanie Skolnick Program Assistant 1

Steven Jagielo

Director of Administration and Business Services

Lynne Hendrickson Financial Assistant 2

Melissa Stone

Financial Assistant 2

Grace Morris, MA

Research Development Specialist

AnnMarie White Grants Manager


INCHIP CENTERS & RESEARCH INTEREST GROUPS InCHIP is the proud home of eight faculty-led Research Interest Groups (RIGS) and three Centers – Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, UConn Center for mHealth and Social Media, and Collaboratory on School and Child Health. RIGs facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration at UConn, and the Centers house nationally- and internationally-recognized thought leaders in their respective fields.

Centers & RIGS

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RUDD CENTER COLLABORATES WITH ORGANIZATIONS WORLDWIDE ON RESEARCH THAT

INFORMS FOOD POLICY

The mission of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity is to promote solutions to childhood obesity, poor diet, and weight bias through research and policy. Since its inception, the Rudd Center has been known in both national and international circles as the place where science and public policy intersect, where new and constructive dialogue takes place, and where innovation linked to action is a guiding philosophy.

I

n FY21, under the leadership of Director Marlene Schwartz, PhD (HDFS) and Deputy Director Rebecca Puhl, PhD (HDFS), Rudd Center faculty and staff maintained a high level of scholarship productivity with 57 peer-reviewed articles and invited editorials published in highimpact and flagship scholarly journals (e.g., American Journal of Public Health, Preventing Chronic Disease, Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Journal of Public Health Policy, Journal of School Health, Public Health Nutrition). Additionally, they gave 26 virtual invited and peer-reviewed presentations at annual national conferences, such as American Public Health Association, Society of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Society for Research and Child Development, Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, and The Obesity Society. This breadth reflects the continued relevance of the Rudd Center’s work across multiple disciplines of public health, medicine, nutrition, obesity, psychology, 39

Centers & RIGS

and education, and underscores the strong national reputation of Rudd Center faculty who are frequently sought for their research expertise. Multiple Research Collaborations Locally, Nationally, and Globally Rudd Center faculty actively engaged in research collaborations with faculty across eight UConn schools and departments as well as with faculty at 36 universities nationally and worldwide. They also continued existing and established new research collaborations with 31 state and national organizations (e.g., Action for Healthy Kids, Feeding America, Connecticut State Departments of Education and Public Health, Feeding America, Hartford HealthCare, Mayo Clinic, and World Obesity Federation). One particularly notable collaboration this year involved Schwartz, who served on Gov. Ned Lamont’s COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Subcommittee. This group advised the governor on preparations for the COVID-19 vaccine, including


the optimization of strategies for statewide vaccine distribution and communication of critical information about the vaccine to state residents. Disseminating Data to Inform Policy The Rudd Center also continued to play the vital role of leader in disseminating the Center’s research to inform the latest legal and public discourse on food policy. Over the past year, Center staff communicated with 92 policy and advocacy organizations, which often included providing policy briefs they created with summaries of relevant Center research. Their research informed specific policy issues in the following areas: limiting food and beverage advertising on online educational platforms during the COVID pandemic; implementing food marketing restrictions on school-issued devices; introducing healthier kids’ meals in Prince George’s County, Maryland; regulating “toddler milks” by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration and enforcing action against “transition formula” products; and extending universal school meals.. In addition, they provided expert testimony at legislative hearings on college food insecurity, water bottle filling stations in schools, and expanding access to the Connecticut Farm-to-School Program. Increasing Presence in Print, Broadcast, and Social Media During this reporting period, the Rudd Center maintained a strong media presence nationally and in Connecticut, continuing to garner significant publicity for the university through high-visibility media. This included appearances in national outlets such as U.S. News & World Report, Scientific American, CNN, USA Today, HealthDay, NBC News, The Huffington Post, CBS

News, Civil Eats, and Yahoo!. Connecticut media outlets featuring Rudd Center’s research included the Connecticut Health I-Team, New Haven Register, Connecticut Post, Stamford Advocate, The Hour, and The Middletown Press. Center faculty members also participated in a variety of podcasts, including Factually! With Adam Conover, which has an estimated reach of 1.2 million. The Rudd Center’s social media presence continued to grow during this reporting period, with its Facebook followers’ ‘likes’ nearing 5,000 and the Center’s Twitter account reaching 16,900 followers, increasing by 4,500 since the Center joined UConn in 2015. The Center also successfully launched a new redesigned website in January 2021, with 145,058 total page views for the main web page from May 1, 2020 to April 30, 2021. In the first month following the website launch, site visits and pageviews increased by 30% and unique visitors increased by 15%. Training and Mentorship Importantly, the Rudd Center continues to provide obesity research training opportunities for UConn students across multiple disciplines, including research assistantships and summer internships. In FY21, Rudd faculty supervised six undergraduate students and advised or mentored 11 PhD students and a Master’s student. They also trained three full-time postdocs.

Centers & RIGS

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CENTER FOR mHEALTH AND SOCIAL MEDIA

EXAMINES SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE COVID-19 INFODEMIC

The mission of the UConn Center for mHealth and Social Media (CHaSM) is to advance the science of digital health by exploring novel applications of digital technologies to health problems, using technology to increase the impact and reach of health interventions, leveraging technology to gain a deeper understanding of health issues, and developing new methodologies with digital health tools to conduct clinical research.

S

herry Pagoto, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) directs the Center, and Molly Waring, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) and Ran Xu, PhD (Allied Health Sciences) serve as core faculty members. There are an additional nine faculty affiliated with CHaSM, three of whom joined in the past year: Jolaade Kalinowski, EdD (HDFS), Roman Shrestha, PhD, MPH (Allied Health Sciences), and Shiri Dori-Hacohen, PhD (Computer Science and Engineering). CHaSM has three full-time research coordinators and a full-time program assistant, and it is mentoring five graduate research assistants, two of whom started in January: Richard Bannor, MPH (Allied Health Sciences) and Christie Idiong (Allied Health Sciences). Additionally, the Center welcomed 15 undergraduate students who worked on a paid, for-credit, or volunteer basis during the past year. One of those students, Cindy Pan (Class of 2022), received a SURF award to conduct an independent research project using Facebook data from the Center’s previous weight loss trials.

Funded Research Studies Underway at CHaSM

The Center is currently working on 12 funded research studies focused on digital health and social media. Pagoto’s team began working with Bengisu Tulu, PhD at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the software development team at Programination on “Building

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Centers & RIGS

Habits Together,” an R34 study to develop and test the feasibility of a mobile app and social network weight loss intervention. The team also began a single arm trial of a multi-component commercial digital weight loss program with WW (formerly known as Weight Watchers). In addition, the National Cancer Institute awarded funds to Pagoto and Waring to conduct a social media research ethics study to identify and investigate knowledge gaps and areas lacking consensus among researchers in this field. These funds are a supplement to an ongoing R01 study at Rutgers Cancer Institute for which Pagoto is a subcontractor. Pagoto and Waring also received funding from the National Science Foundation to examine the impact that changing from in-person to remote classes during the pandemic had on undergraduate education in STEM. Pagoto and Xu also submitted an R01 to develop and test the feasibility of a social media campaign for parents of children who play sports as well as two R01 subcontracts with Klein Buendel, a health communication and technology firm, to address vaccine hesitancy. Graduate student Jared Goetz submitted an F31 application and received a promising score. This past year, Pagoto’s team completed its work on two R01 studies and an R21 study.


Research Dissemination via Multiple Media Outlets

In addition to their funded research, Pagoto, Waring, and Xu gave numerous invited talks and authored 20 interactive poster presentations for virtual research conferences this past year. CHaSM core faculty and students authored 30 peer-reviewed papers in highimpact journals including JAMA Pediatrics, JMIR, and the American Journal of Public Health. Pagoto’s work and comments have appeared in dozens of online publications, including TIME, HuffPost, VOX, and Inside Higher Ed. The Center ramped up its training efforts in FY21, hosting monthly webinars on topics such as “How to Move your Behavioral Research Online” and “How Did You Get That Job? A Digital Health Industry Career Panel.” These webinars attracted over 700 live attendees and have garnered over 4,500 views on YouTube. The entire catalog of Center webinars is available for ondemand viewing.

Virtual Annual Conference on COVID-19

The Center hosted its 5th Annual Conference on May 13-14, 2021, using a virtual format. The theme for the 2021 Annual CHaSM Conference was “The COVID-19 Pandemic: Media, Misinformation, and Science Communication.” The COVID-19 pandemic has made it abundantly clear how misinformation on the Internet can have dire public health consequences and the important role scientists have in communicating to the public. At this two-day Conference, participants

discussed how scientists, clinicians, public health professionals, and patients can work together to counteract the infodemic. JMIR Infodemiology, a journal launched in 2021, sponsored the Opening Keynote and Video Poster Awards. Hosting the Conference virtually facilitated worldwide participation with scholars from 127 institutions in 21 countries and six continents. The virtual format also allowed the Center to record and publish each talk for on-demand viewing. The esteemed keynote speakers were Alison Buttenheim, PhD, MBA (University of Pennsylvania), Natalie Lambert, PhD (Indiana University School of Medicine), Wizdom Powell, PhD (Psychiatry/Health Disparities Institute), and Scott Ratzan, MD, MPA (City University of New York). The panelists were Monica Wang, ScD (Boston University), Jessica Gold, MD, MS (Washington University in St. Louis), Eleanor Murray, ScD (Boston University), Eugenia South, MD, MSHP (University of Pennsylvania), Natalie Shook, PhD (Nursing), and Jasmin Tiro, PhD (University of Texas). The Conference also featured six oral paper presentations and 34 video posters. Attendees viewed the two-minute video posters at their leisure and participated in informal breakout discussions with the poster authors over Zoom. Seven video poster authors and attendees were selected to receive awards; each recipient received 500 JMIR Karma credits or an invitation to publish in a JMIR journal.

Centers & RIGS

42


COLLABORATORY ON SCHOOL AND CHILD HEALTH

FOCUSES ON WELL-BEING OF STUDENTS, STAFF, AND FAMILIES

InCHIP’s Collaboratory on School and Child Health (CSCH) was established in 2016. CSCH is committed to anti-racist work that prioritizes inclusion, reduces disparities, and creates systemic change, which is reflected in it newly updated mission to facilitate innovative and impactful connections across research, policy, and practice arenas to advance equity in school and child health.

U

nder the leadership of Director Sandy Chafouleas, PhD (Educational Psychology), CSCH had a productive FY21, increasing the number of affiliates to 174, developing targeted resources for schools in response to COVID-19, disseminating important research findings, and hosting two successful virtual events: one for CSCH affiliates and one with Public Health House students and affiliates studying mental health. CSCH Response to COVID-19 In response to the pandemic, the Collaboratory published materials in FY20 that focused on the need for a whole child approach in reopening guidance, strategies for fostering an emotionally safe environment, and planning for trauma-informed assessment in schools. In FY21, CSCH continued its work to address immediate school needs, publishing a Crosswalk that aligned school operating guidance plans with components of the Whole School, Whole

43

Centers & RIGS

Community, Whole Child model and enabled schools to see which plans met their needs. In early fall 2020, with funding from both the State of Connecticut and the Neag Foundation, CSCH surveyed Connecticut school administrators about their shifting priorities due to the pandemic (see the CSCH Brief, Connecticut School Administrator Perspectives on Shifting Priorities During COVID-19). When administrators named social and emotional wellness as a critical concern, CSCH pivoted to produce its “Spotlight on Well-being During COVID” three-part podcast series. The series brought together affiliate researchers and practitioners to discuss how schools and communities could address the wellness of school staff, families, and children. Dissemination of CSCH Affiliate Research The Collaboratory continued to focus on disseminating research findings during the 2020-21 academic year


via written materials, affiliate and project profiles, and podcasts. Briefs, Reports, and Profiles CSCH released 12 publications in FY21 that covered a range of topics in addition to the ones mentioned above, including the impact of the pandemic on the family caregivers of children with and without disabilities (Chafouleas; Emily Iovino, PhD, InCHIP); virtual peace rooms that use restorative justice practices (Caitlin Elsaesser, PhD, Social Work); alternative practices to exclusionary discipline (Chafouleas; Jennifer Dineen, PhD, Public Policy); the well-being of college students (Iovino; Chafouleas); how reducing poverty can prevent child neglect (Kerri Raissian, PhD, Public Policy; Megan Feely, PhD, Social Work); teacher well-being (Lisa Sanetti, PhD, Educational Psychology; Alicia Dugan, PhD, Medicine; Jennifer Cavallari, ScD, Public Health Sciences); and teacher mental health (Sanetti; Cavallari; Dugan). In addition to briefs and reports, CSCH profiled 10 affiliate researchers and projects this past year on social media. These profiles can be accessed on the CSCH News Archive. Podcast Episodes CSCH produced six episodes of the CSCH Podcast (searchable through podcatchers like iTunes, Spotify, and others), which covered the following topics: The impact of COVID-19 on: • School Employee Wellness (Sanetti; Taylor Koriakin, PhD, EASTCONN; Ravit Stein, PhD, EASTCONN) • Family Wellness (Alice Forrester, PhD, Clifford Beers Clinic; Beth Russell, PhD, HDFS; Iovino) • Child Wellness (Jeana Bracey, PhD, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut; Damion Grasso, PhD, Psychiatry/Pediatrics) • The importance of physical activity on well-being (Jaci VanHeest, PhD, Educational Psychology; Nneka Arinze, PhD, Educational Leadership; Cassandra Rowett, E.O. Smith High School/Eastern Connecticut State University) • The potential impact of sport and physical activity on youth living in poverty (Jesse Mala, PhD, Educational Leadership) • School personnel and parents’ perspectives on the role schools play in identifying and supporting students’ social, emotional, and behavioral needs (Chafouleas)

Affiliate and Project Profiles CSCH highlighted the work of affiliates on social media, using researcher and project profiles in addition to the briefs and reports. CSCH profiled ten affiliates and affiliate projects this year. New Collaborative Projects Providing School Wellness Policy Evaluation Technical Assistance to Districts Together with the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity, CSCH is working with the State Department of Education and Connecticut school districts to fill an identified professional learning gap in district knowledge about the evaluation of school wellness policies. Using Puppetry to Teach Strategies for Emotional Wellness CSCH has partnered with the UConn Ballard Institute of Puppetry on a project that utilizes puppetry to teach skills in supporting positive emotions. Social, Emotional, and Behavioral School Principal Academy In collaboration with the UConn Center for Education Policy Analysis, Research, and Evaluation, CSCH is coordinating an innovative pilot program for Connecticut Alliance Districts on strengthening equity in social, emotional, and behavioral policies and practices through a whole child and school lens. A Principal Academy (a professional learning program for principals) was held in June 2021 and will be followed by monthly cohort networking meetings throughout the 2021-22 school year.

The resources available online through the UConn Collaboratory on School and Child Health provide educators, families, and community members with free, open access to timely topics directly from the researchers. The briefs and reports provide an avenue to information on current research and evidencebased practices on important topics including fostering social and emotional well-being and establishing healthy, positive school communities.”

-Erica Kaurudar, DEd, NCSP, Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network

Centers & RIGS

44


RESEARCH INTEREST GROUPS

INCLUDE EVENTS ON GUN VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND MINDFULNESS InCHIP RIGs provide a forum for researchers from different disciplines, departments, schools, campuses, and community organizations to work collaboratively in specific health domains. The RIGs range in size from 50 members in the Gun Violence Prevention RIG to 240 members in the eHealth/ mHealth RIG. InCHIP RIGs and their Directors: • Aging: Terry Berthelot, JD, MSW (HDFS) • Cancer: Crystal Park, PhD (Psychological Sciences) • eHealth/mHealth: Sherry Pagoto, PhD (Allied Health Sciences/Center for mHealth and Social Media) • Gun Violence Prevention: Mary Bernstein, PhD (Sociology); Jennifer Dineen, PhD (Public Policy); Kerri Raissian, PhD (Public Policy) • HIV: Deborah Cornman, PhD (InCHIP) • Interprofessional Healthcare: Michelle Judge, PhD, RD (Nursing) • Mind-Body Health: Melissa Bray, PhD (School Psychology); Mary Guerrera, MD (Family Medicine); Sandra Bushmich, DVM (Pathobiology and Veterinary Science); Ana Maria Verissimo, MD (Pediatrics) • Obesity: Kim Gans, PhD, MPH (HDFS); Amy Gorin, PhD (Psychological Sciences/InCHIP) To foster connection and innovation in these multidisciplinary communities, RIG leaders organize a variety of activities, such as networking events, research retreats, training workshops, and lectures. 45

Centers & RIGS

Gun Violence Prevention RIG Brings Together Senators, University Scholars, and Community Experts InCHIP’s Gun Violence Prevention Research Interest Group (GVP RIG) seeks evidencebased solutions to reducing all forms of gun violence. The GVP RIG connects scholars with each other and with resources to enhance the quality and scope of their research. In FY21, the GVP RIG’s first full year, the group grew to over 50 affiliates, brought together diverse stakeholder groups to explore policies and practices aimed at gun violence prevention, and deepened research connections across UConn and beyond. In February, the GVP RIG cohosted an InCHIP Lecture Series presentation by firearm injury prevention expert Megan Ranney, MD, MPH (Associate Dean of Strategy and Innovation, Brown University School of Public Health / Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University / Chief Research Officer, American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction in Medicine). In addition, the RIG organized and hosted two very well-attended virtual events that included Connecticut’s U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy: “Promoting Alternatives to Police in Schools: Addressing the School-to-Prison Pipeline.” In October, this online panel discussion centered on bill S. 4360: Counseling Not Criminalization


Panel participants included Connecticut State Representative Jillian Gilchrest, MSW; Kiel Brennan–Marquez, JD (Law); and Caitlin Elsaesser, PhD (Social Work). Graduate students Cassandra Devaney (Law) and John Monet (Public Policy) moderated the Q&A portion of the event. Over 200 people attended virtually. Recordings of both events, as well as discussion materials, can be accessed on the Gun Violence Prevention RIG webpage. Senator Richard Blumenthal and Senator Chris Murphy in Schools Act, which would “divert Federal funding away from supporting the presence of police in schools and toward evidence-based and trauma informed services that address the needs of marginalized students and improve academic outcomes.” The event included remarks from Senator Murphy and insights from panelists Steven Hernández, JD (Executive Director, Connecticut Commission on Women, Children, and Seniors), Leonard Jahad (Executive Director, Connecticut Violence Intervention Program), and Aaron Kupchik, PhD (Sociology & Criminal Justice, University of Delaware). The panel was moderated by Sandra Chafouleas, PhD (Educational Psychology/CSCH) with opening and closing remarks delivered by then UConn President Thomas Katsouleas, PhD and UConn Provost Carl Lejuez, PhD. Over 300 people attended the event. “Gun Laws in America: What Works and What’s Possible.” Held on April 1, this virtual panel discussion focused on the interplay between federal, state, and local gun laws; the types of laws that have a causal effect on gun violence; and the extent to which laws can promote successful intervention in our communities. Panelists included Senators Blumenthal and Murphy, Cassandra Crifasi, PhD, MPH (Deputy Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Violence Prevention and Policy), and Jacquelyn Santiago, MS (Chief Executive Officer, COMPASS Youth Collaborative). Opening and closing remarks were made by President Katsouleas and Provost Lejuez, respectively. The panel was moderated by Alan Bennett (Director, The UConn Foundation).

Mind-Body Health RIG Sponsors Workshop on Mindfulness On February 24, 2021, the Mind-Body Health RIG hosted a virtual workshop entitled “Working Together to Build the Science and Practice of Mind-Body Health,” featuring Vamsi Koneru, PhD Vamsi Koneru, PhD from the Copper Beech Institute. This popular event was attended by 121 individuals, including UConn faculty, staff, undergraduates, and graduate students, as well as many people from outside UConn. Koneru did a tremendous job leading the event, integrating research data, mindfulness practices, and personal stories. The workshop is available for viewing on InCHIP’s YouTube page. A second workshop on mindfulness is planned for the fall of 2021.

Centers & RIGS

46


Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP) Amy Gorin, PhD Director

InCHIP Centers

Research Training & Development

Deborah Cornman, PhD Associate Director

Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity Marlene Schwartz, PhD, Director

Grace Morris, MA Research Development Specialist Research Assistant 1 (In Process)

Center for mHealth and Social Media Sherry Pagoto, PhD, Director Collaboratory on School and Child Health Sandra Chafouleas, PhD, Director

Grants Management & Business Services

Steven Jagielo Director of Administration & Business Services

Grants Management

Information Technology

Administrative Services

AnnMarie White Grants Manager

Josh Hardin Computer Tech Support Consultant 1

Melissa Stone Financial Assistant 2

Research Interest Groups Aging Terry Berthelot, JD, MSW Chair

HIV Deborah Cornman, PhD Chair

Cancer Crystal Park, PhD Chair

Interprofessional Health Care Michelle Judge, PhD, RD, CD‐N Chair

eHealth/mHealth Sherry Pagoto, PhD Chair

Melissa A. Bray, PhD; Mary P. Guerrera, MD; Sandra Bushmich, DVM; Ana Maria Verissimo, MD Co-Chairs

Gun Violence Prevention

Mary Bernstein, PhD; Jennifer Dineen, PhD; Kerri Raissian, PhD

Co-Chairs

Mind-Body Health

Obesity

Kim Gans, PhD; Amy Gorin, PhD Co‐Chairs

47 Appendix I

Michelle Bates Grants and Contract Assistant 1

Lynne Hendrickson Financial Assistant 2 Financial Assistant 1 Rudd Center (In Process)

Niva Ranjeet Financial Assistant 1

Jess Deojay ‐ CHaSM Program Assistant 1

Melanie Skolnick Program Assistant 1

Research Manager (In Process)


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Acabchuk, Rebecca * CHIP

$19,990

$19,990

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

Andreyeva, Tatiana

$93,743

$12,329

$3,477

$15,806

4.9

09/19/16

07/31/21

Tufts University/ USDA

Andreyeva, Tatiana * ARE

$129,698

$29,518

$10,331

$39,849

3.6

03/01/19

09/29/22

CT DPH/CDC

Andreyeva, Tatiana

ARE

$150,700

$0

$0

$0

1.5

03/01/19

08/31/20

RWJF

Andreyeva, Tatiana

ARE

$24,132

$0

$0

$0

1.0

09/30/19

09/29/20

CDSE/USDA

Andreyeva, Tatiana

ARE

$200,000

$58,188

$6,983

$65,171

2.0

02/01/20

01/31/22

RWJF/HER

$30,102

$26,877

$3,225

$30,102

0.4

11/01/20

03/31/21

American Heart Association

Principal Investigator

Dept

ARE

Andreyeva, Tatiana * ARE

Total Costs Awarded

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$19,990

1.8

03/01/21

12/31/22

Mind and Life Institute

Title Assessing Feasibility and Acceptability of Integrated Mindfulness Programs in Schools: Case Study Evaluation of the Mindfulness Director Initiative The Tufts/University of Connecticut Research and Development Grants in Economics Center (Tufts/ UConn RIDGE Center) Improving Nutrition Standards in Early Childhood Education Settings The Impact of the Community Eligibility Provision: A National Quasi-Experimental Evaluation Capabilities of an Online Training Platform for the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) The Role of the Child and Adult Care Food Program in Improving Food Access and Reducing Dietary and Health Inequities Voices for Healthy Kids/ Rudd Center Sugary Drink Tax Calculator

* Indicates that the project or a portion of the project was newly awarded in FY21. Appendix II

48


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Andreyeva, Tatiana * ARE

$55,024

$49,129

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $5,895

Blackman Carr, Loneke

NUSC

$394,162

$73,208

$44,657

$117,865

3.2

04/10/20

06/30/23

Duke University/ RWJF

Butler, Lisa

CHIP

$3,226,304

$0

$0

$0

6.3

05/01/16

07/31/22

NIH/NIMH

Butler, Lisa

CHIP

$100,000

$0

$0

$0

2.5

05/01/18

10/31/20

Gates Foundation

Butler, Lisa

CHIP

$69,146

$14,001

$8,541

$22,542

3.0

04/01/18

03/31/21

Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Butler, Lisa *

CHIP

$299,411

$252,170

$47,241

$299,411

1.0

03/29/21

03/28/22

MERCK

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

49 Appendix II

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$55,024

0.3

03/31/21

06/30/21

American Heart Association

Title Tiered Taxation: Revenue Implications, Preferences, and Outcomes of Counseling Into the Cloud: Examining Recruitment of Minorities at Risk for Cardiovascular Disease into a Digital Health Intervention to Improve Diet Quality Multi-Sectoral Agricultural Intervention to Improve Nutrition, Health and Developmental Outcomes of HIV-Infected and Affected Children in Western Kenya Optimizing Mother & Child Health and Development in Botswana Randomized Controlled Trial of Standing Tall - A Community-Based Intervention to Improve Linkage, Retention, and Health Outcomes for Newly Diagnosed HIVPositive South African Youth Engaging Sub-Saharan African Communities in Planning for New HIV Prevention Products: The Implant and Monthly Pill


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Butler, Lisa *

CHIP

$299,233

$170,726

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $51,218

Caspi, Caitlin *

AHS

$1,661,992

$444,699

$60,848

$505,547

2.6

08/20/20

03/31/23

NIH/NIDDK

Caspi, Caitlin *

AHS

$711,652

$258,899

$54,097

$312,996

1.5

08/20/20

03/31/22

NIH/NHLBI

Caspi, Caitlin *

AHS

$9,962

$8,895

$1,067

$9,962

1.0

05/18/21

05/17/22

Duke University/ RWJF

Chafouleas, Sandra

EPSY

$572,850

$90,629

$23,564

$114,193

5.0

07/01/19

06/30/24

University of Kansas/USED

Chafouleas, Sandra *

EPSY

$190,000

$90,000

$0

$90,000

2.0

06/18/20

06/17/22

Provost Office

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$221,944

2.0

03/29/21

03/28/23

MERCK

Appendix II

Title Mixed Methods Study to Explore Perceptions toward Potential COVID-19 Vaccines among Health Care Providers and Key Population Groups in the United States and Canada A Natural Experiment Evaluating the Effect of a Minimum Wage Increase on Obesity and DietRelated Outcome A Multi-Component Intervention in the Hunger Relief Network to Improve Diet Among Adults Experiencing Food Insecurity Validating a Nutrition Ranking System for Food Pantries Against the Healthy Eating Index-2015 Enhancing Ci3T: Building Professional Capacity for High Fidelity Implementation to Support Students’ Educational Outcomes (Project ENHANCE) CSCH Foundation Reimbursement 26139

50


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Cohen, Rachel *

HDFS

$49,760

$45,236

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $4,524

Cooksey-Stowers, Kristen * Copenhaver, Michael

AHS

$43,999

$14,286

$1,714

$16,000

1.4

08/01/19

12/31/20

AHS

$3,165,148

$410,700

$209,060

$619,760

4.8

09/01/17

06/30/22

United Way/ Investment Fund NIH/NIDA

Copenhaver, Michael *

AHS

$947,740

$175,507

$14,041

$189,548

5.0

07/15/20

06/30/25

NIH/NIDA

Cornman, Deborah

CHIP

$439,122

$0

$0

$0

4.9

09/30/15

08/31/20

Yale/NIH

Cornman, Deborah

CHIP

$87,925

$10,923

$6,662

$17,585

4.8

05/01/18

02/28/23

NIH/NIMH/Yale University

Cornman, Deborah

CHIP

$50,000

$0

$0

$0

1.2

05/04/20

06/30/21

Cruess, Dean

PSYC

$116,371

$0

$0

$0

5.0

04/01/16

03/31/21

Waterbury Police/ University of Baltimore/ Office of National Drug Control Policy Miriam Hospital / NIH/NICCIH

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

51 Appendix II

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$49,760

0.5

01/01/21

06/30/21

Portland State Perigee Foundation

Title National Study of Parent Experiences with Technology-Enabled PN-3 Family Support Services Invest Health Hartford Testing an Integrated BioBehavioral Primary HIV Prevention Intervention Among High-Risk People Who Use Drugs Optimizing HIV Prevention Among OpioidDependent Persons Working with HIV Clinics to Adopt Addiction Treatments Using Implementation Facilitation (WHAT IF?) Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS (CIRA) RENEWAL Waterbury Warm HandOff Program

Psychosocial, Immunological, and Biobehavioral Benefits of Stress Management Interventions for Chronic Diseases: Comprehensive Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

DiStefano, Lindsay

KINS

$54,524

$0

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

Duffy, Valerie

AHS

$920,564

$252,798

$65,727

$318,525

3.0

10/01/18

09/30/21

DSS/USDA/FNS

Duffy, Valerie

AHS

$25,106

$0

$0

$0

2.0

01/01/19

12/31/20

UCHC/AICR

Eaton, Lisa

HDFS

$3,709,316

$397,933

$183,927

$581,860

5.7

09/26/16

05/31/22

Eaton, Lisa

HDFS

$722,781

$175,000

$106,750

$281,750

3.8

08/01/18

05/31/22

Eaton, Lisa

HDFS

$356,444

$44,691

$27,262

$71,953

4.8

08/01/18

05/31/23

Eaton, Lisa *

HDFS

$2,945,558

$493,591

$129,023

$622,614

4.8

05/15/21

03/31/26

Fein, Deborah

PSYC

$1,372,886

$0

$0

$0

6.0

09/25/14

08/31/20

Fein, Deborah

PSYC

$2,945,807

$354,329

$218,355

$572,684

4.7

09/07/17

05/31/22

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$0

2.1

07/10/18

07/31/20

NATA Research & Education Foundation

Title Comprehensive High School Sport Safety: A Personalized Approach for the Local Implementation of Best Practice Initiatives School and Family-Based SNAP-Ed - RENEWAL

Evaluation of the Preventive and Therapeutic Benefits of the Ellagitannins in the Colon NIH/NIMH Novel Stigma/Structural Interventions for Increasing HIV/STI Testing Among BMSM NIH/NIMH Unified Approach to Address PrEP Cascade for BMSM SDSU/UCSD/ Estimating Mediation NIH/NIDA and Moderation Effects in HIV Incidence Prevention Trials NIH/NIDA Stigma and Substance Use as Barriers to PrEP Linkage, Uptake, Adherence, and Persistence among BMSM Drexel University/ Early Detection of Autism NIH Spectrum Disorders Drexel University/ Connecting the Dots: NIH An RCT Relating Standardized ASD Screening, Intervention Access, and Long-Term Outcomes

Appendix II

52


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Fleming-Milici, Frances

CHIP

$275,964

$0

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

Fleming-Milici, Frances

CHIP

$2,913,913

$929,264

$111,512

$1,040,776

3.0

11/01/19

10/31/22

RWJF

Fiala, Nathan

ARE

$180,780

$34,165

$20,841

$55,006

4.0

06/01/18

06/14/22

Farm Fresh Rhode Island/ USDA

Fiala, Nathan

ARE

$495,539

$115,620

$49,551

$165,171

3.0

05/01/20

04/30/23

USDA/NIFA

Gans, Kim

HDFS

$154,074

$31,092

$18,966

$50,058

3.0

07/15/18

06/30/21

University of Rhode Island/NIH

Gans, Kim *

HDFS

$224,951

$98,468

$11,816

$110,284

2.0

04/01/21

03/31/23

Duke University / RWJF

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

53 Appendix II

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$0

2.5

04/15/19

10/31/21

Duke University/ RWJF

Title Evaluating the Efficacy of Caregiver-Targeted Brief Videos to Discourage SSB Consumption and Encourage Water for Children 9-36 Months Old Encouraging Industry and Government Action to Reduce Marketing of Unhealthy Foods to Children - RENEWAL Optimizing Local Food Outlets: Marketplace and Customer Analysis Across New England Strategies for Economic Growth in Rural New England and Their Impact on Public Health Crises A Home-Based Video and Motivational Interviewing Intervention to Improve Preschoolers Diet Quality and Parental Food Parenting Practices Understanding & Increasing Water Availability and Accessibility in Family Child Care Homes to Improve Young Children’s Water & Sugary Beverage Intake


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Ghosh, Debarchana

GEOG

$863,345

$0

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

Gibbons, Rick

PSYC

$3,229,043

$550,812

$86,570

$637,382

5.0

08/02/18

07/31/23

NIH/NCI

Gibbons, Rick *

PSYC

$333,143

$159,459

$

$159,459

4.0

08/01/19

07/31/23

NIH/NCI

Glenney, Susan *

KINS

$89,210

$17,549

$7,019

$24,568

5.0

05/01/17

04/30/22

UCHC/PCORI

Gorin, Amy

PSYC

$440,875

$0

$0

$0

2.9

09/20/18

08/31/21

NIH/NINR

Gorin, Amy

PSYC

$82,291

$0

$0

$0

2.0

04/01/19

03/31/21

CCMC/NIH

Hennessy, Emily *

CHIP

$192,996

$178,700

$14,296

$192,996

1.0

09/01/20

08/31/21

NIH/NIAAA

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$0

6.0

08/01/14

07/31/20

NIH/NIDA

Appendix II

Title Connecting People, Places, and Barriers: The Effect of These Connections on Adherence and Retention in Care for HIV-Infected Drug Users Contextual and Health Behavior Effects on Epigenetic Aging Among African Americans Contextual and Health Behavior Effects on Epigenetic Aging Among African Americans – SUPPLEMENT 3D Team Care for Cognitively Vulnerable Older Adults Is Long-Term Maintenance Worth the Wait? Using Real Time Data Capture to Examine Delayed Discounting as a Putative Target of Physical Activity Adherence in Weight Loss Maintenance Interventions Pain and Weight Treatment: Development and Trial of PAW Mechanisms of Social Identity, Social Networks, and Recovery Capital: Implications

54


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Johnson, Blair *

PSYC

$663,464

$101,629

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$3,363,244

$0

$0

$0

5.7

09/10/14

05/31/21

NIH/NIAAA

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$1,716,995

$334,950

$16,951

$351,901

5.0

07/01/16

06/30/21

NIH/NIMH

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$3,552,398

$487,908

$195,751

$683,659

5.9

08/15/16

06/30/22

NIH/NIDA

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$303,257

$0

$0

$0

3.5

03/01/17

08/31/20

NIH/NIAAA

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$99,783

$0

$0

$0

3.8

09/01/17

05/31/21

NIH/NIAAA

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$147,737

$0

$0

$0

2.0

07/01/18

06/30/20

NIH/NIDA

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$442,750

$150,000

$91,500

$241,500

3.0

08/01/19

07/31/22

NIH/NIMH

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$133,233

$16,431

$10,024

$26,455

2.4

09/28/19

02/28/22

UCLA/NIH

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

55 Appendix II

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$101,629

6.4

08/01/17

12/31/23

Elsevier LTD

Title Senior Editorship, Social Sciences & Medicine Continuation Comparative Effectiveness Trial for RetentionAdherence-Health Training in Social Processes of HIV/AIDS Unified Intervention to Impact HIV Care Continuum Comparative Effectiveness Trial for RetentionAdherence-Health SUPPLEMENT Comparative Effectiveness Trial for RetentionAdherence-Health - Gender Diversity SUPPLEMENT Unified Intervention to Impact HIV Care Continuum SUPPLEMENT Developing a Novel Approach to Assessing Intersectional Stigma to Advance HIV Prevention Research with Black Men Who Have Sex with Men Effectiveness of a CBT-Based mHealth Intervention Targeting MOUD Retention, Adherence and Opioid Use


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

$514,125

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $76,294

$590,419

4.8

02/01/20

11/30/24

NIH/NIMH

$3,044,245

$518,436

$113,986

$632,422

5.0

12/16/19

11/30/24

NIH/NIMH

PSYC

$32,269

$20,043

$12,226

$32,269

1.0

09/01/20

08/31/21

UCLA/NIH

Kinsey, Steven

NURS

$832,416

$105,745

$64,504

$170,249

4.7

01/01/20

08/31/24

RTI/NIH

Leahey, Tricia

AHS

$3,155,862

$371,996

222,125

$594,121

4.8

08/20/17

05/31/22

NIH/NIDDK

Leahey, Tricia

AHS

$3,333,748

$457,656

$213,620

$671,276

4.8

09/23/19

06/30/24

NIH/NIDDK

Lessard, Leah *

CHIP

$7,500

$7,500

$0

$7,500

2.0

07/01/20

06/30/22

Society for Research on Child Development

Lessard, Leah *

CHIP

$2,000

$2,000

$0

$2,000

1.0

01/01/21

12/31/21

Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI)

Principal Investigator

Total Costs Awarded

Dept

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

$2,955,496

Kalichman, Seth

PSYC

Kalichman, Seth *

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

Appendix II

Title Dose Determination Trial for Implementing Evidence-Based Behavioral Interventions Intervention to Improve HIV Care Retention and Antiretroviral Adherence in Stigmatized Environments Effectiveness of a CBT-Based mHealth Intervention Targeting MOUD Retention, Adherence and Opioid Use - SUPPLEMENT Minor Cannabinoids and Terpenes: Preclinical Evaluation as Analgesics Peer Support for Weight Loss Maintenance Using Behavioral Economic Strategies to Address Obesity in Economically Disadvantaged Adults Harnessing Peer Influence as a Mechanism to Reduce Weight-Based Peer Victimization in Adolescence Reducing Weight Stigma in Adolescence: A Social Norm-Based Intervention

56


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Mancini, Sally

CHIP

$191,511

$55,213

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

McCaffery, Jeanne

AHS

$53,281

$0

$0

$0

1.8

02/01/19

12/01/20

Center for Agriculture and Food Systems, Vermont Law School (CAFS)/ USDA Westat/NIH

Mobley, Amy / Gans, NUSC Kim HDFS

$149,996

$0

$0

$0

4.6

06/01/17

12/31/21

USDA/NIFA

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$446,628

$0

$0

$0

3.3

08/23/17

12/31/20

Klein Buendel/ NIH/NCI

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$1,219,218

$0

$0

$0

2.9

08/23/17

07/31/20

NIH/NCI

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$715,467

$117,605

$71,739

$189,344

4.8

08/23/17

05/31/22

University of Kentucky/NIH

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$86,377

$4,659

$2,841

$7,500

5.0

08/23/17

07/31/22

Klein Buendel/ NIH/NCI

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$376,782

$0

$0

$0

3.0

04/01/18

03/31/21

NIH/NCI

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

57 Appendix II

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

$55,213

4.0

10/01/17

09/17/21

Agency

Title Foodworks: Pioneering State and Local Food Policies - RENEWAL

Randomized Controlled Trials of Lifestyle Weight Loss Interventions for Genome-Wide Association Studies Development and Pilot Testing of mHealth Enhancements for a Father-Focused Childhood Obesity Prevention Program Likes Pins and Views: Engaging Moms on Teen Indoor Tanning Thru Social Media Get Social: Randomized Trial of a Social NetworkDelivered Lifestyle Intervention Randomized Trial of a Behavioral Intervention Targeting Indoor Tanning Users Using Technology to Scale-Up an Occupational Sun Protection Policy Program Using a Narrative-Based Approach to Reducing Indoor Tanning


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$485,884

$57,441

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $35,039

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$358,901

$37,071

$22,613

$59,684

5.0

07/01/18

06/30/23

Vanderbilt University/NIH

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$67,758

$19,506

11,898

$31,404

3.0

06/01/19

05/31/22

Rutgers University/NIH

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$352,263

$0

$0

$0

1.8

03/01/20

12/31/21

Weight Watchers

Pagoto, Sherry

AHS

$71,408

$0

$0

$0

1.0

05/01/20

04/30/21

NSF

Pagoto, Sherry *

AHS

$648,606

$121,715

$9,737

$131,452

5.0

07/15/20

06/30/25

NIH

Pagoto, Sherry *

AHS

$709,180

$178,273

$67,802

$246,075

3.0

09/01/20

08/31/23

NIH/NHLBI

Pagoto, Sherry *

AHS

$61,777

$38,371

$23,406

$61,777

1.0

06/01/20

05/31/21

Rutgers/NIH

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$92,480

4.8

07/01/18

05/31/23

Rutgers University/NIH

Appendix II

Title Facebook Intervention for Young Onset Melanoma Patients and Families Communication and Coping: Addressing Mothers’ Needs to Improve Outcomes in Adolescents with T1D Randomized Trial of a Behavioral Intervention Targeting Indoor Tanning Users - SUPPLEMENT Single Arm Trial of a Multi-Component Commercial Digital Weight Loss Program RAPID: Collaborative Research: Differential impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Undergraduate STEM Education Mentoring in mHealth and Social Networking Interventions for CVD Risk Reduction Building Habits Together: Feasibility Trial of an Integrated Mobile and Social Network Weight Loss Intervention Facebook Intervention for Young Onset Melanoma Patients and Families SUPPLEMENT

58


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Pagoto, Sherry *

AHS

$40,835

$25,363

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $15,472

Park, Crystal

PSYC

$2,706,581

413,711

$210,794

$624,505

4.9

09/25/17

08/31/22

NIH/NCI

Park, Crystal

PSYC

$234,800

$0

$0

$0

2.0

01/01/18

12/31/20

John Templeton Foundation

Park, Crystal

PSYC

$234,207

$0

$0

$0

3.0

01/01/18

12/31/21

John Templeton Foundation

Park, Crystal / Fendrich, Michael / Russell, Beth

PSYC HDFS SOWK

$694,314

$143,750

$87,688

$231,438

2.9

09/25/19

08/31/22

NIH/NIAAA

Park, Crystal / Starkweather, Angela

PSYC NURS

$3,084,633

$355,201

$196,357

$551,558

5.0

06/01/20

05/31/25

NIH/NCCIH

Park, Crystal

PSYC

$541,336

$114,056

$17,108

$131,164

3.0

09/01/19

08/31/22

Biola University/ John Templeton Foundation

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

59 Appendix II

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$40,835

1.4

07/01/20

11/30/21

Klein Buendel/ NIH/NCI

Title Likes Pins and Views: Engaging Moms on Teen Indoor Tanning Thru Social Media SUPPLEMENT Multilevel Resilience Trajectories in the Transition to Cancer Survivorship Development and Validation of a Measure of Implicit and Explicit Religious Beliefs Systematic Investigation of US Federal Investments in Research on Religion and Health Emotion Regulation Interventions for Preventing Collegiate Escalations in Drinking: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Establish Acceptability, Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy Emotion Regulation as a Primary Mechanism of Action in Yoga Interventions for Chronic Low Back Pain: An RCT Testing Biological and Psychological Pathways Christian MeaningMaking, Suffering and the Flourishing Life


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Park, Crystal *

PSYC

$176,000

$71,842

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

Park, Crystal *

PSYC

$224,936

$95,851

$14,378

$110,229

2.1

10/01/20

10/31/22

Biola University/ John Templeton Foundation

Park, Crystal / PSYC Chafouleas, Sandra / EPSY Hoeft, Fumiko * PSYC

$2,431,836

$352,128

$214,798

$566,926

4.0

02/01/21

01/31/25

NIH/NCCIH

Puhl, Rebecca

HDFS

$229,587

$0

$0

$0

1.8

11/01/19

08/31/21

Weight Watchers

Rickles, Nathaniel

PHAR

$627,410

$99,589

$25,893

$125,482

4.9

11/01/18

09/29/23

CT DPH/CDC

Rickles, Nathaniel *

PHAR

$264,069

$50,793

$13,207

$64,000

3.0

09/30/19

09/29/22

CT DHMAS

Sanetti, Lisa *

EPSY

$1,051,645

$50,883

$2,481

$53,364

5.0

10/01/20

09/30/25

US Department of Education

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$71,842

2.0

09/01/20

08/31/22

Issachar Fund/ Templeton

Appendix II

Title Predominance or Balance of Scientific or Religious Influences on Meaning Systems in Understanding and Adaptive Behavior Interplay Among Gratitude to God, Favorable and Adverse Life Circumstances, and Religiousness Network to Advance the Study of Mechanisms Underlying MindBody Interventions and Measurement of Emotional Wellbeing A Multi-National Comparison of Weight Stigma, Internalized Bias, and Coping Strategies Among Adults Engaged in Weight Management Engaging Community Pharmacies as Partners in Advancing Participation in the WISEWOMAN Project Academic Detailing on Opioid Safety in CT Project I3-PREP: Interdisciplinary Preparation in Integrated and Intensive Practices

60


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Schwartz, Marlene *

HDFS

$735,342

$138,066

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $16,569

Schwartz, Marlene *

HDFS

$260,606

$41,518

$4,982

$46,500

6.0

01/06/15

12/31/21

Schwartz, Marlene

HDFS

$200,887

$23,512

$14,342

$37,854

4.8

09/01/17

06/30/22

Schwartz, Marlene

HDFS

$148,550

$23,512

$14,342

$37,854

4.8

07/01/18

04/30/22

Schwartz, Marlene

HDFS

$24,969

$0

$0

$0

1.0

07/01/19

12/31/20

Schwartz, Marlene / Chafouleas, Sandra

HDFS EPSY

$79,750

$0

$0

$0

1.0

09/30/19

09/29/20

Schwartz, Marlene

HDFS

$15,287

$0

$0

$0

0.5

05/01/20

10/31/20

Schwartz, Marlene *

HDFS

$58,770

$58,770

$0

$58,770

0.8

12/01/20

09/30/21

Schwartz, Marlene *

HDFS

$150,000

$150,000

$0

$150,000

1.0

04/01/21

03/31/22

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

61 Appendix II

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

$154,635

4.0

01/01/17

12/13/21

Agency Horizon Foundation

Title

Improving Nutrition in Howard County: A Strategic Science and Policy Initiative CONTINUATION Partnership for a Evaluation of Healthier America Commitments Made by Child Care Centers with Partnership for a Healthier America CONTINUATION University of Communicating the Pennsylvania/ Health Risks of SugarNIH Sweetened Beverages University of A Randomized Trial of Pennsylvania/ Web-Based Behavioral NIH Economic Interventions to Promote Healthy Food Choices Among Food Pantry Clients Kansas Health Evaluating the Kansas Foundation School Wellness Policy Initiative CDSE Assessing Connecticut District Policies using the WSCC Model Duke University/ Phase II: Nutrition RWJF Guidelines for the Charitable Food System CSDE/USDA Assessing Connecticut District Policies using the WSCC Model CSDE/USDA Connecticut 2021 Summer Food Service Program


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Shook, Natalie

NURS

$182,574

$0

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

Shrestha, Roman *

AHS

$418,698

$154,695

$57,872

$212,567

1.6

01/01/21

07/31/22

NIH/NIDA

Shrestha, Roman * Shrestha, Roman *

AHS

$823,183

$90,351

$7,228

$97,579

4.5

01/01/21

06/30/25

NIH/NIDA

AHS

$10,679

$9,888

$791

$10,679

0.7

01/01/21

08/31/21

Fordham University/NIH

Shrestha, Roman *

AHS

$1,308,761

$126,611

$76,512

$203,123

4.5

01/01/21

06/30/25

Fogarty International Center/NIH

Shrestha, Roman *

AHS

$137,737

$49,969

$30,481

$80,450

1.9

04/28/21

03/31/23

Yale University/ NIH

Snyder, Leslie *

COMM $363,598

$46,871

$28,591

$75,462

3.0

04/01/18

03/31/21

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center /NIH

MsFLASH: Living a Healthy Menopause

Sosis, Richard

ANTH

$86,331

$12,950

$99,281

2.8

09/01/19

05/18/22

University of Otago/John Templeton

The Evolutionary Dynamics of Religion, Family Size, and Child Success

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

$286,134

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

End Date

Agency

$0

1.0

03/23/20

03/31/21

NSF

Appendix II

Title RAPID: Characterizing Changes in Social Attitudes and Behavior in Response to COVID-19 Integrated Rapid Access to HIV Prevention Program for People Who Inject Drugs (iRaPID) Training in mHealth Prevention with MSM. Exploring Ethical Concerns Related to Participation in a Smartphone App-Based HIV Prevention Research Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Malaysia Development and Testing of a Mobile Application to Enhance HIV Prevention Cascade in Malaysian MSM Improving HIV Testing and PrEP for Transgender Women Through mHealth

62


APPENDIX II: InCHIP FY21 Newly Awarded and Active Grants (July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021)

Sosis, Richard

ANTH

$60,024

$25,716

FY21 Indirect Costs Awarded $0

Waring, Molly

AHS

$702,982

$0

$0

$0

4.3

08/23/17

12/31/21

NIH/NHLBI

Watson, Ryan

HDFS

$952,225

$176,338

$14,107

$190,445

5.0

04/01/19

03/31/24

NIH

Watson, Ryan

HDFS

$182,051

$63,622

$19,854

$83,476

3.0

09/15/19

08/31/22

NIH

White, C. Michael

PHAR

$305,000

$0

$0

$0

5.8

12/01/14

08/31/20

AHRQ

Willen, Sarah

ANTH

$699,960

$0

$0

$0

4.0

10/15/17

10/14/21

RWJF

TOTAL ACTIVE GRANTS AWARD

119

$86,098,666

$12,846,591 $3,967,613

Principal Investigator

Dept

Total Costs Awarded

63 Appendix II

FY21 Direct Costs Awarded

FY21 Total Costs Awarded

Yrs

Start Date

$25,716

2.3

03/01/20

$16,814,204

End Date

Agency

Title

05/31/22

University of Oxford/Templeton Religion Trust

Religion and Sport: An Ethnographic Study of the Adaptive Consequences of Syncretic Meaning Systems Delivering a Post-Partum Weight Loss Intervention via Facebook vs In-Person Groups: A Feasibility Pilot Trial PrEP and Substance Use Among Sexual Minority Young Adults SGM Youth Substance Use: Subgroup Differences, Risk, and Protective Factors Evidence-Based Practice Center (EPC) V Who Deserves a Healthy Life? How Implicit “Deservingness Assessments” Can Advance, or Obstruct, Efforts to Tackle Health Inequities


Department Abbreviation Index ARE

Agricultural and Resource Economics

HDFS

Human Development and Family Sciences

AHS

Allied Health Sciences

KINS Kinesiology

ANTH Anthropology

NURS Nursing

CHIP

NUSC

Nutritional Sciences

COMM Communication

PHAR

Pharmacy Practice

EPSY

PSYC

Psychological Sciences

SOWK

Social Work

Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy Educational Psychology

GEOG Geography

Appendix II

64


65

Profile for UConn_InCHIP

InCHIP Annual Report FY21  

This is the Annual Report of UConn's Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy. It reflects activities during the repo...

InCHIP Annual Report FY21  

This is the Annual Report of UConn's Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy. It reflects activities during the repo...

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