Issuu on Google+

Brain Food

LONDON’S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

Public events at UCL: January–April 2013

www.ucl.ac.uk/events

Welcome to UCL’s public events leaflet highlighting talks, exhibitions, workshops, film screenings and activities from across the university. In this issue, we see the reopening of UCL’s Flaxman Gallery and the launch of the new interactive Octagon Gallery exhibiting previously unseen items from UCL’s extensive collections. This term there is a diverse programme of talks from UCL’s Institute of Jewish Studies and a range of interesting discussions from UCL’s new Institute of the Americas. Finally, UCL’s Lunch Hour Lectures once again deliver bite-sized talks on topics ranging from diet and ageing to the Eurozone crisis. For a full listing and to find out more information, visit our online events calendar:

www.ucl.ac.uk/events

Cover image (detail): Map of Asia Hensel Synopsis universae philologiae (1741) UCL Library Special Collections

Talks

02

Lunch Hour Lectures

07

Activities

13

Performances

17

Exhibitions

22

Events diary

26

Venues/maps

28

Please note: all events are free and open to all, unless otherwise stated. Listings are correct at time of going to press. Watch online www.youtube.com/UCLTV http://itunes.ucl.ac.uk Read our blog http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/events Subscribe to our newsletter events@ucl.ac.uk Follow on Twitter @UCLEvents

01

Talks Lectures Discussions

The developmental challenges of mining and oil UCL Institute of the Americas hosts a book launch and discussion on the development and challenges of mining oil. One of the book’s authors, Dr Rosemary Thorp (University of Oxford), will join the discussion. Wed 16 Jan  |  5.30–7.30pm UCL Institute of the Americas Seminar Room 103 Pre-booking recommended Followed by a drinks reception o.martinez@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 9721

The life and work of Michel-Rolph Trouillot This panel discussion reflects on the life and work of Michel-Rolph Trouillot, author of pioneering studies on Haiti and the Caribbean, and explores his lasting contribution to the fields of anthropology, history and politics. Wed 23 Jan  |  5.30–7.30pm UCL Institute of the Americas Seminar Room 103 Pre-booking recommended Followed by a drinks reception o.martinez@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 9721 02

Literature, politics and the Dutch Republic In this special lecture organised by the UCL Centre for Early Modern Exchanges, Professor Nigel Smith (Princeton University) talks about his work on 17th-century literature and politics. Thurs 24 Jan  |  6–7.30pm Ramsay Lecture Theatre h.hackett@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3127

America Imagined: explaining the United States in 19th-century Europe and Latin America Professor Miles Taylor (Institute of Historical Research) and Professor Guy Thomson (University of Warwick) discuss the United States in 19th-century Europe and Latin America to mark the launch of this new book. Wed 30 Jan  |  5.30–7.30pm UCL Institute of the Americas Seminar Room 103 Pre-booking essential Followed by a drinks reception o.martinez@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 9721

Transmission and translation of trauma – interviews with underage Holocaust survivors

Library of Congress

In 1946, psychologist David Boder recorded interviews with more than 100 survivors of the Nazi persecution, constituting one of the first oral history projects with survivors. Dr Beate Müller (University of Newcastle) discusses his work. Thurs 24 Jan  |  6.45–8pm Pearson Lecture Theatre s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520 UCL Institute of the Americas book launches, 16 and 30 Jan

03

Talks/Lectures/Discussions

Isaiah Berlin Taking a fresh look at the philosopher and political thinker Sir Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997), this contextualised study of his formative years gives a reappraisal of his theory of liberalism. Thurs 31 Jan   |  6.45–8pm Pearson Lecture Theatre s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

A small town near Auschwitz: ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust Using letters, memoirs, testimonies and interviews, Professor Mary Fulbrook (UCL German) pieces together one man’s role in the unfolding degradation of the Jews, resulting in 85,000 Jews being sent to the gas chambers. Wed 6 Feb |  6.45–8pm Pearson Lecture Theatre s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

04

Timekeeper in Residence at the Petrie Join the Petrie Museum’s Timekeeper in Residence, artist-curator Cathy Haynes for a series of conversations with time specialists from music to mapmaking, as they debate what time actually is. Check online for information on her weekly guests. Tues 12 & Thurs 28 Feb, Thurs 21 & Tue 26 March  |  6–8pm UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology Pre-booking essential www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/petrie Tel: +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Every good thing: objects from the Petrie Museum in celebration of LGBT History Month Utilising artefacts from ancient Egypt, Egyptologist John J. Johnston discusses objects selected by prominent members of the LGBT community that further our understanding of the LGBT experience in the ancient world. Tues 26 Feb  |  6–8pm UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology Pre-booking essential, Followed by a drinks reception events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Sport and British Jewry (1890–1970)

We are here: memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust

Giving a broad overview of Jewish involvement in British sport, this lecture discusses how sport not only affected the way that Jews thought about their identities and culture, but also how they were perceived by the wider non-Jewish population.

Writer Ellen Cassedy explores how a nation divided by competing histories is, and is not, engaging with its Nazi and Soviet past, and probes the terrain of memory and moral dilemmas.

Tues 26 Feb  |  7–8pm Pearson Lecture Theatre s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

Thurs 7 March  |  7–8.15pm Garwood Lecture Theatre s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

The big question 6.9 billion people live on our planet, but is this too many? Should we control human population growth? Six speakers from the worlds of ecology, history, finance, conservation and economics discuss the undiscussable. UCL Petrie Collection

Wed 6 March   |  6–8.30pm UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Petrie Museum LGBT History Month, 26 Feb

05

Talks/Lectures/Discussions

New perspectives on Caribbean literature As part of a series on the Caribbean by UCL’s Institute of the Americas, Dr Malachi McIntosh (Cambridge University) and Dr Wendy Knepper (Brunel University) discuss new perspectives on literature from this region. Wed 13 March  |  5.30–7.30pm UCL Institute of the Americas Seminar Room 103 Pre-booking essential Followed by a drinks reception o.martinez@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 9721

To what extent was archaeology founded on prejudice? Drawing on her new book, The Archaeology of Race, Debbie Challis (UCL Petrie Museum) explores the application of racial theory to interpret the past in Britain during the late Victorian and Edwardian period. Thurs 14 March  |  6.30–8.30pm UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

06

Identity through difference: Rabbinic Judaism confronts Christian narrative Rabbinic Judaism is the scholarly term for the form of Judaism that emerged after the destruction of the Jerusalem temple (70 CE). Holger Zellentin (University of Nottingham) discusses this term in the context of emerging Christianity. Thurs 14 March  |  7–8.15pm Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

Fighting a spectre in times of war: Soviet Jewry and the heroisation of Bohdan Khmelnitsky Discover how the uprising against the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth led by Bohdan Khmelnitsky (1648–1654) resulted in the creation of a Cossack state and the eventual loss of independence to the Russian Empire. Wed 20 March  |  6.45–8pm Chadwick Lecture Theatre s.benisaac@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3520

Lunch Hour Lectures

From Bletchley Park to modern computing – the value of Twitter

Tuesdays and Thursdays

Codebreaking at Bletchley Park by Alan Turing and others during World War II led to the birth of the modern computer. Marking the centenary of Turing’s birth last year, Dr Black discusses the pivotal role of social media in everything from campaigning for a historical site to improving the quality of software. This lecture is rescheduled from 22 November 2012.

1.15–1.55pm, free, no need to book Places are on a first-come, first-served basis. Please arrive by 1pm to avoid disappointment. c.dean@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 3838 Darwin Lecture Theatre (accessed via Malet Place)

Dr Sue Black, UCL Computer Science

Tues 8 Jan  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Watch online www.youtube.com/ucllhl

Computer History Museum

Watch live www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl/streamed

www.ucl.ac.uk/lhl

Bletchley Park, 8 Jan

07

Lunch Hour Lectures

Gower Street to Euston Square: a local history of the Underground Professor Richard Dennis, UCL Geography

Science for everyone by everyone – the re-emergence of citizen science

When the world’s first underground railway opened in January 1863, it was beset by problems of asphyxiation, inadequate lighting, accidents, explosions and crime. This lecture will show how these issues were countered by the opportunities for improved connectivity, speed and intimacy – as seen through the lens of UCL’s local station.

Professor Muki Haklay, UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering

Tues 15 Jan  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Tues 22 Jan   |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Obama’s America: the significance of the 2012 elections

Xtreme Everest 2 research expedition

Professor Iwan Morgan, UCL Institute of the Americas

Dr Ned Gilbert, UCL Institute of Child Health

Obama won a second term with the support of women, the young, blue collars, African Americans and Latinos. The Republicans retained the support of their habitual white base that in essence represents America’s demographic past. In this polarised nation, how can the United States make progress towards solving its fiscal, environmental and educational problems?

Following their first recordbreaking research expedition in 2007, the Xtreme Everest team will return to Everest in March 2013. Their investigations into the effects of low oxygen on the body at high altitude are identifying mechanisms that may lead to successful treatment of critically ill patients.

Thurs 17 Jan  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre 08

Public participation in scientific research – from birdwatching to stargazing – is not new. This lecture will demonstrate a model for extreme citizen science, in which any community, regardless of their literacy, can utilise scientific methods and tools to understand and control their environment.

Thurs 24 Jan  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Where to give birth, at home or in a hospital? Does it matter? Professor Peter Brocklehurst, UCL Institute for Women’s Health

Gravity and continuum Dr Christian Boehmer, UCL Maths & Physical Sciences

The past 10 years have seen increasing emphasis on the importance of offering healthy women choice in where they give birth. This lecture will discuss the results of the Birthplace in England research project, the implications for maternity policy and the challenges in undertaking large-scale research of this kind.

Within theoretical physics, the gravitational force is the odd one out. It is much weaker than the other forces, its mathematical formulation is different and we are struggling to understand it. This talk outlines a new approach to understanding the gravitational force motivated by ideas from material sciences and the study of crystals.

Tues 29 Jan  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Tues 5 Feb  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Framing the digital: materialising new media Professor Susan Collins, UCL Slade School of Fine Art

Xtreme Everest

How are artists translating or materialising digital works for gallery and physical situations? Professor Collins will show works from the Slade and the Slade Centre for Electronic Media in Fine Art (SCEMFA) over the past decade that explore the material of the digital. Thurs 31 Jan  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre Xtreme Everest 2, 24 Jan

09

Lunch Hour Lectures

The influence of Islam on science

A diet to treat ageing

Dr William MacLehose, UCL Science & Technology Studies

Dr Matt Piper, UCL Institute of Healthy Ageing

The influence of classical Arabic science on the Western scientific tradition has been much discussed, yet these achievements have been variously ignored, overlooked or occasionally overstressed. This lecture discusses the impact that scholars from the Islamic world have made in the fields of medicine, astronomy, optics, geography, mechanics and many other disciplines.

It has been known for some time that moderate dietary restriction can extend healthy lifespan in a variety of organisms. Experiments on fruitflies are uncovering that only very small changes in specific nutrients are required for this effect, and that these new discoveries could be applied to benefit human ageing.

Thurs 7 Feb  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Can the Eurozone crisis be solved? Professor Wendy Carlin, UCL Economics

Thurs 21 Feb  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

By the donzerly light: when our ears play tricks on us

Economists have long been sceptical about the success of a common currency in Europe. Peripheral countries have seen growing public sector deficits and private sector debts, while in the South, wages have increased and productivity decreased. This lecture will set out the risks of full political union and explore whether there is a solution.

Dr Andrew Nevins, UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

Tues 19 Feb  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Tues 26 Feb  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

10

Almost every song lyric can be misunderstood, but while slips of the tongue are well-known, slips of the ear have received far less attention. The lecture looks into recurrent slips to reveal that our expectations can bias what we mishear, but our ears can only deceive us within limits.

Genomics and healthcare Professor Aroon Hingorani, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science

Greater understanding of how genetic differences influence disease susceptibility and drug response has potentially important healthcare applications. This lecture will focus on some of the opportunities and challenges of using genomic information to improve personal and public health, using cardiovascular disease as an example. Thurs 28 Feb  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Scandinavian crime fiction and the end of the welfare state Dr Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen, UCL Scandinavian Studies

The Scandinavian region, with its universal welfare states, is commonly considered a peaceful place, with low rates of crime and high levels of wellbeing. Scandinavian crime fiction offers a much bleaker and more complex image. To what extent does ‘Nordic Noir’ indicate the end of the Nordic Model in a global age? Thurs 7 Mar  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Civil engineers against the double negative Professor Chris Wise, UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering

Alice Genevet

Is a culture of infallibility holding back our engineers by celebrating the avoidance of failure rather than the achievement of success? This lecture will offer a wholly upbeat alternative: re-wiring the engineering mind to be optimistic, life-enriching and mind-blowing, arming itself to do amazing stuff. Tues 5 Mar  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre A diet to treat ageing, 21 Feb

11

Lunch Hour Lectures

Stuff matters Professor Mark Miodownik, UCL Mechanical Engineering

As a result of our greater understanding of matter, the distinction between living things and non-living ‘stuff’ is now becoming blurred and is likely to usher in a new materials age. As we become more synthetic, our man-made environment is becoming more lifelike. This lecture reviews the changes to the material world that are coming our way. Tues 12 Mar  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

Cigarettes: the most successful product ever Professor Allan Hackshaw, UCL Cancer Institute

Despite five decades of research into the harms of smoking, many people take up and continue with the habit. Cigarette sales remain high as tobacco companies excel at marketing. This lecture will explore what has been learnt, the benefits of quitting at any age and plans for future policies. Thurs 14 Mar  |  1.15–1.55pm Darwin Lecture Theatre

12

Activities Workshops Family events

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: Getting plastered… Get your hands on casting, mixing, carving and moulding plaster with artist and Curator of Materials, Zoe Laughlin from UCL’s Institute of Making. Tues 29 Jan | 1–2pm | workshop UCL Art Museum college.art@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540

Getting plastered, 29 Jan

13

Activities/Workshops/Family events

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: Under the microscope

Fantastic fossils

What is plaster made of? Find out the recipe used in the age of industrialism by neoclassical sculptor John Flaxman with geologist and archaeologist Dr Ruth Siddal.

Get your hands on some of UCL’s most fantastic fossils this half-term – whether it’s the bones of an Iguanodon or the teeth of a giant shark. Bring along your budding palaeontologists for our Pterosaur-iffic hands-on activities.

Tues 5 Feb  |  1–2pm  UCL Art Museum college.art@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540

Mon 18–Sat 23 Feb | 1–5pm | activity UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Love in the natural world

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: Jane Rendell presents

Looking for love or seeking to impress your Valentine date? Discover how seduction is done in the animal world. Find out how big a heart can get and just how far animals will go to get the girl in this one-night only exhibition. Thurs 14 Feb | 6.30–8.30pm | exhibition UCL Grant Museum of Zoology £5 payable at the door (includes a glass of wine) zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

14

Jane Rendell (UCL Bartlett School of Architecture) investigates thresholds and transitional spaces by linking up prints and drawings from the Art Museum’s collections in unexpected ways. Tues 26 Feb  |  1–2pm UCL Art Museum college.art@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540

Grant Museum (not in a) pub quiz

Easter egg-laying animals

Do you know your manatees from your dugongs or your anacondas from your African rock pythons? Bring along your brainiest friends for the chance of being crowned winners at our first Grant Museum (not in a) pub quiz.

For the Easter holidays, the Grant Museum is exploring the wonderful world of eggy animals. From penguins to platypuses, sharks to snails and bullfrogs to butterflies, our fantastic specimenbased activities will investigate the best shells and spawn. Come and unscramble our games and whip up some excitement with our amazing animal specimens.

Wed 27 Feb | 6–8.30pm | quiz UCL Grant Museum of Zoology Free, pre-booking essential Teams of up to five people zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Mon 8–Sat 13 April | 1–5pm | workshop UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Fossil forage Mark National Science & Engineering Week by seizing this amazing opportunity to sieve through sediment to hunt out fossils. Any fossils you find, you get to keep – but be warned, you will have to work for them!

Matt Clayton

Sat 16 & Sat 23 March  |  1–5pm  |  activity UCL Grant Museum of Zoology zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

Grant Museum (not in a) pub quiz, 27 Feb

15

Activities/Workshops/Family events

Out and about: Freemasons and Ancient Egypt at Kensal Green Cemetery Explore the influence of ancient Egypt on Victorian funeral monuments and learn to recognise the Egyptian Revival style with Cathie Bryan in the capital’s first garden cemetery – the Cemetery of All Souls at Kensal Green (1833). Sat 13 April | 11–1pm | Walk Main Gate, Kensal Green Cemetery, Harrow Road, London W10 4RA Pre-booking essential, £7/£5 concession events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Timekeeper In Residence workshops The Petrie Museum’s Timekeeper in Residence, artist-curator Cathy Haynes invites you to take part in two creative workshops giving you the opportunity to help invent maps and models of how time is actually lived. Sat 20 April & Sat 4 May  |  1.30–4pm  |  workshop UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology Free, pre-booking essential +44 (0)20 7679 4138 events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk

16

From devilry to divinity: readings in the Divina Commedia Weekly public readings, in English and Italian, from Dante’s Divine Comedy. Each week, Professor Took (UCL Italian) and Dr Scafi (Warburg Institute) will discuss a canto, with Dr Tuckett (UCL Library) presenting rare books from UCL’s Dante Collection. Tuesdays until 5 March  |  1–2.30pm Cost per term £80/£50 concessions /free UCL & Warburg Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB spec.coll@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 7827

UCL Library Special Collections

Performances Film screenings Music

From devilry to divinity, until 5 Mar The Vision of Hell viii, iII. Doré (1869) 17

Performances/Film screenings/Music

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

Enjoy a varied programme of chamber music, including Schumann’s Six Songs for voice and string quartet, Op.107, Schubert’s ‘Arpeggione’ sonata in the arrangement for flute and piano, and works by Bach and Brahms.

Welcome performers new to the Chamber Music Club presenting a programme including Rachmaninov’s Trio élégiaque No 1 in G minor and Beethoven’s Bagatelles, Op.126.

Tues 8 Jan  |  5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room www.ucl.ac.uk/chamber-music +44 (0)7903 104764

Tues 22 Jan  |  5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room www.ucl.ac.uk/chamber-music +44 (0)7903 104764

Digging the past: archaeology on TV

Fantastic Voyage (1966) on the big screen

The UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the UCL Institute of Archaeology and the British Film Institute present three sessions looking at the different aspects of television’s approach to archaeology and those often eccentric characters who presented the stories.

When a brilliant scientist falls into a coma with a blood clot on the brain, a surgical team embarks on a journey to the centre of the mind in a submarine shrunk to microbial dimensions. Join this Grant Museum of Zoology event hosted by Professor Joe Cain (UCL Science & Technology Studies).

Sat 19 Jan  |  4pm, 6.20pm, 8.40pm  |  TV/film screening BFI Southbank, London See www.bfi.org.uk for tickets and prices events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

18

Wed 23 Jan  |  6–9pm  |  film screening J Z Young Lecture Theatre Followed by a drinks reception zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

Celebrate Benjamin Britten’s centenary and John Dowland’s 450th anniversary with Britten’s Lachrymae, based on a song by Dowland. The concert also includes Roger Beeson’s Two Poems of W B Yeats and is dedicated to the memory of Slade academic Liz-Anne Bawden MBE (1931–2012).

A lunch hour concert featuring the piano duet version of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring. Fri 8 Feb  |  1.10–1.55pm  Haldane Room www.ucl.ac.uk/chamber-music +44 (0)7903 104764

Wed 30 Jan  |  5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room www.ucl.ac.uk/chamber-music +44 (0)7903 104764

Caesar and Cleopatra (UK, Gabriel Pascal, 1946) Join John J. Johnston as he introduces this stunning adaptation of George Bernard Shaw’s take on history’s most famous love affair, starring Claude Rains as Julius Caesar and Vivien Leigh as, arguably cinema’s greatest, Cleopatra. Wed 6 Feb  |  6–9pm  |  film screening UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138 Digging the past, 19 Jan

19 11

Performances/Film screenings/Music

Bright Club: Out

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

Marking UCL Diversity Month and LGBT History Month, UCL researchers become stand-up comedians for one night to celebrate the contributions that LGBT people have made to science, history, culture and London. Includes professional comedians too.

A programme presented by members of UCL Music Society to promote UCOpera’s forthcoming production of Verdi’s I Lombardi. Thurs 21 Feb  |  5.30–6.30pm Haldane Room www.ucl.ac.uk/chamber-music +44 (0)7903 104764

Fri 8 Feb  |  7.30–10pm Bloomsbury Theatre Pre-booking essential £8 (plus booking fee) www.brightclub.org +44 (0)20 7388 8822

Digital Egypt: museums of the future Travel back in time to antiquity with future technology and give feedback to our on-hand designers to help with new technologies being developed for the museum. Sat 16 Feb | 1–4.30pm | activity UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

20 20

The Tragedie of Cleopatra This play by Samuel Daniel overturns the conventional view that women did not participate in drama in Shakespeare’s time, demonstrating the complex and turbulent politics of the Elizabethan court. Find out why this fascinating play calls out for revival 400 years on. Sun 3 March  |  2.30–6pm Great Hall, Goodenough College, Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB Pre-booking essential y.arshad@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)7783 162499

Empire

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

It is 2083 and London is a soulless dystopia where dancing is prohibited. Rogue dancers have secretly been organising dance jams, but are being arrested one by one. Can this tyranny be overthrown? Join UCLU Dance Society to find out.

A ‘world music’ concert featuring music from around the world, including Chôros No 2 for flute and clarinet by the Brazilian Composer Heitor Villa-Lobos.

Thurs 7–Sat 9 March  |  7–9.30pm Bloomsbury Theatre Pre-booking essential, £10 full / £8 Concessions / £5 Students edbarrie@hotmail.co.uk +44 (0)7917 874567

Fri 15 March  |  1.10–1.55pm Haldane Room www.ucl.ac.uk/chamber-music +44 (0)7903 104764

The women behind the Petrie Museum

Fri 8 March | 6–8pm | activity UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 4138

Mary Hinkley

To celebrate International Women’s Day, meet the influential women who made the career of Flinders Petrie and created, nurtured and saved the museum. They include writer Amelia Edwards, Egyptologist Margaret Murray and model, archaeologist and wife Hilda Urlin Petrie.

The women behind the Petrie Museum, 8 Mar

21 11

Exhibitions

Model Translations For the first exhibition in the new Octagon Gallery, UCL Museums & Public Engagement and UCL Mellon Programme join forces to present previously never displayed artefacts from UCL’s extensive research collections. Until Tues 30 April  |  9am–6pm, Mon–Fri, 11am–5pm, Sat UCL Octagon Gallery sussanah.chan@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3163

Death mask

22

The Octagon Gallery

23

Burwell Deakins Architects

Exhibitions

Flaxman and his circle

Journeys and exchange: This exhibition illustrates the world the Dutch East India Company that John Flaxman inhabited in the 18th and 19th centuries. The main display focuses on the design and development of UCL’s Flaxman Gallery, with other exhibits drawing on the man himself and his contemporaries. Until Dec 2013  |  9am–5pm, Mon–Fri Main Library k.cheney@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 6141

This exhibition explores cultural exchange during the Dutch Golden Age and in today’s London. It includes exquisitely illustrated early printed books, alongside tiles and vases beautifully painted in the style of delftware by workshop participants in collaboration with the Wallace Collection.

Design for the Flaxman Gallery

24

UCL Library Special Collections

UCL Library Special Collections

Until end of April  |  9am–5pm, Mon-Fri Main Library spec.coll@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 7827

Jewish Bible, 1666

Plastered This exhibition about plaster and the casting process highlights the sculpture models of the neoclassical artist John Flaxman, and includes displays of Victorian death masks and casts of human pathological specimens.

Rob Eagle

Mon 21 Jan–Fri 19 April  |  1–5pm, Mon–Fri UCL Art Museum college.art@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540

Flaxman work

25

Events diary (exhibitions listed p23–25)

2 Jan 8

Tues until 5 Mar 1–2.30pm 1.15–1.55pm

8

5.30–6.30pm

15

1.15–1.55pm

From devilry to divinity: readings in the Divina Commedia

p17

From Bletchley Park to modern computing – the value of Twitter UCL Chamber Music Club concert

p07 p18

16

5.30–7.30pm

Gower Street to Euston Square: a local history of the Underground The developmental challenges of mining and oil

17

1.15–1.55pm

Obama’s America: the significance of the 2012 elections

p08

19

p18

22

4pm, 6.20pm, Digging the past: archaeology on TV 8.40pm 1.15–1.55pm Science for everyone by everyone – the re-emergence of citizen science 5.30–6.30pm UCL Chamber Music Club concert

p18

23

5.30–7.30pm

p02

22

The life and work of Michel-Rolph Trouillot

p08 p02

p08

23

6–9pm

Fantastic Voyage (1966) on the big screen

p18

24

1.15–1.55pm

Xtreme Everest 2 research expedition

p08

24

6–7.30pm

Literature, politics and the Dutch Republic

p03

24

6.45–8pm

p03

29

1–2pm

29

1.15–1.55pm

30

5.30–7.30pm

p19 p09

30

5.30–6.30pm

Transmission and translation of trauma – interviews with underage Holocaust Survivors Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: Getting plastered… Where to give birth, at home or in a hospital? Does it matter? America Imagined: explaining the United States in 19th-century Europe and Latin America UCL Chamber Music Club concert

31

1.15–1.55pm

Framing the digital: materialising new media

p13 p09 p03

31

6.45–8pm

Isaiah Berlin

p04

5 Feb

1–2pm

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: Under the microscope Gravity and continuum

p14

5

1.15–1.55pm

6

6.45–8pm

6

6–9pm

A small town near Auschwitz: ordinary Nazis and the Holocaust Caesar and Cleopatra (UK, Gabriel Pascal, 1946)

7

1.15–1.55pm

The influence of Islam on science

p09 p04 p19 p10

8

1.10–1.55pm

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

p19

8

7.30–10pm

Bright Club: Out

p20

12

6–8pm

Timekeeper in Residence at the Petrie

p04

14

6.30–8.30pm

Love in the natural world

p14

16

1–4.30pm

Digital Egypt: museums of the future

p20

26

18 Feb

Fantastic fossils

p14

19

until 23 Feb 1–5pm 1.15–1.55pm

Can the Eurozone crisis be solved?

p10

21

1.15–1.55pm

A diet to treat ageing

p10

21

5.30–6.30pm

UCL Chamber Music Club concert

p20

26

1–2pm

p14

26

6–8pm

26

7–8pm

Pop-up exhibitions at UCL Art Museum: Jane Rendell presents Every good thing: objects from the Petrie Museum in celebration of LGBT History Month Sport and British Jewry (1890–1970)

26

1.15–1.55pm

By the donzerly light: when our ears play tricks on us

p10

27

6–8.30pm

Grant Museum (not in a) pub quiz

p15

28

1.15–1.55pm

Genomics and healthcare

p11

28

6–8pm

Timekeeper in Residence at the Petrie

p04

3 Mar

2.30–6pm

The Tragedie of Cleopatra

p20

5

1.15–1.55pm

Civil engineers against the double negative

p11

6

6–8.30pm

The big question

p05

7

1.15–1.55pm

p11

7 7

until 9 March 7–9.30pm 7–8.15pm

Scandinavian crime fiction and the end of the welfare state Empire We are here: memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust

p05

8

6–8pm

The women behind the Petrie Museum

p21

12

1.15–1.55pm

Stuff matters

p12

13

5.30–7.30pm

New perspectives on Caribbean literature

p06

14

1.15–1.55pm

Cigarettes: the most successful product ever

p12

14

6.30–8.30pm

To what extent was archaeology founded on prejudice?

p06

14

7–8.15pm

p06

15

1.10–1.55pm

Identity through difference: Rabbinic Judaism confronts Christian narrative UCL Chamber Music Club concert

16

1–5pm

Fossil forage

p15

20

6.45–8pm

p06

21

6–8pm

Fighting a spectre in times of war: Soviet Jewry and the heroisation of Bohdan Khmelnitsky Timekeeper in Residence at the Petrie

23

6–8.30pm

Fossil forage

p15

26

6–8pm

Timekeeper in Residence at the Petrie

p04

8 Apr

until 13 Apr

Easter egg-laying animals

p15

13

11–1pm

20

1.30–4pm

Out and about: Freemasons and Ancient Egypt at Kensal p16 Green Cemetery Timekeeper in Residence workshops p16

p04 p05

p21

p21

p04

27 27

Venues/map

3  UCL Art Museum South Cloisters, Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT Mon–Fri, 1–5pm college.art@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2540 www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/ uclart 4  UCL Bloomsbury Theatre 15 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH +44 (0)20 7388 8822 www.thebloomsbury.com 5  Chadwick Lecture Theatre Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT 6  Darwin Lecture Theatre (accessed via Malet Place) London WC1E 6BT 7  Garwood Lecture Theatre South Wing, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT 8  UCL Grant Museum of Zoology Rockefeller Building, 21 University Street, London WC1E 6DE Mon–Sat, 1–5pm zoology.museum@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 3108 2052 www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/ zoology 28

10  Haldane Room Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT 11  JZ Young Lecture Theatre Anatomy Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT 12  Octagon Gallery Octagon, Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT Mon–Fri, 9am–6pm Sat, 11am–5pm susanah.chan@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 3163

Warren Street

GRAFTON WAY

UNIVERSITY STREET

13  Pearson Lecture Theatre Pearson Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT 14  Ramsay Lecture Theatre Christopher Ingold Building, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ

HUNTLEY STREET

2  UCL Institute of the Americas Seminar Room 103, 51 Gordon Square London WC1H 0PN

9  Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT

TOTTEN HAM C OURT R OAD

1  UCL Main Campus Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT +44 (0)20 7679 2000 www.ucl.ac.uk

15  The Warburg Institute Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB 16  UCL Main Library Wilkins Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT 17  UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology Malet Place, London WC1E 6BT Tues–Sat, 1–5pm events.petrie@ucl.ac.uk +44 (0)20 7679 2369 www.ucl.ac.uk/museums/ petrie

TORRING Goodge Street

Euston

Euston Square

P

GOWER

PLACE

GARD

7

14

9 E

E GORD ON SQUARE GORDON STREET

6

MALET PLACE

17

WOB URN

15

SQUARE

Waterstones

GORDON SQUARE

2 BYNG PLACE

GTON PLACE

GORD

GOWER

11

CHENIES MEWS

TAVITON STREET

3

5

4

16

GORDON

GOWER STREET

UCL Quad

12

ST E T

1

T

10

North Lodge

Wilkins

8

13

North Cloisters

AY

STREET

GOWER CT

Getting to UCL By Tube

ACCESSIBILITY

Underground stations near to UCL’s main campus:

UCL aims to provide accessibility to all its events. If you require any information about any accessibility requirements, please contact UCL Disability Services on:

Euston Square (Circle, Metropolitan, Hammersmith and City lines) Goodge Street (Northern line) Warren Street (Northern and Victoria lines)

+44 (0)20 7679 0100 disability@ucl.ac.uk

By Rail Mainline train stations near to UCL’s main campus: Euston, King’s Cross and St Pancras International

By Bus Buses serving Gower Street: 134, 390, 10, 73, 24, 29, 14

By Car The Bloomsbury area has metered parking and visitors are strongly advised not to travel to UCL by car.

University College London Gower Street London WC1E 6BT +44 (0)20 7679 2000 For further information about any of our events, please visit our website:

www.ucl.ac.uk/events


Brain Food January – April 2013