Issuu on Google+

UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science Center for Excellence in Engineering and Diversity

The CEED Vision CEED Mission Work with a community of partners to ensure equity and parity in the K-20 pathways that lead to engineering and computing degrees.

CEED Vision We develop leaders for California’s diverse technical workforce. Inside this issue:

Industry Advisory Board 2

MESA Program

4

SMARTS Summer Program

4

Summer Bridge

5

Community College Transition to UCLA

6

Student Organizations —AISES, NSBE, & SOLES

7

RISE-UP Undergraduate 9 Research on Campus

Fall 2010

Diversifying Engineering              salient  national  Sci‐ A ence,  Technology,  Engineer‐ ing and Mathematics (STEM)  education  challenge  is  how  to  address  the  contradiction  presented by the large, rapid  growth  of  underrepresented  college‐age  students  that  bears  no  commensurate  in‐ crease  in  their  numbers  in  engineering  schools.  In  Cali‐ fornia,  over  6.3  million  K‐12  students are enrolled in pub‐ Rick Ainsworth lic schools, and 56% are His‐ CEED Director panic  and  African  American.   Yet  only  11%  of  the  approximately  9,000  engi‐ neering  graduates  per  year  come  from  this  “underrepresented  majority”  student  population.  California  needs  this  population  to  contribute  its  talent to the engineering field and the state’s eco‐ nomic future.  The  challenge  to  increase  the  num‐ bers  of  underrepresented  engineering  students  (URES)  and  their  persistence  to  degree  comple‐

tion  is  a  three‐fold  problem.  First,  only  2.2%  of  African American and 13.9% of Latino high school  graduates are ranked in the top 10% of the state’s  graduating senior class. To increase the number of  competitively  eligible  URES  applicants  to  UC  schools  of  engineering  requires  early  academic  intervention  designed  around  in‐class  and  out  of  school  time.  Second,  recruiting,  admitting  and  enrolling  the  few  competitive  URES  is  another  challenge  because  out  of  state  schools  of  engi‐ neering can provide full scholarships without Cali‐ fornia’s legal constraints. The third challenge is a  national  problem:  the  National  Science  Board  in  its 2007 report, “Moving Forward to Improve En‐ gineering Education” stated the national retention  to graduation percentage is 60% for all engineer‐ ing  students who  obtain a degree  within  6  years.  In comparison, the national  persistence to degree  completion for URES is only 40%. This difference  represents  a  20%  disparity  in  retention  between  URES  and  the  majority  of  engineering  students.                              Article Cont. Pg. 3 

Spotlight IAB Representative: Janelle Sasaki, Cisco

I  continue  to  maintain  a  strong  part‐   nership  with  the  CEED  organization  because  I  value  the  leadership  capabilities  that  the  stu‐ dents bring to not only Cisco, but other organi‐ zations as well as the community. I feel that it  is not only the right thing to do, but the smart  thing  because  it  helps  our  business  as  well  as  innovation.  It  continues  to  be  a  rewarding  ex‐ perience at each event because I not only learn  about myself, but I also help foster the growth  of the young student leaders. I manage a team  of Cisco employees that help participate in the  CEED  events  like  mock  interviews,  corporate  gamesmanship,  and  resume  critiques.  These  events  are  helping  students  with  their  career  paths and are essentially the subsets to build‐ ing each student’s soft skills and professional‐ ism. I have learned over my three‐year engage‐ ment  with  CEED  that  offering  open,  transpar‐ ent  communication  between  CEED,  my  com‐ pany,  and  the  students  has  resulted  with  ex‐ ceptional  collaboration  with  high  levels  of  in‐

tegrity.  I  try  to  offer  practical  solutions  to  help  with  professional  development  and  give  students  an  industry  perspective  to  help  fos‐ ter their success. Being a  member on a number of  boards  including  one  at  USC,  I  realize  that  CEED  has  the  best  model  and  practice  possibly  Janelle Sasaki throughout  the  entire  U.S.  CEED  offers  the  Cisco Representative infrastructure  and  the  resources  these  students  need  in  one  central‐ ized  place  that  allows  all  parties  involved  to  benefit.  Working  with  CEED,  I  have  learned  more from the students and the CEED commu‐ nity than I feel I could ever give and it is truly a  satisfying and rewarding experience. 


The CEED Vision Page 2

Arnold Hackett VP, Alliance and Partnership Management at Xerox IAB Chair

“It’s a great honor being the Chair of a benchmark organization.” Arnold Hackett, Xerox IAB Meeting, 1/20/10

Anthony Gallegos 2009-2010 SOLES President B.S. Mechanical Engineering Full -Time Hire at General Mills Co.

“The professional contacts I’ve met at both of these events have proved vital to securing employment in the engineering industry. Because of these events, my networking skills and understanding of how to carry myself in professional social environments has greatly improved.”

Industry Advisory Board Importance - Arnold Hackett

D                iversity  of  ethnicity  and  thought  is  a  cornerstone  of  Xerox’s  success,  and  being  a  member  of  the  Industry  Advi‐ sory  Board  (IAB)  allows  us,  Xerox,  to  identify,  develop,  and  attract  a  top  pool  of  diversified  talent.  I serve as the CEED IAB  chair  because  it  enables  Xerox  to have a three‐way partnership  with  the  CEED  staff,  student  organizations,  as  well  as  indus‐ try to assist in the development  of  our  future  industry  leaders  and building a relationship with  the  UCLA  Engineering  depart‐ ment.                What  drives  me  as  an  ac‐ tive  member  is  the  innovative  programs  and  activities  that  CEED  organization  has  devel‐ oped  in  partnership  with  the  IAB  to  encourage,  support,  and  develop  current  and  future  UCLA  engineering  students.    In  addition  to  providing  academic  and  professional  development 

of  engineering’s  top  diversity  students;  CEED  and  IAB  also  partner in offering several inno‐ vative  and  engaging  outreach  programs  for  the  K‐12  student  population.    This  allows  Xerox,  as  well  as  other  IAB  companies  the  opportunity  to  positively  influence  and  build  relation‐ ships  with  future  college  stu‐ dents.  CEED  continues  to  work  with  the  IAB  to  ensure  compa‐ nies  are  receiving  the  highest  Return  on  Investment  (ROI)  for  their  participation  on  the  IAB  and support of CEED.  Statistics  indicate  that  IAB  member  com‐ panies  are  not  only  attracting  but hiring CEED students for full ‐time  and  summer  internship  positions.           My  vision  for  the  IAB  over  the next two years is to expand  the diversity of the board mem‐ bership  well  beyond  the  tradi‐ tional  industries.  Those  areas  that  we  are  looking  to  expand  are for example and not limited 

to  Pharmaceuticals  &  Biotech‐ nology, Construction & Facilities  and Media.  In addition, I would  like  to  work  with  the  IAB  and  CEED  to  develop  a  strategic  roadmap  and  plans  to  ensure  a  financial  stability  so  that  CEED  will  be  viable  for  the  next  dec‐ ade  and  continue  to  be  a  leader  amongst  engineering  diversity  programs. I have talked to many  industry  colleagues  and  it  is  clear  that  UCLA’s  CEED  in  part‐ nership with IAB has one of the  most  innovative  and  progres‐ sive  partnerships  in  the  coun‐ try.  The collaboration and com‐ mitment  that  extends  between  the  CEED  Staff,  the  Engineering  department,  and  the  student  organizations  shows  their  com‐ mitment to “excellence”.             I  would  like  to  thank  the  CEED  staff,  the  Dean  of  Engi‐ neering,  and  CEED  students  for  being  open  to  and  embracing  the  IAB’s  ideas  and  contribu‐ tions.     

CEED Corporate Gamesmanship & Corporate Round Table   The  Corporate  Gamesmanship  and  Cor‐ porate  Round  Table  hosted  annually  by  CEED  are  unique  events  that  provide  students  with  the opportunity to directly interact with repre‐ sentatives  from  industry.  For  students  to  be  competitive  in  the  world  today,  it  isn’t  enough  to  read  the  textbook  and  do  the  homework  problems;  they  must  go  out  into  the  field  and  get  experience.  Speaking  with  representatives  is  a  gateway  into  the  world  outside  of  school,  and  these  events  help  the  students  to  take  the  first steps toward their future.    At  the  Corporate  Gamesmanship,  held  in October, a variety of workshops are available  to the  students that  offer advice  about  specific  techniques  for  career  fairs  and  interviewing  skills.  Throughout  the  event,  a  small  career  expo is available to students who wish to speak  with  the  various  representatives.  The  fair  works  hand‐in‐hand  with  the  workshops,  as  students  may  take  the  techniques  they  have 

learned  in  the  workshops  and  immediately  ap‐ ply them.    While  Corporate  Gamesmanship  is  fo‐ cused on technique and practice, the Corporate  Round  Table  held  in  January  is  not  only  an  ap‐ plication of the techniques students have had a  change to cultivate, but it is also an opportunity  for students to have a more personal encounter  with  the  representatives.  This  allows  students  to actively engage with representatives and give  them a stronger chance to lobby for internships  and full‐time jobs.    Both  events  help  the  younger  students  to  take  the  initial  steps  into  the  world  beyond  school by giving them the skills to succeed early  in  their  careers.  It  also  provides  students  with  several  personal  opportunities  to  expand  their  networking skills and obtain internships. These  events  give  CEED  students  the  tools  they  need  to succeed and help mold them into strong can‐ didates for the future. 


Fall 2010 Page 3

Director’s Message: Diversifying Engineering (Cont.) The  UCLA  Center  for  Excellence  in  Engineering  and  Diversity’s  (CEED)  retention  percentage  ex‐ ceeds the national URES percentage of 40% by 19  percentage points.     CEED’s  goal  is  to  provide  academic  and  social  programs  to  broaden  the  participation  of  underrepresented  students  in  STEM  fields  and  careers.  CEED’s  pre‐college,  community  college,  undergraduate  retention,  and  professional  devel‐ opment programs address these disparities in the  K‐16 pathway leading to engineering and comput‐ ing  degrees.  In  doing  so,  CEED  has  received  na‐ tional,  state,  and  corporate  recognition  for  its  ef‐ forts  to  increase  the  numbers  of  URES  entering  and  graduating  in  engineering  and  computing.  The  National  Science  Foundation,  through  its  STEM  programs,  has  awarded  CEED  major  fund‐ ing to support our programs. Equally important is  the  support  we  have  received  over  the  many 

years  from  our  Industry  Advisory  Board  who  support  our  efforts  to  diversify  engineering  and  prepare URES for corporate America.     This CEED Quarterly edition features the  outstanding  accomplishments  of  CEED’s  2010  graduating  class.  In  addition,  the  reader  will  learn  that  early  research  experience  makes  a  major impact on URES persistence and academic  performance.  We  highlight  the  three  nationally  award  winning  student  organizations—AISES  NSBE,  and  SOLES—for  their  outreach  programs  to local schools. Their work with CEED’s precol‐ lege  and  community  college  initiatives  contrib‐ ute largely to CEED’s success. We thank all those  industry  and  organizations  who  contribute  to  our  mission.  Our  success  is  directly  related  to  their contributions. A special thanks to Vijay Dhir  the  Dean  of  the  UCLA  Henry  Samueli  School  of  Engineering  and  the  CEED  Staff  for  their  sup‐ port.  

Scholarship Banquet: Support for Our Students

C EED  hosts  an  annual    Scholarship  Banquet  to  honor  the  recipients  and  to  create   interactions between the schol‐ ars  and  the  industry  represen‐ tatives  from  awarding  compa‐ nies.  The  scholarship  program  is  a  key  component  of  CEED;  students  are  awarded  scholar‐ ships from industry partners as  well  as  from  grants  from  the  National  Science  Foundation.  During  the  2009‐2010  aca‐ demic  year,  CEED  awarded  $258,167  in  industry  and  NSF 

scholarships  and  facilitated  an  additional  $55,802  in  HSSEAS  scholarships.  83  CEED  Stu‐ dents  were  awarded  scholar‐ ships  (nearly  1/3  of  all  CEED  students).      The  benefit  goes  be‐ yond  financial.  For  companies,  giving  scholarships  is  an  op‐ portunity  to  be  matched  with  exceptional  scholars.  The  scholarship  is  often  the  first  step in forming a working con‐ nection  in  which  the  students  will  then  be  invited  to  partici‐ pate  in  internships  and  in  some  cases  will  go  on  to  secure  full  time  employ‐ ment  with  the  com‐ pany.  Corporations  that  provide  schol‐ arships  greater  ac‐ cess  to  hiring  these  outstanding  schol‐ ars.  Scholarship  allows  students  to  focus  more  on  their  Alcoa representatives with scholarships academics  and  less  recipients on  having  to  work 

burdensome hours.    CEED  has  been  suc‐ cessful  at  providing  scholar‐ ships  to  one‐third  or  more  of  their students over the last few  years.  However,  increased  competition  for  public  funds  and  tough  economic  times  in  the  private  sector  will  make  it  hard  for  CEED  to  offer  the  same  level  of  scholarships  and  affect the  same  number  of stu‐ dents  this  coming  year.  Due  to  the  end  of  NSF  grant  for  the  coming year, industry partners  and  alumni  will  play  a  greater  role in contributing to the   success  of  the  program.     In  a  survey  of  CEED  alumni,  87%  of  the  respon‐ dents  (n=82)  agreed  or  strongly  agreed  that  the  schol‐ arships  are  a  valuable  compo‐ nent  and  greatly  contribute  to  student  success.  One‐third  of  the respondents selected schol‐ arships  as  one  of  the  top  3  components  that  influenced  their post‐UCLA success. 

Eric Gamez Graduated Cum Laude B.S. Mechanical Engineer Full Time Hire at Edwards Air Force Base

“Scholarship Banquet has always been a very successful event. We’re provided food and an opportunity to mingle with the companies that awarded us scholarships. The banquet was a great experience, and really showed CEED’s appreciation for their students.

Raylene Moreno B.S. Civil Engineering At UCLA Pursuing Masters in Mechanical Engineering

“The Scholarship Banquet provided great professional networking opportunities and the scholarships I received were very helpful with my educational expenses, especially because of the UC fee increases imposed this year.”


The CEED Vision Page 4

Olaleke Owolabi 2008-2009 NSBE President B.S. Mechanical Engineering Full Time Hire at Frito Lay

“MESA Day at UCLA this year was an excellent event that involved workshops and testing which provided the kids with material to get them thinking of math and science. I love working with MESA because it’s a great feeling to be giving back to the community.

Carlos Marrufo 2008-2009 SOLES President B.S. Civil Engineering Full Time Hire at Schlumberger Tech Corp.

“I worked as a SMARTS mentor one summer and I’ve come to realize that the SMARTS Program is an opportunity for high school students to excel and exceed in higher education.”

Pre-College Initiatives MESA Program

T he  Mathematics  Engineering  Science  ports 1,100 students and teachers in the Los An‐   Achievement  (MESA)  program  is  a  school‐site  geles and Inglewood Unified School Districts.  based  outreach  and  student  development  effort  with  a    focus  on  engineering,  math,  science  and  technology. CEED works in partnerships with mid‐ dle and high school principals to identify and train  teachers to run MESA programs at their respective  sites.  Math  or  science  teachers  (high  school  and  middle  school)  are  designated  to  serve  as  MESA  advisors  to  coordinate  the  activities  and  instruc‐ tion as well as prepare students for regional MESA  Day engineering and science competitions.     MESA  provides  an  individual  academic  planning  program,  academic  excellence  work‐ shops,  CEED  undergraduate  mentors,  parent  in‐ volvement,  field  trips,  and  exposure  to  high‐tech  careers. CEED currently serves 21 schools and sup‐ CEED staff and student volunteers at LA Metro Region Jr. MESA Day at UCLA in April 2010 SMARTS Program for High School Students

What do motivated and successful students do for their summer vacation? They partici‐ pate in summer programs such as Science Mathematics Achievement and Research Training for  Students  (SMARTS)  Program.  SMARTS  is  a  six‐week  summer  college  preparation  program  at  UCLA  designed  to  increase  the  number  of  high  school  students  in  urban  areas  who  are  inter‐ ested  in  careers  in  science,  technology,  engineering,  and  math  (STEM)  based  fields.  SMARTS  participants engage in a variety of classes and activities, including math courses (Introduction  to  Statistics  and  AP  Calculus  Readiness),  SAT  preparation,  robotics,  research  and  college  and  career planning workshops.       A hallmark of SMARTS is the Research Apprentice Program (RAP). Through this unique  opportunity, selected students participate in a six–week paid research internship. Mentored by  UCLA graduate students, RAP participants perform cutting–edge research in areas such as Bio‐ medical Engineering, Cell Pathology, 3D‐ MicroBatteries, Human Computer Interaction, Experi‐ mental Psychology and Molecular Genetics. For all, it was a challenging and motivating experi‐ ence.  As  one  RAP  student  commented:  “Through RAP I learned the basics of working a lab set­ ting. I also saw how mathematics was incorporated in science... and learned how to apply the sci­ entific method. RAP was a very beneficial and rewarding experience.”    In addition to the academic component, SMARTS students attended the Industry Career    Exploration (ICE) Luncheon. ICE is an opportunity for students to meet and speak with profes‐ sional engineers and company representative about their company, engineering and career de‐ velopment and the steps needed to become an engineer or scientist. The luncheon also served  as an introduction to networking.  Past participants have included Boeing, Conoco Phillips, Pratt  & Whitney Rocketdyne, Raytheon, LA DWP, Northrop Grumman, Verizon, and Xerox.      The six‐week experience culminates with a Closing Ceremony where the Research Ap‐ prentices  formally  presented  posters as well  as a  10 minute  presentation  of their  research to  peers, faculty, and parents.        SMARTS  is  funded  through  a  Howard  Hughes  Medical  Institute  grant  (under  Life  Sci‐ ence’s  Professor  Fred  Eiserling)  and  through  contributions  from  corporate  members  of  the  CEED Industry Advisory Board.  


Fall 2010 Page 5

Summer Bridge: The Bridge to Success

Eric Padilla 2007-2008 AISES President B.S. Materials Engineering At ASU pursuing Masters in Materials Engineering

The 2009 CEED Freshmen class.   E ach September since 1983, the UCLA  CEED  Freshman  Summer  Bridge  Program  offers  the  incoming  students  advanced  preparation into the rigorous curriculum and  pace  of  UCLA  and  HSSEAS  by  providing  two  weeks  of  intensive  instruction  in  Mathemat‐ ics, Chemistry, and Computer Science.       PhD Students who have been recom‐ mended  by  their  UCLA  Departments  use  the  same  textbooks  required  during  the  Aca‐ demic Year and teach according to the course  outlines,  assign  homework,  and  give  weekly  exams.  CEED  Freshmen  also  participate  in  the  academic  excellence  group  problem‐ solving  workshops  (AEW)  in  conjunction  with  their  Math  and  Chemistry  courses,  as  well as C++ programming assignments.       This  two‐week  lead  time  allows  the  new  freshmen  to  identify  their  academic  strengths  so  they  know  what  to  expect  as  they  prepare  to  transition  from  high  school  to  the  university.  Summer  Bridge’s  Profes‐ sional  Development  component  includes  both  Resume  Preparation  and  an  Industry  Tour.      During  the  2‐week  period,  the  stu‐ dent  organizations  (Tri‐Org:  AISES,  NSBE,  and  SOLES)  use  the  opportunity  to  recruit  CEED  students  into  their  organizations  as  well  as  show  the  students  the  more  enter‐ taining things to do around campus. The Tri‐

Org  invites  the  students  to  a  UCLA  tailgate  for  the  football  game,  a  picnic  by  Santa  Monica Beach, and a game of broomball at a  local ice rink.    For  the  past  25  years,  Summer  Bridge  students  have  been  housed  in  West‐ wood  Village’s  Claremont  Hotel.  This  small  landmark  facility  –  with  its  one‐and‐only  TV  in the lobby – promotes an environment con‐ ducive  to  engaging  students  in  group  study  and  forming  solid  friendships  among  fellow  Engineering majors.    Aside  from  the  courses  offered  dur‐ ing  the  Summer  Bridge  Program,  the  CEED  Freshmen  are  separated  into  groups  based  on major and begin a research project within  departmental laboratories under the instruc‐ tion  of  grad  students.  These  projects  con‐ tinue  into  Fall  quarter  during  the  Engineer‐ ing  87  course.  More  information  about  this  program  can  be  found  on  Page  8  of  this  newsletter.    In  Fall  2009,  the  44  CEED  Freshmen  earned  a  3.070  average  GPA  in  their  Fall  Quarter Math Courses, with 84% at the mas‐ tery  level  (“B”  and  above).    Similar  results  have  been  obtained  each  year  in  the  Math  &  Science  foundation  courses.    The  ongoing  impact of Freshman Summer Bridge has long  been  recognized  as  a  premier  UCLA  CEED  retention and transition program.  

“Having zero programming experience, I was worried that I would have a very difficult time taking CS31. Being able to take the class during Bridge however, gave me the chance to really focus on the basic material and that coupled with having an excellent instructor made me competent enough that I was helping the CS majors in the class when Fall quarter rolled around.”

Juan Zuniga 2008-2009 AISES President B.S. Civil Engineering Full Time Hire at Army Corps. Of Engineers

“Summer Bridge helped us establish study groups for fall classes and these study groups, along with studying material up to the first midterm of the fall quarter classes, helped us have a far smoother transition into college than if we had arrived without them.”


The CEED Vision Page 6

Community College

Alex Franceschi B.S. Mechanical Engineer At UCLA pursuing Masters in Mechanical Engineering

The Transition for Community College Students to UCLA

C

“The transition from community college to UCLA was very difficult, but one of the most fulfilling experiences I have ever had. I have grown to understand more of myself as a student, a friend, a man, and now an engineer. I am forever grateful for my success and the stepping stones CEED has provided along the way, thank you all!”

Vanessa Evoen Graduated Cum Laude 2009-2010 NSBE Vice-President

B.S. Chemical Engineering At Cal Tech pursuing Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering

“BREES was an awesome opportunity to form a study support group crucial to my academics at UCLA. There is an introduction to coursework covered in the coming year, that gives an immeasurable advantage. BREES is Awesome!”

  EED  strives  to  increase  the  number  of  underrepresented students in the community col‐ lege  system  that  transfer  into  the  Henry  Samueli  School  of  Engineering  and  Applied  Science  at  UCLA.  Through  improved  communication  and  information  dissemination  between  UCLA  and  California  Community  College  programs,  CEED  is  able  to  better  identify  and  assist  community  col‐ lege  students  with  the  aptitude  and  interest  to  pursue undergraduate degrees in engineering and  computer  science.    Visits  to  local  community  col‐ leges  with  high  concentrations  of  underrepre‐ sented  students  were  made  to  meet  key  transfer  and  counseling  specialists  in  programs  such  as  MESA, TAP, and STEM offices. 

   Additionally, UCLA CEED hosted campus visits  to  the  UCLA  campus  and  tours  of  HSSEAS  laboratory.  These  two  community  college  MESA  programs:  Allan  Hancock and Rio Hondo Colleges brought about 20 stu‐ dents  each.  Admitted  HSSEAS  transfer  applicants  are  hosted  for  visits  upon  acceptance  notification.  Visits  allowed the community college students to meet current  CEED  students  who  have  transferred  from  community  college. In discussion panels, students learn more about  the  different  engineering  majors,  success  strategies  for  transferring,  and  about  the  unique  opportunities  avail‐ able at UCLA. The value of UCLA’s rich research oppor‐ tunities  are  demonstrated  through  lab  tours  and  re‐ search  presentations  by  Professors  and  graduate  stu‐ dents. 

Summer Bridge Review for Enhancing Engineering Students (BREES)

M

  odeled  closely  after  the  Freshmen  Summer  Bridge  Program,  the  Summer  Bridge  Review  for  En‐ hancing Engineering Students (BREES) is a two‐week  intensive introduction of key topics in core engineer‐ ing  courses.  BREES  instruction  is  led  by  engineering   graduate  students  within  each  of  the  departments.  Furthermore,  BREES  has  proven  successful  in  engag‐ ing underrepresented transfer students into the CEED  community  and  in  assisting  them  in  their  transition  into the University.    The  BREES  program  assists  continuing  stu‐ dents  and  new  transfer  students  with  the  transition  from  general  math,  chemistry  and  physics  courses  into core ‘gatekeeper’ engineering courses. At BREES,  CEED offers courses in bioengineering, chemical engi‐ neering,  civil  and  environmental  engineering,  com‐ puter  science,  electrical  engineering,  materials  engi‐ neering,  and  mechanical  and  aerospace  engineering.  Students  are  given  the  opportunity  to  organize  study  groups  early  on,  providing  them  with  a  close‐knit  group  to  work  with  when  the  academic  year  begins.  BREES  offers  new  transfers  and  rising  juniors  the  opportunity to meet current students and be exposed  to  new  material  which  increases  retention  through  upper  division  courses.  BREES  students  cover  three  weeks of material into their fall quarter classes.    During BREES, students are also required to  attend  Academic  Excellence  Workshops  (AEWs)  for  their  engineering  courses.  While  in  these  AEWs,  stu‐

dents  are  given  extra  problems  related  to  the  engi‐ neering  material.  The  students  are  expected  to  solve  the  problems  as  a  group  or  individually;  a  graduate  student is available for assistance. In conjunction with  AEWs, students attend industry workshops to prepare  them  for  entering  the  technical  workforce.  These  in‐ dustry  workshops  consist  of  career  fair  and  email  etiquette as well as a resume workshop. This prepares  the students for upcoming career fairs and corporate  events.      The  student  organizations—AISES,  NSBE  and  SOLES—also  make  a  point  to  attend  BREES  to  welcome  new  students  and  expose  them  to  life  at  UCLA  from  a  student  perspective.  Members  of  each  organization  help    answer  any  questions  the  new  transfer students would have about UCLA, whether it  be about apartment listings,  buying used engineering  books, places to eat, etc.  

BREES students at the picnic enjoying the company and good food.


Fall 2010 Page 7

Student Organizations American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)

The 

UCLA  Chapter  of  the  American  In‐ dian  Science  and  Engineering  Society  is  very  excited  for  the  new  aca‐ demic  year  with  brand  new  goals.  AISES at UCLA plans to  focus  on  the  acquisition  and  retention of new membership  for  the  school  year  while 

maintaining  its  focus  on  out‐ reaching  to  local  native  com‐ munities  to  promote  higher  education  in  the  technical  fields  of  study.  This  year,  AISES  is  seeking  out  new  na‐ tive  communities  to  visit  and  increasing  its  participation  with  existing  communities.  AISES  is  also  outreaching  to  industry,  even  those  with  Na���

tive  chapters  of  their  own  to  establish  new  collaborations  and  support.    By  strengthen‐ ing  the  chapter,  UCLA  AISES  will  have  the  opportunity  to  empower  others  and  help  local  communities  by  staying  united  and  providing  re‐ sources  to  succeed  profes‐ sionally. 

Former AISES President, Ray Avalos, tutoring at local Middle Schools

The UCLA Chapter at the 2009 AISES National Conference

National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)

T

      his year, UCLA’s chapter of  the  National  Society  of  Black  Engineers  is  striving  to  build  on  previous  accomplishments.  We were named “Small Chap‐ ter  of  the  Year”  at  the  2009  National Convention and plan  on  continuing  our  success.  Our  main  goals  for  the  year  are to attend our regional and  national  conferences,  to  insti‐

tute a NSBE Jr. chapter, and to  establish  a  lasting  procedure  for  our  PCI  program  with  MESA  schools.  We  attended  our  regional  conference  in  November  with  about  25  members  and  are  currently  working  with  six  NSBE  chap‐ ters  in  having  a  group  travel  to nationals. We’re also work‐ ing  closely  with  CEED  in  so‐

lidifying  our  tutoring  sys‐ tem  and  also  involving  our  most  dedicated  and talented members as lead  chapter  representatives  for  the schools. It has been a solid  31 years since our chapter set  out  to  achieve  the  mission  of  NSBE  at  UCLA,  and  we  strive  for it passionately.  

NSBE Fall Regional Conference in Long Beach, CA

NSBE Alumni Bowling 2010

Society of Latino Engineers and Scientists (SOLES)

The  Society  of  Latino  Engi‐

neers  and  Scientists  (SOLES)  are one‐third of the Tri‐Org at  UCLA  that  CEED  supports  in  its  efforts  to  increase  the  number  of  minority  students  pursuing  engineering  degrees  through  community  outreach  and  the  academic  and  profes‐ sional  development  of  its  members.  Besides  taking  more than half its members to  the  national  conference  in 

November  2009,  one  of  SOLES’  many  goals  is  to  im‐ plement  new  events  that  fur‐ ther  promote  our  member‐ ship’s  development  and  com‐ munity service initiatives. The  combination  of  holding  these  new  events  and  continuing  existing  ones  will  attain  re‐ sults for which we strive. New  events  focused  on  academic  development are being organ‐ ized  to  help  improve  mem‐ bers’ GPAs. The education and  experience  that  our  members 

will  receive  prepares  them  to  achieve success professionally  and  academically.  SOLES  has,  and will continue, to utilize its  resources to expose K‐12 stu‐ dents  to  opportunities  in  STEM  fields  and  inspire  them  to enter these majors.  

SOLES Volunteers at Noches De Ciencia

SOLES Volunteers tutoring middle school students


The CEED Vision Page 8

Undergraduate Research E-87: Freshmen Undergraduate Researchers

I

Freshmen students from 2009 E87 class working on soil testing

      ntroduction to Engineering Disciplines (E‐87) focuses on academic, professional,  and  personal  development  of  freshmen  through  collaborative  learning  assignments  and team research projects.  The objectives of the course are to: (1) Introduce engi‐ neering  as  a  professional  career  for  freshmen  students    by  exploring  the  difference  between  engineering  disciplines  and  the  functions  engineers  perform;  (2)  Provide  exposure  to  leading‐edge  technology  and  research  in  HSSEAS;  (3)  Familiarize  stu‐ dents with various computer applications and processes; (4) Develop effective study  skills  and  techniques  for  academic  excellence;  (5)  Develop  interpersonal  and  per‐ sonal communications skills through the team process; (6) Educate and prepare stu‐ dents for community service and leadership. One unique feature of this course is that  freshmen  get  to  perform  leading‐edge  research  during  their  very  first  quarter  at  UCLA.    The  students  are  grouped  into  teams,  based  upon  their  chosen  major  fields,  and  complete  a  quarter‐long  research  project  under  the  guidance  of  a  faculty  re‐ searcher and graduate student.   

  During the Fall of 2009 there were 44 freshmen in E87 and they formed 13 research teams.  The students’ majors, re‐ search project titles and sponsoring faculty members/graduate advisors are listed in the table below. Student  Majors 

Project Title 

Faculty/Graduate Student 

Aerospace Engineering 

Balsa Wood Glider 

Professor Jeff Eldredge  Albert Medina 

Chemical Engineering 

Glucose‐Oxygen Biofuel Cells 

Professor Bruce Dunn  Nick Ciriliagno & Rita Blaik 

Chemical Engineering 

Design and Optimization of Green   Energy Systems 

Professor Vasilios I. Manousiouthakis  Jorge Pena Lopez & Fernando Olmos 

Civil Engineering 

Hydrology and Water Quality Survey 

Professor Terri Hogue  Sonya Lopez 

Civil Engineering 

Environmental Engineering:  Investigating   Sources of Ecoli at the Beach 

Professor Jenny Jay  Greg Imamura 

Civil Engineering 

Earthquake Engineering 

Professor Jon Stewart  Dr. Bob Nigbor & Lisa Star 

Computer Science 

Wireless Pain Intervention for Sickle Cell Disease 

Professor Mario Gerla  Jerrid Matthews 

Computer Science &   Engineering 

Piecewise Linear Approximation Using Dynamic   Programming 

Professor Miodrag Potkonjak  Sheng Wei 

Electrical Engineering 

Sensors, Actuators and LabVIEW for   Biomechanics Applications:  Part 1 

Professor William Kaiser 

Electrical  Engineering 

Sensors, Actuators and LabVIEW for   Biomechanics Applications:  Part 2 

Professor William Kaiser 

Electrical  Engineering 

Timing is Everything:  Building an Accurate Clock 

Professor Rob Candler 

Mechanical Engineering 

Magnetoelectric (ME) Effect in Laminate Composites 

Professor Greg P. Carman  Tao Wu 

Mechanical Engineering 

Material Characterization   using Destructive/Non‐Destructive Techniques 

Professor Ajit Mal  Himadri Samajder 


Fall 2010 Page 9

RISE-UP Undergraduate Research Program  

The Center for Excellence in Engineering and Diver‐

sity (CEED), in the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering  and  Applied  Science  (HSSEAS),  is  committed  to  the  recruit‐ ment, development, retention, and graduation of underrepre‐ sented  engineering  and  computing  students.  CEED’s  under‐ graduate  retention  approach  offers  numerous  programs  and  services focused on the personal, academic, and career devel‐ opment of economically disadvantaged and underrepresented  engineering and computing students at UCLA.  During the Summer of 2005, CEED began its Research  Intensive Series in Engineering for Underrepresented Popula‐ tions (RISE‐UP) program, with support from: the National Sci‐ ence  Foundation  (NSF)  Science  Technology  Engineering  &  Mathematics  Talent  Expansion  Program  for  Underutilized  Populations (STEP‐UP), Intel, Hewlett‐Packard, the University  of  California  Leadership  Excellence  through  Advanced  De‐ grees (UC LEADS), the UCLA Undergraduate Research Center ‐  Center  for  Academic  and  Research  Excellence  (URC‐CARE)  and the NSF‐funded Center for Scalable and Integrated Nano‐ Manufacturing  (SINAM)  CEED  had  a  total  of  fifteen  under‐ graduate students involved in its inaugural 10‐week, summer  immersion,  research  program.    The  program  has  since  been  expanded  to  include  academic  year,  as  well  as  summer  re‐ search appointments, and is  now funded by the Semiconduc‐ tor Research Corporation (SRC) in partnership with Intel, the  NSF and Lockheed Martin.  The  purpose of this  program  is  to keep  CEED’s  engi‐ neering and computing students, particularly from underrep‐

(Front: L-R) Alfonso Roman, Stephanie Gachot, Dianne Pulido, Maricela Maldonado, Gabriela Bran, David Moreno-Magaña, Tihut Kebede, Kilty Inafuku, Richard Gaona, Alex Franceschi, Audrey Pool O’Neal (Rear: L-R) Former HSSEAS Assoc Dean Stephen Jacobson, Rick Ainsworth, Jian Sorge, Alex Martinez, Marcel Martin, Romulo Magallanes, George Torres, Anthony Erlinger, Drew Stanley, HSSEAS Assoc. Dean Richard Wesel

UCLA HSSEAS Dean Vijay K. Dhir with poster presenter Maricela Maldonado

resented groups, interested in the excitement of learning.  The  ultimate goal of this program is to encourage these young schol‐ ars  to go  on  to graduate school and  perhaps  the  professoriate.   RISE‐UP  challenges  and  inspires  students  to  stay  on  in  engi‐ neering  and  computing  or  to  use  those  problem‐solving  skills  no  matter  their  future  endeavors.    In  addition  to  conducting  research, RISE‐UP scholars also attend workshops on preparing  for graduate school and present their work at the annual CEED  RISE‐UP Poster competition in August of each year.    To date, there have been sixty‐seven RISE‐UP Scholars,  and 97% have been retained in their major.  Thirty‐seven have  graduated,  with  twenty‐six  graduates  (70%)  going  to  industry  and eleven (30%) going on to advanced studies.  The 5th Annual CEED RISE‐UP Poster Competition was  held at UCLA on August 27, 2009 in the California NanoSystems  Institute  (CNSI)  lobby.    There  were  seventeen  presenters,  and  the  competition  was  judged  by:  Stephen  Jacobsen,  Associate  Dean  Emeritus  of  HSSEAS;  Richard  Wesel,  Associate  Dean  of  HSSEAS;  and  Rick  Ainsworth,  CEED  Director.      First  place  was  awarded to Dianne Pulido, who is a 3rd year Bioengineering stu‐ dent,  for  her  work  on  Vesicular  Monoamine  Transporter  as  a  Neuroprotective  Agent  in  a  Drosophila  Model  of  Parkinson’s  Disease sponsored by Amgen, under the direction of Professor  David  Krantz.    Second  place  was  awarded  to  Alex  Franceschi,  who is a 5th year Mechanical Engineering student, for his work  on The Effects of Particle Size and Processing on the Properties  of a Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) Polymer Composite sponsored by  SINAM, under the direction of Professor H. Thomas Hahn.  Third  place was awarded to Anthony Erlinger, who is a 5th year Elec‐ trical  Engineering  student,  for  his  work  on  Lens‐free  On‐chip  Cell Counting and Characterization for Wireless Health Applica‐ tions sponsored by Intel, under the direction of Professor   Aydogan Ozcan. 


The CEED Vision Page 10

CEED Graduates with Ph.D.s in Engineering & Computing • Dr. John Harding, CS, Entrepreneur • Dr. Mark Ross, EE, Boeing HRL • Dr. Brian Smith, CS, Faculty at UPenn • Dr. Willie Harper, CivilE, Faculty at Auburn • Dr. Ron Metoyer, CS, Faculty at Oregon State • Dr. Oscar Dubon, MSE, Faculty at UC Berkeley • Dr. Lealon Martin, ChemE, Faculty at RPI • Dr. Raul Ramirez, EE, Ball Industries • Dr. Eric Gans, ME • Dr. Joseph Coe, Faculty at the Citadel CEED 2009-2010 Graduates Pursuing Advance Studies • Christine Charles, AE, MBA • Colleen Charles, Civil, Cal State • Anthony Erlinger, EE, Columbia University • Vanessa Evoen, ChemE, Cal Tech • Alex Franceschi, MechE, UCLA • Stephanie Gachot, ChemE, UCLA • Jennifer Guerrero, ChemE, UC Santa Barbara • Alan Lewis, Civil, UCLA • Marcel Martin, AE, Stanford • Justin Meza, Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon • Pavan Narsai, AE, Stanford • Raylene Moreno, Civil, UCLA MechE • Eric Padilla, Materials, Arizona State • Nicole Virdone, BioE, Duke University

CEED Graduates UCLA CEED Cohort (1995-2004)

The percentage of students who entered as a part of CEED and continued to graduation in engineering

Some of the 2010 CEED Graduates with CEED Director Rick Ainsworth


Fall 2010 Page 11

Summary of CEED Data on the 2009-2010 Graduating Class Total Number of HSSEAS Graduates: Approximately 650 Total Number of CEED Graduates: 52 CEED Graduating Students Average GPA: 3.038 Total Achievement Awards presented: 39 Achievement Awards were presented to CEED Students: 13 2010 HSSEAS Commencement Awards and Recognition of CEED Students: “Harry M. Showman Prize” for Outstanding Research “Outstanding BS in Aerospace Engineering,” “Engineering Achievement Award for Student Welfare”

Cum GPA's of the 52 CEED 2009-10 Graduating Seniors (Avg: 3.038)

5 CEED Seniors Graduated with Latin Honors: 3 Cum Laude, 1 Magna, and 1 Summa

3.50-4.000 (13.5%)

14 CEED Seniors are pursuing Graduate School: UCLA (ChemE, Civil, 2 ME); Arizona State (Mat); Cal State (Civil); CalTech (ChemE); Carnegie-Melon (CS); Colombia (EE); Duke (BioE); MBA Program (AE); Stanford (2 AE); UCSB (ChemE). 2 are applying for Grad School in Fall 2011.

3.00-3.499 (38.5%) 2.75-2.999 (26.9%) 2.50-2.749 (15.4%) 2.00-2.499 (5.8%)

24 of the 52 CEED Graduating Seniors (48%) were Community College Transfer Students.

< 2.000

(0%)

Data on all 266 CEED Students Undergraduate CEED Students by Major, Level and Gender 2010-11 HSSEAS Major

1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 5th+ Year Gender Total MAJOR M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

TOTAL

Aerospace Engineering

6

0

0

1

3

0

12

1

2

0

23

2

25

BioEngineering

0

1

0

1

3

3

5

1

0

0

8

6

14

Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science

0 3 0

2 2 0

3 6 2

2 3 1

1 7 4

6 3 0

4 8 3

2 5 2

4 5 7

2 2 1

12 29 16

14 15 4

26 44 20

Computer Science & Engr

6

0

3

0

6

1

4

2

8

0

27

3

30

Electrical Engineering

4

4

10

3

5

1

6

2

16

0

41

10

51

Materials Engineering

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

1

1

0

3

2

5

Mechanical Engineering

7

0

8

1

7

1

11

0

9

4

42

6

48

Undeclared Engineering

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

3

28

11

32

12

36

15

55

16

51

9

202

63

266

TOTALS


Partners and Supporters

We’re on the web: www.ceed.ucla.edu

Center for Excellence in Engineering and Diversity (CEED)  405 Hilgard Ave  Boelter Hall 6291  Los Angeles, CA 90095  Phone: (310) 206‐6493  Fax: (310) 825‐3908  E‐mail: ceed@ea.ucla.edu 

Special thanks to Xerox  for printing. 


CEED Newsletter Fall 2010