RUMBLE 2020

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JUNE 8-9, 2020


MONDAY, JUNE 8, 2020 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM 1PM – 5PM

SECTION AND ELEVATION

GEORGINA HULJICH

KATY BARKAN BENJAMIN FREYINGER JAKE MATATYAOU JASON PAYNE

WORKHOUSE: LATENT FUTURES

TERMINAL TERRAIN

IDEAS ENTERTAINMENT STUDIO: STRANGER THAN FICTION

TERMINAL TERRAIN

SECTION AND ELEVATION

ON FORCE AND FORM

BIG DUMB BUILDING

NARINEH MIRZAEIAN

KATY BARKAN BENJAMIN FREYINGER JAKE MATATYAOU JASON PAYNE

HEATHER ROBERGE

RAMIRO DIAZ-GRANADOS

HITOSHI ABE NATASHA SANDMEIER NATHAN SU

IDEAS URBAN STRATEGY STUDIO: LA-ND JEFFREY INABA GILLIAN SHAFFER DAVID JIMENEZ INIESTA

IDEAS MOBILITY STUDIO: MULTI-MODAL HUB GREG LYNN, MARTA NOWAK (4–5:30PM)

DISCUSSION #1: 5:30PM – 6:15PM

8:15 AM – 12:15 PM

TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 2020 TERMINAL TERRAIN

SECTION AND ELEVATION

JIMENEZ LAI

KATY BARKAN BENJAMIN FREYINGER JAKE MATATYAOU JASON PAYNE

A FOREST IN THE CITY: MASS TIMBER INFILL URBANISM

IMAGE BEYOND FACTS: AN ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY AND ITS MOMENTOUS OUTCOMES

NEIL DENARI GEORGINA HULJICH

GREG LYNN MARTA NOWAK (9–10:30 AM, 1–2 PM)

DISCUSSION #2: 12:45PM – 1:30PM

1:45 PM – 5:45 PM

IDEAS MOBILITY STUDIO: MULTI-MODAL HUB

TERMINAL TERRAIN

SECTION AND ELEVATION

LOS ANGELES PORTRAITS

MOHAMED SHARIF

KATY BARKAN BENJAMIN FREYINGER JAKE MATATYAOU JASON PAYNE

YARA FEGHALI

IDEAS TECHNOLOGY STUDIO: DEEP URBANISM: TECHNOCRITICAL ARCHITECTURAL NARRATIVES FOR HUMAN/ MACHINE SOCIETY GÜVENÇ ÖZEL BENJAMIN ENNEMOSER

DISCUSSION #3: 6:15PM – 7PM

AWARDS DAY CELEBRATION: 7PM – 8PM


WELCOME TO RUMBLE 2020! What a year it has been! It is bittersweet that I write to invite you to join us virtually rather than to celebrate the end of the year together in-person. Our RUMBLE end-of-year exhibition has always been a special event, showcasing the efforts of students and faculty over the course of the academic year and this year is no exception. Despite the transition to remote learning and the personal challenges many of us have faced during this time, together we produced a compelling body of work this spring. I’m excited to honor our accomplishments with a virtual format for RUMBLE 2020. I also wanted to express my appreciation for your collaboration and support during this time. While I know we’d all prefer to be back in our studios, classrooms, and workshops, it has been comforting to see familiar faces on Zoom and to continue discussing our creative and scholarly work. While the impact of COVID-19 has been far reaching and its end still uncertain, I’ve been impressed with the solidarity, ingenuity and comradery that have shaped your responses. Architects have an incredible capacity to build community, to solve problems, and to imagine futures. With our collective intelligence, we can activate the public to support investment in the future of our infrastructure, our climate responses, and our living environments. This requires vision, competence, and advocacy for the future we want to enact. Your commitment over the past year leaves me optimistic about the future. RUMBLE is an opportunity to engage the broader architecture and urban design communities in conversations about the future of the built environment as forecasted and imagined by UCLA Architecture and Urban Design. It reveals how the architectural and urban ideas that motivate us have matured and developed under the direction of our talented students and the collective stewardship of faculty. This year, through online design reviews and conversations, we have an exciting opportunity to engage people who wouldn’t have seen the work in the past, but who can now contribute to the conversation remotely. To those joining us this year, thank you for taking the time to engage, critique, and celebrate the efforts of our students and faculty. To our graduating students: I know that the future is uncertain, but I hope you will take a moment to acknowledge your incredible accomplishments. Your intelligence, talent, and commitment will serve you well in your careers. As an alumnus, you are an integral part of the UCLA Architecture and Urban Design community and we will be here to support you long after you graduate. Keep in touch. Warmly, Heather Roberge CHAIR, UCLA ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN

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PUBLIC PROGRAMS

SYMPOSIA

Spring Quarter, which we transformed to an online lecture series with guests including: Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher, the Helen Hilton Raiser Curator of Architecture and Design at SFMOMA in conversation with Architect, Tatiana Bilbao; Ignacio G. Galan, Principal of [igg - office for architecture]; Our 2019-20 lecture series hosted speak- Historian David Gissen; and Tei Carpenter, ers from the intersecting vectors of Founder of Agency—Agency. As a followdesign, media, technology, and urbanism up to her lecture, Oana Stănescu also to share their work and their reflections hosted a student workshop that conon the state of contemporary culture. sidered alternative and unconventional This year, we welcomed a diverse group modes of professional practice such as of architects, artists, and scholars, the client-less architect and the architect including: Distinguished Alumni Kai-Uwe without architecture learning from other Bergmann (M.Arch. ‘93), Partner at BIG; fields including music, film, fashion, arts, François Charbonnet, Founding Partner of and graphic design. Our public programs Made in, Neil Denari, UCLA AUD Professor are open to the UCLA community and the and Principal, Neil M. Denari Architects; public at large, and it was great to see Dominic Leong, Founding Partner of so many of our students, alumni and the Leong Leong and Adjunct Assistant greater Los Angeles architecture commuProfessor at Columbia University nity participate throughout the year. GSAPP; Oana Stănescu, Founder of Oana Stănescu Studio and Design Critic in Architecture at Harvard University GSD; Jeannette Kuo, Partner of Karamuk Kuo and Assistant Professor in Practice at Harvard University GSD; and Thomas Robinson, Founder and Principal of LEVER Architecture. We had planned an exciting lineup of public programs for the

LECTURES

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At the IDEAS campus, two symposia explored emerging trends in some of Los Angeles’ most creative industries: Entertainment and Urban Strategy. In the fall, Natasha Sandmeier and the IDEAS Entertainment Studio hosted Stranger than Fiction. Making (un)Real Worlds, a journey through the worlds and narratives that straddle the increasingly blurry line between fact and fiction. The lineup included presentations and performances from: Johannes Mucke, Founder, CEO and Production Designer at Wideshot; Keely Colcleugh, Founder and CEO of Kilograph; Sally Slade, Lead AR/VR Developer at Magnopus; Johannes Saam, Senior Creative Technologist at Framestore; Amalia Ulman, Artist and creator of ‘Excellences and Perfections’; and Aaron Koblin, Founder of Within. Jeffrey Inaba and the IDEAS Urban Strategy Studio hosted LA-ND. The Future of Land Value in LA, which explored the history and future making of land and urban strategies to improve the quality of life in LA. Speakers included Christopher Hawthorne, Chief Design Officer of the City of Los Angeles, and former LA Times Architecture Critic; Francesca Ammon, Associate Professor of City and Regional Planning and Historic Preservation at University of Pennsylvania, and the author of Bulldozer: Demolition and Clearance of the Postwar Landscape; and Débora Mesa, Architect and Principal of Ensamble Studio (Madrid and Boston). The studio also hosted special lectures with Vince Bertoni, Planning Director for the City of Los Angeles, and Tony Chou, partner at Opsis Capital and community developer who shared their insights on densification strategies for LA.


EXHIBITIONS

Student and faculty work was on display throughout the city this year. UCLA AUD was one of four schools featured as part of The Los Angeles Schools, a collective exhibition of work and statements on display at the A+D Museum. The department’s installation offered an opportunity to hear directly from our students, in their voices, the diversity of perspectives, interests, and ambitions pursued in Research Studios during the 2018-19 academic year. In celebration of UCLA’s Centennial, undergraduate student work from Georgina’s Huljich’s Spring 2019 studio Facts Beyond Image was on display at CicLAvia— Heart of L.A., an open streets event in

downtown Los Angeles. The studio conducted an architectural survey of UCLA’s iconic Royce Hall, and re-envisioned how the building could be transformed as the campus plans for its future. In the Perloff Hall Gallery, Katy Barkan and Gabriel Fries-Briggs explored the theme of Superposition; an interest in simultaneity and overlap – both conceptual and material. The joint exhibition questioned the threshold between architectural objecthood and its spatial corollaries, problematizing a clear boundary between the two. Superposition, as a model of working, proposed the overlay of multiple categories of work and multiple authors allowing for category errors, transpositions, and irresoluble differences.

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UCLA AUD ON THE ROAD

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Our students traveled the globe this year. In the fall, M.Arch. students visited Chicago with Mohamed Sharif to explore a transformation of Mies van der Rohe’s Federal Center for a near future Chicago when the city’s heat and humidity will match that of Atlanta. Jimenez Lai led students on a road-trip of the American South West, exploring the architecture, graphic signage, art, and other communicative matters. Ben Refuerzo’s studio visited Beijing in a collaboration with Tianjin University, touring the Commune by the Great Wall and staying the night in the Bamboo House by Kengo Kuma. The IDEAS Urban Strategy Studio travelled to Mexico City to explore the city’s vertiginous land transformations. Hosted by Wonne Ickx of PRODUCTORA, students had the opportunity to stop by the studios of Tatiana Bilbao and Alberto Kalach and visited large urban sites, like Santa Fe with Jose Castillo and the architectural sites of Luis Barragan. In the winter, Hitoshi Abe’s M.Arch. Research Studio visited Tokyo to learn about the similarities and differences in work culture in Japan. Students learned about the design, business strategies, and operations of a range of workspaces managed by Mitsui Fudosan. Heather Roberge led students on a European tour through Barcelona and Paris to visit projects by Gaudi, Miralles, Nervi, and others that explore the geometric, material, and spatial impact of force on structural organization and building form. Neil Denari’s studio travelled to Portland, Oregon, to understand the present conditions of the research and developments in mass timber – a local process in Oregon’s climate and landscape but perhaps a distant or even exotic concept in architecture production in California, a dry and less wooded state. Closer to home, the IDEAS Entertainment Studio visited Warner Bros. Studio in Burbank exploring all aspects of pre-production, production and post-production. Tours of exterior and interior sets revealed what it means for a set to be designed “for the camera” and how the same assets, often as big as entire structures, can be altered and used for different purposes. In post-production, students learned about new technologies to achieve visual effects and optical illusions, and were introduced to strategies of layering music scores and sound effects.


RESEARCH CENTERS URBAN HUMANITIES INITIATIVE

xLAB Founded by Professor Hitoshi Abe, xLAB is an international think tank at UCLA AUD that examines architecture’s elastic boundaries and considers new possibilities through creation of interdisciplinary platforms for the study of the future of the built environment. Starting in 2017, the Workhouse Research Studio has researched the gray zone between the domestic and work spaces and activities that transform the architectural typology today. The 2019–2020 Workhouse: Latent Futures is the final in the Workhouse trilogy. In 2019, together with IRIDes at Tohoku University and Miraikan National Museum for Emerging Science and Innovation, xLAB launched the ArcDR3 Initiative as a part of the Association of Pacific Rim Universities (APRU) Multihazard program. Architecture and Urban Design for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience initiative (ArcDR3) is a three-year global interdisciplinary architecture education project that involves participation from 11 APRU universities and proposes the study and design for resilience in our contemporary environment. The initiative includes a number of research studios run by all participating universities, a series of symposiums and exhibitions, and a publication, scheduled for the end of the program.

The UCLA Urban Humanities Initiative (UHI) is a cross-disciplinary teaching and research initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, based within cityLAB. UHI integrates the interpretive, historical approaches of the humanities with the material, projective practices of design, to document, elucidate, and transform the cultural object we call the city. A new book by UHI faculty was cityLAB-UCLA is a think tank producing just released called Urban Humanities: cutting-edge design and policy research New Practices for Reimagining the City to make cities more livable for everyone. (Cuff et al, MIT Press, 2020). Architecture, Directed by Dr. Dana Cuff, both graduate urban studies, and humanities stuand undergraduate UCLA AUD students dents are the heart of the program, and participate in funded studies that deploy over 150 students have completed the experimental design for spatial justice. year-long Graduate Certificate in Urban Here in Los Angeles, cityLAB drives inno- Humanities. Along with urban theory vative solutions to issues like housing and innovative design methods, the affordability, sustainable infrastruccoming year will offer varied research ture, and urban sprawl. In 2020, cityLAB opportunities under direct mentorship advanced the on-campus conversation of faculty from across the UCLA campus. around student housing insecurity, colApplications for 2020-21 open in May. laborating with student advocates, In February, our current students campus administrators, and UCLA AUD traveled to Tijuana, Mexico to join faculty to design research-backed soluwith students and faculty from the tions for “super commuters” vis-à-vis Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana the Wooden Hub. Off-campus, our team Cuajimalpa (Mexico City) to study migrais probing design and policy that would tion, informality, and border urbanism locate affordable housing on public under the guidance of Professors Maite school lands throughout California, Zubiaurre and Maria Moreno Carranco. An developing proposals that benefit active group of UHI alumni are currently students, teachers, and surrounding com- organizing a Digital Salon, featuring a munities. Every year, cityLAB awards one podcast that will narrate alumni projects graduate student the cityLAB Fellowship, in response to COVID-19. as well as an Undergraduate Fellow. In collaboration with the Urban Humanities Initiative, cityLAB launched a new satellite center called coLAB. Led by Dr. Gustavo Leclerc, coLAB’s studies, conducted in deep partnership with community organizations, seek to build an embedded understanding of a complex neighborhood where design can be leveraged to transform the public sphere, and serve as a model for 21st century architectural and urban research. Despite circumscribed conditions due to COVID-19, coLAB kicked off this partnership with a series of thick mapping workshops that reveal critical issues of access to public space, design and infrastructure needs, and hidden neighborhood histories.

cityLAB-UCLA

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WORKSHOPS

Over the course of the year, a number of guests shared their time and expertise during exclusive workshops for UCLA AUD students. Kai-Uwe Bergmann led a workshop for students in the IDEAS Urban Strategy Studio sharing what it meant to be an architect and an urbanist through his work at BIG. Students were asked to create a pilot proposal for the Palms neighborhood of Los Angeles, exploring topics of scale, housing density, recreation, landscape, and infrastructure. The IDEAS Mobility Studio kicked off the year with a workshop and demo

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of the gita robot, a mobile assistant designed by Greg Lynn and his team at Piaggio Fast Forward. As part of an ongoing collaboration with BMW DesignWorks, the studio met with Seleta Reynolds, General Manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) to learn about the city’s vision for mobility in Los Angeles, including challenges and consequences to existing infrastructure, the need for new infrastructure, and specific mobility plans for the 2028 Los Angeles Olympics. The IDEAS Technology Studio hosted Tammuz Dubnov, CEO of Zuzor for a workshop on interactive environments. Using their artificial intelligence, multimedia technology, and machine vision-powered software, students learned how to customize experiences using a variety of graphical assets and create dynamic journeys using trigger points. The IDEAS Entertainment Studio hosted several workshops throughout the year with: Jackson Lukas, an architect-trained VFX artist who introduced Substance Painter

to the students and discussed material texturing and UV mapping; Johannes Mucke, an architect and entertainment designer and Founder of Wideshot and Volker Engel, an oscar-winning production designer, who together led a workshop on concept art and scene development; David James, Creative Director of Visual Development at Warner Animation Group and Art Center College of Design faculty who delivered a talk on creative design and storytelling; and Bethany Edgoose, a scriptwriter and co-founder of Inferstudio who consulted with each of the teams on their script development.


PUBLICATIONS

POOL

When the POOL editorial team chose the theme of “Simulation” in November 2019, huddled closely together over a table filled with printed images, snippets of text, and eager scribbles we had hoarded over the fall, the conversation revolved around materiality and softwares, training – for construction and for war – and methods of making do and making new. Today, as the simulation of public life becomes a means of clinging to survival and sanity, forever changing notions of progress and production, the theme has taken on unpredictable meanings and contexts. POOL presents Issue No. 05: Simulation, and POOLside v3, phenakistoscope.gif, edited from nine living rooms (and occasionally bedrooms, kitchens, and closets) across Los Angeles, Indiana, Montana, and Illinois, with contributions from 25 architects, artists, musicians, filmmakers, and theorists around the world. As part of our broader mission to engage architects and creatives in Los Angeles and beyond, this year POOL partnered with Roundhouse Platform to present Simulation: A Virtual Symposium on Cities, Cinema, and Simulation in Architecture at Texas Tech University, hosted the Literary Lounge for the School of Arts and Architecture’s annual Opening Event, joined Angelenos in taking back the streets during the CicLAvia—Heart of L.A. celebration, and spoke on The Current State of Student-Led Publications in LA’s Architecture Schools at the A+D Museum. Now, more than ever, POOL aspires to reach new audiences through the incorporation of media unconventional to architectural discourse. Learn more at www.pool-la.com.

POOL 2019–20 editorial team: Managing Editors: Rayne Laborde Content Editors: Phoebe Webster, Christina Rodriguez Graphic Editors: Michael DePrez, Georgia Pogas Digital Editors: Casey Knudsen, Samantha Radice Production and Finance Editor: Hannah Hortick Outreach Editor: Peiwei Zhang Events Editor: David Vasquez Assistant Editor: Erica Luedtke

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STUDIOS

WORKHOUSE: LATENT FUTURES Research Studio with Hitoshi Abe M.Arch.I, Third Year Over the course of the year, the Workhouse Research Studio has studied the ecology of relationships surrounding the emerging typology of co-working and co-living spaces. In the context of this studio, co-working and co-living spaces have been primarily understood as programmatic concepts tied to a new building type that has yet to be determined. Coworking and co-living spaces are currently under explosive development and are beginning to be subject to critical evaluation, conversation, and experimentation. The consideration and coordination of relationships is extremely important in the process of understanding and designing spaces that respond to contemporary shifts in technology, the economy, lifestyles, and culture. For the final design project, the studio will focus on the design of a co-working and co-living building, contributing towards an experiment in developing new building types. “This new type of space, its sudden appearance analogous to the growth in manufactories in the 19th century, can be read as an economic tool as well as an architectural trope, where design is mobilized to create a peculiar sense of place and to organize and manage resources.”

With the evolution in work-lifestyle and the rapid development of mobile technology, specific activities have been released from the building forms that once separated and regulated them. In this studio, we have studied co-working and co-living as catalytic programs, independent of a building type and capable of promoting new programmatic relationships. Students have developed the basis for design of a co-working / co-living building in the Los Angeles area and in Tokyo city, carefully demonstrating their vision of how a series of economic, social, and cultural relationships play out in their proposal. In the Spring Quarter, students will work individually to design a comprehensive architecture that produces and is produced by these relationships. Students: Megan Berookhim, Ryan Holloway, Florian Lepinard, Ziyao Li, Zhiyin Lin, Jacob Sertich, Yujie Shi, Daniel Sklar, David Vasquez, Ada Luchao Wang, Wandi Wang, Chloe Watson

A FOREST IN THE CITY: MASS TIMBER INFILL URBANISM Research Studio with Neil M. Denari M.Arch.I, Third Year Three quite succinct questions sum up architecture’s future as it relates to the problematics of climate change: 1) How much of it do we need? 2) Where will it be built? 3) What will it be made of? If the first question is substantially answered by data that shows a dramatic shortfall in housing (our most ubiquitous program) in California and the second logically suggests urban environments like Los Angeles, then the third answer is less direct and murkier when seen through the lens of sustainable metrics. At this point, a moment defined by both urgency and ambiguity, our ability to measure and define carbon emissions and eco-footprints is guided as much by assumption as fact. Life cycle costs and performance criteria can be analyzed according to data, but also shaped by sheer belief or faith in a certain way of thinking that can be scientific and moralistic. And if there is one material that speaks to this range of opinions and emotions regarding sustainable construction

it is wood, more specifically mass timber, a type of generalized system based on large, prefabricated structural elements and modules. Based on initial urban plans – designed by six two-student teams – for sites in Los Angeles of 400 meters in diameter located at major transportation nodes, and on field research in Oregon to study recent timber buildings and mass timber factories, the work presented here aims at depicting scenarios for a future Los Angeles in which materials, zoning, form, and programmatic compaction reach new levels of provocation for urban densification. A local forestation of architecture. Students: Shany Albalak, Catherine Carlson, Michael DePrez, Zihao Ding, Sammy Hasan, Ching Kao, Rayne Laborde, Sunghoon Lee, Yushan Men, Kyoung Eun Park, Georgia Pogas, Jiajie Wang

—Fig Projects, Around the World in Six Coworking Spaces.

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LOS ANGELES PORTRAITS Research Studio with Yara Feghali M.Arch.I, Third Year Today, there is an urgency to address our cities’ cultural messiness. This research studio explores Los Angeles’ lush diversity by uncovering its multiple layers of resolution. We speculate – through interactive storytelling – on the near future of cultural space working with machine aesthetics, photogrammetry, and cinematographic techniques. Los Angeles is an exceedingly complex city that thrives through its diversity. We researched its various neighborhoods and learned from their current states by using today’s representational platforms. Research becomes a search where we scroll through infinite TikTok videos, Instagram Posts, YouTube channels live-streams, and other interfaces where LA’s identities are portrayed and celebrated for all their glorious messiness. Where discussions around architectural styles and genres turn into digital material filters and augmented reality add-ons. Where aesthetics is bound to cultural identities, and neighborhood borders’ politics. Where economic and social systems have direct physical impacts manifested through aesthetics.

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In our conversations, we question the expectations of architectural research, the standardization of drawings’ representation, and rigid historical canons. Each designer has developed their workflow, language, and position associated with their specific neighborhood. Starting from two-dimensional images using convolutional neural networks, making our way to three-dimensional models of a cabinet of curiosities, we acutely address the realms of projective geometry juggling between 2D and 3D, of digital crafts and technical expertise, of Bavarian rococo redefining the frame, and finally the realm of new media leading to a fullyfledged critical project. Los Angeles Portraits is an invitation to open a discussion on spaces’ identities through various means of searching and registering them. We speculate through ways of seeing on possible stories of Los Angeles Portraits looking at Beverly Hills’ Rodeo Drive, the UCLA Campus, Downtown’s Chinatown, Olvera Street, and Broadway, Hollywood’s Sunset Strip, the Grove’s Original Farmers Market, Westwood’s village, and even expanding our search to Old Pasadena and San Juan Capistrano. Students: Kristiana Burgi, ChiehTing Chuang, Samantha Crawford, Yu Han, Daravuth Hav, Hideyo Kameda, Heather Tipton, Deyang Yu, Ni Zhang, Yifan Zhang

ON FORCE AND FORM Research Studio with Heather Roberge M.Arch.I, Third Year Where the material goes, the force flows. This concise phrase links material, geometry and force in relationships that are operative. Without this triad, we would lack a broad and captivating history of architecture. It is precisely material coursing with force that has configured centuries of social interaction, political debate, religious liturgy and indeed, a central disciplinary vector of architecture. The studio will be deeply invested in how structures perform and produce spatial organization, new forms of social engagement, and new experiences. On Force and Form is a play on the title of D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form and like this reference, On Force and Form studies the relationships of matter and environment. The term environment has three distinct meanings here. Environment (as force) encompasses the applied conditions that shape matter. Environment (as a set of physical conditions) describes the local aftereffects of material production. Environment (as an aggregate of influences) records the cumulative impact of production more broadly. These three definitions of environment cross scales from the molecular to the human to the planetary. The

calculations that interrelate geometry, material and force directly implicate environment at each scale. The natural resources, embodied energy, mechanical and electrical operations, and waste associated with construction account for 36% of the energy consumed worldwide. As a designer always eager to harness the technical in producing the critical, this studio postulates that expertise in the design of structural proposals is deeply connected to all three of these definitions of environment, making structural knowledge especially relevant to a culture increasingly concerned with natural resource and energy liabilities. Our highly computational milieu allows us to actively work with physics to study the dynamic response of objects to applied force. Parametric software and game engines alike allow designers to simulate active environments, objects with material properties, and other agents. If designers actively engage structural principles, not only can they produce innovative structure and organization, but can do so while aware of the limits of minimal means, the tension between math and material, and the implications of material excess. A special thanks to Daniela Rincon and Daniel Segraves of Thornton Tomasetti for structural consultations. Students: David Erlich, Kate Gancedo, Sarah Grieve, Martha Kriley, Philip Li, Noam Taylor, Teodora Velkova, Erfan Zamani, Peiwei Zhang


STRANGER THAN FICTION

LA-ND

MULTI-MODAL HUB

IDEAS Entertainment Studio with Natasha Sandmeier and Nathan Su

IDEAS Urban Strategy Studio with Jeffrey Inaba, Gillian Shaffer and David Jimenez Iniesta

M.Arch.II

M.Arch.II

M.Arch.II

The IDEAS Entertainment Studio lives within the worlds and narratives that straddle the increasingly blurry line between fact and fiction – the Stranger Than Fiction reality that we all inhabit every day. As our media landscape adapts itself to AI-created content and deepfakes, the studio explores this inability to distinguish fact from fiction, and mines it for innovative forms of visual storytelling to create uncanny stories set in the spaces and cities of our real/fictional times. The IDEAS Entertainment Studio is an interdisciplinary learning environment – we collaborate with visual storytellers, vfx artists, concept artists, production designers and architects to develop the agency we have as architects and designers to speculate on and design the worlds and legends of tomorrow. Qingyang, Yusi and Yueshi’s film, Best Before, envisions a future in which our lives are entirely determined by our use-by date and transforms the ways we engage with our body, friends, and city. Chunsu, Tianyi and Xianrui explore new planets and build intricate webs of relationships with collaborators in their multiplayer game, Innermost; in which you terraform your planet as you cultivate your identity and community. Gestimani, Alekya and Yanrong channel the minds of two investigators (a human detective and an AI analyst) to reveal the contradictions between forensic evidence and remembered testimonies. Liang, Ruohan and Yuexuan muse on the ways in which technologies have fundamentally transformed our experience of time, while Akash and Negin design a world in which algorithms are our gods; managing the ebb and flow of economies and resources, while giving life through the global orchestration of weather. Neha, Akshada and Aishwarya’s film, Forever, animates plastic waste to deliver a powerful treatise on our rampant affluenza, and offers an alternative to our anthropocentric trajectory. In a time when reality truly is stranger than fiction, these films offer stories of hope and optimism.

This year’s IDEAS Urban Strategy Studio explored LA-ND – as in land ownership, land development, land planning, endangered land, land disasters, land scarcity, and land redevelopment – is the bottom-line story of Los Angeles as a city. From its settlement to its series of expansions and finally its densification, reimagining the land has been the vehicle for the city to grow. One of the most remarkable attempts is Olmsted and Bartholomew’s 1930 plan to create an emerald necklace of parks from the Pacific Ocean through Downtown LA to the Santa Monica and San Gabriel Mountains along the path of the LA River, transforming the land from a handful of disparate municipalities into a new regional geography of open spaces connected by transportation corridors. The ambitious proposal to give LA’s land an urban culture before it had one resonates today as plans for the LA River have prompted discussions about knitting the region together through a series of linked landscapes and urban attractors. Taking the Olmsted and Bartholomew plan as a source of inspiration to imagine the future of Los Angeles at a broad scale, the studio will work with partners that have a stake in LA’s land, including real estate investors, urban planners, community organizations, and companies with large land holdings. Final design proposals will consider three key aspects of future LA-NDs: (1) Nature – rather than battle nature to build, we’ll use it as a medium to grow the city using geography, landscape, and inclusive habitats, (2) Climate – because the land is changing we’ll design infrastructure and urban areas that improve the quality of life in a world of climate risk, and (3) New building types - the rising value of land means architects will need to create new types of buildings whose urban spaces make the best use of limited area in a city reluctant to densify.

New forms of mobility are being developed currently for both people and things. From autonomous container ships and trucks, to autonomous buses and cars, to autonomous aerial and land drones, logistics and transportation is being reformulated rapidly. These new forms of intelligent motion are impacting urban, suburban and rural infrastructure. However, little thought is being applied to how buildings are impacted; in particular, the interior circulation and building envelope. It is the premise of this studio that lightweight intelligent electric mobility should enter architecture and provoke a similar transformation that the elevator and escalator provoked a century ago. Previously architecture has been defined as static and function has been defined as dynamic. Necessary for the formulation of architectural responses to autonomous vehicles and intelligent mobility in and out of buildings is the development of numerical and spatial techniques for the quantification of moving people and things in buildings. The format of these concepts will be spatial diagrams and generic typologies accompanied by numerical and narrative descriptions. The diagrams and typological speculations can take the form of digital modeling, simulation, robotic physical models, or working full scale mock-ups. The IDEAS Mobility Studio is devoted to the invention of architectural concepts in response to new forms of mobility and several building typologies will be analyzed and transformed by the students. The studio looks into a combination of a retail market with a grocery store and situates these programs above an existing mobility hub. The studio has to consider a new building topology that also involves a subway station, bus terminal, ride hailing and micro mobility.

Students: Qingyang Li, Alekya Malladi, Yueshi Min, Akshada Muley, Negin Nayeri, Neha Oswal, Chunsu Ouyang, Akash Ragde, Aishwarya Rajasekar, Gesthimani Roumpani, Tianyi Song, Xianrui Wang, Liang Yang, Ruohan Yang, Yanrong Yang, Yuexuan Zhang, Yusi Zhang

Students Aron Carcamo, Ruoyang Chen, Wenhan Dong, Xinran Ge, Yuxuan He, Lecan Li, Qi Long, Yeawon Min, Gaurav Puri, Ruchi Singhania, Chinmayi Suri, Jingyi Wang, Tong Wang, Xiyan Wang, Dingkai Xiang, Sihang Zeng, Linyi Zhang, Xue Zhao

IDEAS Mobility Studio with Greg Lynn and Marta Nowak

Students: Shuaijiang Chen, Revathi Ganesh, Luis Garcia, Anatoli Georgiadou, Jingyi Huang, Shervin Peyghambari Oskoui, Pranay Sharma, Nan-Tse Su, Shilin Wang, Xiran Wang, Jinfeng Wu, Wenzhao Zhang

DEEP URBANISM: TECHNOCRITICAL ARCHITECTURAL NARRATIVES FOR HUMAN/MACHINE SOCIETY IDEAS Technology Studio with Güvenç Özel and Benjamin Ennemoser M.Arch.II In the world of surveillance capitalism designed to collect and monetize data, digital representations of ourselves and our environments are harvested by CCTV cameras, drones, internet bots, social media platforms and their allies for social, economic and political manipulation and control. Since the modes of operation for these platforms and how they monetize our actions are opaque, how do we create useful and engaging methods to understand the impact of our digital behaviors? Data is inherently invisible, ubiquitous, complex and intangible. It has no scale, no materiality and no perceivable properties through our senses. Its impact can only be measured through its subjectivity and influence in the social sphere. Through instrumentalizing architecture, the objective of the Deep Urbanism studio is to demystify the inner-workings of the algorithms that hold increasing influence over our decisions, emotions, and sense of self by turning them into media that are comprehensible through our spatial perception. By subverting their innate purpose and objectifying them, the studio aims to hack such computational systems of surveillance and control in order to exploit them for their creative potential for architectural production. Based on this premise, the title for the studio, Deep Urbanism, is a double entendre, one referring to the utilization of deep learning algorithms for their generative potential for creating novel architectural and urban form, the other referencing a contemporary mode of “deep state” where the data of individuals are constantly collected, archived, manipulated and weaponized. Computer vision systems coupled with machine learning allow for these emergent systems of control to be deployed. We used the current form of computer vision systems and the databases they create as our arsenal to understand how machines see our world, and critically utilize deep learning to decipher how they interpret what they see. Students: Weonwoo Choi, Ali Hakami, Dipinti Kapoor, Onur Koyun, Sangmee Lee, Huilin Liu, Xuanhong Liu, Zhishan Liu, Kaushil Ketan Shah, Irem Uygur, Yiyin Wu, Wei Xie, Siyuan Xu, Xiaoman Zhang, Zhi Zhou

RUMBLE 2020 • 17


TERMINAL TERRAIN

SECTION AND ELEVATION

MY LIVING ROOM IS PUBLIC

COMPETITION: ART/CHAIR

Major Building Design Studio with Georgina Huljich (Coordinator), Jimenez Lai, Narineh Mirzaeian, and Mohamed Sharif

Tech Core with Katy Barkan (Coordinator), Benjamin Freyinger, Julia Koerner, Jake Matatyaou, and Jason Payne

Technology Seminar with Yara Feghali

Technology Seminar with Ben Refuerzo

M.Arch.I, M.Arch.II

M.Arch.I, M.Arch.II

My Living Room is Public is a twisted documentation of the spaces we inhabit. We are now isolated in our domesticity and will use that constraint as the starting point of the seminar working our way from realism towards abstraction. We will collect photorealistic data from your domestic environments as as-built survey and work backwards to drawings, and then to design propositions by inputting them into a gam.

ART/CHAIR is often taken for granted and the design of everyday items is regularly manifested in the mundane. Too often the utilitarian is relegated to function and not associated with design and is therefore considered to be lacking in aspects of critical/conceptual thinking...nothing should be further from the truth. Design should be elevated to art through the use of materials, details and form to make the simple sublime...DESIGN, ANIMATE, MAKE A CHAIR.

M.Arch.I, Second Year A 60,000 GSF +/- Ferry Terminal in the reorganized waterfront landscape of the Channel Islands Harbor in Oxnard, California Utilizing specific instructor-led disciplinary positions and formal, and representation techniques, each studio began the quarter by reconfiguring the structure and contents of the waterfront landscape of the harbor peninsula. With rising sea-levels in mind, the exercise addressed issues of infrastructure, district plan, and section organizations and programming (both fixed and temporal) through topics and binaries of edge, figure, ground, mass, landform, forces, flows, and functions. Following that, students developed proposals for a replacement of the existing Channel Islands cruise and charter terminal and its ancillary functions. The large-scale reformulation and small-scale design developments prioritize distinct forms over dated ideas of landscape urbanism and establish new systems of order over what is currently a hazy terrain of loosely connected episodes. Students (Huljich): Chiwoo Back, Justin Carson, Yick Shun, Nickson Chan, Tianyuan Fan, Sana Jahani, Lauren Mitchell, Austin Ng, Jean-Paul Previero, Yiwei Qian, Qetuwrah Reed, Ziyi Yang, Yixuan Zhang Students (Lai): Morgan Jacobs, Chaoran Lin, Jourdon Miller, Jennifer Peterson Ruiz, Xavier Ramirez, Amy Robles, Annabella Rosa, Markus Russell, Artin Sahakian, Yiwen Song, Guannan Wang, Yulu Wang Students (Mirzaeian): Shabnam Abtahi, Maha Benhachmi, Cullen Fu, Andrew Gonzales, Hannah Hortick, Bernard Kazmierski, Yufei Liang. Samantha Radice, Christina Rodriguez, Andrei Sharyshev, Phoebe Webster, Yuemeng Zhao Students (Sharif): Phillip Brown, Tomasz Groza, Sonali Khanna, Casey Knudsen, Gabriel Strzepek, Nathan Waddell, Yufan Wang, Yixiao Wei, Kaiwen Wu, Mei Wu, Yuqi Zhang, Xueying Zou

18 • RUMBLE 2020

M.Arch.I, First Year The stacked section – mute, repetitive, indeterminate – has been the foil against which many architectural projects have positioned themselves. As the primary object of study, this studio is concerned with the capacity of the section to move beyond seriality to develop complex spatial propositions. In an effort to challenge and interrogate the limitations of the stack the studio proposes to nest together a parking garage and a gym. While at first glance the organization and circulation of cars in a parking garage may seem a banal coordination of metrics, there is a great range of logics to be gleaned from this choreography of ramps, slabs, spirals, and staggers. At a large scale, parking provides a coarse sectional strategy that dislodges the serial plane as the given datum of building, while remaining adherent to the necessities of circulation and movement. Against this sectional readymade, the gym provides a more pliable counterpart, whose specificities derive as much from sequences of use as from dimensionally defined volumes and surfaces of action. Finally, while the section remains the site of much architectural concern, this focus nearly always finds itself hidden, wrapped, and closed – the insistent visibility of the elevation eclipsing whatever lies within. In this way, the studio problematizes the section – both as an orthographic abstraction, and as a spatial medium – by setting it into tension with the demands of the elevation. Students (Barkan): Marina Archangeli, Gibson Bastar, Ziwei Hou, Angelica Luna, Ethan Ma, Ronald Oziogu, Sunay Rajbhandari, Cheng Zhang, Roya Chagnon Students (Freyinger): Eric Alexander, Shiying Gan, Steven Katz, Xiuwen Qi, Jordan Rae, Monica Roh, Claire Rosenberg, Emily Sherman, Xiaoyue Wang Students (Matatyaou): Morgane Copp, Erica Luedtke, Siyu Mao, Tiffany Orozco, Wei Qiu, Hamidreza Sanjabi, Camille Walkinshaw, Kaibo Wang, Xinyu Yan Students (Payne): Julie Shay, Miranda Hirujo-Rincon, Akana Jayewardene, Wei-Shih Lin, Qiuying Lu, Tien Pham, Maxwell Pittman, Hongye Wu, Kaiwen Yang

Students: Kristiana Burgi, Shuaijiang Chen, Revathi Ganesh, Luis Garcia, Hiroshi (Ryan) Holloway, Hideyo Kameda, Dipinti Kapoor, Sangmi Lee, Xuanhong Liu, Alekya Malladi, Negin Nayeri, Xavier Ramirez, Gesthimani Roumpani, Pranay Sharma, Chinmayi Suri, Heather Tipton, Irem Uygur, Xianrui Wang, Xiyan Wang, Chloe Watson, Jinfeng Wu, Siyuan Xu, Ruohan Yang, Sihang Zeng, Linyi Zhang

ON MYOPIA AND FARSIGHTEDNESS: BRIDGING MICRO AND MACRO ECOLOGIES Technology Seminar with David Jimenez Iniesta M.Arch.I, M.Arch.II Photogrammetry generates detailed 3D models from photographs and is transforming industries like cartography, archeology, and VFX. Students will explore the theoretical and practical dimensions of photogrammetry with emphasis on applications in architecture. Ultimately, students will design and fabricate devices to collect images, process photoreal models, and produce complex virtual environments. Students: Aron Carcamo, Ruoyang Chen, Weonwoo Choi, Anatoli Georgiadou, Yu Han, Yuxuan He, Jingyi Huang, Lecan Li, Yufei Liang, Huilin Liu, Qi Long, Yeawon Min, Akshada Muley, Neha Oswal, Gaurav Puri, Yujie Shi, Nan-Tse Su, Ada Luchao Wang, Shilin Wang, Dingkai Xiang, Yifan Zhang, Zhi Zhou

Students: Samantha Crawford, Zihao Ding, David Erlich, Sammy Hasan, Sunghoon Lee, Ziyao Li, Chaoran Lin, Yushan Men, Aishwarya Rajasekar, Yujie Shi, Daniel Sklar, Nathan Waddell, Ada Luchao Wang, Jiajie Wang, Jingyi Wang, Wandi Wang, Deyang Yu, Erfan Zamani, Ni Zhang, Yifan Zhang, Yusi Zhang, Xue Zhao, Yuemeng Zhao

PENDING: ARCHITECTURAL PATENT OFFICE (APO) Technology Seminar with Garrett Ricciardi M.Arch.I, M.Arch.II The Architectural Patent Office (APO) explores the novel, technological, and intellectual property applications of architectural patents. Assuming a fundamentally different relationship to technology – the group abandons conventional tools, software, and building techniques in favor of an architecture made possible by oneof-a-kind inventions, scratch built technologies, or construction equipment designed ground-up. Students: Phillip Brown, Michael Deprez, Wenhan Dong, Cullen Fu, Xinran Ge, Hannah Hortick, Morgan Jacobs, Sana Jahani, Casey Knudsen, Qingyang Li, Zhishan Liu, Yueshi Min, Chunsu Ouyang, Georgia Pogas, Samantha Radice, Xavier Ramirez, Amy Robles, Christina Rodriguez, Annabella Rosa, Daniel Skylar, Tianyi Song, Tong Wang, Xiran Wang, Phoebe Webster, Yiyin Wu, Wei Xie, Liang Yang, Yanrong Yang, Wenzhao Zhang, Yuexuan Zhang


METHODS OF PARAMETRIC AND COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN

ADVANCED BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

Technology Seminar with Daniel Segraves

Advanced Building Construction with Julia Koerner

M.Arch.I, M.Arch.II

M.Arch.I, Second Year

This course will explore the everexpanding domain of computational design by starting with the basics of parametric modeling and building up to true algorithmic processes of design generation and optimization. The visual scripting platform, Grasshopper, will serve as the foundation for experimentation. Students will become adept at using Grasshopper and the many available plugins to develop and control their design models towards an array of goals such as ease of production, optimal building energy, structural efficiency, ease of fabrication, and programmatic efficiency. We will employ a range of computational processes such as associative geometry, genetic algorithms, dynamic relaxation, swarm behavior, and other custom methods developed in-class.

This seminar introduces construction systems and techniques with a focus on digital fabrication and advanced material studies. The course elaborates on contemporary methods of design, digital fabrication and assembly associated to professional practice and research in architecture through lectures, case studies and invited international industry specialists. Consisting of lectures on principles of construction and construction types; Primarily focused on the understanding of basic tectonic taxonomy the course requires the students to conduct research studies on new and innovative construction principles and explore the use of new materials. The course is also aimed to expose students to new assembly methods such as pre-fabrication, robotic fabrication and additive manufacturing in construction.

Students: Shany Albalak, Chiwoo Back, Samantha Crawford, Zihao Ding, David Erlich, Tianyuan Fan, Kate Gancedo, Sarah Grieve, Ali Hakami, Sammy Hasan, Ching Kao, Onur Koyun, Martha Kriley, Florian Lepinard, Philip Li, Zhiyin Lin, Jourdan Miller, Shervin Peyghambari, Yiwei Qian, Qetuwrah Reed, Kaushil Shah, Ruchi Singhania, Noam Taylor, David Vasquez, Teodora Velkova, Yulu Wang, Yixiao Wei, Kaiwen Wu, Mei Wu, Erfan Zamani, Peiwei Zhang, Xiaoman Zhang

Students: Shabnam Abtahi, Marina Archangeli, Chiwoo Back, Gibson Bastar, Maha Benhachmi, Phillip Brown, Justin Carson, Yick Chan, Morgane Copp, Tianyuan Fan, Cullen Fu, Andrew Gonzales, Tomasz Groza, Hannah Hortick, Morgan Jacobs, Sana Jahani, Bernard Kazmierski, Sonali Khanna, Casey Knudsen, Sunghoon Lee, Chaoran Lin, Lauren Mitchell, Austin Ng, Jennifer Peterson Ruiz, Jean-Paul Previero, Yiwei Qian, Samantha Radice, Qetuwrah Reed, Amy Robles, Christina Rodriguez, Annabella Rosa, Markus Russell, Artin Sahakian, Andrei Sharyshev, Yiwen Song, Nathan Waddell, Guannan Wang, Yufan Wang, Yulu Wang, Phoebe Webster, Yixiao Wei, Kaiwen Wu, Mei Wu, Ziyi Yang, Yixuan Zhang, Yuqi Zhang, Yuemeng Zhao, Xueying Zou

BIG DUMB BUILDING Studio III with Ramiro Diaz-Granados Undergraduate, Senior Year This studio examines the relationship between architecture and the city, deepening students’ understanding of the ways in which architecture can both inform, and be informed by, the city into which it intervenes. Through both the in-depth study of relevant examples and site research, models of formal, infrastructural, and ecological approaches to architecture’s interface with cities are considered and applied. Tasked with developing proposals for a large, mixed use project, students are encouraged to design into existing urban conditions with an understanding of the dynamic and interdependent forces of economics, planning, ecology, politics, and infrastructure that have shaped the contemporary city. Working from the inside out, students will develop topological voids as distributed atria encased in simple masses. Students: Miguel Cuevas Striekwold, Anna Davenport, Nicole Kashfian, Joshua Kramer, Chiara Noppenberger, John Northrup, Jessica Rahmani, Farida Saleh, Krisakon Savathasuk, Andy Sett, Katherine Strawn, Sabrina Tanuwidjaja, Michika Watanabe,

IMAGE BEYOND FACTS: AN ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY AND ITS MOMENTOUS OUTCOMES Technology III: Digital Technology with Georgina Huljich Undergraduate, Junior Year This studio will debate on the correlation between domestic and public facts and their corresponding images during the COVID-19 era, and the influence that these exert upon the reception of architecture from broader audiences. The class will intend to establish a common ground and a solid platform for the examination of architectural facts and their possible images based on its initial scrutiny. By obsessively surveying spaces, not just physically and materially, but experientially, emotionally and performative, and appropriating each and all of their coordinates through complex and innovative modes of architectural documentation and representation, we will aim to produce a series of divergent, albeit fictional narratives presented as architectural images.

Kamila Weiss, Pengyan Wu, Tang Yao Wu, Kelvin (Qi Yun) Yeoh, Amber (Dai

Students: Charley Andrews, Owen

Fen) Zeng, Qiang Zhang

Bradbury Aranda, Andrew Frastaci, Matthew Go, William GoldmanBelsma, Riley Hammond, Eunice Han, Yujie Hu, Chak Lam (Alvin) Juen, Nicole Kfoury, Nicholas Kleinberg, Alden Kramer, Jacqualin Lewis, Xiaolin Li, Lauren Mendoza, Alexander Morris, Paola Ovando, Ken Pitts, Daniel Refoua, Lisa Steward, Michael Stroud, Pablo Subiotto Marques, Yelena Tamrazyan, Montserrat Vasquez Camarena, Louise Wang, Wai Chi (Julie) Wong

RUMBLE 2020 • 19


UNDERGRADS

M.ARCH.I

JUNIORS

NOT PICTURED: ZIWEI HOU, K A I B O WA N G

CHARLEY ANDREWS

OWEN BRADBURY ARANDA

ANDREW F R A S TA C I

M AT T H E W GO

RILEY HAMMOND

YUJIE HU

CHAK LAM JUEN

ALDEN KRAMER

XIAOLIN LI

L AU R E N MENDOZA

ALEXANDER MORRIS

PA O L A O VA N D O

DANIEL R E FO UA

MICHAEL STROUD

YELENA TA M R A Z YA N

M O N T S E R R AT VA Z Q U E Z C A M A R E N A

WA I WONG

UNDERGRADS

SENIORS

FIRST YEAR

N O T P I C T U R E D : W I L L I A M G O L D M A N - B E L S M A , E U N I C E H A N , N I C O L E K F O U R Y, N I C H O L A S K L E I N B E R G, JACQ UA L I N L E W I S, K E N P I T T S, LO U I S E WA N G

ERIC ALEXANDER

MARINA ARCHANGELI

GIBSON B A S TA R

R O YA CHAGNON

PA B L O S U B I O T T O MARQUES

MORGANE COPP

SHIYING GAN

MIRANDA HIRUJO-RINCON

AKANA J AY E W A R D E N E

LISA S T E WA R D

STEVEN K AT Z

WESLEY WEISHIH LIN

QIUYING LU

ERICA LUEDTKE

ANGELICA LUNA

ETHAN MA

SIYU MAO

T I F FA N Y OROZCO

RONALD OZIOGU

TIEN PHAM

MAXWELL PITTMAN

EMMANUEL PROUSSALOGLOU

NOT PICTURED: M I G U E L C U E VA S STRIEKWOLD

ANNA D AV E N P O R T

NICOLE KASHFIAN

J O S H UA KRAMER

CHIARA NOPPENBERGER

JOHN NORTHRUP

XIUWEN QI

WEI QIU

JORDAN RAE

S U N AY RAJBHANDARI

JESSICA RAHMANI

FA R I D A SALEH

K R I S A KO N S AVAT H A S U K

A N DY SETT

K AT H E R I N E S T R AW N

MONICA ROH

CLAIRE ROSENBERG

HAMIDREZA S A N JA B I

JULIE S H AY

SABRINA TA N U W I D J A J A

MICHIKA W ATA N A B E

KAMILA WEISS

P E N G YA N WU

TA N G YA O

E M I LY SHERMAN

CAMILLE WA L K I N S H AW

X I A OY U E WA N G

HONGYE WU

K E LV I N ( Q I Y U N ) YEOH

AMBER (DAIFEN) ZENG

QIANG ZHANG

XINYU YA N

KAIWEN YA N G

CHENG ZHANG

WU


THIRD YEAR SECOND YEAR

SHANY ALBAL AK

MEGAN BEROOKHIM

KRISTIANA BURGI

C AT H E R I N E CARLSON

SHABNAM A B TA H I

CHIWOO BACK

MAHA BENHACHMI

PHILLIP BROWN

SARAH C A LUAG

C H I E H -T I N G C H UA N G

SAM C R AW FO R D

MICHAEL DEPREZ

ZIHAO DING

JUSTIN CARSON

YICK SHUN NICKSON CHAN

T I A N YUA N FA N

CULLEN FU

ANDREW GONZALES

D AV I D ERLICH

K AT E GANCEDO

SARAH GRIEVE

YU HAN

TOMASZ GROZA

HANNAH HORTICK

MORGAN JACO B S

S A N A JA H A N I

BERNARD KAZMIERSKI

SAMMY HASAN

DARA H AV

HIROSHI H O L L O W AY

H I D E YO KAMEDA

SONALI KHANNA

CASEY KNUDSEN

YUFEI LIANG

CHAORAN LIN

JOURDON MILLER

ANNIE KAO

MARTHA KRILEY

R AY N E LABORDE

SUNGHOON LEE

L AU R E N MITCHELL

AU S T I N NG

JENN PETERSON RUIZ

J E A N - PA U L PREVIERO

YIWEI QIAN

FLORIAN LEPINARD

PHILIP LI

Z I YA O LI

ZHIYIN LIN

SAMANTHA RADICE

X AV I E R RAMIREZ

QETUWRAH REED

AMY ROBLES

CHRISTINA RODRIGUEZ

YUSHAN MEN

K YO U N G E U N PA R K

GEORGIA POGAS

JACO B SERTICH

BELLA ROSA

MARKUS RUSSELL

ARTIN SAHAKIAN

ANDREI SHARYSHEV

YIWEN SONG

YUJIE SHI

DANIEL SKLAR

NOAM TAY L O R

H E AT H E R TIPTON

GABRIEL STRZEPEK

N AT H A N WA D D E L L

G UA N N A N WA N G

Y U FA N WA N G

YULU WA N G

D AV I D VA S Q U E Z

TEODORA V E L K O VA

JIAJIE WA N G

ADA LUCHAO WA N G

PHOEBE WEBSTER

YIXIAO WEI

KAIWEN WU

MEI WU

ZIYI YA N G

WA N D I WA N G

CHLOE W AT S O N

D E YA N G YU

E R FA N ZAMANI

YI X UA N ZHANG

YUQI ZHANG

YUEMENG ZHAO

XUEYING ZOU

NI ZHANG

PEIWEI ZHANG

Y I FA N ZHANG


M.ARCH.II

M.ARCH.II

IDEAS ENTERTAINMENT STUDIO

IDEAS MOBILITY STUDIO

Q I N G YA N G LI

A L E K YA MALLADI

YUESHI MIN

AKSHADA MULEY

NEGIN N AY E R I

S H UA I J I A N G CHEN

R E VAT H I GANESH

LUIS GARCIA

A N AT O L I GEORGIADOU

NEHA O S WA L

CHUNSU O U YA N G

AKASH RAGDE

A I S H W A R YA R A JA S E K A R

GESTHIMANI R O U M PA N I

JINGYI H UA N G

SHERVIN P E YG H A M B A R I O S K O U I

P R A N AY SHARMA

N A N -T S E SU

TIANYI SONG

XIANRUI WA N G

LIANG YA N G

RUOHAN YA N G

YA N R O N G YA N G

SHILIN WA N G

XIRAN WA N G

JINFENG WU

WENZHAO ZHANG

YU E X UA N ZHANG

YUSI ZHANG

M.ARCH.II

M.ARCH.II

IDEAS TECHNOLOGY STUDIO

IDEAS URBAN STRATEGY STUDIO

WEONWOO CHOI

ALI HAKAMI

DIPINTI KAPOOR

ONUR K OY U N

SANGMEE LEE

ARON CARCAMO

R U OYA N G CHEN

WENHAN DONG

XINRAN GE

ZHISHAN LIU

HUILIN LIU

X UA N H O N G LIU

K AU S H I L K E TA N S H A H

IREM U YG U R

YU X UA N HE

LECAN LI

QI LONG

Y E AWO N MIN

YIYIN WU

WEI XIE

S I YUA N XU

XIAOMAN ZHANG

ZHI ZHOU

G A U R AV PURI

RUCHI SINGHANIA

C H I N M AY I SURI

JINGYI WA N G

TONG WA N G

X I YA N WA N G

DINGKAI XIANG

SIHANG ZENG

LINYI ZHANG

XUE ZHAO



2019–20 FACULTY

Hitoshi Abe Cristóbal Amunátegui Katy Barkan Can Bilsel Arne De Boever Dana Cuff Neil Denari Ramiro Diaz Granados Benjamin Ennemoser Yara Feghali Benjamin Freyinger Ron Frankel Georgina Huljich Jeffrey Inaba David Jimenez Iniesta Julia Koerner Helen Kongsgaard Jimenez Lai Gustavo Leclerc Alan Locke Todd Lynch Greg Lynn Jake Matatyaou Juliana Maxim Narineh Mirzaeian Marta Nowak

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

Sasha Ortenberg

Alberto Alquicira, Saul Alvarez, Kat English, Geovani Garcia, Linda Holmes, Verlena Johnson, E Roon Kang, Jim Kies, Valerie Leblond, Shay Lorseyedi, Jacquelin Montes, Peter Pak, Tyson Phillips, Heather Roberge, Philip Soderlind, Tess Stevenson, and Debbie Tilkema

Michael Osman Güvenç Özel Marty Paull Jason Payne Ben Refuerzo Garrett Ricciardi Heather Roberge Natasha Sandmeier Daniel Segraves Gillian Shaffer Mohamed Sharif Roger Sherman Shannon Starkey Nathan Su Christina Tung

© 2020 The Regents of the University of California, Los Angeles UCLA Architecture and Urban Design 1317 Perloff Hall Los Angeles, CA 90095 IDEAS Campus 3691 Lenawee Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90016 310.825.7857 aud.ucla.edu Design: Juliette Cezzar Cover image: Prithi Khalique, composed with models from Florian Lepinard, Qingyang Li, Alekya Malladi, Yueshi Min, Akshada Muley, Negin Nayeri, Neha Oswal, Chunsu Ouyang, Kyoung Eun Park, Akash Ragde, Aishwarya Rajasekar, Gesthimani Roumpani, Tianyi Song, Xianrui Wang, Liang Yang, Ruohan Yang, Yanrong Yang, Yuexuan Zhang, Yusi Zhang


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